Georgetown University.

Academic Essay Examples and Samples

Being the most important writing task for college and university students, it is important to look through samples of essays to get a clear picture of how to write one on your own.

How to Write an Academic Essay: The Full Guide

Writing an academic essay, whether for a school assignment or a scholarly publication, requires a unique set of skills. Unlike casual writing or opinion pieces, an academic paper requires the author to present a clear and well-reasoned argument on a particular topic. The purpose of the essay could be to inform, persuade, or describe, but regardless of the type of academic essay, the process of essay writing largely remains the same. This guide to essay writing will walk you through the process of crafting an excellent essay, from the initial brainstorming phase to the final proofreading stage.

Types of Academic Essays

There are several types of academic essays, each with its own purpose and structure. The narrative essay tells a story in a structured manner, often presented in chronological order. The descriptive essay aims to paint a vivid picture for the reader, describing an experience or an object in great detail.

An expository essay or informative essay, is designed to educate the reader about a particular topic. It’s a facts-based essay that requires thorough research and a clear, concise presentation of the information.

Lastly, a persuasive essay or argumentative essay, aims to convince the reader of a certain viewpoint. It’s essential to present clear arguments and evidence to support your stance in this type of essay.

Knowing the specific characteristics and objectives of these essay types can help you in determining the best approach for your academic writing.

Proper Format for Your Academic Writing

The structure of an academic essay is typically divided into three main sections: the introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion.

The introduction , or opening paragraph, presents the topic of your essay and provides a glimpse of your thesis statement or central idea. This section should grab the reader’s attention and provide some context for your main argument.

The body paragraphs , or main sections of your essay, provide the bulk of your argument. Each paragraph should contain a single point or idea that supports your thesis statement. It’s important to present your points in a logical order and provide clear evidence for each of your arguments.

The conclusion of your essay, provides a wrap-up of your main argument and final thoughts on the topic. This section should not introduce any new ideas but rather summarize your key points and reaffirm your thesis statement.

Properly structuring your essay and ensuring that each section fulfills its purpose is crucial for creating a compelling and well-organized academic paper.

How to Create an Outline for Academic Essay: A Step-By-Step Approach

Creating an outline for your essay can make the writing process much smoother. It helps you organize your thoughts, keep your essay focused on your thesis statement, and ensure that each of your body paragraphs serves a distinct purpose in your argument.

Start by brainstorming ideas related to your topic and organizing them into a logical order. Once you have a general idea of what you want to cover, you can develop your thesis statement, the central idea that will guide your essay.

Next, create a list of main points or arguments that support your thesis. Each of these will become a body paragraph in your essay. For each point, consider the evidence or examples you can use to support it.

Once you have your outline, you’re ready to start writing. Begin with a draft and don’t worry about making it perfect. Focus on getting your ideas down first, then revise and edit until you have a polished academic essay.

In conclusion, writing an academic essay involves careful planning, a clear understanding of the essay type, and meticulous attention to structure and format. By following these guidelines, you can craft an academic paper that effectively communicates your ideas and meets the standards of scholarly writing. Whether you’re new to academic writing or looking to refine your skills, this guide provides a comprehensive overview to help you succeed in your academic writing endeavors.

Research and Planning for an Academic Essay

Before you begin writing an academic essay, it’s essential to do your homework. This involves understanding the essay prompt, researching the topic, and planning your essay. Research is a crucial part of academic writing. Unlike narrative or descriptive essays, where personal experience or observation can be the primary source of information, an expository or persuasive essay relies heavily on facts and evidence. Therefore, it’s vital to gather reliable and relevant sources that can provide a solid foundation for your argument. Planning, on the other hand, helps in organizing your thoughts and ideas coherently. A well-crafted outline serves as a roadmap for your essay, ensuring that you stay on topic and effectively address the thesis statement.

Crafting a Strong Thesis Statement

The thesis statement is a crucial component of an academic essay. This single sentence serves as the cornerstone of your argument, succinctly presenting the main point or central idea of your essay. A strong thesis statement is clear, concise, and specific. It makes a claim that requires support through evidence and provides a roadmap for your essay’s direction. For a persuasive essay, it’s essential to take a stance, while an expository essay would require a thesis statement that articulates the focus of your investigation.

Writing Engaging Body Paragraphs

The body paragraphs form the meat of your academic essay. These main sections contain the supporting arguments or ideas that validate your thesis statement. Each paragraph should start with a topic sentence that presents one aspect of your argument, followed by evidence or examples to support it. It’s also crucial to provide analysis or explanation showing how the evidence supports your point. Remember, these paragraphs need to be cohesive, maintaining a logical flow of ideas from one to the next.

Mastering the Art of Introduction and Conclusion

The introduction and conclusion of your essay act as the ‘bookends’ to your argument. The opening paragraph, or introduction, sets the tone for your essay. It provides the context, introduces the topic, and presents the thesis statement. It’s crucial to make the introduction engaging to grab the reader’s interest.

The conclusion, on the other hand, brings closure to your essay. It’s your chance to revisit the main points, reinforce the thesis statement, and provide final thoughts or implications of your argument. Be careful not to introduce new ideas in the conclusion; it should merely wrap up the essay by synthesizing the information presented.

Proofreading and Editing Your Essay

After drafting your essay, the final steps are proofreading and editing. This process involves checking for grammatical errors, ensuring your arguments make sense, and verifying that you’ve adequately addressed your thesis statement. It’s a good idea to take a break before you start proofreading so you can approach your work with fresh eyes. If possible, ask a peer or mentor to review your essay, as they might catch mistakes that you’ve overlooked.

Writing an academic essay can be a challenging yet rewarding process. It requires critical thinking, thorough research, and meticulous attention to detail. By following these guidelines and tips, you’re well on your way to crafting an excellent academic essay that effectively communicates your ideas and arguments.

Putting It All Together: The Journey of Academic Essay Writing

In conclusion, academic essay writing is a systematic process that requires a blend of creativity, critical thinking, and a firm grasp of essay structure. Whether you’re crafting a narrative, expository, persuasive, or descriptive essay, understanding the unique demands of each type is crucial. Each essay type serves a distinct purpose, be it presenting a compelling story, delivering well-researched information, or asserting an argument convincingly.

From choosing a topic and crafting a robust thesis statement to structuring engaging body paragraphs and bringing your thoughts to a powerful close, each step contributes to the overall coherence and impact of your academic paper. Beyond writing, the importance of meticulous proofreading and editing cannot be overstated, as they ensure your scholarly writing meets the high standards expected of it.

With practice and dedication, you can improve your academic writing skills and deliver excellent essays consistently. Remember, writing is as much a journey as it is a destination. So, embrace the process, learn from your experiences, and strive to make each essay better than the last.

Hirschi’s Social Bond Theory

The following sample is meant to be a source of inspiration for students in their academic pursuits. JOIN OUR LEARNING HUB ✅ AI Essay Writer ✅…

Another Brick In The Wall Meaning

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on “Another Brick In The Wall:…

Rationalism vs Empiricism

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on “Difference between rationalism and empiricism”.…

Classical vs Operant Conditioning

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on “Classical and operant conditioning”. JOIN…

Was Fidel Castro a Good or a Bad Leader?

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on the question “Was Fidel Castro…

Themes in The Crucible

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on the themes in “The Crucible”…

Lord of the Flies Themes

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on the themes of “Lord of…

Malcolm X vs Martin Luther King

Fate vs free will in macbeth.

Shakespeare’s “Macbeth,” written in the early 17th century, stands as a timeless masterpiece that delves into the profound and often debated theme of fate in…

Why Is Of Mice And Men Banned

John Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men” is not just a book; it’s a journey into the heart of American literature, a journey that has captivated…

Who Dies In Romeo And Juliet

Was julius caesar a good leader.

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on the question “Was Julius Caesar…

Why is Iago Jealous of Othello?

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on “Othello”. JOIN OUR LEARNING HUB ✅…

Themes in To Kill a Mockingbird

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on the themes in “To Kill…

Is Listening to Music a Hobby?

The following argumentative essay example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on hobbies and music in…

Of Mice and Men Theme

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing a discussion piece on the Of Mice and…

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest Book Summary

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing the “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” book…

Was Helen Keller racist?

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on Helen Keller, her role in…

Courage vs Bravery

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on “Bravery vs Courage”. JOIN OUR…

Diary of Anne Frank summary

The following review example can serve as a guide for students trying to find inspiration when writing an assignment on the “Diary of Anne Frank”…

Remember Me

What is your profession ? Student Teacher Writer Other

Forgotten Password?

Username or Email

PrepScholar

Choose Your Test

Sat / act prep online guides and tips, 3 strong argumentative essay examples, analyzed.

author image

General Education

feature_argumentativeessay

Need to defend your opinion on an issue? Argumentative essays are one of the most popular types of essays you’ll write in school. They combine persuasive arguments with fact-based research, and, when done well, can be powerful tools for making someone agree with your point of view. If you’re struggling to write an argumentative essay or just want to learn more about them, seeing examples can be a big help.

After giving an overview of this type of essay, we provide three argumentative essay examples. After each essay, we explain in-depth how the essay was structured, what worked, and where the essay could be improved. We end with tips for making your own argumentative essay as strong as possible.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is an essay that uses evidence and facts to support the claim it’s making. Its purpose is to persuade the reader to agree with the argument being made.

A good argumentative essay will use facts and evidence to support the argument, rather than just the author’s thoughts and opinions. For example, say you wanted to write an argumentative essay stating that Charleston, SC is a great destination for families. You couldn’t just say that it’s a great place because you took your family there and enjoyed it. For it to be an argumentative essay, you need to have facts and data to support your argument, such as the number of child-friendly attractions in Charleston, special deals you can get with kids, and surveys of people who visited Charleston as a family and enjoyed it. The first argument is based entirely on feelings, whereas the second is based on evidence that can be proven.

The standard five paragraph format is common, but not required, for argumentative essays. These essays typically follow one of two formats: the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model.

  • The Toulmin model is the most common. It begins with an introduction, follows with a thesis/claim, and gives data and evidence to support that claim. This style of essay also includes rebuttals of counterarguments.
  • The Rogerian model analyzes two sides of an argument and reaches a conclusion after weighing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

3 Good Argumentative Essay Examples + Analysis

Below are three examples of argumentative essays, written by yours truly in my school days, as well as analysis of what each did well and where it could be improved.

Argumentative Essay Example 1

Proponents of this idea state that it will save local cities and towns money because libraries are expensive to maintain. They also believe it will encourage more people to read because they won’t have to travel to a library to get a book; they can simply click on what they want to read and read it from wherever they are. They could also access more materials because libraries won’t have to buy physical copies of books; they can simply rent out as many digital copies as they need.

However, it would be a serious mistake to replace libraries with tablets. First, digital books and resources are associated with less learning and more problems than print resources. A study done on tablet vs book reading found that people read 20-30% slower on tablets, retain 20% less information, and understand 10% less of what they read compared to people who read the same information in print. Additionally, staring too long at a screen has been shown to cause numerous health problems, including blurred vision, dizziness, dry eyes, headaches, and eye strain, at much higher instances than reading print does. People who use tablets and mobile devices excessively also have a higher incidence of more serious health issues such as fibromyalgia, shoulder and back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and muscle strain. I know that whenever I read from my e-reader for too long, my eyes begin to feel tired and my neck hurts. We should not add to these problems by giving people, especially young people, more reasons to look at screens.

Second, it is incredibly narrow-minded to assume that the only service libraries offer is book lending. Libraries have a multitude of benefits, and many are only available if the library has a physical location. Some of these benefits include acting as a quiet study space, giving people a way to converse with their neighbors, holding classes on a variety of topics, providing jobs, answering patron questions, and keeping the community connected. One neighborhood found that, after a local library instituted community events such as play times for toddlers and parents, job fairs for teenagers, and meeting spaces for senior citizens, over a third of residents reported feeling more connected to their community. Similarly, a Pew survey conducted in 2015 found that nearly two-thirds of American adults feel that closing their local library would have a major impact on their community. People see libraries as a way to connect with others and get their questions answered, benefits tablets can’t offer nearly as well or as easily.

While replacing libraries with tablets may seem like a simple solution, it would encourage people to spend even more time looking at digital screens, despite the myriad issues surrounding them. It would also end access to many of the benefits of libraries that people have come to rely on. In many areas, libraries are such an important part of the community network that they could never be replaced by a simple object.

The author begins by giving an overview of the counter-argument, then the thesis appears as the first sentence in the third paragraph. The essay then spends the rest of the paper dismantling the counter argument and showing why readers should believe the other side.

What this essay does well:

  • Although it’s a bit unusual to have the thesis appear fairly far into the essay, it works because, once the thesis is stated, the rest of the essay focuses on supporting it since the counter-argument has already been discussed earlier in the paper.
  • This essay includes numerous facts and cites studies to support its case. By having specific data to rely on, the author’s argument is stronger and readers will be more inclined to agree with it.
  • For every argument the other side makes, the author makes sure to refute it and follow up with why her opinion is the stronger one. In order to make a strong argument, it’s important to dismantle the other side, which this essay does this by making the author's view appear stronger.
  • This is a shorter paper, and if it needed to be expanded to meet length requirements, it could include more examples and go more into depth with them, such as by explaining specific cases where people benefited from local libraries.
  • Additionally, while the paper uses lots of data, the author also mentions their own experience with using tablets. This should be removed since argumentative essays focus on facts and data to support an argument, not the author’s own opinion or experiences. Replacing that with more data on health issues associated with screen time would strengthen the essay.
  • Some of the points made aren't completely accurate , particularly the one about digital books being cheaper. It actually often costs a library more money to rent out numerous digital copies of a book compared to buying a single physical copy. Make sure in your own essay you thoroughly research each of the points and rebuttals you make, otherwise you'll look like you don't know the issue that well.

body_argue

Argumentative Essay Example 2

There are multiple drugs available to treat malaria, and many of them work well and save lives, but malaria eradication programs that focus too much on them and not enough on prevention haven’t seen long-term success in Sub-Saharan Africa. A major program to combat malaria was WHO’s Global Malaria Eradication Programme. Started in 1955, it had a goal of eliminating malaria in Africa within the next ten years. Based upon previously successful programs in Brazil and the United States, the program focused mainly on vector control. This included widely distributing chloroquine and spraying large amounts of DDT. More than one billion dollars was spent trying to abolish malaria. However, the program suffered from many problems and in 1969, WHO was forced to admit that the program had not succeeded in eradicating malaria. The number of people in Sub-Saharan Africa who contracted malaria as well as the number of malaria deaths had actually increased over 10% during the time the program was active.

One of the major reasons for the failure of the project was that it set uniform strategies and policies. By failing to consider variations between governments, geography, and infrastructure, the program was not nearly as successful as it could have been. Sub-Saharan Africa has neither the money nor the infrastructure to support such an elaborate program, and it couldn’t be run the way it was meant to. Most African countries don't have the resources to send all their people to doctors and get shots, nor can they afford to clear wetlands or other malaria prone areas. The continent’s spending per person for eradicating malaria was just a quarter of what Brazil spent. Sub-Saharan Africa simply can’t rely on a plan that requires more money, infrastructure, and expertise than they have to spare.

Additionally, the widespread use of chloroquine has created drug resistant parasites which are now plaguing Sub-Saharan Africa. Because chloroquine was used widely but inconsistently, mosquitoes developed resistance, and chloroquine is now nearly completely ineffective in Sub-Saharan Africa, with over 95% of mosquitoes resistant to it. As a result, newer, more expensive drugs need to be used to prevent and treat malaria, which further drives up the cost of malaria treatment for a region that can ill afford it.

Instead of developing plans to treat malaria after the infection has incurred, programs should focus on preventing infection from occurring in the first place. Not only is this plan cheaper and more effective, reducing the number of people who contract malaria also reduces loss of work/school days which can further bring down the productivity of the region.

One of the cheapest and most effective ways of preventing malaria is to implement insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs).  These nets provide a protective barrier around the person or people using them. While untreated bed nets are still helpful, those treated with insecticides are much more useful because they stop mosquitoes from biting people through the nets, and they help reduce mosquito populations in a community, thus helping people who don’t even own bed nets.  Bed nets are also very effective because most mosquito bites occur while the person is sleeping, so bed nets would be able to drastically reduce the number of transmissions during the night. In fact, transmission of malaria can be reduced by as much as 90% in areas where the use of ITNs is widespread. Because money is so scarce in Sub-Saharan Africa, the low cost is a great benefit and a major reason why the program is so successful. Bed nets cost roughly 2 USD to make, last several years, and can protect two adults. Studies have shown that, for every 100-1000 more nets are being used, one less child dies of malaria. With an estimated 300 million people in Africa not being protected by mosquito nets, there’s the potential to save three million lives by spending just a few dollars per person.

Reducing the number of people who contract malaria would also reduce poverty levels in Africa significantly, thus improving other aspects of society like education levels and the economy. Vector control is more effective than treatment strategies because it means fewer people are getting sick. When fewer people get sick, the working population is stronger as a whole because people are not put out of work from malaria, nor are they caring for sick relatives. Malaria-afflicted families can typically only harvest 40% of the crops that healthy families can harvest. Additionally, a family with members who have malaria spends roughly a quarter of its income treatment, not including the loss of work they also must deal with due to the illness. It’s estimated that malaria costs Africa 12 billion USD in lost income every year. A strong working population creates a stronger economy, which Sub-Saharan Africa is in desperate need of.  

This essay begins with an introduction, which ends with the thesis (that malaria eradication plans in Sub-Saharan Africa should focus on prevention rather than treatment). The first part of the essay lays out why the counter argument (treatment rather than prevention) is not as effective, and the second part of the essay focuses on why prevention of malaria is the better path to take.

  • The thesis appears early, is stated clearly, and is supported throughout the rest of the essay. This makes the argument clear for readers to understand and follow throughout the essay.
  • There’s lots of solid research in this essay, including specific programs that were conducted and how successful they were, as well as specific data mentioned throughout. This evidence helps strengthen the author’s argument.
  • The author makes a case for using expanding bed net use over waiting until malaria occurs and beginning treatment, but not much of a plan is given for how the bed nets would be distributed or how to ensure they’re being used properly. By going more into detail of what she believes should be done, the author would be making a stronger argument.
  • The introduction of the essay does a good job of laying out the seriousness of the problem, but the conclusion is short and abrupt. Expanding it into its own paragraph would give the author a final way to convince readers of her side of the argument.

body_basketball-3

Argumentative Essay Example 3

There are many ways payments could work. They could be in the form of a free-market approach, where athletes are able to earn whatever the market is willing to pay them, it could be a set amount of money per athlete, or student athletes could earn income from endorsements, autographs, and control of their likeness, similar to the way top Olympians earn money.

Proponents of the idea believe that, because college athletes are the ones who are training, participating in games, and bringing in audiences, they should receive some sort of compensation for their work. If there were no college athletes, the NCAA wouldn’t exist, college coaches wouldn’t receive there (sometimes very high) salaries, and brands like Nike couldn’t profit from college sports. In fact, the NCAA brings in roughly $1 billion in revenue a year, but college athletes don’t receive any of that money in the form of a paycheck. Additionally, people who believe college athletes should be paid state that paying college athletes will actually encourage them to remain in college longer and not turn pro as quickly, either by giving them a way to begin earning money in college or requiring them to sign a contract stating they’ll stay at the university for a certain number of years while making an agreed-upon salary.  

Supporters of this idea point to Zion Williamson, the Duke basketball superstar, who, during his freshman year, sustained a serious knee injury. Many argued that, even if he enjoyed playing for Duke, it wasn’t worth risking another injury and ending his professional career before it even began for a program that wasn’t paying him. Williamson seems to have agreed with them and declared his eligibility for the NCAA draft later that year. If he was being paid, he may have stayed at Duke longer. In fact, roughly a third of student athletes surveyed stated that receiving a salary while in college would make them “strongly consider” remaining collegiate athletes longer before turning pro.

Paying athletes could also stop the recruitment scandals that have plagued the NCAA. In 2018, the NCAA stripped the University of Louisville's men's basketball team of its 2013 national championship title because it was discovered coaches were using sex workers to entice recruits to join the team. There have been dozens of other recruitment scandals where college athletes and recruits have been bribed with anything from having their grades changed, to getting free cars, to being straight out bribed. By paying college athletes and putting their salaries out in the open, the NCAA could end the illegal and underhanded ways some schools and coaches try to entice athletes to join.

People who argue against the idea of paying college athletes believe the practice could be disastrous for college sports. By paying athletes, they argue, they’d turn college sports into a bidding war, where only the richest schools could afford top athletes, and the majority of schools would be shut out from developing a talented team (though some argue this already happens because the best players often go to the most established college sports programs, who typically pay their coaches millions of dollars per year). It could also ruin the tight camaraderie of many college teams if players become jealous that certain teammates are making more money than they are.

They also argue that paying college athletes actually means only a small fraction would make significant money. Out of the 350 Division I athletic departments, fewer than a dozen earn any money. Nearly all the money the NCAA makes comes from men’s football and basketball, so paying college athletes would make a small group of men--who likely will be signed to pro teams and begin making millions immediately out of college--rich at the expense of other players.

Those against paying college athletes also believe that the athletes are receiving enough benefits already. The top athletes already receive scholarships that are worth tens of thousands per year, they receive free food/housing/textbooks, have access to top medical care if they are injured, receive top coaching, get travel perks and free gear, and can use their time in college as a way to capture the attention of professional recruiters. No other college students receive anywhere near as much from their schools.

People on this side also point out that, while the NCAA brings in a massive amount of money each year, it is still a non-profit organization. How? Because over 95% of those profits are redistributed to its members’ institutions in the form of scholarships, grants, conferences, support for Division II and Division III teams, and educational programs. Taking away a significant part of that revenue would hurt smaller programs that rely on that money to keep running.

While both sides have good points, it’s clear that the negatives of paying college athletes far outweigh the positives. College athletes spend a significant amount of time and energy playing for their school, but they are compensated for it by the scholarships and perks they receive. Adding a salary to that would result in a college athletic system where only a small handful of athletes (those likely to become millionaires in the professional leagues) are paid by a handful of schools who enter bidding wars to recruit them, while the majority of student athletics and college athletic programs suffer or even shut down for lack of money. Continuing to offer the current level of benefits to student athletes makes it possible for as many people to benefit from and enjoy college sports as possible.

This argumentative essay follows the Rogerian model. It discusses each side, first laying out multiple reasons people believe student athletes should be paid, then discussing reasons why the athletes shouldn’t be paid. It ends by stating that college athletes shouldn’t be paid by arguing that paying them would destroy college athletics programs and cause them to have many of the issues professional sports leagues have.

  • Both sides of the argument are well developed, with multiple reasons why people agree with each side. It allows readers to get a full view of the argument and its nuances.
  • Certain statements on both sides are directly rebuffed in order to show where the strengths and weaknesses of each side lie and give a more complete and sophisticated look at the argument.
  • Using the Rogerian model can be tricky because oftentimes you don’t explicitly state your argument until the end of the paper. Here, the thesis doesn’t appear until the first sentence of the final paragraph. That doesn’t give readers a lot of time to be convinced that your argument is the right one, compared to a paper where the thesis is stated in the beginning and then supported throughout the paper. This paper could be strengthened if the final paragraph was expanded to more fully explain why the author supports the view, or if the paper had made it clearer that paying athletes was the weaker argument throughout.

body_birdfight

3 Tips for Writing a Good Argumentative Essay

Now that you’ve seen examples of what good argumentative essay samples look like, follow these three tips when crafting your own essay.

#1: Make Your Thesis Crystal Clear

The thesis is the key to your argumentative essay; if it isn’t clear or readers can’t find it easily, your entire essay will be weak as a result. Always make sure that your thesis statement is easy to find. The typical spot for it is the final sentence of the introduction paragraph, but if it doesn’t fit in that spot for your essay, try to at least put it as the first or last sentence of a different paragraph so it stands out more.

Also make sure that your thesis makes clear what side of the argument you’re on. After you’ve written it, it’s a great idea to show your thesis to a couple different people--classmates are great for this. Just by reading your thesis they should be able to understand what point you’ll be trying to make with the rest of your essay.

#2: Show Why the Other Side Is Weak

When writing your essay, you may be tempted to ignore the other side of the argument and just focus on your side, but don’t do this. The best argumentative essays really tear apart the other side to show why readers shouldn’t believe it. Before you begin writing your essay, research what the other side believes, and what their strongest points are. Then, in your essay, be sure to mention each of these and use evidence to explain why they’re incorrect/weak arguments. That’ll make your essay much more effective than if you only focused on your side of the argument.

#3: Use Evidence to Support Your Side

Remember, an essay can’t be an argumentative essay if it doesn’t support its argument with evidence. For every point you make, make sure you have facts to back it up. Some examples are previous studies done on the topic, surveys of large groups of people, data points, etc. There should be lots of numbers in your argumentative essay that support your side of the argument. This will make your essay much stronger compared to only relying on your own opinions to support your argument.

Summary: Argumentative Essay Sample

Argumentative essays are persuasive essays that use facts and evidence to support their side of the argument. Most argumentative essays follow either the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model. By reading good argumentative essay examples, you can learn how to develop your essay and provide enough support to make readers agree with your opinion. When writing your essay, remember to always make your thesis clear, show where the other side is weak, and back up your opinion with data and evidence.

What's Next?

Do you need to write an argumentative essay as well?  Check out our guide on the best argumentative essay topics for ideas!

You'll probably also need to write research papers for school.  We've got you covered with 113 potential topics for research papers.

Your college admissions essay may end up being one of the most important essays you write. Follow our step-by-step guide on writing a personal statement to have an essay that'll impress colleges.

Need more help with this topic? Check out Tutorbase!

Our vetted tutor database includes a range of experienced educators who can help you polish an essay for English or explain how derivatives work for Calculus. You can use dozens of filters and search criteria to find the perfect person for your needs.

Connect With a Tutor Now

Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

Student and Parent Forum

Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub.PrepScholar.com , allow you to interact with your peers and the PrepScholar staff. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process. Ask questions; get answers.

Join the Conversation

Ask a Question Below

Have any questions about this article or other topics? Ask below and we'll reply!

Improve With Our Famous Guides

  • For All Students

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 160+ SAT Points

How to Get a Perfect 1600, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 800 on Each SAT Section:

Score 800 on SAT Math

Score 800 on SAT Reading

Score 800 on SAT Writing

Series: How to Get to 600 on Each SAT Section:

Score 600 on SAT Math

Score 600 on SAT Reading

Score 600 on SAT Writing

Free Complete Official SAT Practice Tests

What SAT Target Score Should You Be Aiming For?

15 Strategies to Improve Your SAT Essay

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 4+ ACT Points

How to Get a Perfect 36 ACT, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 36 on Each ACT Section:

36 on ACT English

36 on ACT Math

36 on ACT Reading

36 on ACT Science

Series: How to Get to 24 on Each ACT Section:

24 on ACT English

24 on ACT Math

24 on ACT Reading

24 on ACT Science

What ACT target score should you be aiming for?

ACT Vocabulary You Must Know

ACT Writing: 15 Tips to Raise Your Essay Score

How to Get Into Harvard and the Ivy League

How to Get a Perfect 4.0 GPA

How to Write an Amazing College Essay

What Exactly Are Colleges Looking For?

Is the ACT easier than the SAT? A Comprehensive Guide

Should you retake your SAT or ACT?

When should you take the SAT or ACT?

Stay Informed

text essay example

Get the latest articles and test prep tips!

Looking for Graduate School Test Prep?

Check out our top-rated graduate blogs here:

GRE Online Prep Blog

GMAT Online Prep Blog

TOEFL Online Prep Blog

Holly R. "I am absolutely overjoyed and cannot thank you enough for helping me!”

text essay example

How to Write an Informative Essay: Everything You Need to Know

text essay example

Did you know that informative essays are not limited to academic settings? While they are commonly assigned in schools and universities, informative essays also have practical applications in various professional fields. Industries such as journalism, marketing, and public relations often utilize this type of writing to communicate complex ideas, educate the public, and promote products or services. This demonstrates the versatile nature of informative essays and their ability to convey valuable information beyond the classroom setting.

So, if you are looking to write an informative essay, congratulations! You have chosen a genre that is not only interesting but also quite challenging. To ensure the success of your essay, according to our essay writer , you must invest time and effort into thoughtful planning, thorough research, and effective organization. It's key to maintain a balanced tone, provide clear and concise information, and incorporate your own analysis to make your essay stand out.

Short Description

Throughout this comprehensive guide, we will explore the definition and purpose of informative essays, highlighting the reasons why you should embrace the art of crafting one. Furthermore, we will provide valuable insights on how to commence and organize your own informative essay format effectively. Without further ado, let us embark on this enriching journey!

What is an Informative Essay: Unraveling the Essence

Informative writing aims to educate readers about a specific topic by presenting accurate and objective information. Whether used in academic settings or published in magazines and online platforms, informative essay examples cover a wide range of subjects and require thorough research and credible sources. This type of essay follows a structured format and considers the intended audience to ensure clarity and engagement. Here are some important facts from our admission essay writing service you should know about this kind of paper:

What is an Informative Essay

  • They are designed to educate or inform readers about a particular topic.
  • The emphasis is on presenting accurate, objective facts and information.
  • They can cover various subjects, from science and technology to literature, history, and culture.
  • They are commonly used in academic settings but can also be found in magazines, newspapers, and online publications.
  • The essays rely on verifiable facts and require extensive research and credible sources.
  • Personal opinions and biases should be avoided to maintain credibility.
  • The essay structure includes an introduction with background information and a clear thesis statement, a body presenting main points and supporting evidence, and a conclusion summarizing the information.
  • The language and tone should be appropriate for the target audience.
  • The level of detail should be adjusted based on the audience's knowledge of the topic.

Reasons to Write an Informative Essay

Writing an informative essay, whether in an IEEE format or any other style, offers an opportunity to share expertise, educate others, and shed light on lesser-known topics. Whether driven by passion, a desire to showcase expertise or a quest for spreading awareness, there are compelling reasons to embark on this writing journey:

  • Share knowledge : Understanding how to write an informative essay allows you to impart knowledge about a specific field or subject. As an expert in psychology, for instance, you could enlighten readers about theories of personality or the impact of stress on mental health. By sharing your expertise, you contribute to increased understanding and awareness of significant issues.
  • Demonstrate expertise : If you are a professional in a particular field like medicine or law, writing this kind of paper provides a platform to showcase your expertise. By articulating your knowledge and skills, you can establish credibility not only within your field but also among the general public.
  • Unveil the unknown : It can be an effective means to present information that is not widely known or understood. For instance, you might delve into a lesser-known historical event or a scientific discovery that has yet to receive widespread attention. By unveiling such knowledge to your readers, you contribute to raising awareness and fostering understanding of significant topics.

How to Start an Informative Essay: Effective Strategies

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the thought of how to write an informative essay? Don't worry; you're not alone! Many students struggle with getting started on their writing assignments. You can either order essay or, with a few helpful tips, you can tackle this task with confidence and ease.

Start an Informative Essay

  • Choose an engaging topic : Select a topic that genuinely interests you, as it will make the writing process more enjoyable and engaging. Additionally, choose a topic you have some knowledge about to write with authority and credibility.
  • Conduct thorough research : Invest time in researching your chosen topic to gather the necessary information for a compelling and essay. Use reputable sources and take detailed notes to ensure accuracy.
  • Determine the purpose of your essay : Clarify the purpose of your essay. Are you explaining a complex concept, analyzing a problem, or comparing and contrasting ideas? Knowing the purpose will help you stay focused and organized throughout the writing process.
  • Create an outline : Use an outline to organize your thoughts and information. Include an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. This structure of an informative essay will provide a clear framework for your paper and make the writing process smoother.

Informative Essay Outline

Many students overlook the importance of creating an outline, yet it serves as a valuable tool for directing research and organizing the structure and flow of an essay. By investing a little more time in crafting an outline, you can significantly reduce the time spent on the actual writing process. To assist you, here is a sample informational essay format from our term paper writing services that can serve as a helpful guide:

I. Introduction

A. Hook or attention-grabbing statement

B. Background information on the topic

C. Informative essay thesis statement that states the main focus of the essay

II. Body Paragraphs

A. Main Idea 1

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 1

2. Explanation or analysis of the supporting evidence

3. Transition sentence to the next paragraph

B. Main Idea 2

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 2

C. Main Idea 3

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 3

III. Conclusion

A. Restate the thesis statement

B. Summarize the main points discussed in the body paragraphs

C. Closing thoughts or final remarks to leave a lasting impression

IV. Optional: Additional Sections

A. Counter Arguments and refutations (if necessary)

B. Further research or recommendations for further reading

C. Personal reflections or real-life examples (if applicable)

Informative Essay Structure

Now that you have an outline and know how to start an essay , it's important to understand how to structure your essay with further elaboration:

  • Introduction : When it comes to writing an informative essay, the first step is to choose a topic that is interesting and relevant to your audience. You should also do some research to gather information and facts that will support your thesis statement. Once you have a clear understanding of your topic, you can start writing your introduction. Your informative essay introduction should provide some background information about your topic and end with a thesis statement that summarizes the main points of your essay.
  • Body Paragraphs : Each body paragraph should focus on a main point and provide evidence to support it. Use examples, statistics, and quotes to strengthen your argument. For example, if you are writing an essay about the benefits of exercise, your first body paragraph could focus on the physical benefits of exercise, such as weight loss, increased muscle mass, and improved cardiovascular health. You could provide evidence from scientific studies or expert opinions to support your argument.
  • Conclusion : Summarize the main points of your essay and provide a concluding thought. Avoid introducing new information in your conclusion. For example, if you are writing about the benefits of exercise, your conclusion should summarize the physical, mental, and social benefits of exercise and encourage your reader to start an exercise routine for a healthier and happier life.

Informative Essay Topics

When writing an informative essay, topic selection is a task more challenging than it may initially appear. Since the objective of such an essay is to provide information about a subject, almost any topic can serve as a suitable choice. However, it is crucial to avoid hastily diving into the first topic that comes to mind. Instead, dedicate time to brainstorming multiple options and conducting preliminary research on each of them. To narrow down a good topic, consider the following guidelines:

How to Choose informative essay topics

  • Avoid excessive breadth : Ensure that the topic is not too broad to allow for a comprehensive explanation within the essay.
  • Steer clear of excessive specificity : Similarly, avoid selecting a topic that lacks substantial information, as it may hinder your ability to present a well-supported essay.
  • Appeal to the audience : Choose a topic that is interesting and relevant to your target audience, as this will captivate their attention and enhance the overall quality of your essay.
  • Personal interest : Opt for a topic that personally intrigues you. When you find the subject matter fascinating, it becomes easier to engage in the research and writing process.
  • Significance of the topic : Ensure that your chosen topic addresses something important, as this will contribute to the overall value and relevance of your essay.

Take sufficient time to generate a strong topic. If you encounter difficulties, consider reviewing some examples to understand the type of information you need to find. Additionally, you can refer to a list of topics for inspiration.

10 History Topics

  • Recounting a Cherished Era: Reflections on a Favorite Period in History.
  • Unveiling the Origins of the English Language: Tracing its Linguistic Development.
  • Unraveling Your Family Tree: An In-depth Analysis of Ancestral Lineage.
  • Echoes of the Ancient Egyptians: Exploring the Auditory Landscape of a Bygone Civilization.
  • Timekeeping Techniques of Ancient Civilizations: Examining Methods and Instruments.
  • Shifting Perspectives: Three Formerly Acceptable Norms Now Regarded as Iniquitous.
  • Tracing the Fascinating History of a European Royal Family.
  • Pre-European Africa: A Glimpse into the Continent's Precolonial Era.
  • The Significance of the Silk Trade Route: Examining its Historical, Economic, and Cultural Impacts.
  • Connecting the Dots: How the Last Mass Extinction Event Paved the Way for Mammalian Dominance.

10 Business Topics

  • Examining the Detrimental Environmental Effects of Global Supply Chains: Three Key Reasons.
  • Unlocking Social Media Marketing Success: Effective Strategies for Maximum Impact.
  • Navigating Entrepreneurship: Identifying the Major Challenges of Starting a Small Business.
  • The Ripple Effect: Exploring the Influence of Government Policy Changes on Business Decision-Making.
  • Expanding Horizons: A Guide to Introducing a Product to a New Market.
  • The Rising Value of Data and Information: Exploring their Transformation into Commodities.
  • Unveiling the Long-Term Implications of Cryptocurrency: Examining its Lasting Impact.
  • The Advantages of Bartering: Assessing the Benefits of the Ancient Trading System.
  • Diverse Regulations: Understanding the Variances in Child Labor Laws Among Countries.
  • Spotting Business Opportunities: Key Strategies for Identifying and Capitalizing on Potential Ventures.

10 Social Topics

  • Addressing the Social Stigma of Mental Disorders: Steps Towards Promoting Understanding and Acceptance.
  • Unveiling the Evolution of Media Censorship: A Historical Perspective.
  • The Impact of Geographic Location on Life Opportunities: Exploring the Connection.
  • The Significance of Jane Goodall: Contributions to Conservation and Primatology.
  • The Phenomenon of Snap Judgments: Understanding the Quickness to Judge Others.
  • Gaining Insights into Humanity through Animal Observation: Lessons from Non-Human Behavior.
  • Unraveling the Effects of the Pandemic on the World's Wealthiest Individuals.
  • Making an Impact: Effective Approaches to Donating for Charitable Causes.
  • Combating Bullying in Schools: Promoting Effective Strategies and Interventions.
  • The Influence of Social Media on Loneliness: Examining the Connection and Implications.

10 Political Topics

  • The French Revolution: Paving the Way for Contemporary Democracy.
  • Exploring the Factors Behind the Increased Political Polarization Worldwide.
  • Understanding China's Rapid Expansion: Key Drivers and Implications.
  • Weighing the Pros and Cons of Different Political Systems.
  • Bridging the Divide: Initiating Conversations with Individuals from Differing Perspectives.
  • Navigating the Path to the Presidency: Steps Towards Becoming the Leader of the United States.
  • Assessing the Ramifications of Another World War on Global Dynamics.
  • Contrasting Liberalism and Conservatism: Key Differentiating Factors.
  • The Ripple Effect: How Elections in a Neighboring Country Impact Your Nation.
  • Portrait of a Political Luminary: Examining the Life and Contributions of an Influential Leader.

10 Education Topics

  • Exploring the Advantages and Disadvantages of Standardized Testing.
  • Enhancing Memory: Strategies to Improve Cognitive Recall.
  • Unveiling the Advantages of Mentor Programs for Personal and Professional Development.
  • The Transformative Power of Higher Education: How Universities Enhance Lives.
  • Empowering Student Choice: The Importance of Allowing Students to Select Their Subjects.
  • Contrasting Educational Systems: A Comparative Analysis of Schooling Approaches Worldwide.
  • Conquering the Toughest Tests: A Look at the Most Challenging Examinations Globally.
  • Bridging the Gap: The Role of Education in Reducing Social Inequality.
  • Crafting an Academic Essay: Guidelines and Tips for Effective Writing.
  • The Vital Role of Restful Sleep in Exam Preparation and Performance.

Ready to Ignite Minds with Your Informative Essay?

Our qualified writers are here to craft a masterpiece tailored to your needs worthy of an A+

Informative Essay Examples

Essay examples are invaluable resources that demonstrate the skill of translating theoretical concepts into practical applications with effectiveness and engagement. By examining the below well-crafted essays, you gain insights into how to write an informative essay with proper structure, organization, and presentation techniques!

Meanwhile, you can also explore essay writing apps that enable you to work on your upcoming assignments anytime and anywhere, providing convenience and flexibility to enhance your writing process.

EssayPro is the best custom essay writing service on the web, as we always hire qualified paper writers to create high-level content for very fair prices.

Final Remarks

Congratulations! You are now equipped with the knowledge to craft an outstanding paper. This comprehensive guide has provided essential insights, including understanding the essence of informative essay writing, selecting an engaging topic, constructing a well-structured outline, and step-by-step instructions for composing each paragraph. Additionally, valuable tips and general advice have been shared to enhance your writing journey. By following the guidance provided, you are bound to embark on a fulfilling, informative writing experience, allowing you to share compelling information about a subject close to your heart.

Want to Unleash the Brilliance of Your Ideas?

Claim your expertly crafted informative essay today and command attention with your brilliant insights!

Related Articles

Satire Essay

text essay example

Introduction

CDHE Nomination

AUCC Requirements

Course Description

Sample Policy Statements

Syllabus Sequencing Strategies

Sample Daily Syllabi

Lesson Plans

Reading Selection Recommendations

Assignments

Response Papers and Discussion Forums

Presentations

Discusssion, Group, WTL Questions

Variations, Misc.

Curbing Plagiarism

Additional Teaching & Course Design Resources

Guide Contributors

E238 Text Analysis Essay Example

Text Analysis Papers

For five of the six texts you read this semester, you will be expected to hand in a corresponding text analysis paper. A text analysis paper will focus upon an area of the work that you find interesting, significant, or feel merits discussion. A text analysis paper should be fairly formal, and should genuinely attempt to shed light on one or more aspects of the work. You may discuss the significance of character, plot, setting, symbol...whatever catches your fancy. Overall, I am looking for interesting and original insights concerning the reading assignment.

An ideal text analysis will be 2 pages in length, double-spaced, and typed. Your paper will explore a problem or point of interest created by a work of literature (this includes, but is not limited to, character motivation, thematic elements, contextual significance, culture, symbol, irony, etc.). Your ideas and insights will be based on information from the pages in the text we have read so far (outside research is encouraged, but not at all necessary), calling upon specific examples to illustrate the idea or issue you are exploring. Your grade will be based on the quality and depth of your insights, and on the use of specific textual evidence as support. Avoid the obvious. Take risks--Make it interesting! This is an issue that the class may be asked to discuss at a later date.

Possible starting places for your text analysis include an author's life, politics, the social context of the work, philosophical musings, how and why the work evokes a particular feeling in you, cultural relevance, or the components of the text such as the significance of setting, narrative voice, imagery, or symbolism. Or, perhaps you will read a critical approach to the text and use it as a springboard for your own ideas (the library database Contemporary Literary Criticism Select is often a nice starting place). Or, you may wish to explore the relationship between various elements of the text (How does setting influence character?). Or, perhaps you would like to build on an idea touched on in class discussion. As we move on into the later weeks of the course, you may even wish to direct your questions toward identifying patterns between texts, and asking what the significance of these patterns might be.

The Dos and Don'ts of Text Analysis Papers:

**Remember: Text analysis papers must be typed and submitted on time. They will be evaluated on the basis of focus, development, use of evidence, creativity, and level of insight. They will count as 30% of your final grade.

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

APA Sample Paper

OWL logo

Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

Note:  This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style  can be found here .

Media Files: APA Sample Student Paper  ,  APA Sample Professional Paper

This resource is enhanced by Acrobat PDF files. Download the free Acrobat Reader

Note: The APA Publication Manual, 7 th Edition specifies different formatting conventions for student  and  professional  papers (i.e., papers written for credit in a course and papers intended for scholarly publication). These differences mostly extend to the title page and running head. Crucially, citation practices do not differ between the two styles of paper.

However, for your convenience, we have provided two versions of our APA 7 sample paper below: one in  student style and one in  professional  style.

Note: For accessibility purposes, we have used "Track Changes" to make comments along the margins of these samples. Those authored by [AF] denote explanations of formatting and [AWC] denote directions for writing and citing in APA 7. 

APA 7 Student Paper:

Apa 7 professional paper:.

7+ Explanatory Essay Examples That Get the Best Grades

7+ Explanatory Essay Examples That Get the Best Grades

Table of contents

text essay example

Meredith Sell

Writing explanatory essays is hard, even for experienced scholars.

In this post, I want to try to tackle the major challenges students face when writing this type of essay, using examples of successful essays. These challenges include:

  • Struggling to come up with the right idea . (solution:  brainstorming techniques )
  • Difficulty in organizing the essay. (solution: working on the outline of the essay)
  • Not having enough evidence or sources to back up points. (solution: doing proper research )
  • Failing to come up with a conclusion. (solution: following our guide to conclusions )
  • Not having enough knowledge of the topic. (solution: summarizing key articles on the topic)
  • Having trouble finding the right words. (solution: writing with Wordtune )
  • Not having enough time to finish the essay. (solution: working on student time management )
  • Not being able to present arguments effectively. (solution: learning essay persuasion techniques )

As you can see, for every issue there is the relevant solution, but it takes time to implement it. Another way of tackling this essay is to see other people's essay examples and getting inspiration from them.

Write your explanatory essay faster with this FREE AI tool > Write your explanatory essay faster with this FREE AI tool >

Explanatory essay generator

What Is an Explanatory Essay?

What Is an Explanatory Essay?

If you google “explanatory essay”, you’ll find a bunch of sites saying that an explanatory essay is the same as an expository essay, or that it’s totally different, or not even mentioning that expository essays exist. Who’s right?

Answer: Whoever your professor agrees with.

No, seriously. Your professor decides the parameters of your assignment. So if your professor defines an explanatory essay as one that describes a perspective or analyzes the efficacy of, for example, a local housing policy—that’s the definition you should work from.

But if your professor distinguishes between explanatory essays (which simply explain what something is and how it works or was developed) and expository essays (which expose the reality of a person, place, thing, or idea through investigation and evaluation), you should distinguish between them as well.

For the purposes of this piece, we’re going to use explanatory and expository interchangeably. The dividing line that some draw between these essay types is unnecessarily technical. What’s important is that both:

  • Use an objective perspective
  • Let the facts speak for themselves

As long as your essay does the same (and includes analysis if required by your professor), you should be in good shape.

Example of explanatory essay

We wrote a whole article on generating essay topic ideas , but here is a good example that can help you get an idea for your own essay:

Why is having a dog as a pet such a wonderful experience?

Dogs are one of the most popular pets in the world. They are beloved companions that bring joy and happiness into the lives of their owners. Dogs have been domesticated for thousands of years and have evolved to become the perfect pet for humans. In this essay, I will explain why having a dog as a pet is a wonderful experience.

One of the primary benefits of having a dog as a pet is the companionship they offer. Dogs are social animals that thrive on human interaction. They are loyal and loving creatures that are always there for their owners. Dogs can help alleviate feelings of loneliness and depression, and provide comfort and support during difficult times.

Another benefit of having a dog as a pet is the health benefits they offer. Studies have shown that owning a dog can help lower blood pressure, reduce stress, and improve overall health. Dogs require daily exercise, which encourages their owners to be more active and can lead to a healthier lifestyle. Additionally, having a dog can boost the immune system and reduce the risk of allergies and asthma in children.

Dogs are also great for families with children. They can help teach children about responsibility, compassion, and empathy. Children can learn to care for and nurture their pets, which can be beneficial for their emotional development. Dogs are also great playmates for children and can provide hours of entertainment and fun.

Training and caring for a dog can also be a rewarding experience. Dogs can be trained to perform a variety of tasks, such as fetching, obedience, and even therapy work. The process of training a dog can help strengthen the bond between the owner and the dog and can be a fulfilling experience. Additionally, caring for a dog requires daily attention and can provide a sense of purpose and fulfillment for the owner.

In conclusion, having a dog as a pet can be a wonderful experience. Dogs offer companionship, health benefits, and can be great for families with children. Caring for a dog can also be a rewarding experience and can provide a sense of purpose and fulfillment for the owner. Owning a dog is a big responsibility, but the rewards far outweigh the effort required.

Example of an explanatory paragraph, generated with AI:

text essay example

A few subtypes of explanatory essays:

Description or definition essay example

‍ Perhaps the most basic, this subtype does the deceptively simple work of, well, describing or defining a concept, place, person, etc.

Example: How Suspension Bridges Work

This essay explains: The way suspension bridges are constructed and how their design enables them to carry such immense weight.

Cause-and-effect essay example

This type of essay hones in on a particular phenomenon to show what caused it (i.e., where it came from) and how it influences other things.

Example: How Federally Funded Highways Transformed the United States

This essay explains: The history of federally funded highways in the U.S., when federal programs to fund highway construction started, why politicians and others thought highways were important, and what the effect has been on the landscapes, communities, economies, and ecosystems of the country.

Compare-and-contrast essay example

Take two or more things, gather the facts about them, and then write about their similarities and differences.

Example: Hybrid vs. Electric Cars

This essay explains: The various features of hybrid and electric cars, and shows how they are either different or similar in terms of: cost, energy consumption, size, drive time, ease of use, and so on.

‍ How-to essay example

Walk your reader step-by-step through a procedure so they can do it for themselves. (We’re doing this later!)

Example: How to Prepare for an Intercontinental Bike Trip

This essay explains: How to get ready for a bike trip between nations and continents. Readers learn how to research their route, find out what travel documents they need, choose the right gear, and determine how much training they should do before leaving.

Problem and solution essay example

Explain a problem (along with its causes and effects) and then describe one or more potential solutions to that problem. This subtype could also be combined with compare-and-contrast to determine the most effective solution.

Example: How Bike Infrastructure Could Solve American Obesity

This essay explains: How American reliance on motorized vehicles promotes a sedentary lifestyle that drives obesity, whereas building bike lanes and trails could encourage Americans to be more active and improve their health one pedal at a time.

‍ Chronology essay example

Explain the history or backstory of a person, place, thing, or idea in chronological order.

Example: The Evolution of the Bicycle

This essay explains: The initial invention of the bicycle and how its shape, frame, and size changed over the years.

What type of explanatory essay are you writing? Hopefully, this list helped you hone in. Now, let’s start the writing process.

5 Steps to Write Your Essay

Whether you’re writing an explanatory/expository essay or a persuasive essay, the process of researching and writing is pretty much the same. Both genres require research, organization, and thought . But with expository essays, the thought focuses on making sure you understand your topic inside-out and determining the best way to explain it, while with persuasive essays, you’re focused on crafting a convincing argument.

Follow these steps to turn that blank page into a final manuscript:

1. Choose topic and angle. 

Do you have free rein to write about the topic of your choice? Make the most of it.

In college, my public speaking professor let us choose all of our own speech topics. A classmate gave an explanatory presentation on how to survive the zombie apocalypse . She brought props and had the class totally enchanted. Our professor encouraged creativity, so I’m sure she earned a winning grade—and had fun in the process.

You can’t use props or sound in a written essay, but you can still work some creative magic. That magic starts with choosing your topic and angle.

To choose well, first make sure you understand the assignment: 

  • What exactly has your professor asked you to write? Which of the subtypes should your piece be?
  • Are there any parameters for what type of topic you can write about?
  • What kind of class is this? An English composition class will offer more freedom than, say, a history class focused on the French Revolution.

If you’re allowed to write about anything, brainstorm a list of topics you’re curious about. Then think of smaller topics within that area.

Example: Transportation

  • Electric cars
  • The highway system
  • Engineering

Any of these topics you could easily write volumes about, so next, narrow down to your specific angle. One way I like to come up with angles is to think of how two or three different topics intersect.

Example 1: electric cars + the highway system 

Angle: How Much Will It Cost to Update Federal Highways with Charging Stations for Electric Cars

Notice that this angle includes a third element: cost

Example 2: bicycles + bridges

Angle: The Safest Bridges for Bicycles Have One Thing in Common: No Cars

Third element: safety

Example 3: electric cars + buses

Angle: Electric Cars vs. Buses: Which Is Better for the Environment?

Third element: environment

Your turn: Make a list of topics you’re interested in. Then, identify some intersecting topics. Based on your assignment parameters, develop an angle that narrows your focus to an intersection that interests you.

Not sure what angle to go with? Do some broad research on your topics and then return to this step.

2. Research, research, research.

Explanatory essays require solid research. These essays exist to lay out the facts for the reader so they can clearly understand the topic. Your opinion—what you think about electric cars or suspension bridges or transportation infrastructure—doesn’t matter. And it doesn’t belong here.

Where you should start your research depends on how much knowledge you already have.

If you’re writing about suspension bridges and you already know the Brooklyn Bridge and Golden Gate Bridge are suspension bridges, you probably don’t need to start with the encyclopedic entry for “suspension bridges”. But if you don’t know the basic facts about your topic, encyclopedias are a great place to start.

Thanks to the advances of technology—and this marvelous thing called the internet—you don’t have to go to a research library to gain that ground-level knowledge of your topic. But you do still need to make sure you’re drawing from credible sources.

For encyclopedias, try these to start:

  • Encyclopedia.com

Dictionaries can be helpful too:

  • Merriam-Webster
  • Dictionary.com

Once you know your topics’ basic facts, focus on researching those topics in the context of your angle . It may help to make a list of questions you’re trying to answer so you can keep your research focused.

Example: Electric Cars vs. Buses: Which Is Better for the Environment?

  • Are most buses gas-powered or electric?
  • What’s the average emissions of greenhouse gas from gas-powered buses?
  • How much energy do electric cars use? What’s the lifespan of their batteries? Are they just using electricity that was produced in a polluting way somewhere else? What about electric buses?
  • How many people can ride a bus? How many people typically are transported by one car? 
  • What would be the average energy consumption per person in an electric car versus a bus?

Once you know the questions you need to answer, look for sources that address those questions. For an academic essay, you’ll probably want to stick with academic sources : peer-reviewed studies and research papers published by academic journals. But official government databases can also be useful. And news stories from reputable publications can provide some direction as well (check with your professor to see whether or not you can use news publications as sources for your essay). Your educational institution likely provides access to all of these kinds of sources through the university library.

Your turn: Think through your angle and make a list of questions your piece needs to answer. Next, start searching academic databases for the information you need. Take notes as you research, and be sure to save any links, titles, author names, page numbers, and publication information you’ll need to properly cite your sources.

3. Outline your essay.

Call me crazy, but I actually think this is the fun part. I hated writing outlines when I was in school, but since making my living as a professional writer, they’ve become the #1 way I beat writer’s block.

First: Throw out the idea that your outline should be a series of bullet points neatly organized into sections and subsections. Your outline only needs to make sense to you , so play around to find an approach that works with your brain. The idea here is simply to make a map you’ll follow when you sit down to write.

Here’s what I do:

  • Identify the specific hook I’m going to use to start things off.
  • List the different examples and details I need to include.
  • Use the main focus or idea of my piece to order everything in a natural, logical way.

A lot of times, my outline becomes a combination of bullet points and sentences or paragraphs I write as I’m sketching out the piece. I’m basically just thinking the piece through, from beginning to end. Instead of getting stuck while I’m writing, I work through the tough spots in the outlining stage.

This is what my outline looked like for this piece:

text essay example

Okay, that’s kind of long, so I cut it off early—but you get the point. 

A lot of times, my outline starts as bare-bones bullets. As I work on it, ideas pop up that I stick in where they make sense. But when I write, those elements might move around ( notice how the examples of transportation essays got bumped up to the section on subtypes of essays ).

Your outline is just a guide. It’s not an architect’s blueprint that needs to be followed to the exact millimeter. There’s room for things to change. 

But an outline keeps you on-track when you’re writing . If you find yourself stuck (or lost) in the writing step, reference your map. You might need to backtrack, move what you’ve written around, or adjust your route. 

Your turn: Take a few minutes and sketch out your essay. Where does it start? What points does it hit? Are there any ways you see the different points connecting that should inform how you order them? As you think it through, scribble out any lines or paragraphs that come to you and stick them in the outline where they make the most sense. Even if you don’t use these exact words later, they’ll help prevent that deer-in-the-headlights stare that hits when you see a blank page.

Time to put everything together! 

With your outline and research ready, start your intro and set up your piece. Your opening should briefly introduce your readers to the topic(s) you’re writing about and the questions you’re going to answer—but don’t give everything away. You want to stir up readers’ curiosity and give them a reason to keep reading.

Depending on the length of your essay, your intro may be one to three paragraphs long (longer pieces get longer intros). But it should be concise and to the point, and smoothly transition into the body of your essay.

The body is the meat and potatoes of your piece. Answer those questions, flesh out your explanation, and give readers a thorough understanding of your topic. Show off your research! Include those bizarre and fascinating facts you learned along the way. Use a tasteful metaphor or compelling anecdote to explain some of the more difficult aspects of your topic. 

As you write, be sure to follow a consistent logic throughout your piece: 

  • If you’re detailing a history or an event, use chronological order: start at the beginning and write about the events in the order that they happened.
  • Are you explaining how a machine or other invention works? Start with where the movement starts—the pedals of a bicycle, the wind turning the turbines—or with the feature doing the most significant work (e.g., the wires of the suspension bridge). 
  • Other logics include: size (small to large, large to small), significance (greatest to least), or space (left to right, right to left, outside to center, center to outside).

You don’t need to label everything you write about as the “next biggest” or “least significant”, but sticking to a logic helps your readers orient themselves—and helps you determine which paragraph or subtopic should go where. This way, your thoughts clearly flow from one paragraph to the next. 

‍ Quick note: If you can’t name the logic that’s guiding your piece, don’t worry. As long as your paragraphs naturally follow each other and all questions raised in the intro are answered by the end, your essay probably follows a logic just fine. But if you feel like your piece bounces around willy-nilly, play with a couple different logics and see if one smoothly orders your sentences and paragraphs.

Your turn: Get writing! If you’re stuck on the intro, try writing a working title for your piece to focus your attention. Then, follow your outline to work all the way from the beginning to a conclusion that sums everything up.

If you can, let your piece sit for at least a day. Then, for the editing process , open up that document and read through with these questions in mind:

  • Does the essay fulfill the assignment? Review the assignment description from your professor. Does your essay tick all the boxes? If not, what’s missing? Can you weave that element into what you’ve already written? Revise as necessary.
  • Are the sentences and paragraphs ordered in a way that makes logical sense? If your essay feels clunky in places, you might have switched logics (as explained above) or you might need to insert some more explanation that clearly ties the sentences or paragraphs together. Make sure your essay doesn’t just list facts, but also shows how they relate to each other.
  • Does the hook catch your eye? The beginning of your piece should grab your reader’s attention. Check out our advice for prize-winning hooks here .
  • Does the conclusion effectively sum things up? Instead of repeating everything your essay says, your conclusion should briefly distill the main takeaway or core idea for your reader. It should show that you’ve fulfilled the promise made in your intro, without being unnecessarily repetitive or redundant.
  • Have you cited all your sources? Make sure to cross this off before hitting “submit.” Follow the citation style specified by your professor.
  • Is spelling and grammar clean and correct? You are writing, after all, and these things matter. A bonus tip to help you catch those sneaky typos: Read your piece backwards. You might be surprised what you spot.

Did We Explain That Well Enough?

This blog was basically a long, non-academic explanatory essay, so hopefully, you’ve learned something new and are feeling less overwhelmed about your essay on medieval literature, transportation infrastructure, Persian history—or whatever you’re writing about.

Share This Article:

How To Write an Abstract for Any Subject and Publication (With Examples)

How To Write an Abstract for Any Subject and Publication (With Examples)

How To Make Money Writing on X (Twitter) in 2024

How To Make Money Writing on X (Twitter) in 2024

How to Write an Impactful Product Review

How to Write an Impactful Product Review

Looking for fresh content, thank you your submission has been received.

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • How to write an expository essay

How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples

Published on July 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

“Expository” means “intended to explain or describe something.” An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn’t set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

Expository essays are usually short assignments intended to test your composition skills or your understanding of a subject. They tend to involve less research and original arguments than argumentative essays .

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Upload your document to correct all your mistakes in minutes

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

When should you write an expository essay, how to approach an expository essay, introducing your essay, writing the body paragraphs, concluding your essay, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about expository essays.

In school and university, you might have to write expository essays as in-class exercises, exam questions, or coursework assignments.

Sometimes it won’t be directly stated that the assignment is an expository essay, but there are certain keywords that imply expository writing is required. Consider the prompts below.

The word “explain” here is the clue: An essay responding to this prompt should provide an explanation of this historical process—not necessarily an original argument about it.

Sometimes you’ll be asked to define a particular term or concept. This means more than just copying down the dictionary definition; you’ll be expected to explore different ideas surrounding the term, as this prompt emphasizes.

Receive feedback on language, structure, and formatting

Professional editors proofread and edit your paper by focusing on:

  • Academic style
  • Vague sentences
  • Style consistency

See an example

text essay example

An expository essay should take an objective approach: It isn’t about your personal opinions or experiences. Instead, your goal is to provide an informative and balanced explanation of your topic. Avoid using the first or second person (“I” or “you”).

The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It’s worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline .

A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Like all essays, an expository essay begins with an introduction . This serves to hook the reader’s interest, briefly introduce your topic, and provide a thesis statement summarizing what you’re going to say about it.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

The body of your essay is where you cover your topic in depth. It often consists of three paragraphs, but may be more for a longer essay. This is where you present the details of the process, idea or topic you’re explaining.

It’s important to make sure each paragraph covers its own clearly defined topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Different topics (all related to the overall subject matter of the essay) should be presented in a logical order, with clear transitions between paragraphs.

Hover over different parts of the example paragraph below to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

The invention of the printing press in 1440 changed this situation dramatically. Johannes Gutenberg, who had worked as a goldsmith, used his knowledge of metals in the design of the press. He made his type from an alloy of lead, tin, and antimony, whose durability allowed for the reliable production of high-quality books. This new technology allowed texts to be reproduced and disseminated on a much larger scale than was previously possible. The Gutenberg Bible appeared in the 1450s, and a large number of printing presses sprang up across the continent in the following decades. Gutenberg’s invention rapidly transformed cultural production in Europe; among other things, it would lead to the Protestant Reformation.

Here's why students love Scribbr's proofreading services

Discover proofreading & editing

The conclusion of an expository essay serves to summarize the topic under discussion. It should not present any new information or evidence, but should instead focus on reinforcing the points made so far. Essentially, your conclusion is there to round off the essay in an engaging way.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a conclusion works.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

College essays

  • Choosing Essay Topic
  • Write a College Essay
  • Write a Diversity Essay
  • College Essay Format & Structure
  • Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

An expository essay is a broad form that varies in length according to the scope of the assignment.

Expository essays are often assigned as a writing exercise or as part of an exam, in which case a five-paragraph essay of around 800 words may be appropriate.

You’ll usually be given guidelines regarding length; if you’re not sure, ask.

An expository essay is a common assignment in high-school and university composition classes. It might be assigned as coursework, in class, or as part of an exam.

Sometimes you might not be told explicitly to write an expository essay. Look out for prompts containing keywords like “explain” and “define.” An expository essay is usually the right response to these prompts.

An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2023, July 23). How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved February 23, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/expository-essay/

Is this article helpful?

Jack Caulfield

Jack Caulfield

Other students also liked, academic paragraph structure | step-by-step guide & examples, how to write topic sentences | 4 steps, examples & purpose, how to write an argumentative essay | examples & tips, what is your plagiarism score.

EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

The use of artificial intelligence in the EU will be regulated by the AI Act, the world’s first comprehensive AI law. Find out how it will protect you.

A man faces a computer generated figure with programming language in the background

As part of its digital strategy , the EU wants to regulate artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure better conditions for the development and use of this innovative technology. AI can create many benefits , such as better healthcare; safer and cleaner transport; more efficient manufacturing; and cheaper and more sustainable energy.

In April 2021, the European Commission proposed the first EU regulatory framework for AI. It says that AI systems that can be used in different applications are analysed and classified according to the risk they pose to users. The different risk levels will mean more or less regulation. Once approved, these will be the world’s first rules on AI.

Learn more about what artificial intelligence is and how it is used

What Parliament wants in AI legislation

Parliament’s priority is to make sure that AI systems used in the EU are safe, transparent, traceable, non-discriminatory and environmentally friendly. AI systems should be overseen by people, rather than by automation, to prevent harmful outcomes.

Parliament also wants to establish a technology-neutral, uniform definition for AI that could be applied to future AI systems.

Learn more about Parliament’s work on AI and its vision for AI’s future

AI Act: different rules for different risk levels

The new rules establish obligations for providers and users depending on the level of risk from artificial intelligence. While many AI systems pose minimal risk, they need to be assessed.

Unacceptable risk

Unacceptable risk AI systems are systems considered a threat to people and will be banned. They include:

  • Cognitive behavioural manipulation of people or specific vulnerable groups: for example voice-activated toys that encourage dangerous behaviour in children
  • Social scoring: classifying people based on behaviour, socio-economic status or personal characteristics
  • Biometric identification and categorisation of people
  • Real-time and remote biometric identification systems, such as facial recognition

Some exceptions may be allowed for law enforcement purposes. “Real-time” remote biometric identification systems will be allowed in a limited number of serious cases, while “post” remote biometric identification systems, where identification occurs after a significant delay, will be allowed to prosecute serious crimes and only after court approval.

AI systems that negatively affect safety or fundamental rights will be considered high risk and will be divided into two categories:

1) AI systems that are used in products falling under the EU’s product safety legislation . This includes toys, aviation, cars, medical devices and lifts.

2) AI systems falling into specific areas that will have to be registered in an EU database:

  • Management and operation of critical infrastructure
  • Education and vocational training
  • Employment, worker management and access to self-employment
  • Access to and enjoyment of essential private services and public services and benefits
  • Law enforcement
  • Migration, asylum and border control management
  • Assistance in legal interpretation and application of the law.

All high-risk AI systems will be assessed before being put on the market and also throughout their lifecycle.

General purpose and generative AI

Generative AI, like ChatGPT, would have to comply with transparency requirements:

  • Disclosing that the content was generated by AI
  • Designing the model to prevent it from generating illegal content
  • Publishing summaries of copyrighted data used for training

High-impact general-purpose AI models that might pose systemic risk, such as the more advanced AI model GPT-4, would have to undergo thorough evaluations and any serious incidents would have to be reported to the European Commission.

Limited risk

Limited risk AI systems should comply with minimal transparency requirements that would allow users to make informed decisions. After interacting with the applications, the user can then decide whether they want to continue using it. Users should be made aware when they are interacting with AI. This includes AI systems that generate or manipulate image, audio or video content, for example deepfakes.

On December 9 2023, Parliament reached a provisional agreement with the Council on the AI act . The agreed text will now have to be formally adopted by both Parliament and Council to become EU law. Before all MEPs have their say on the agreement, Parliament’s internal market and civil liberties committees will vote on it.

More on the EU’s digital measures

  • Cryptocurrency dangers and the benefits of EU legislation
  • Fighting cybercrime: new EU cybersecurity laws explained
  • Boosting data sharing in the EU: what are the benefits?
  • EU Digital Markets Act and Digital Services Act
  • Five ways the European Parliament wants to protect online gamers
  • Artificial Intelligence Act

Related articles

Digital transformation in the eu, share this article on:.

  • Sign up for mail updates
  • PDF version

IMAGES

  1. Academic Essay Examples

    text essay example

  2. FREE 17+ Essay Writing Samples & Templates in PDF

    text essay example

  3. English Essay Examples Articles

    text essay example

  4. Narrative Essay Samples: Tell Me A Story

    text essay example

  5. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

    text essay example

  6. Informative Essay

    text essay example

VIDEO

  1. WRITING AN ESSAY

  2. GUIDE TO WRITING AN ESSAY📝

  3. Write an Essay Properly ! #essay #speaking #writing #eassywriting

  4. Essay Writing

  5. Loss: The Characteristic’s Review

  6. How to write an expository text essay

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    So, for example, if you were writing an essay about the Supreme Court decision in Dobbs vs. Jackson Women's Health, it wouldn't be enough to say that what's at stake is that "people care about reproductive rights." That would explain why, in general, someone might want to read about this topic. But your readers need

  2. Example of a Great Essay

    Revised on July 23, 2023 by Shona McCombes. This example guides you through the structure of an essay. It shows how to build an effective introduction, focused paragraphs, clear transitions between ideas, and a strong conclusion.

  3. The Beginner's Guide to Writing an Essay

    For example, if you've been assigned a five-paragraph expository essay for a high school class, you'll probably spend the most time on the writing stage; for a college-level argumentative essay, on the other hand, you'll need to spend more time researching your topic and developing an original argument before you start writing.

  4. Sample Essays

    Sample Essays The breadth of Georgetown's core curriculum means that students are required to write for a wide variety of academic disciplines. Below, we provide some student samples that exhibit the key features the most popular genres. When reading through these essays, we recommend paying attention to their 1.

  5. How to Structure an Essay

    Chronological structure. The chronological approach (sometimes called the cause-and-effect approach) is probably the simplest way to structure an essay. It just means discussing events in the order in which they occurred, discussing how they are related (i.e. the cause and effect involved) as you go. A chronological approach can be useful when ...

  6. Essay Structure: The 3 Main Parts of an Essay

    Here are a few examples of thesis statements: In the final scene of The Awakening, Edna Pontellier's decision demonstrates that it was impossible for her to have the lifestyle she truly wanted in the society in which she lived. Due to its volatility and lack of government regulation, Bitcoin cannot become a viable currency for everyday purchases.

  7. Essay Writing: How to Write an Outstanding Essay

    The basic steps for how to write an essay are: Generate ideas and pick a type of essay to write. Outline your essay paragraph by paragraph. Write a rough first draft without worrying about details like word choice or grammar. Edit your rough draft, and revise and fix the details. Review your essay for typos, mistakes, and any other problems.

  8. How to Write a Short Essay, With Examples

    2 Generate ideas. Jot down key points, arguments, or examples that you want to include in your essay. Don't get too wrapped up in the details during this step. Just try to get down all of the big ideas that you want to get across. Your major argument or theme will likely emerge as you contemplate.

  9. 177 College Essay Examples for 11 Schools + Expert Analysis

    177 College Essay Examples for 11 Schools + Expert Analysis Posted by Dr. Anna Wulick College Admissions , College Essays The personal statement might just be the hardest part of your college application. Mostly this is because it has the least guidance and is the most open-ended.

  10. Academic Essay Examples and Samples

    Sort by: Most Popular Latest Academic Essay Examples and Samples Being the most important writing task for college and university students, it is important to look through samples of essays to get a clear picture of how to write one on your own. Write better with AI!

  11. The Four Main Types of Essay

    The example below is a paragraph from the body of an argumentative essay about the effects of the internet on education. Mouse over it to learn more. Argumentative essay example paragraph A common frustration for teachers is students' use of Wikipedia as a source in their writing.

  12. Sample papers

    Sample Papers This page contains sample papers formatted in seventh edition APA Style. The sample papers show the format that authors should use to submit a manuscript for publication in a professional journal and that students should use to submit a paper to an instructor for a course assignment.

  13. 3 Strong Argumentative Essay Examples, Analyzed

    For example, say you wanted to write an argumentative essay stating that Charleston, SC is a great destination for families. You couldn't just say that it's a great place because you took your family there and enjoyed it.

  14. How to Write a Five-Paragraph Essay, With Examples

    The five-paragraph essay format is a guide that helps writers structure an essay. It consists of one introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs for support, and one concluding paragraph. Because of this structure, it has been nicknamed the "hamburger essay," the "one-three-one essay," and the "three-tier essay.".

  15. How to Write an Informative Essay: Expert Tips and Techniques

    Reasons to Write an Informative Essay. Writing an informative essay, whether in an IEEE format or any other style, offers an opportunity to share expertise, educate others, and shed light on lesser-known topics. Whether driven by passion, a desire to showcase expertise or a quest for spreading awareness, there are compelling reasons to embark on this writing journey:

  16. E238 Text Analysis Essay Example

    E238 Text Analysis Essay Example. Text Analysis Papers. For five of the six texts you read this semester, you will be expected to hand in a corresponding text analysis paper. A text analysis paper will focus upon an area of the work that you find interesting, significant, or feel merits discussion. A text analysis paper should be fairly formal ...

  17. Argumentative Essay Examples to Inspire You [+Formula]

    Argumentative Essay Examples to Inspire You (+ Free Formula) Students Have you ever been asked to explain your opinion on a controversial issue? Maybe your family got into a discussion about chemical pesticides Someone at work argues against investing resources into your project

  18. How to Write a College Essay

    How to Write a College Essay | A Complete Guide & Examples The college essay can make or break your application. It's your chance to provide personal context, communicate your values and qualities, and set yourself apart from other students. A standout essay has a few key ingredients: A unique, personal topic A compelling, well-structured narrative

  19. APA Sample Paper

    Note: This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style can be found here. Media Files: APA Sample Student Paper , APA Sample Professional Paper This resource is enhanced by Acrobat PDF files. Download the free Acrobat Reader

  20. 7+ Explanatory Essay Examples That Get the Best Grades

    Writing explanatory essays is hard, even for experienced scholars. In this post, I want to try to tackle the major challenges students face when writing this type of essay, using examples of successful essays. These challenges include: Struggling to come up with the right idea. (solution: brainstorming techniques) Difficulty in organizing the ...

  21. Expository Essay Guide With Definition & Examples

    These include the following: 1 Classification essays In a classification essay, you write about various subjects within one category, discussing each subject's unique characteristics alongside the characteristics that connect it with others in its category. For example, you might write a classification essay about different kinds of herding dogs.

  22. How to Write an Expository Essay

    "Expository" means "intended to explain or describe something." An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn't set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

  23. EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

    As part of its digital strategy, the EU wants to regulate artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure better conditions for the development and use of this innovative technology. AI can create many benefits, such as better healthcare; safer and cleaner transport; more efficient manufacturing; and cheaper and more sustainable energy.. In April 2021, the European Commission proposed the first EU ...

  24. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    For example, if you are asked to "discuss" several proposals for reaching carbon neutral by 2050, your instructor would likely not be asking you to list the proposals and summarize them; instead, the goal would be to analyze them in relation to each other and offer some sort of claim—either about the differences between the proposals, the potent...