What Makes a Good School Culture?

  • Posted July 23, 2018
  • By Leah Shafer

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Most principals have an instinctive awareness that organizational culture is a key element of school success. They might say their school has a “good culture” when teachers are expressing a shared vision and students are succeeding — or that they need to “work on school culture” when several teachers resign or student discipline rates rise. 

But like many organizational leaders, principals may get stymied when they actually try to describe the elements that create a positive culture. It's tricky to define, and parsing its components can be challenging. Amid the push for tangible outcomes like higher test scores and graduation rates, it can be tempting to think that school culture is just too vague or “soft” to prioritize.

That would be a mistake, according to  Ebony Bridwell-Mitchell , an expert in education leadership and management. As she explains, researchers who have studied culture have tracked and demonstrated a strong and significant correlation between organizational culture and an organization’s performance. Once principals understand what constitutes culture — once they learn to see it not as a hazy mass of intangibles, but as something that can be pinpointed and designed — they can start to execute a cultural vision.

A culture will be strong or weak depending on the interactions between people in the organization. In a strong culture, there are many, overlapping, and cohesive interactions, so that knowledge about the organization’s distinctive character — and what it takes to thrive in it — is widely spread.

At a recent session of the  National Institute for Urban School Leaders  at the  Harvard Graduate School of Education , Bridwell-Mitchell took a deep dive into “culture,” describing the building blocks of an organization’s character and fundamentally how it feels to work there. 

Culture Is Connections

A culture will be strong or weak depending on the interactions between the people in the organization, she said.  In a strong culture, there are many, overlapping, and cohesive interactions among all members of the organization.   As a result, knowledge about the organization’s distinctive character — and what it takes to thrive in it — is widely spread and reinforced.  In a weak culture, sparse interactions make it difficult for people to learn the organization’s culture , so its character is barely noticeable and the commitment to it is scarce or sporadic.

  • Beliefs, values, and actions will spread the farthest and be tightly reinforced when everyone is communicating with everyone else. In a strong school culture, leaders communicate directly with teachers, administrators, counselors, and families, who also all communicate directly with each other.
  • A culture is weaker when communications are limited and there are fewer connections. For example, if certain teachers never hear directly from their principal, an administrator is continually excluded from communications, or any groups of staff members are operating in isolation from others, it will be difficult for messages about shared beliefs and commitments to spread. 

Culture Is Core Beliefs and Behaviors

Within that weak or strong structure, what exactly people believe and how they act depends on the messages — both direct and indirect — that the leaders and others in the organization send. A good culture arises from messages that promote traits like collaboration, honesty, and hard work.

Culture is shaped by five interwoven elements, each of which principals have the power to influence: 

  • Fundamental beliefs and assumptions , or the things that people at your school consider to be true. For example: “All students have the potential to succeed,” or “Teaching is a team sport.”
  • Shared values , or the judgments people at your school make about those belief and assumptions — whether they are right or wrong, good or bad, just or unjust. For example: “It’s wrong that some of our kindergarteners may not receive the same opportunity to graduate from a four-year college,” or “The right thing is for our teachers to be collaborating with colleagues every step of the way.” 
  • Norms , or how members believe they  should  act and behave, or what they think is expected of them. For example: “We should talk often and early to parents of young students about what it will take for their children to attend college.” “We all should be present and engaged at our weekly grade-level meetings.”
  • Patterns and behaviors , or the way people  actually  act and behave in your school. For example: There are regularly-scheduled parent engagement nights around college; there is active participation at weekly team curriculum meetings. (But in a weak culture, these patterns and behaviors can be different than the norms.)
  • Tangible evidence , or the physical, visual, auditory, or other sensory signs that demonstrate the behaviors of the people in your school. For example: Prominently displayed posters showcasing the district’s college enrollment, or a full parking lot an hour before school begins on the mornings when curriculum teams meet.

Each of these components influences and drives the others, forming a circle of reinforcing beliefs and actions, Bridwell-Mitchell says; strong connections among every member of the school community reinforce the circle at every point.

More on School Culture

  • See Part II of our story, which moves from "what makes school culture" to "how to build it."

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School Culture: A key aspect of positive and successful schools

This week we have two Guest Bloggers. I’m excited to introduce you to Kent D. Peterson who is Emeritus Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin, United States. And Scott K. Guzman-Peterson a teacher at Woodrow Wilson Middle School in the Glendale Unified School District,  Glendale, California.  Kent and Scott are a father and son writing duo who have been discussing positive and negative school leadership, social justice in schools, ways to shape school culture, and other educational topics for many years.  This is their first piece together.

importance of school culture essay

                                                           

What is Culture?

School culture is the underlying set of norms and values, history and stories, symbols and logos, rituals and traditions that make up the foundation of a school’s social and emotional ethos.

While “climate” represents the tone of a school, culture consists of a deeper and broader set of elements that shape everything that goes on within a school, shaping how people think, feel, and act. School leaders—administrators and teachers alike—need to understand what culture is and how to shape it through words, actions, policies, and daily practices.  

School culture is one of the key elements of creating positive, successful schools. Without a culture that supports learning for all, positive relationships, meaningful values, as well as norms for improvement, achievement, and colleagueship, schools are likely to be less productive or create potentially toxic environments. Positive features of school climate need to be fostered, maintained, and fine-tuned over time. 

School cultures vary across districts, regions, countries, but most often comprise a few foundational elements, as detailed below.

Norms are the collective expectations for behavior.  What is the expected attire for staff and administrators? What types and frequency of discussions are occurring and where? What professional development is encouraged and engaged informally? Who talks in staff meetings?  What are considered “good” teaching practices? 

Norms should be presented early in the school year and collectively shaped by colleagues and school staff to foster buy-in. Just as teachers allow students to share their ideas when creating classroom expectations, norms, and goals to foster a familial and accepting learning environment, so too can leaders provide spaces for staff contributions. Such practice ensures that everyone’s voices are heard and demonstrates that the classroom and school is a safe learning space where ideas and opinions are valued.

Examples of norms include: “All staff will be respectful of other’s ideas and inputs,” or “Our focus efforts are solution-oriented, applicable and relevant to our school’s mission,” or “We will adhere and respect everyone’s time by starting and ending meetings on time.” 

Values are based on what is important, valued and held dear.  Which is valued more, learning or socio-emotional development? Are art and music meaningful aspects of the school? Is equity a central value of the school? Does the school’s mission strongly prioritize social justice? Are extended learning opportunities prioritized for a whole child approach?

Values contribute to creating a well-rounded school culture and are gathered from multiple cultural backgrounds, socio-emotional needs, and academic goals. When staff share their values with each other in a safe, accepting environment, such as community circles and team building exercises, they can be adapted to the context of a school’s culture. This holds a lasting impact on staff morale and the overall school culture.

Beliefs are collective, school-wide understandings about people, processes, and purposes.  Do staff believe that some “types” of students are more likely to succeed than others? Is teacher learning considered to be an individual or a group process? Are there varying beliefs among departments or learning groups? How do staffs’ beliefs impact the school’s culture?

There are many schools where not all teachers and staff believe that every student can learn, grow, and succeed academically. It is necessary to incorporate staff beliefs into team building activities and share real-world student academic and teacher successes to create an optimistic school culture where staff see examples of their beliefs in policies and practices.

Histories and Stories

The history of a school and its stories are key features of school culture. In particular, stories communicate core values, reinforce the core mission, and build a sense of commitment.  How did the school form and what key events shaped the culture of the school? What stories are told in the staff room, on social media, and in the hallways?  Stories influence how one thinks and feels about a school. It is important to have a deep understanding of a school’s history, as lack of knowledge can affect student’s buy-in of the school culture and mission.

For example, when a school is well-established, sharing the school’s history, alumni stories, and accomplishments with incoming students can increase staff and student’s excitement about joining the school community.

Symbols are found in every school, providing a visual representation of core values and ideas.  What is your school’s name and what does it represent? Is there a school logo or mascot that reinforces key values and expectations? What has the school done to beautify the campus? Are there murals and/or student work posted? Is student work regularly changed and added to?

Weak symbols may contribute to low student buy-in during school gatherings, assemblies, and extracurricular activities, as well as affecting overall school culture. Schools without an established mascot, school colors, or historical representative symbols result in a lack of a collective school identity and impacts student motivation, teacher morale and sense of community.  

Rituals, Traditions, Ceremonies, and Celebrations

Strong school cultures include engaging in a wide variety of rituals, traditions, ceremonies, and celebrations. Rituals include the regular morning greeting from the principal. Traditions are regular activities that communicate meaning and purpose, molding and cementing relationships and commitment to the school and its mission. Ceremonies are a more complex set of rituals, symbols, traditions, and stories that are held at key times during the school year. These may include graduation ceremonies, school opening ceremonies, or spring solstice ceremonies. Celebrations, both large and small, recognize the accomplishments of staff, students, community, and stakeholders. For example, when new students and staff join the school community, creating a welcome video for them can show them care and appreciation. A best practice is to prepare a fresh, creative video each year for new staff and students.

The Importance of Reading, Assessing, and Shaping the Culture

As school culture develops over time as people work together, share successes and challenges, and establish professional relationships, it is important to  read —understand the current and historical culture,  assess —identify the positive elements of the culture, and actively work to reinforce,  shape, or reshape  the culture. 

School principals, heads, as well as teacher leaders are central to maintaining and shaping the culture. Leaders should regularly take time to reflect on the current culture; identify aspects of the culture to change or reinforce; and make plans to shape or reshape their culture through their words, actions, policies, and daily practices. 

One way to do so is by using Google forms to conduct easy, quick, data-driven check-ins with staff and students regarding what is and is not working, as well as areas with room for growth.

The best leaders choose words carefully to highlight important aspects of the culture and energize school staff and students. Such leaders know which communication method (face-to-face; videos; social media; hand-written notes) is best for their messages. 

Leaders should find and implement small actions that resonate with staff.  Do staff enjoy Post-It Note encouragement after an observation? Do staff appreciate inspiring stories of success and growth with students in a weekly school staff newsletter?  Find ways to incorporate words of affirmation and empathy each week as an avenue to promote culture. 

When leaders show they care and appreciate staff, it can make a difference in motivating them to put in extra effort to produce amazing results. While teachers might not have had the initial drive to implement their ideas, they are often more determined after hearing encouragement. They are also less apt to feel burned out if leaders show empathy by taking time to perform quick personal or mental health check-ins. 

Every action a school leader takes can affect the school culture, from decisions made to planning and communicating values, to choices for professional development. Reactions, body language and overall demeanor play a part in how one is perceived, listened to, and respected as a leader. Understanding how each staff member responds to feedback is essential for helping the collective school group come together to work as a whole.

Policies may seem like managerial structures, but they also signal what norms or values are central to the school. At the same time, involving staff in deciding which policies need to be adjusted or changed helps reinforce a collegial culture. Incorporating team department planning and time to share about different team and individual needs allows for staff to feel heard and appreciated.

Finally, daily practices, how leaders spend their time, which classrooms they visit, how they use social media, and what questions they ask teachers are all cultural messages that form or reform the culture. Leaders should use daily practices as a way to shape the culture. Be reflective and attentive to what those practices communicate. 

In Conclusion

Organizational culture is a crucial part of any school. Success or failure can often be attributed to the nature of a school’s culture.  Formal and informal leaders are key to knowing, maintaining, and shaping that culture. 

To learn more about Kent D. Peterson and Scott K. Guzman-Peterson and their respective work, please Google Kent D. Peterson for further information on his writing and books.

importance of school culture essay

References and Suggested Resources

  • Peterson, Kent and Deal, Terrence. 2 nd  Edition (2009).  The Shaping School Culture Fieldbook.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  • Peterson, Kent. Is Your School’s Culture Positive or Negative? 

https://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin275.shtml

  • Peterson, Kent.  Positive or Negative. Journal of Staff Development (2002). https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ65475
  • Deal, Terrence and Peterson, Kent. 3rd Edition (2016).  Shaping School Culture.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  • Muhammad, Anthony. (2009).  Transforming School Culture.  Solution Tree.
  • Kruse, Sharon and Louis, Karen. (2008).   Building Strong School Cultures.  Corwin Press.

Kent D. Peterson Bio 

Dr. Peterson is an Emeritus professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis and founder of the Vanderbilt Principals Institute. 

His research and writing have focused on the realities of principals’ work, school improvement, effective leadership, and school culture building.

In addition to numerous articles, he has co-authored several books with Terrence Deal that examine leadership and school culture.  These include: The Leadership Paradox, Shaping School Culture, and the Shaping School Culture Fieldbook from Jossey Bass Publishers.

In addition to his teaching and research he has consulted with states, districts, and foundations on effective leadership development designs and practices to help leaders better serve all their students, staff, and communities.

Scott Guzman-Peterson Bio 

Scott Guzman-Peterson is a veteran teacher of 13 years in some of the largest public-school systems in the United States. He has taught students the wonders of math and science ranging from kindergarten through high school within in the Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Chicago Public Schools as well as the Los Angeles Unified School District. Most recently he has taught middle school science in the Glendale Unified School District, Glendale, California. 

Mr. Guzman-Peterson focuses his teaching on a whole-child approach with emphasis on creating a welcoming, inclusive, and transformative classroom environment for all students. Teaching in urban communities, making meaningful connections with all stakeholders, and shaping school culture, drive Mr. Guzman-Peterson to continue learning, teaching, and leading in public education.

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5 thoughts on “school culture: a key aspect of positive and successful schools”.

A brilliant piece of work. I have adapted these strategic headings for mt professional development workshops and reading tjis makes me content because its in sync with your message 100%

  • Pingback: School Culture: A key aspect of positive and successful schools | Edify Education

So good to see you writing with your son, Kent. Wishing you good times in retirement. Bruce Barnett

Thanks for sharing. I read many of your blog posts, cool, your blog is very good. https://accounts.binance.com/it/register?ref=PORL8W0Z

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Improving School Culture for a Better Learning Environment

Infographic explaining how to improve school culture.

School culture is so much more than academic performance or happiness. It’s a complicated, hard-to-define measurement of institutional values, staff training and decision making, and daily behaviors. It’s more important than ever as the pandemic and other dynamics have challenged our educational system. 

To learn more, check out the infographic below, created by American University’s School of Education .

What Do We Mean by School Culture?

School culture has no easy definition, even though most educators agree on the importance of having a positive culture. School culture is sometimes referred to as school climate and it includes everyone: students, families, teachers, and support staff.

Why Does School Culture Matter?               

School culture matters because it can help improve quality of life. A strong school culture can help guard against the negative impacts of social media. It can increase students’ interest in learning, improve academic outcomes, reduce problematic and risky behavior, limit school suspensions, strengthen student-teacher relationships, and boost attendance rates.

Elements of school culture include how the school is structured, including its educational aims; the enjoyment and respect of school community members; and collaboration to develop a vision for the school. It also includes the involvement of the community in caring for the school; the satisfaction of its learners; respect for each person’s beliefs; and community values concerning what’s good, what’s bad, and what’s wrong. Behavior is also key, be it the expectations of student and staff behavior or actual student and staff behavior.

Measuring School Culture              

Across the country, school districts survey students, parents, and educators to understand how positive their school culture is. In elementary schools, surveys cover familial support; diversity; behaviors, both internal and external; how connected students and others feel; motivation to learn; relationships with classmates; and social skills, including caring for others.

In junior high, middle, and high schools, surveys cover mental health, including suicide; alcohol and drug use; physical activity levels; sexual behavior; academic support; engagement levels; and bullying and aggression. 

Teachers Are Key to Positive School Culture

Student performance is closely linked to teaching quality, which means teachers have an important role to play in creating a strong school culture. Unfortunately, in 2020, only 38 percent of teachers saw their profession in a positive light.

Nearly three-quarters of teachers surveyed said their students were struggling to meet existing emotional and social needs, while 58 percent worried about students having more social and emotional needs as a result of the pandemic, and 56 percent saw social and emotional needs as crucial for post-pandemic academic catch-up.

Return to In-Class Instruction a Positive Step             

However, teachers were positive about the return to in-class instruction, with 80 percent excited to teach and 75 percent believing their students will be more engaged as a result of being on-site.

Still, teachers have a tough job. They need to prepare the next generation of citizens for an uncertain future, and they can’t do that very well if they’re struggling. That means those looking to improve school culture need to understand the importance of choosing teachers; teacher accountability; and teaching quality, including attitude, practical skills, and motivation. This might be difficult since the United States is short on teachers.

Why A Positive School Culture Matters More Than Ever

Not all schools take the same approach to education, but experts tend to agree on at least two points. First, that positive school culture leads to positive outcomes, and second, that negative school culture leads to negative outcomes.

Not every educator or parent will agree on what makes a positive learning environment. Schools can be a microcosm for cultural debates more broadly. Some of the major current debates concern mask mandates (pandemic related), sports policies, teaching critical race theory, and transgender rights.

From teachers to parents to students, COVID-19 has had an impact on everyone involved in creating a positive school culture. Students, in particular, are now struggling with anger, separation issues, isolation, reduced ability to self-regulate, and a lack of socialization.

How to Establish and Reinforce a Positive School Culture             

Educators can take several steps to establish and reinforce positive school culture. They can start by getting everyone on board, discussing the specific school culture during the hiring process, and making space for professional development. Formal training is also a way to reinforce culture, embrace informal conversations, and encourage honesty.

Educators should communicate aims clearly and make sure that everyone knows what the school culture is, and why. They can give concrete examples, be positive, and make sure that everyone knows it’s a collective effort by using “we” statements.

They can also spread culture in visible ways by creating unique traditions, updating the school’s physical design, identifying symbolic objects, and ascertaining relevant mottoes. Ultimately, they need to encourage engagement by all. Connections are key, so they should identify those who aren’t connecting, figure out why not, and then adjust accordingly.

Strong school culture is key to making schools more constructive and instructive places; this is why some refer to school culture as “the hidden curriculum.” Better school culture doesn’t necessarily mean spending more money. Instead, it means building strong emotional and social connections that set students on the path to success. 

Cedarville University, “The Impact of School Culture Upon an Educational Institution”

Connecticut Association of Schools, “School Culture: ‘The Hidden Curriculum’”

Dinaric Perspectives on TIMSS 2019, “Teachers, Teaching and Student Achievement”

Education Week, “The Essential Traits of a Positive School Climate”

HMH, 7th Annual Educator Confidence Report

International Journal of Education , “The Effects of School Culture on Students Academic Achievements”

McKinsey & Company, “Teacher Survey: Learning Loss Is Global—and Significant”

National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, School Climate Measurement

Psychology Today , “Post-Pandemic School Culture and How to Navigate It”

The New York Times , “The School Culture Wars: ‘You Have Brought Division to Us’”

The Palgrave Handbook of Positive Education , “Teacher and Staff Wellbeing: Understanding the Experiences of School Staff”

The Washington Post, “School Environments Can Be Toxic. Why and How They Must Change”

U.S. Department of Education, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)

U.S. Department of Education, Fact Sheet: The U.S. Department of Education Announces Partnerships Across States, School Districts, and Colleges of Education to Meet Secretary Cardona’s Call to Action to Address the Teacher Shortage

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North American International School

Impact of School Culture on Student Development and Learning

importance of school culture essay

The culture within a school plays a vital role in shaping students’ educational experiences and outcomes. Often overlooked, school culture profoundly impacts everything from student achievement and teacher retention rates to a school’s sense of community. At North American International School (NAIS), we recognize that nurturing a positive school culture is as important as the curriculum . 

This blog post will explore why learning culture in schools matters. We’ll also look at the critical elements of a healthy culture and how to create an environment that brings out the best in students and teachers. When students feel safe, valued, and invested in their school community, it unlocks their potential inside and outside the classroom.

Defining School Culture

School culture refers to the beliefs, perceptions, relationships, attitudes, and written and unwritten rules that shape and influence every aspect of a school’s functions. It also encompasses more concrete issues such as the physical and emotional safety of students, the orderliness of classrooms, and the degree to which a school embraces and celebrates racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity.

School culture is often described as the character of a school. It’s the intangible “feel” when you walk through the doors, the impact of which is highly tangible. While every school has a culture, that culture can be intentionally shaped to facilitate high levels of learning. 

The Importance of School Culture

School culture profoundly influences students’ motivation to learn, teacher retention, educator collaboration, and almost every learning experience aspect. Some key reasons why school culture has such a significant impact include:

  • Sense of Belonging: When students feel welcomed, accepted, included, and supported, they are more likely to be engaged and take academic risks in the classroom. Positive relationships and belonging help meet students’ fundamental needs.
  • Safety & Trust: Physical and emotional safety are foundational learning needs. Bullying, discrimination, or a chaotic school environment inhibit learning. Trust between teachers, students, and families enables open communication, which supports students. 
  • Collaborative Spirit: Schools where teachers, administrators, and families work together as a team are likely to have a unified school culture focused on student-centered outcomes.
  • Diversity: Embracing and celebrating cultural diversity in schools fosters students’ abilities to collaborate across differences and prepares them to live and work in a multicultural world.
  • Growth Mindset: Students are motivated to persevere through challenges when the culture emphasizes effort, progress, and mastery over innate ability and high-stakes testing.

A school’s culture impacts everything within the building. Creating a positive school culture is one of the most effective ways to provide students with the best learning environment . 

The Role of Cultural Activities  

Cultural activities for schools are a valuable way to cultivate diversity, inclusion, and identity within their culture. Schools can incorporate cultural experiences into academic and extracurricular activities to expose students to new perspectives and unite the community. Cultural festivals like Diwali, Lunar New Year, and Día de los Muertos provide immersive experiences where students engage in traditions meaningful to their peers. International Days can highlight cuisines, fashions, music, and customs from cultures worldwide. These celebrations teach students about diverse backgrounds and validate multicultural representation within the student body.

Elements of a Positive School Culture

School culture is complex and multifaceted. While each school culture is unique, certain elements facilitate student learning in all settings. Here are some critical components for building a positive school culture:

Safe, Supportive Environment 

Students need to feel physically, socially, emotionally, and intellectually safe to engage in learning fully. This means classrooms, hallways, and common areas are orderly and well-supervised. Peer-to-peer connections are positive, and bullying is not tolerated. Teachers work to cultivate inclusion, celebrate diversity, and foster a growth mindset where students feel free to take academic risks without fear of embarrassment.

Trusting Relationships

Learning is a social process built on trusting relationships between students, teachers, and families. Teachers get to know students personally and show care for each learner. Healthy teacher-student and peer relationships create a team environment. Families are welcomed into the school community as valued partners in their children’s education.

Shared Mission & Vision

When all stakeholders work toward a shared, student-centered mission focused on high levels of learning for all students, school culture and learning outcomes improve. Collaboratively developing the vision can help build alignment, relationships, and accountability.

Positive Behavior Management

Consistent behavioral expectations, classroom management, and schoolwide systems of positive discipline and restorative practices help maintain a calm, orderly environment focused on learning.

Effective Leadership

School leaders and educators actively engage in teamwork to make decisions, promote a growth mindset, facilitate customized learning experiences, and prioritize inclusivity. They help shape school culture through the policies, programs, and priorities they establish and promote.

Meaningful Traditions 

From special events to the day-to-day routines, traditions build community and identity. They reflect what the community cares about, from honoring heritage and culture to promoting core values. Traditions engage students and give them a sense of belonging.

By intentionally cultivating these and other positive elements, schools can build a supportive school culture that meets the needs of our diverse community and empowers students to reach their full potential. 

Strategies to Develop School Culture

School culture affects diverse stakeholders, including students, teachers, administrators, families, and the wider community. Therefore, school culture development must utilize an inclusive process that brings people together around a shared vision and a sense of purpose. Here are several strategies NAIS uses to build a vibrant culture focused on student learning and development:

  • Form a Culture Committee: At NAIS, a team of representative stakeholders comes together to assess our current culture and make recommendations. Getting input from various voices ensures a comprehensive approach.
  • Focus Groups: We facilitate structured conversations to dive deeper into issues of culture. Focus groups shed light on stakeholders’ lived experiences and root causes of problems.
  • Develop Shared Vision & Values: Through an inclusive process, we created consensus statements that paint a picture of NAIS’s ideal culture and articulate core values that guide our work.
  • Define Expectations: Articulating norms of respectful behavior for classrooms and common areas, as well as modeling nurturing, equitable practices, helps maintain a positive culture.
  • Foster Diversity: NAIS celebrates cultural heritage months, equitable hiring practices, and diversity training to help build cultural competence and inclusion.
  • Community Building: From new student welcome ceremonies to inclusive school wide events, we bring people together across differences to form bonds centered on shared values.
  • Observe Classrooms: Seeing student engagement and teacher-student interactions provides insight into how culture affects learning and relationships at the classroom level.
  • Be Proactive: School culture is easier to maintain than repair. We monitor issues proactively and quickly intervene to resolve problems before they escalate.

By taking a holistic approach focused on our people, NAIS aims to create an empowering culture that allows students and educators to thrive.

School culture significantly impacts students’ education and well-being. Nurturing a positive culture with safety, trust, collaboration, and meaningful traditions is vital. Strategies like forming committees, fostering diversity, and proactive monitoring are crucial to building a thriving school culture that benefits everyone involved. At NAIS, we aim to create an empowering culture that enables both students and educators to thrive.

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Why School Culture Matters and Strategies to Improve It

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Why School Culture Matters

I recently read a quote by Dr. Joseph Murphy, Associate Dean at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of Education, which really spoke to me. He said, “Seeds of change will never grow in toxic soil. School culture matters.” This message has stuck with me for the past several weeks as I have reflected on the past school year and look to move forward towards the next. 

As I examined the issue of school culture, I wondered how one would define it. Over the past few weeks, I have formulated my own definition. School culture includes an atmosphere of mutual respect amongst all stakeholders where teaching and learning are valued; achievements and successes are celebrated, and where ongoing collaboration is the norm.   

Dr. Murphy is 100% correct in both of his assertions. First, school culture does matter.  When all stakeholders have the same goals and are on the same page, a school will flourish.  Unfortunately, toxic soil can keep those seeds from growing and in some cases create virtually irreparable damage.  Because of this school leaders must ensure that creating a healthy school culture is a priority.  Building a positive school culture starts with leadership. Leaders must be hands-on, willing to make personal sacrifices, and should work with people rather than working against them if they want to improve school culture. 

School culture is a mindset that can either be positive or negative. No one flourishes in constant negativity.  When negativity persists in a school culture, no one wants to come to school. This includes the administrators, teachers, and students. This type of environment is set up to fail. Individuals are just going through the motions trying to get through another week and eventually another year. No one prospers in this type of environment. It is not healthy, and educators should do everything they can to ensure that they never allow this mindset to creep in.

When positivity persists in a school culture, everyone thrives. Administrators, teachers, and students are generally happy to be there. Amazing things happen in a positive environment.  Student learning is enhanced. Teachers grow and improve . Administrators are more relaxed.  Everyone benefits from this type of environment.

School culture does matter. It should not be discounted. Over the past few weeks as I have reflected on this, I have come to believe that it may be the single most important factor for school success. If no one wants to be there, then ultimately a school will not be successful. However, if a positive, supporting school culture exists then the sky is the limit for how successful a school can be.

Now that we understand the importance of school culture, we must ask how to improve it. Fostering a positive school culture takes a lot of time and hard work.  It will not happen overnight. It is a difficult process that will likely come with immense growing pains.  Tough decisions will have to be made. This includes personnel decisions with those unwilling to buy into a change in school culture. Those who resist these changes are the “toxic soil” and until they are gone, the “seeds of change” will never firmly take hold.

Strategies to Improve School Culture

The following seven broad strategies can help guide the process of improving school culture. These strategies are written under the assumption that a leader is in place which seeks to change the culture of a school and is willing to work hard. It is important to note that many of these strategies will require modifications along the way. Every school has its own unique challenges and as such there is no perfect blueprint for refining school culture.  These general strategies are not the end all be all solution, but they can aid in the development of a positive school culture.

  • Create a team consisting of administrators, teachers, parents, and students to help shape changes to school culture. This team should develop a prioritized list of issues they believe harm to the overall school culture. In addition, they should brainstorm possible solutions for fixing those issues. Eventually, they should create a plan as well as a timeline for implementing the plan for turning around the school culture.
  • Administrators must surround themselves with like-minded teachers who fit the mission and vision the team has in place for establishing an effective school culture.  These teachers must be trustworthy professionals who will do their job and make positive contributions to the school environment.
  • It is important for teachers feel supported. Teachers who feel like their administrators have their backs are generally happy teachers, and they are more likely to operate a productive classroom.  Teachers should never question whether or not they are appreciated.  Building and maintaining teacher morale is one of the most important duties a school principal plays in fostering a positive school culture.  Teaching is a very difficult job, but it becomes easier when you work with a supportive administrator.
  • Students spend the largest amount of their time at school in the classroom. This makes teachers the most responsible for creating a positive school culture.  Teachers help this process through a variety of ways. First, they build trusting relationships with students . Next, they ensure that every student has an opportunity to learn the required material. Additionally, they figure out a way to make learning fun so that students keep wanting to come back to their class. Finally, they show a vested interest in each student in a variety of ways including attending extracurricular activities, engaging in conversations about interests/hobbies, and being there for a student when they are having a hard time.
  • Collaboration is critical to developing a positive school culture.  Collaboration enriches the overall teaching and learning experience. Collaboration builds lasting relationships. Collaboration can challenge us and make us better. Collaboration is essential in helping a school truly become a community of learners. Collaboration must be ongoing between every stakeholder within the school. Everyone should have a voice.
  • To establish an effective school culture, you must consider every little nuance in a school. Ultimately, everything contributes to the overall culture of a school. This includes school security , the quality of the food in the cafeteria, the friendliness of the main office staff when there are visitors or when answering the phones, the cleanliness of the school, the maintenance of the grounds, etc.  Everything should be evaluated and changed as necessary.
  • Extra-curricular programs can foster an immense amount of school pride.  Schools must offer a well-balanced assortment of programs to give every student an opportunity to be involved.  This includes a mixture of both athletic and non-athletic programs.  Coaches and sponsors responsible for these programs must provide the participants with everyone opportunity to be successful Programs and individuals within these programs should be recognized for their accomplishments.  Ultimately, if you have a positive school culture, every stakeholder feels a sense of pride when one of these programs or individuals is successful.
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  • TESS-India: Key resources
  • Key resources (complete)
  • Planning lessons
  • Involving all
  • Talk for learning
  • Using pair work
  • Using questioning to promote thinking
  • Monitoring and giving feedback
  • Using groupwork
  • Assessing progress and performance
  • Using local resources
  • Storytelling, songs, role play and drama
  • Compendium for teacher development
  • School–home communication
  • TI-AIE: School–home communication
  • A language-rich classroom
  • TI-AIE: A language-rich classroom
  • Speaking and listening
  • TI-AIE: Speaking and listening
  • Early reading
  • TI-AIE: Early reading
  • Storytelling
  • TI-AIE: Storytelling
  • Reading for pleasure
  • TI-AIE: Reading for pleasure
  • Reading for information
  • TI-AIE: Reading for information
  • Knowing and using children's literature
  • TI-AIE: Knowing and using children’s literature
  • Knowing and using children’s literature
  • Authentic writing
  • TI-AIE: Authentic writing
  • TI-AIE: Using local resources
  • Language, literacy and citizenship
  • TI-AIE: Language, literacy and citizenship
  • Multilingualism in the classroom
  • TI-AIE: Multilingualism in the classroom
  • Pair work for language and literacy
  • TI-AIE: Pair work for language and literacy
  • Integrating language, literacy and subject learning
  • TI-AIE: Integrating language, literacy and subject learning
  • Monitoring, assessment and feedback
  • TI-AIE: Monitoring, assessment and feedback
  • Acknowledgements
  • Elementary Language and Literacy acknowledgements
  • Classroom routines
  • TI-AIE: Classroom routines
  • Songs, rhymes and word play
  • TI-AIE: Songs, rhymes and word play
  • Letters and sounds of English
  • TI-AIE: Letters and sounds of English
  • Mark-making and early writing
  • TI-AIE: Mark-making and early writing
  • Shared reading
  • TI-AIE: Shared reading
  • Planning around a text
  • TI-AIE: Planning around a text
  • Promoting the reading environment
  • TI-AIE: Promoting the reading environment
  • English and subject content integration
  • TI-AIE: English and subject content integration
  • Using the textbook creatively
  • TI-AIE: Using the textbook creatively
  • Learning English in the creative arts
  • TI-AIE: Learning English in the creative arts
  • The learning environment
  • TI-AIE: The learning environment
  • Developing and monitoring reading
  • TI-AIE: Developing and monitoring reading
  • Developing and monitoring writing
  • TI-AIE: Developing and monitoring writing
  • Community resources for English
  • TI-AIE: Community resources for English
  • Elementary English acknowledgements
  • Local resources for teaching English
  • TI-AIE: Local resources for teaching English
  • Using more English in your classroom
  • TI-AIE: Using more English in your classroom
  • Building your students' confidence to speak English
  • TI-AIE: Building your students' confidence to speak English
  • Supporting reading for understanding
  • TI-AIE: Supporting reading for understanding
  • Whole-class reading routines
  • TI-AIE: Whole-class reading routines
  • Supporting independent writing in English
  • TI-AIE: Supporting independent writing in English
  • Whole-class writing routines
  • TI-AIE: Whole-class writing routines
  • Strategies for teaching listening
  • TI-AIE: Strategies for teaching listening
  • Supporting speaking in English: pair and groupwork
  • TI-AIE: Supporting speaking in English: pair and groupwork
  • English grammar in action
  • TI-AIE: English grammar in action
  • Strategies for teaching vocabulary
  • TI-AIE: Strategies for teaching vocabulary
  • Promoting reading for pleasure
  • TI-AIE: Promoting reading for pleasure
  • Supporting language learning through formative assessment
  • TI-AIE: Supporting language learning through formative assessment
  • Developing your English
  • TI-AIE: Developing your English
  • Using resources beyond the textbook
  • TI-AIE: Using resources beyond the textbook
  • Secondary English acknowledgements
  • Using number games: developing number sense
  • TI-AIE: Using number games: developing number sense
  • Using structured resources to develop understanding: place value
  • TI-AIE: Using structured resources to develop understanding: place value
  • Using a number line and the expression 'Imagine if ...': positive and negative numbers
  • TI-AIE: Using a number line and the expression ‘Imagine if …’: positive and negative numbers
  • Mathematical stories: word problems
  • TI-AIE: Mathematical stories: word problems
  • Asking questions that challenge thinking: fractions
  • TI-AIE: Asking questions that challenge thinking: fractions
  • Making students believe they CAN do mathematics: operations on fractions
  • TI-AIE: Making students believe they CAN do mathematics: operations on fractions
  • Using manipulatives: decomposition and regrouping
  • TI-AIE: Using manipulatives: decomposition and regrouping
  • Using real-life contexts: the formal division algorithm
  • TI-AIE: Using real-life contexts: the formal division algorithm
  • Comparing and contrasting tasks: volume and capacity
  • TI-AIE: Comparing and contrasting tasks: volume and capacity
  • Using rich tasks: area and perimeter
  • TI-AIE: Using rich tasks: area and perimeter
  • Physical representation in mathematics: handling data
  • TI-AIE: Physical representation in mathematics: handling data
  • Learning through talking: variables and constants
  • TI-AIE: Learning through talking: variables and constants
  • Conjecturing and generalising in mathematics: introducing algebra
  • TI-AIE: Conjecturing and generalising in mathematics: introducing algebra
  • Using embodiment, manipulative and real-life examples: teaching about angles
  • TI-AIE: Using embodiment, manipulatives and real-life examples: teaching about angles
  • Creative thinking in mathematics: proportional reasoning
  • TI-AIE: Creative thinking in mathematics: proportional reasoning
  • Elementary Maths acknowledgements
  • Using visualisation: algebraic identities
  • TI-AIE: Using visualisation: algebraic identities
  • Developing mathematical reasoning: mathematical proof
  • TI-AIE: Developing mathematical reasoning: mathematical proof
  • Visualising, comparing and contrasting: number systems
  • TI-AIE: Visualising, comparing and contrasting: number systems
  • Connecting mathematics: finding factors and multiples
  • TI-AIE: Connecting mathematics: finding factors and multiples
  • Building mathematical resilience: similarity and congruency in triangles
  • TI-AIE: Building mathematical resilience: similarity and congruency in triangles
  • Cooperative learning and mathematical talk: triangles
  • TI-AIE: Cooperative learning and mathematical talk: triangles
  • Creating contexts for abstract mathematics: equations
  • TI-AIE: Creating contexts for abstract mathematics: equations
  • Enacting vocabulary and asking questions: exploring the circle
  • TI-AIE: Enacting vocabulary and asking questions: exploring the circle
  • Hands-on learning and embodiment: constructions in geometry
  • TI-AIE: Hands-on learning and embodiment: constructions in geometry
  • Tackling mathematical anxiety: combination shapes and solids
  • TI-AIE: Tackling mathematical anxiety: combination shapes and solids
  • Learning from misconceptions: algebraic expressions
  • TI-AIE: Learning from misconceptions: algebraic expressions
  • Developing creative thinking in mathematics: trigonometry
  • TI-AIE: Developing creative thinking in mathematics: trigonometry
  • Reading, writing and modelling mathematics: word problems
  • TI-AIE: Reading, writing and modelling mathematics: word problems
  • Thinking mathematically: estimation
  • TI-AIE: Thinking mathematically: estimation
  • Developing stories: understanding graphs
  • TI-AIE: Developing stories: understanding graphs
  • Secondary Maths acknowledgements
  • Brainstorming: sound
  • TI-AIE: Brainstorming: sound
  • Pair work: life processes
  • TI-AIE: Pair work: life processes
  • Using groupwork: floating and sinking
  • TI-AIE: Using groupwork: floating and sinking
  • Using demonstration: food
  • TI-AIE: Using demonstration: food
  • Concept mapping: water
  • TI-AIE: Concept mapping: water
  • Teacher’s questioning: forces
  • TI-AIE: Teacher’s questioning: forces
  • Pupils’ questioning: sorting and classifying things
  • TI-AIE: Pupils’ questioning: sorting and classifying things
  • Observing patterns: shadows and night & day
  • TI-AIE: Observing patterns: shadows and night & day
  • Practical investigation: change
  • TI-AIE: Practical investigation: change
  • Using stories: environment
  • TI-AIE: Using stories: environment
  • Using games: electricity
  • TI-AIE: Using games: electricity
  • Alternative conceptions: heat and temperature
  • TI-AIE: Alternative conceptions: heat and temperature
  • Developing the learning environment
  • TI-AIE: Developing the learning environment
  • Discussion in science: malnutrition
  • TI-AIE: Discussion in science: malnutrition
  • Using the community: environmental issues
  • TI-AIE: Using the community: environmental issues
  • Elementary Science acknowledgements
  • Pair work: atoms and molecules, and chemical reactions
  • TI-AIE: Pair work: atoms and molecules, and chemical reactions
  • Reading in the science classroom : heredity and evolution
  • TI-AIE: Reading in the science classroom: heredity and evolution
  • Reading in the science classroom: heredity and evolution
  • Mind mapping and concept mapping: acids, bases and salts
  • TI-AIE: Mind mapping and concept mapping: acids, bases and salts
  • Using local resources: life processes
  • TI-AIE: Using local resources: life processes
  • Community approaches: science education and environmental issues
  • TI-AIE: Community approaches: science education and environmental issues
  • Using games: the Periodic Table
  • TI-AIE: Using games: the Periodic Table
  • Questioning: why do we fall ill?
  • TI-AIE: Questioning: why do we fall ill?
  • Language in the science classroom: cells
  • TI-AIE: Language in the science classroom: cells
  • Probing understanding: work and energy
  • TI-AIE: Probing understanding: work and energy
  • Using physical models: teaching electricity to Class X
  • TI-AIE: Using physical models: teaching electricity to Class X
  • Brainstorming: forces and laws of motion
  • TI-AIE: Brainstorming: forces and laws of motion
  • Building mental models: teaching carbon and its compounds to Class X
  • TI-AIE: Building mental models: teaching carbon and its compounds to Class X
  • Practical work and investigations: teaching gravitation to Class IX
  • TI-AIE: Practical work and investigations: teaching gravitation to Class IX
  • Effective demonstrations: teaching light and vision to Class X
  • TI-AIE: Effective demonstrations: teaching light and vision to Class X
  • Effective project work: sources of energy
  • TI-AIE: Effective project work: sources of energy
  • Secondary Science acknowledgements
  • Orientation
  • TI-AIE: Orientation: the elementary school leader as enabler
  • Orientation: the elementary school leader as enabler
  • TI-AIE: Orientation: the secondary school leader as enabler
  • Orientation: the secondary school leader as enabler
  • Perspective on leadership
  • TI-AIE: Perspective on leadership: leading the school’s self-review
  • Perspective on leadership: leading the school’s self-review
  • TI-AIE: Perspective on leadership: leading the school development plan
  • Perspective on leadership: leading the school development plan
  • TI-AIE: Perspective on leadership: using data on diversity to improve your school
  • Perspective on leadership: using data on diversity to improve your school
  • TI-AIE: Perspective on leadership: planning and leading change in your school
  • Perspective on leadership: planning and leading change in your school
  • TI-AIE: Perspective on leadership: implementing change in your school
  • Perspective on leadership: implementing change in your school
  • TI-AIE: Perspective on leadership: building a shared vision for your school
  • Perspective on leadership: building a shared vision for your school
  • Managing and developing self
  • TI-AIE: Managing and developing self: managing and developing yourself
  • Managing and developing self: managing and developing yourself
  • Transforming teaching-learning process
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: leading improvements in teaching and learning in the elementary school
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: leading improvements in teaching and learning in the elementary school
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: leading improvements in teaching and learning in the secondary school
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: leading improvements in teaching and learning in the secondary school
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: leading assessment in your school
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: leading assessment in your school
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: leading teachers’ professional development
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: leading teachers’ professional development
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: supporting teachers to raise performance
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: supporting teachers to raise performance
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: mentoring and coaching
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: mentoring and coaching
  • What this unit is about

What school leaders can learn in this unit

1 What is school culture and how does it impact on learning?

2 Styles of school leadership

  • 3 Identifying and analysing the culture in your school
  • 4 Developing a positive shared culture
  • Resource 1: Plan of action
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: developing an effective learning culture in your school
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: promoting inclusion in your school
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: promoting inclusion in your school
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: managing resources for effective student learning
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: managing resources for effective student learning
  • TI-AIE: Transforming teaching-learning process: leading the use of technology in your school
  • Transforming teaching-learning process: leading the use of technology in your school
  • Leading partnerships
  • TI-AIE: Leading partnerships: engaging with parents and the wider school community
  • Leading partnerships: engaging with parents and the wider school community
  • School Leadership acknowledgements
  • TI-AIE: TESS-India Video Resources
  • TI-AIE: TESS-India School Leadership Video Resources
  • TESS-India OER title list
  • TESS-India Subject Frameworks
  • TESS-India Key Resources and Video Resources mapping matrix
  • TESS-India Video Script titles
  • TESS-India Localisation Handbook
  • TESS-India MOOC Facilitation Guide
  • TESS-India Consultant Orientation Handbook (Draft)
  • Academic mentoring
  • Action research
  • Facilitating teachers' meetings
  • Networks: effective professional development for educational change
  • Reflection in education
  • Running an effective participatory interactive workshop
  • Engaging students
  • Focusing on examination results
  • Improving attendance
  • Dealing with large multi-grade classes
  • Motivating teachers
  • Speaking English with confidence
  • Supporting school leaders in motivating teacher change in their schools
  • Teacher development meetings
  • Teaching student teachers
  • Teaching multilingual classes
  • Using English in everyday life
  • Working with elementary Maths teachers

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TESS-India: All India Resources (in English)

TESS-India: All India Resources (in English)

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A school that is able to develop and maintain a positive shared culture knows what aspects of the culture are important in developing an effective learning environment; it consciously transmits these values to its students. Through collective awareness and action, culture can be used positively in order to enhance student learning and achievement, whether through small actions such as celebrating achievements in public events, or to more large-scale projects such as developing democratic processes for teachers, students and other stakeholders to contribute to curriculum reform.

While it appears to be constant , culture is a dynamic space that is influenced by laws, policies and changes of leadership. It therefore requires school leaders to be aware of what influences or changes aspects of the school culture, whether deliberately or not, and ensuring that the culture for learning and achievement are never put at risk. Research demonstrates that school leaders have a critical role in ensuring that the culture supports student achievement (MacNeil et al., 2009). But – as identified by Bulach (2001) – a leader must identify a school’s existing culture before attempting to change it.

A positive school culture can be defined broadly to include (Character Education Partnership, 2010):

  • social climate , including a safe and caring environment in which all students feel welcomed and valued, and have a sense of ownership of their school; this helps students in their moral development
  • intellectual climate , in which all students in every classroom are supported and challenged to do their very best and achieve work of quality; this includes a rich, rigorous and engaging curriculum, and a powerful pedagogy for teaching it
  • rules and policies that hold all school members accountable to high standards of learning and behaviour
  • traditions and routines built from shared values that honour and reinforce the school’s academic and social standards
  • structures for giving staff and students a voice in, and shared responsibility for, solving problems and making decisions that affect the school environment and their common life
  • ways of effectively working with parents to support students’ learning and character growth
  • norms for relationships and behaviours that create a professional culture of excellence and ethical practice.
Figure 2 Does your school have a positive school culture?

This definition covers the breadth of school life, both academic and social. However, every bullet point can be seen to have a direct impact on student learning, whether it is through developing a culture of excellence, or ensuring that students feel safe and listened to. The National Curriculum Framework (NCF) recognises this by stating that ‘schools have a major role to play in ensuring that children are socialised into a culture of self-reliance, resourcefulness, peace-oriented values and health’ (2005, p. 35).

The NCF mentions the conscious creation of a culture that has a long-term, developmental impact, stating that ‘children cannot wake up one morning and know how to participate in, preserve and enhance a democracy, especially if they have had no prior personal or even second-hand experience of it, nor any role models to learn from’. It specifically mentions the importance of:

  • a culture of reading
  • a culture of innovation, curiosity and practical experience
  • highlighting students’ identities as ‘learners’ and creating an environment that enhances the potential and interests of each student
  • messages that convey interpersonal relations, teacher attitudes, and norms and values that are part of the culture of the school.

More recently, Section 17 of the Right to Education Act 2009 (RtE) is of particular significance in the context of developing a positive school culture, because it states that ‘no child shall be subjected to physical punishment or mental harassment’. This calls for the school leader to focus on making the school an enabling and facilitative place for all school children, thereby providing a stress-free, child-friendly, learner-centred classroom environment, which requires redefining notions of discipline, punishment and student–teacher relationships. Further, the National Programme Design and Curriculum Framework (2014) highlights the need to empower and develop the capabilities of the school leader so that the transformed school proactively nurtures children and facilitates their all-round development.

Before understanding the role of school leaders in establishing, modelling and sharing their vision of a positive school culture, it is necessary to consider how different aspects of the culture are enacted in schools. Activity 1 will help you to consider your own understanding of school culture in relation to the Character Education Partnership (CEP) definition above.

Activity 1: Identifying examples of positive school culture

Look again at the seven bullet points listed above in the CEP definition of school culture. For each bullet point, write down in your Learning Diary two examples of how this might be reflected to your school.

For each example you have listed, justify how it would have a positive impact on student learning.

You will have naturally drawn on examples from your own experience, and will maybe have thought of examples of practice that you feel your school should aim to implement. You may notice that the examples you have thought of range from something as small as all teachers saying good morning to students as they enter classrooms, to something more substantial such as changing the classroom pedagogy .

The examples you thought of for Activity 1 are likely to be context-specific. Table 1 lists some generic ideas to help you think through the broad range of practical elements that might contribute to a school culture.

Having considered the multi-faceted nature of what is meant by a school’s culture, it should be clear that there is very little that does not have an impact on how staff and students experience the school and affect the learning that takes place. As a school leader, this includes the way you lead and manage the staff, how you communicate your vision of the school’s development, and the relationships and interactions you have with staff, students and stakeholders.

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

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  9. 1 What is school culture and how does it impact on learning?

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  13. PDF A Culture of Success—Examining School Culture and Student Outcomes via

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    The term school culture generally refers to the beliefs, perceptions, relationships, attitudes, and written and unwritten rules that shape and influence every aspect of how a school functions, but the term also encompasses more concrete issues such as the physical and emotional safety of students, the orderliness of classrooms and public spaces, or the degree […]

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    The essays in this issue of Paedagogica Historica are not consistent in their conceptualisations. That inconsistency is a virtue, because it points to the extraordinary range of historical phenomena that may be included in discussions of education and culture. ... Another important element of culture is religion. Robyn Sneath's paper won the ...

  19. The importance of school culture in supporting student mental health in

    This paper adds to existing knowledge by focusing on the importance of school culture in creating an environment in which student MH is privileged. Through the use of a systems-based approach (Rudasill et al., 2018 ), it reflects the complex factors which influence both the ways school culture is experienced and how this ultimately impacts on ...

  20. The Importance Of Positive School Culture

    Research The Importance Of Positive School Culture The Importance Of Positive School Culture Better Essays 1230 Words 5 Pages Open Document Some of the best education and successful schools are centered around a positive school environment that provides opportunities for students to learn and grow at rigorous instructional levels.

  21. The Importance Of School Culture

    The Importance Of School Culture 1388 Words 6 Pages School Culture flows from the traditions, goals, values, vision, and motto of a school system. Culture is the elastic that binds students, teachers, support staff and administrators together and it has a profound impact on the learning environment.

  22. Mastering the Importance of Culture Essay: Pro Tips, Examples, and

    10.04.2022 Every student exploring cultural and other social studies may face the task of writing a thematic essay. This type of educational activity is an independent reflection of a person on a scientific problem, using ideas, cultural backgrounds, associative images from other areas of their own culture, personal experience, and social practice.

  23. The Importance Of School Culture

    As Peterson, K. D., & Deal, T. E. (1999) mentioned, "School culture influences what people pay attention to (focus), how they identify with the school (commitment), how hard they work ( motivation ), and the degree to which they achieve their goals (productivity)…"