• Skip to Nav
  • Skip to Main
  • Skip to Footer

Landmark College

How to Use Oral Presentations to Help English Language Learners Succeed

Please try again

presentation second language learning

Excerpted from “ The ELL Teacher’s Toolbox: Hundreds of Practical Ideas to Support Your Students ,” by Larry Ferlazzo and Katie Hull Sypnieski, with permission from the authors.

Having the confidence to speak in front of others is challenging for most people. For English Language Learners, this anxiety can be heightened because they are also speaking in a new language. We’ve found several benefits to incorporating opportunities for students to present to their peers in a positive and safe classroom environment. It helps them focus on pronunciation and clarity and also boosts their confidence. This type of practice is useful since students will surely have to make presentations in other classes, in college, and/or in their future jobs. However, what may be even more valuable is giving students the chance to take these risks in a collaborative, supportive environment.

Presentations also offer students the opportunity to become the teacher—something we welcome and they enjoy! They can further provide valuable listening practice for the rest of the class, especially when students are given a task to focus their listening.

Research confirms that in order for ELLs to acquire English they must engage in oral language practice and be given the opportunity to use language in meaningful ways for social and academic purposes (Williams & Roberts, 2011). Teaching students to design effective oral presentations has also been found to support thinking development as “the quality of presentation actually improves the quality of thought, and vice versa” (Živković, 2014, p. 474). Additionally, t he Common Core Speaking and Listening Standards specifically focus on oral presentations. These standards call for students to make effective and well-organized presentations and to use technology to enhance understanding of them.

GUIDELINES AND APPLICATION

Oral presentations can take many different forms in the ELL classroom—ranging from students briefly presenting their learning in small groups to creating a multi-slide presentation for the whole class. In this section, we give some general guidelines for oral presentations with ELLs. We then share ideas for helping students develop their presentation skills and describe specific ways we scaffold both short and long oral presentations.

We keep the following guidelines in mind when incorporating oral presentations into ELL instruction:

presentation second language learning

Length —We have students develop and deliver short presentations (usually 2-4 minutes) on a regular basis so they can practice their presentation skills with smaller, less overwhelming tasks. These presentations are often to another student or a small group. Once or twice a semester, students do a longer presentation (usually 5-8 minutes), many times with a partner or in a small group.

Novelty —Mixing up how students present (in small groups, in pairs, individually) and what they use to present (a poster, a paper placed under the document camera, props, a slide presentation, etc.) can increase engagement for students and the teacher!

Whole Class Processing -- We want to avoid students “tuning out” during oral presentations. Not only can it be frustrating for the speakers, but students also miss out on valuable listening practice. During oral presentations, and in any activity, we want to maximize the probability that all students are thinking and learning all the time. Jim Peterson and Ted Appel, administrators with whom we’ve worked closely, call this “whole class processing” (Ferlazzo, 2011, August 16) and it is also known as active participation. All students can be encouraged to actively participate in oral presentations by being given a listening task-- taking notes on a graphic organizer, providing written feedback to the speaker, using a checklist to evaluate presenters, etc.

Language Support —It is critical to provide ELLs, especially at the lower levels of English proficiency, with language support for oral presentations. In other words, thinking about what vocabulary, language features and organizational structures they may need, and then providing students with scaffolding, like speaking frames and graphic organizers. Oral presentations can also provide an opportunity for students to practice their summarizing skills. When students are presenting information on a topic they have researched, we remind them to summarize using their own words and to give credit when using someone else’s words.

Technology Support —It can’t be assumed that students have experience using technology tools in presentations. We find it most helpful using simple tools that are easy for students to learn (like Powerpoint without all the “bells and whistles” or Google Slides). We also emphasize to students that digital media should be used to help the audience understand what they are saying and not just to make a presentation flashy or pretty. We also share with our students what is known as “The Picture Superiority Effect”-- a body of research showing that people are better able to learn and recall information presented as pictures as opposed to just being presented with words (Kagan, 2013).

Groups -- Giving ELLs the opportunity to work and present in small groups is helpful in several ways. Presenting as a group (as opposed to by yourself) can help students feel less anxious. It also offers language-building opportunities as students communicate to develop and practice their presentations. Creating new knowledge as a group promotes collaboration and language acquisition--an ideal equation for a successful ELL classroom!

Teacher feedback/student evaluation --The focus of oral presentations with ELL students should be on the practice and skills they are gaining, not on the grade or “score” they are earning. Teachers can give out a simple rubric before students create their presentations. Then students can keep these expectations in mind as they develop and practice their presentations. The teacher, or classmates, can then use the rubric to offer feedback to the speaker. We also often ask students to reflect on their own presentation and complete the rubric as a form of self-assessment. Figure 30.1 – “Presentation Peer Evaluation Rubric” , developed by talented student teacher Kevin Inlay (who is now a teacher in his own classroom), is a simple rubric we used to improve group presentations in our ELL World History class.

presentation second language learning

Teaching Presentation Skills

We use the following two lesson ideas to explicitly teach how to develop effective presentation skills:

LESSON ONE: Speaking and Listening Do’s and Don’ts

We help our students understand and practice general presentation skills through an activity we call Speaking and Listening “Do’s and Don’ts.” We usually spread this lesson out among two class periods.

We first ask students to create a simple T-chart by folding a piece of paper in half and labeling one side “Do” and the other side “Don’t.” We then post Figure 30.2 “Speaking Do’s and Don’ts” on the document camera and display the first statement (the rest we cover with a blank sheet of paper).

We read the first statement, “Make eye contact with the audience,” and ask students if this is something they want to do when they are giving a presentation or if it is something they don’t want to do. Students write the statement where they think it belongs--under the “Do” column or “Don’t” Column. Students then share their answer with a partner and discuss why they put it in that column. After calling on a few pairs to share with the class, we move down the list repeating the same process of categorizing each statement as a “Do” or a “Don’t.” Students write it on their chart and discuss why it should be placed there.

After categorizing the statements for speaking, we give students Figure 30.3 “Listening Do’s and Don’ts .” We tell students to work in pairs to categorize the statements as something they do or something they don’t want to do when listening to a student presentation. This time, we ask students to make a quick poster with the headings “Do’s” and “Don’ts” for Listening. Under each heading students must list the corresponding statements--the teacher can circulate to check for accuracy. Students are asked to talk about why each statement belongs in each category and should be prepared to share their reasoning with the class. Students must also choose one “do” statement and one “don’t” statement to illustrate on their poster. Students can present their posters in small groups or with the whole class. This serves as a great opportunity to apply the speaking and listening “do’s” they just reviewed and heightens their awareness of the “don’ts!”

presentation second language learning

A fun twist, that also serves as a good review on a subsequent day, is to ask groups of students to pick two or three “do’s” and “don’ts” from both Speaking and Listening to act out in front of the class.

LESSON TWO Slide Presentations Concept Attainment

We periodically ask students to make slide presentations using PowerPoint or Google Slides to give them practice with developing visual aids (see the Home Culture activity later in this section). We show students how to make better slides, along with giving students the language support they may need in the form of an outline or sentence starters. An easy and effective way to do this is through Concept Attainment.

Concept Attainment involves the teacher identifying both "good" and "bad" examples of the intended learning objective. In this case, we use a PowerPoint containing three “good” slides and three “bad” ones (see them at The Best Resources For Teaching Students The Difference Between A Good and a Bad Slide ).

We start by showing students the first example of a “good” or “yes” slide (containing very little text and two images) and saying, “This is a yes.” However, we don’t explain why it is a “yes.” Then we show a “bad” or “no” example of a slide (containing multiple images randomly placed with a very “busy background”), saying, “This is a no” without explaining why. Students are then asked to think about them, and share with a partner why they think one is a "yes" and one is a "no."

At this point, we make a quick chart on a large sheet of paper (students can make individual charts on a piece of paper) and ask students to list the good and bad qualities they have observed so far. For example, under the “Good/Yes” column it might say “Has less words and the background is simple” and under the “Bad/No” column “Has too many pictures and the background is distracting.”

We then show the second “yes” example (containing one image with a short amount of text in a clear font) and the “no” example (containing way too much text and using a less clear font style). Students repeat the “think-pair-share” process and then the class again discusses what students are noticing about the “yes” and “no” examples. Then they add these observations to their chart.

Students repeat the whole process a final time with the third examples. The third “yes” example slide contains one image, minimal text and one bullet point. The third “no” example, on the other hand, contains multiple bullet points.

To reinforce this lesson at a later date, the teacher could show students more examples, or students could look for more “yes” and “no” examples online. They could continue to add more qualities of good and bad slides to their chart. See the Technology Connections section for links to good and bad PowerPoint examples, including the PowerPoint we use for this Concept Attainment lesson.

You can learn more about other presentations that support public speaking, such as home culture presentations, speed dating, talking points, top 5 and PechaKucha Book talks in our book, “ The ELL Teacher’s Toolbox: Hundreds of Practical Ideas to Support Your Students .”

presentation second language learning

Larry Ferlazzo has taught English Language Learners, mainstream and International Baccalaureate students at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento for 15 years. He has authored eight books on education, hosts a popular blog for educators, and  writes a weekly teacher advice column for Education Week Teacher .  He was a community organizer for 19 years prior to becoming a high school teacher.

presentation second language learning

Katie Hull Sypnieski has worked with English Language Learners at the secondary level for over 20 years.  She currently teaches middle school ELA and ELD at Rosa Parks K-8 School in Sacramento, California. She is a teaching consultant with the Area 3 Writing Project at the University of California, Davis and has leads professional development for teachers of ELLs. She is co-author (with Larry Ferlazzo) of The ESL/ELL Teacher’s Survival Guide and Navigating the Common Core with English Language Learners .

Academia.edu no longer supports Internet Explorer.

To browse Academia.edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to  upgrade your browser .

Enter the email address you signed up with and we'll email you a reset link.

  • We're Hiring!
  • Help Center

paper cover thumbnail

Explaining Second Language Learning

Profile image of Xayapheth Chaphichith

This is the slide presentation on explaining second language learning for master students in Teaching English as a Foreign Language Programme. Department of English Faculty of Letters National University of Laos

Related Papers

The Modern Language Journal

presentation second language learning

Claudia Gutierrez

Applied Linguistics

This book, a follow-up to the editors’ successful guide to second language (L2) teacher education (Burns and Richards 2009), is a clear and concise introduction to the research and scholarship across 36 topics related to learning English as an L2. Although the title indicates that the focus is on English, because many of the authors discuss L2 learning and second language acquisition (SLA) more generally, the book should find an audience with scholars who are interested in research on learning other languages as well.

Alexandria, VA: TESOL Press. ISBN 978-1-945351-04-4

Michael Lessard-Clouston

Second Language Acquisition Applied to English Language Teaching offers teachers of English language learners an overview of second language acquisition (SLA) theory while allowing readers to reflect on their own classroom practices. It defines SLA, outlines how it helps teachers understand their roles and those of learners in their classes, and introduces major concepts and issues. The book argues that input, output, and interaction are essential for English language learning and teaching, and touches on questions of age, anxiety, and error correction. Finally, SLA Applied to ELT encourages readers to use teaching materials that reflect SLA principles and explains what the field of SLA offers practicing English teachers, including encouragement. The book is written in a straightforward, easy-to read style, complete with reflection questions so that busy teachers can apply what they are reading to their own classroom teaching. As such, it’s a must have for any teacher who wants to understand student learning better so that they can teach their English language students effectively. [Note: The attached file includes the Table of Contents and a sample of Ch. 5.]

Lina Mukhopadhyay

Course Description The course will begin with a historical perspective on English Language Education (also commonly referred to as English Language Teaching) from ancient days of teaching the language like other classical languages as Greek and Latin up to the 21 st century trends. Basic principles and procedures of the most recognized and commonly used approaches and methods for teaching English as a second (or a foreign language) will be presented. These are the Grammar Translation Method, Direct Method, Audio-Lingual Method, Communicative Language Teaching, Content-Based Instruction and other alternative approaches. Each approach or method will be discussed in terms of their theoretical orientation, teaching practices and learning activities designed to reach the specified teaching goals and learning outcomes. Candidates will examine and analyze the teaching methods and compare whether the methods reflect similar or opposing views of language learning principles. Through course readings and sample video lessons, candidates will reflect on what constitutes language use, and the role of teacher and learners in each of the teaching methodologies. The analysis will help them to gain a fuller understanding of the principles and practices behind the choices teachers make regarding particular methods. In all, the course will enable learners to look for the rationale for the different techniques that have been used in the course of language teaching history and learn to critique the practices and materials designed to teach English and many unresolved issues in the domain. The course will not espouse any particular approach to second language teaching but rather present an overview of the many approaches to teaching second and foreign languages.

Syeda Bukhari

Lazaros Kikidis

Mark Feng Teng

Firda Bachmid

Language and Education

Nicole Ziegler

RELATED PAPERS

TANIA AGGELOPOULOU

Rauf G. Muradov

Revista Internacional de Ciencias Podológicas

Luis Lopez B

Acta Mechanica Sinica

Qingping SUN

Biophysical Journal

PRANAV GARG

Dimasejati: Jurnal Pengabdian Kepada Masyarakat

Rifal Rifal

The Neuroradiology Journal

José Jordan

Nikos Saratzis

Progress of Theoretical Physics Supplement

Ichiro Tsuda

European Journal of Physical Education and Sport Science

Fotis Mavrovouniotis

Claude Mangion

Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy

Ayman Attya

The Turkish Journal of Gastroenterology

kadir öztürk

Food chemistry

Nilesh Nirmal

Zdeněk Koudelka

Olufemi Babatunde

Scientific Reports

Reena Ghildyal

Jurnal Samudra Ekonomi dan Bisnis

rohmat hidayat

Revista iberoamericana de educación (Impresa)

Yaritza GARCES DELGADO

Middle East Journal of Age and Ageing

HASAN I SUBAI

RELATED TOPICS

  •   We're Hiring!
  •   Help Center
  • Find new research papers in:
  • Health Sciences
  • Earth Sciences
  • Cognitive Science
  • Mathematics
  • Computer Science
  • Academia ©2024

Book cover

Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning pp 2980–2983 Cite as

Second Language Learning

  • Angelika Rieder-Bünemann 2  
  • Reference work entry

1915 Accesses

Foreign language learning ; L2 acquisition ; Second language acquisition

Second language learning (SLL) is concerned with the process and study of how people acquire a second language, which is often referred to as L2 or target language, as opposed to L1 (the native language). Generally, the term second language in this context can refer to any language (also a third or fourth language) learned in addition to the native language. However, second language learning would be contrasted with a bilingual learning situation, in which a child acquires two languages simultaneously (e.g., when the parents speak two different languages). We only speak of second language acquisition if another language is acquired after the first language.

The terms learning and acquisition are frequently treated as synonyms in the literature. Some researchers, however, distinguish between acquisition and learning, stating that acquisition refers to the gradual subconscious development of...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution .

Buying options

  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Chomsky, N. (1965). Aspects of the theory of syntax . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Google Scholar  

Ellis, R. (1997). SLA research and language teaching . Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Ellis, R. (2008). The study of second language acquisition (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Krashen, S. (1982). Principles and practice in second language acquisition . London: Pergamon.

Mitchell, R., & Myles, F. (2004). Second language learning theories (2nd ed.). London: Arnold.

Selinker, L. (1972). Interlanguage. International Review of Applied Linguistics, 10 , 209–241.

Download references

Author information

Authors and affiliations.

English Department, University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 2-4, Hof 8.3, 1090, Vienna, Austria

Dr. Angelika Rieder-Bünemann

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Angelika Rieder-Bünemann .

Editor information

Editors and affiliations.

Faculty of Economics and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Education, University of Freiburg, 79085, Freiburg, Germany

Norbert M. Seel

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC

About this entry

Cite this entry.

Rieder-Bünemann, A. (2012). Second Language Learning. In: Seel, N.M. (eds) Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1428-6_826

Download citation

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1428-6_826

Publisher Name : Springer, Boston, MA

Print ISBN : 978-1-4419-1427-9

Online ISBN : 978-1-4419-1428-6

eBook Packages : Humanities, Social Sciences and Law

Share this entry

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

  • Publish with us

Policies and ethics

  • Find a journal
  • Track your research

Got any suggestions?

We want to hear from you! Send us a message and help improve Slidesgo

Top searches

Trending searches

presentation second language learning

spring flowers

88 templates

presentation second language learning

16 templates

presentation second language learning

world war 1

45 templates

presentation second language learning

st patricks day

12 templates

presentation second language learning

calendar 2024

35 templates

presentation second language learning

33 templates

Celebrate Slidesgo’s big 5! Five years of great presentations, faster

Education Major For College: English-as-a-Second-Language Education

Education major for college: english-as-a-second-language education presentation, free google slides theme and powerpoint template.

Your college students who are learning English as a second language understood that this skill will be essential to building a bright future and accessing better opportunities. Strive to plan a great class using this wonderfully illustrated template to teach about terminology and types, student difficulties, social challenges, and the importance of the English language. We've already done a lot of work, now you just have to customize the different resources with your content and you're all set.

Features of this template

  • 100% editable and easy to modify
  • 35 different slides to impress your audience
  • Contains easy-to-edit graphics such as graphs, maps, tables, timelines and mockups
  • Includes 500+ icons and Flaticon’s extension for customizing your slides
  • Designed to be used in Google Slides and Microsoft PowerPoint
  • 16:9 widescreen format suitable for all types of screens
  • Includes information about fonts, colors, and credits of the resources used

How can I use the template?

Am I free to use the templates?

How to attribute?

Attribution required

Related posts on our blog.

How to Add, Duplicate, Move, Delete or Hide Slides in Google Slides | Quick Tips & Tutorial for your presentations

How to Add, Duplicate, Move, Delete or Hide Slides in Google Slides

How to Change Layouts in PowerPoint | Quick Tips & Tutorial for your presentations

How to Change Layouts in PowerPoint

How to Change the Slide Size in Google Slides | Quick Tips & Tutorial for your presentations

How to Change the Slide Size in Google Slides

Related presentations.

English & Foreign Languages Major for College: Linguistics presentation template

Premium template

Unlock this template and gain unlimited access

Critical Theory - Master of Arts in English presentation template

Register for free and start editing online

SlidePlayer

  • My presentations

Auth with social network:

Download presentation

We think you have liked this presentation. If you wish to download it, please recommend it to your friends in any social system. Share buttons are a little bit lower. Thank you!

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Second Language Learning

Published by Lucas Schumacher Modified over 5 years ago

Similar presentations

Presentation on theme: "Second Language Learning"— Presentation transcript:

Second Language Learning

Grammar & Communication in the FL Classroom

presentation second language learning

Exposure and Focus on Form What is it? Exposure * Children learn language by pick it up from their surroundings automatically. * The main way that children.

presentation second language learning

Second Language Acquisition

presentation second language learning

THEORY OF SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING

presentation second language learning

Intellectual Development from One to Three

presentation second language learning

L1 vs. L2 acquisition. L1L2 Parents or caretakers are the primary language models for L1 learners. L1 learners have innumerable opportunities to interact.

presentation second language learning

The Nature of Language Learning

presentation second language learning

Principles for teaching speaking 1.Give students practice with both fluency and accuracy 2.Provide opportunities for students to interact by using pair.

presentation second language learning

Second language acquisition theories. Popular beliefs (Lightbown & Spada,1993) 1. Languages are learnt mainly through imitation. 2. Parents usually correct.

presentation second language learning

Second Language Acquisition (SLA)

presentation second language learning

Recovering the Struggling Reader Debra K. Nicholson Hillcrest Elementary Morristown, Tennessee.

presentation second language learning

Specific Considerations in Evaluating Teachers of ELLs Adam Bauchner Mid-State Regional Bilingual Education Resource Network.

presentation second language learning

Tradition and Transition in Second Language Teaching Methodology.

presentation second language learning

14: THE TEACHING OF GRAMMAR  Should grammar be taught?  When? How? Why?  Grammar teaching: Any strategies conducted in order to help learners understand,

presentation second language learning

An Introduction to English Teaching and Learning 梁 淑 芳 正修科技大學應用外語系.

presentation second language learning

Grammar-Translation Approach Direct Approach

presentation second language learning

Language Learning Strategies Recognizing your strengths and weaknesses, and practicing to improve what you can Adapted from Lessons From Good Language.

presentation second language learning

Second Language acquisition

presentation second language learning

About project

© 2024 SlidePlayer.com Inc. All rights reserved.

Mobile Navigation

Creating video from text.

Sora is an AI model that can create realistic and imaginative scenes from text instructions.

We’re teaching AI to understand and simulate the physical world in motion, with the goal of training models that help people solve problems that require real-world interaction.

Introducing Sora, our text-to-video model. Sora can generate videos up to a minute long while maintaining visual quality and adherence to the user’s prompt.

Today, Sora is becoming available to red teamers to assess critical areas for harms or risks. We are also granting access to a number of visual artists, designers, and filmmakers to gain feedback on how to advance the model to be most helpful for creative professionals.

We’re sharing our research progress early to start working with and getting feedback from people outside of OpenAI and to give the public a sense of what AI capabilities are on the horizon.

Sora is able to generate complex scenes with multiple characters, specific types of motion, and accurate details of the subject and background. The model understands not only what the user has asked for in the prompt, but also how those things exist in the physical world.

The model has a deep understanding of language, enabling it to accurately interpret prompts and generate compelling characters that express vibrant emotions. Sora can also create multiple shots within a single generated video that accurately persist characters and visual style.

The current model has weaknesses. It may struggle with accurately simulating the physics of a complex scene, and may not understand specific instances of cause and effect. For example, a person might take a bite out of a cookie, but afterward, the cookie may not have a bite mark.

The model may also confuse spatial details of a prompt, for example, mixing up left and right, and may struggle with precise descriptions of events that take place over time, like following a specific camera trajectory.

We’ll be taking several important safety steps ahead of making Sora available in OpenAI’s products. We are working with red teamers — domain experts in areas like misinformation, hateful content, and bias — who will be adversarially testing the model.

We’re also building tools to help detect misleading content such as a detection classifier that can tell when a video was generated by Sora. We plan to include C2PA metadata in the future if we deploy the model in an OpenAI product.

In addition to us developing new techniques to prepare for deployment, we’re leveraging the existing safety methods that we built for our products that use DALL·E 3, which are applicable to Sora as well.

For example, once in an OpenAI product, our text classifier will check and reject text input prompts that are in violation of our usage policies, like those that request extreme violence, sexual content, hateful imagery, celebrity likeness, or the IP of others. We’ve also developed robust image classifiers that are used to review the frames of every video generated to help ensure that it adheres to our usage policies, before it’s shown to the user.

We’ll be engaging policymakers, educators and artists around the world to understand their concerns and to identify positive use cases for this new technology. Despite extensive research and testing, we cannot predict all of the beneficial ways people will use our technology, nor all the ways people will abuse it. That’s why we believe that learning from real-world use is a critical component of creating and releasing increasingly safe AI systems over time.

Research techniques

Sora is a diffusion model, which generates a video by starting off with one that looks like static noise and gradually transforms it by removing the noise over many steps.

Sora is capable of generating entire videos all at once or extending generated videos to make them longer. By giving the model foresight of many frames at a time, we’ve solved a challenging problem of making sure a subject stays the same even when it goes out of view temporarily.

Similar to GPT models, Sora uses a transformer architecture, unlocking superior scaling performance.

We represent videos and images as collections of smaller units of data called patches, each of which is akin to a token in GPT. By unifying how we represent data, we can train diffusion transformers on a wider range of visual data than was possible before, spanning different durations, resolutions and aspect ratios.

Sora builds on past research in DALL·E and GPT models. It uses the recaptioning technique from DALL·E 3, which involves generating highly descriptive captions for the visual training data. As a result, the model is able to follow the user’s text instructions in the generated video more faithfully.

In addition to being able to generate a video solely from text instructions, the model is able to take an existing still image and generate a video from it, animating the image’s contents with accuracy and attention to small detail. The model can also take an existing video and extend it or fill in missing frames. Learn more in our technical report .

Sora serves as a foundation for models that can understand and simulate the real world, a capability we believe will be an important milestone for achieving AGI.

All videos on this page were generated directly by Sora without modification.

second language learning in the classroom

Second Language Learning in the Classroom

Mar 28, 2019

540 likes | 756 Views

Second Language Learning in the Classroom. Comparing instructional and natural settings for language learning. Comparing instructional and natural settings for language learning. Comparing instructional and natural settings for language learning. Activity: Analyzing an ESL Class.

Share Presentation

  • communicative competence measures
  • early stages
  • valuable part
  • communicative practice study

saber

Presentation Transcript

Comparing instructional and natural settings for language learning

Activity: Analyzing an ESL Class You’ll watch a video clip showing an adult ESL class doing a problem-solving activity. Pay attention to the following features: • Focus of instruction: form-based or meaning-based • Source and nature of the input • Questions asked by the teacher (display or genuine questions / yes-no or wh- questions) • Feedback / Error correction • Conversational modifications (comprehension checks, clarification requests, self-repetition or paraphrase) • Metalinguistic comments • Teacher-student interaction (negotiation of meaning) • Student-student interaction (negotiation of meaning)

Five Proposals for Classroom Teaching Which theoretical proposal holds the greatest promise for improving language learning in classroom settings? • Get it right from the beginning • Say what you mean and mean what you say • Just listen… and read • Teach what is teachable • Get it right in the end

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Introduction • This proposal emphasizes the importance of accuracy in second language teaching and the use of structure-based or form-based approaches. • It includes the two most common traditional approaches to second language teaching: grammar translation and audiolingualapproaches.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Grammar-Translation approach • It is characterized by giving the explicit instruction of grammatical rules and lists of vocabulary with their translation equivalents in the L1, and then getting students to apply this knowledge to translation and to language analysis. • It uses deductive method of language teaching, based on classical studies of dead languages, and often ignores the communicative aspect of language use.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Audiolingual approach (1) • It is based on the behaviorist theory of language learning and assumes that language learning can be broken down into a series of individual habits, which can be formed by reinforcement of correct response. • It emphasizes habit formation through the practice (e.g., pattern drilling), memorization, and rote repetition of grammatical structures and lexical items usually in isolation from contexts of meaningful use. • It places emphasis on the ordering of the four skills – listening, speaking, reading, writing – and the need for maximum error prevention.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Audiolingual approach (2) • Teachers avoid letting beginning learners speak freely because this would allow them to make errors. Therefore, it consists of all controlled practice to prevent these bad habits. • This approach was used successfully only with highly motivated adult learners in training programs for government personnel in the U.S. • Though it emphasizes the learning of oral language, students rarely use the language spontaneously for genuine communicative purposes (but it can help students improve their pronunciation) <see examples on pp. 118-119> • There is little classroom research to support this approach for students in ordinary school L2 programs (study 1).

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Communicative language teaching (CLT) approaches argue that • Language is not learned by the gradual accumulation of one item after another. • Errors are a natural and valuable part of the language learning process. • The motivation of learners is often stifled by an insistence on correctness and by rote learning. • It is better to encourage learners to develop fluencybefore accuracy. They need to develop communicativeabilities right from the beginning.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Limitation of Communicative language teaching (CLT) approaches: • Allowing learners too much ‘freedom’ without correction and explicit instruction is likely to lead to early fossilization of errors. • However, little research has been done to test the hypothesis that form-based instruction in the early stages of L2 learning will, in the long run, lead to higher levels of linguistic performance and knowledge than meaning-based instruction in the early stages.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Grammar plus communicative practice(study 2) • Learners: 48 college students enrolled in French language courses at an American university • Methods: 3 groups • G1: ALM + CLT (an additional hour) • G2: ALM + culture (an additional hour) • G3: ALM + ALM (an additional hour) • Results: • On the linguistic competence measures, no significant differences between groups • On the communicative competence measures, G1 scored significantly higher than the other two groups • Conclusion: L2 programs which focus only on accuracy and form do not give students sufficient opportunity to develop communication abilities in L2.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Grammar plus communicative practice (study 3) • Learners: ESL adult students • Methods: 2 groups • G1: grammar-based • G2: grammar-based + communicative component • Results: • Beginner and intermediate-level learners engaging in communicative activities in addition to their regular grammar course made greater improvements in accent, vocabulary, grammar, and comprehension than did learners who received only the grammar course. • The area of greatest improvement for the learners getting ‘real world’ communicative practice was in grammatical accuracy.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Conclusions (I) • The proposal “Get it right from the beginning” has important limitations. L2 learners receiving audiolingual or grammar-based instruction are often unable to communicate their messages and intentions effectively. • Primarily or exclusively grammar-based approaches to teaching do notguarantee that learners develop high levels of accuracy and linguistic knowledge. • The classroom emphasis on accuracy usually results in learners who are inhibited and will not take chances in using their knowledge for communication.

Proposal 1. Get it right from the beginning • Conclusions (II) • Learners benefit more from opportunities for communicative practice in contexts where the emphasis is on understanding and expressing meaning. • It is important to be aware that meaning-based instruction is advantageous, but it does not mean that form-based instruction is not. In fact, L2 learners need to develop both accuracy and fluency in order to use the language effectively.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Introduction (I) • This proposal emphasizes the necessity for learners to have access to meaningful and comprehensibleinput through conversational interactions with teachers and other students. • It is based on the interactionists’ hypothesis. When learners are given the opportunity to use the TL to interact with others, they are compelled to “negotiate for meaning”, that is, to express and clarify their intentions, thought, opinions, etc., in a way which allows them to arrive at a mutual understanding.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Introduction (II) • Negotiation for meaning can be achieved in communicative language teaching (CLT) and task- based instruction (e.g., students are asked to work together to accomplish a particular goal using the TL). • Negotiation enables learners to use a variety of modifications that naturally arise in interaction, for example, clarification, confirmation, repetition, and other kinds of information as they attempt to negotiate meaning. • Through negotiation, learners can acquire the language forms more naturally – the words and the grammatical structures – which carry the meaning they are attending to (see examples 3-7).

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Group work and learner language (study 4) • Learners produced not only a greater quantity but also a greater variety of speech in learner- centered (group-work) activities than in teacher-centered activities. In addition, the learner-centered activities led to a much greater variety of language functions (e.g., disagreeing, hypothesizing, requesting, clarifying, and defining). • In contrast, in the teacher-centered activities, the students primarily responded to the teacher’s questions and rarely initiated speech on their own.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Learners talking to learners (study 5) • Learners talked more with other learners than they did with native speakers. Though they cannot always provide each other with the accurate grammatical input, they can offer each other genuine communicative practice. • Also, learners produced more talk with advanced-level than with intermediate-level partners. • However, their errors showed no differences across contexts. That is, intermediate-level learners did not make any more errors with another intermediate-level speaker than they did with an advanced or native speaker.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Learner language and proficiency level (study 6) • When different proficiency-level learners interact with each other, the result showed that when low-proficiency learners were in the ‘sender’ role, the interactions were longer and more varied than when high-proficiency learners were the ‘senders’. • The explanation was that high-proficiency ‘senders’ tended to act as if the lower-level ‘receiver’ had very little contribution to make in the completion of the task. Therefore, the lower-level ‘receivers’ played a very passive role and had very little negotiation for meaning.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Interaction and comprehensibility (study 7) • Modified interaction led to higher levels of comprehension than modified input. • Learners who had the opportunity to engage in interaction (e.g., asking clarification questions and seeking verbal assistance as they were listening to the instructions) comprehended much more than those who received simplified input (e.g., repetition, paraphrasing, simple grammatical constructions, and simple vocabulary) but had no opportunity to interact while listening.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Interaction and L2 development (study 8) • Learners who engaged in conversational interactions with native speakers produced more advanced question forms than 1) learners who had no interaction with native speakers and 2) learners who received pre-modified input (i.e., the native speakers use language which had been simplified and scripted to match a level of language which was comprehensible to the learners) but had no negotiation of meaning with native speakers.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Interaction with recasts (study 9) • Learners who were at more advanced stages of question development benefited more from interaction with recasts than they did from interaction without recasts. However, learners who were at less advanced stages of question development did not differ according to the type of interaction they were exposed to (study 9). * “Recasts” are paraphrases of a learner’s utterance which involve changing one or more components of the utterance while maintaining the meaning (see examples on p. 104).

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Conclusions (I) • The research described above has contributed to a better understanding of how to organize group and pair work more effectively in the classroom. • Limitations: • The measure of L2 learning in these studies was often the learners’ immediate production following the interactions. It is therefore difficultto draw any conclusions as to thelong-term benefits of conversational interaction. • These studies were designed as one-on-one pair-work activities between trained native speakers and learners focusing on a single grammatical feature. Therefore, it is also difficult to relate the findings toclassroom interactions.

Proposal 2. Say what you mean and mean what you say • Conclusions (II) • Limitations: 3. Recasts may be more salient in pair work, particularly if only one form is recast consistently. However, in the L2 classroom, teachers’ recasts are less likely to be effective in regular L2 classrooms. For one reason, teachers’ recasts are not usually focused on only one form; for the other, they may not be perceived by the learners as an attempt to correct their language form but rather as just another way of saying the same thing.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Introduction (I) • This proposal emphasizes providing learners with comprehensible input through listening and/or reading activities. It is believed that hearing and understanding the TL is sufficient for L2 learning. • It is based on the assumption that it is not necessary to drill and memorize language forms in order to learn them. It is particularly associated with Krashen’s Input hypothesis that one essential requirement for SLA is the availability of comprehensible input. (see example 8)

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Introduction (II) • This approach is very controversial because it not only says that L2 learners need not drill and practice language, but also that they do not need to speak at all in their learning process. • The material that the students read and listen to is not graded in any rigid way according to a sequence of linguistic simplicity. Rather, the material is graded on the basis of what teachers consider intuitively to be comprehensible for the learners, because a given text has shorter sentences, clearer illustrations, or is based on a theme or topic that is familiar to the learners.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Comprehension-based instruction (study 10) • Learners received native-speaker input from tapes and books but virtually no interaction with the teacher or other learners. There was no oral practice or interaction in English at all. • The result showed that learners in the comprehension-based program learned English as well as learners in the regular program (from grade 3 through grade 5). This was true not only for their comprehension skills but also for their speaking skills. • However, a follow-up study in grade 8 showed that students who continued in the comprehension-only program were not doing as well as students in a program that included speaking and writing components, teacher feedback, and classroom interaction.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Total physical response (TPR) (study 11) • In TPR class, students (children or adults) participate in activities in which they hear a series of commands in the TL. They simply listen and show their comprehension by their actions but are not required to say anything. • The vocabulary and structures are carefully graded and organized so that learners deal with material which gradually increases in complexity and each new lesson builds on the ones before. This position differs from Krashen’s input hypothesis.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Total physical response (TPR) • Research showed that students can develop quite advanced levels of comprehension in the TL without engaging in oral practice. • When students begin to speak, they take over the role of the teacher and give commands as well as following them. However, the kind of language students can learn in such an environment is quite limited. • This approach gives learners a good start. It allows them to build up a considerable knowledge of the language without feeling the nervousness that often accompanies the attempts to speak the TL.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Immersionprograms (study 12) • In an immersion program, a second language is taught via content-based instruction. The emphasis is on subject matter learning through rich, comprehensible input, and little time is spent focusing on the formal aspects of the L2. • Canadian French immersion programs provide excellent examples. The findings show convincing evidence that these programs are among the most successful large-scale L2 programs in existence. Learners developed not only good comprehension, but also fluency, functional abilities, and confidence in using their L2.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Limitations of immersion programs • However, learners failed to achieve high levels of performance in some aspects of French grammar after several years of the study in the immersion programs. • Some researchers think that learners engage in too little language production in these programs and do not get sufficient form-focused instruction. Students just use their incomplete TL knowledge because they are rarely pushed to be more precise or more accurate. • Also, because students share the same interlanguage, they have no difficulty understanding each other. Therefore, there is little need for them to use appropriate TL form to negotiate for meaning.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Input flood (study 13) • Learners were given high-frequency exposure to a particular form in the instructional input (e.g., adverb placement). They read a series of texts containing the use of this form, but there was no teaching of this form nor was any error correction given. • The results showed that exposure to many instances of correct models in the instructional input could help learners add something new to their interlanguage, but not to get rid of an error based on their L1. That is, this approach failed to provide learners with information about what is not possible or not grammatical.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Enhanced input (study 14) • Learners were given the reading passages designed to draw their attention to a particular form (e.g., the possessive determiners – his/her) which was embedded in the text. This was done through typographical enhancement (i.e., the form appeared in bold type, underlined, italicized, or written in CAPITAL LETTERS). • Comparison of the performance of learners who had read the typographically enhanced passages with that of learners who had not showed little difference in their knowledge and use of these forms. Perhaps the enhancement was not explicit enough to draw the learners’ attention to this form.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Input processing (study 15) • Learners received explicit explanations about a particular form (e.g., object pronouns) and comprehension-based “procession instruction” (i.e., through focused listening and reading activities, learners were required to pay attention to how the target forms were used to convey meaning). • The results showed that learners who had received the comprehension-based processing instruction achieved higher levels of performance on both the comprehension tasks and the production tasks than learners who engaged in production practice doing exercises to practice the form.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Conclusions (I) • The French immersion research confirms the effectiveness of comprehensible input in terms of learners’ development of comprehension skills (reading and listening), fluency, and confidence in the TL. • However, the research does not support that an exclusive focus on meaning in comprehensible input is enough to bring learners to high levels of accuracy in their L2. • The claim that “language will take care of itself as long as meaningful comprehensible input is provided” is questionable.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Conclusions (II) • It is important to keep in mind that the learners in the comprehension-based immersion studies were beginners and the follow-up study suggested that more guidance from a teacher was needed to ensure their continuing development in the L2. • The performance of the learners in the comprehension-based programs was eventually surpassed by that of learners who had opportunities to use the TL interactively and to receive some careful form-focused intervention later in their development.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Conclusions (III) • The TPR results show great benefits for learners in the early stages of their L2 development. It prepares learners to go out into the TL community to get more comprehensible input. • The input flood and enhancement studies provide more evidence that L2 learners may not be able to discover what is ungrammatical in their own interlanguage if the focus is always on meaning, even if the frequency and salience of correct model is increased. • The processing instruction shows greater benefits for comprehension practice over production practice. This points to the benefits of an explicit focus on language formwithin input-based instruction.

Proposal 3. Just listen… and read • Summary • Comprehension-based programs appear to be beneficial in the development of basic comprehension and communicative performance in the early stages of L2 learning. • However, comprehension-based instructional approaches may not be sufficient to get learners to continue developing their L2 abilities to advanced levels. In particular, these approaches may make it difficult for learners to discover and eliminate patterns already present in the interlanguage that are not grammatical in the TL.

Proposal 4. Teach what is teachable • Introduction (I) • The purpose is for teachers to choose appropriate language features to teach according to learners’ L2 developmental stages. • The research has shown that some linguistic structures develop along a particular developmental path. These structures are called “developmental features”, such as question forms (examples 9-12), negation, tense, and relative clauses. • On the other hand, researchers also found that some language features can be taught at any time, such as vocabulary, which are called “variational features”. The success of learning these variational features depends on factors such as motivation, intelligence, and the quality of instruction.

Proposal 4. Teach what is teachable • Introduction (II) • These research studies can inform teachers about which language features are “developmental” (and thus teachable only in a given sequence) and which are “variational” (and thus teachable at various points in learner language development). • The recommendation is to assess the learners’ developmental level and teach what would naturally come next. This is based on Krashen’s “natural order hypothesis”. Thus, instruction cannot change learners’ natural language developmental course.

Proposal 4. Teach what is teachable • Research findings (I) • For some linguistic structures, learners cannot be taught what they are not ‘developmentally ready’ to learn. That is, instruction cannot permit learners to ‘skip’ a stage in the natural sequence of development (study 16 – German word order). • When learners are ‘developmentally ready’ to learn a specific language feature, instruction on that feature (whether it is meaning-focused or form-focused) makes a difference when it is provided at the time (study 17 – English relative clause formation).

Proposal 4. Teach what is teachable • Research findings (II) • The research showed little effect for instruction on learners’ development of question forms. This may be due to limited instructional time or no explicit instruction (study 18 – wh-question inversion rules). • Instruction that is timed to match learners’ developmental readiness may move them into more advanced stages but their performance may still be affected by other factors, such as L1 influence (study 19 – questions)

Proposal 4. Teach what is teachable • Conclusions • The research only measured the short-term effects of instruction. There is no way of knowing whether instruction had any permanent or long-term effects on learners’ developing interlanguage systems. • Explicit instruction might have led to more positive results, particularly if the instruction had consisted of contrastive information about L1 and L2. • “Teach what is teachable” position is of great potential interest to syllabus planners as well as teachers.

Proposal 5. Get it right in the end • Introduction (I) • Proponents of this position argue that there is a role for form-focused instruction and correction provided within communicative contexts. • This position is assumed that learners need guidance in learning some specific features of the TL. Comprehensible input and meaningful interaction is not enough to bring learners to high levels of accuracy as well as fluency. • While they view comprehension-based, content-based, task-based, or other meaning-focused instruction as crucial for language learning, they hypothesized that learners will do better if they also have access to some form-focused instruction.

Proposal 5. Get it right in the end • Introduction (II) • This position also emphasizes the idea that some aspects of language must be taught and may need to be taught quite explicitly. Explicit instruction is particularly needed when learners in a class share the same L1, because the errors resulting from L1 transfer are not likely to lead to any kind of communication breakdown; thus, it will be very difficult for learners to discover the errors on their own. • They argue that learners will benefit in terms of both speed and efficiency of their learning and also in terms of the level of proficiency which they will eventually reach.

Proposal 5. Get it right in the end • Research findings • The research findings support the hypothesis that form-focused instruction and corrective feedback within communicative L2 programs can improve learners’ use of particular grammatical features. • The effects of form-focused instruction are not always long-lasting, which can be explained in terms of the frequency of use of the particular structure in regular classroom input. Thus, opportunities for continued use may have contributed to the continued improvement in learners’ use of a particular form. • Form-focused instruction may be more successful with some language features than with others.

Proposal 5. Get it right in the end • Conclusions • Form-focused instruction and corrective feedback provided within the communicative contexts are more effective in promoting L2 learning. • The challenge is to find the balance between meaning-focused and form-focused activities. The right balance is likely to be different according to the characteristics of the learners, such as age, metalinguistic sophistication, motivation, goals, and the similarity of the TL to the L1. • Explicit, guided form-focused instruction is needed when features in the TL differ from the L1 in subtle ways, particularly when the information about these differences is not available in the regularly occurring input.

Implications of Classroom Research for Teaching • Rethink the five proposals • Get it right from the beginning • Grammar-translation & audiolingual methods • Say what you mean and mean what you say • Communicative language teaching (“what to say” vs. “how to say it”) • Just listen… and read • Comprehension-based programs • Teach what is teachable • Setting realistic expectations • Get it right in the end • Finding the balance between meaning-based and form-based instruction

  • More by User

Explaining Second Language Learning

Explaining Second Language Learning

Explaining Second Language Learning. Contexts for Language Learning Behaviorism Innatism Cognitive/developmental perspective Information Processing Connectionism The Competition Model The Sociocultural Perspective . Contexts for Language Learning.

1.94k views • 43 slides

Second Language Learning in the Classroom

Second Language Learning in the Classroom. Comparing instructional and natural settings for language learning. Comparing instructional and natural settings for language learning. Comparing instructional and natural settings for language learning. Activity: Analyzing an ESL Class .

1.2k views • 50 slides

Language in the Classroom

Language in the Classroom

Language in the Classroom. Andrea Sturgeon Education 301/ Section 02 Diversity Technology Lesson. The Structure. Unit: Poetry Intended Grade Level: Open for grades 7-12 depending on the poetry selection Lesson: Voice in Poetry. Objectives.

417 views • 21 slides

Mobile learning in English language classroom.

Mobile learning in English language classroom.

Mobile learning in English language classroom. Presenter: Dr.Malahat veliyeva British council Trainer, (Azerbaijan). Aims of the presentation:. To familiarize the audience with the idea of mobile learning in English language classroom.

904 views • 19 slides

Second Life in the Classroom

Second Life in the Classroom

Second Life in the Classroom. The Trial of Socrates. Collaboration. Jury. Plato’s Cave. Teen Grid. Getting Into Second Life. 1)Download the software. secondlife.com/support/downloads.php.

391 views • 22 slides

Explaining second language learning

Explaining second language learning

second language application: Krashen's ?monitor model". Krashen's model was influenced by Chomsky's theory of first language acquisition. Krashen (1970s) created this model for second language acquisition and called it ?Monitor Model".. Krashen described his model in terms of five hypotheses.. Ac

817 views • 22 slides

Instructed Second language learning

Instructed Second language learning

Instructed Second language learning. Gass chapter 11 Presented by Mick Hidding &amp; Yao Cui. 11.1 Classroom Language. Learners do not pick up errors from one another. They do pick up corrections. Learners usually know if they are right/wrong/not sure. . 11.1 Classroom Language con’t.

560 views • 13 slides

Classroom Research in Autonomous Language Learning

Classroom Research in Autonomous Language Learning

Classroom Research in Autonomous Language Learning. Venice 2011 Lienhard Legenhausen University of Münster. Overview. Why research in the autonomous classroom? Aims and findings of the LAALE research project 2.1 Looking at the quality of learning Vocabulary Grammar

233 views • 22 slides

Understanding the Second Language Learner in your Classroom: Building an Inclusive Learning Environment

Understanding the Second Language Learner in your Classroom: Building an Inclusive Learning Environment

Understanding the Second Language Learner in your Classroom: Building an Inclusive Learning Environment. Ivy Tech Community College 2009 Adjunct Faculty Annual Conference. Overview. Second language learners in Ivy Tech classrooms in the North East region

284 views • 16 slides

Learning: Second Language (L2)

Learning: Second Language (L2)

UNIT PLAN. Learning: Second Language (L2). Unit Summary.

441 views • 23 slides

Explaining Second Language Learning

Explaining Second Language Learning. Table of Contents. Behaviourism The Innatist Perspective Cognitive Perspectives Information processing Connectionism The competition model Discussion. Behaviourism. Explains learning in terms of Stimulus Response Reinforcement. Behaviourism.

827 views • 32 slides

Inquiry into the Second Language Classroom

Inquiry into the Second Language Classroom

Inquiry into the Second Language Classroom. Beverley Bunker Jen Rossi. STA Convention May 2013. The Marshmallow Challenge. une guimauve le spaghetti le ruban la ficelle. Inquiry is. freedom to learn what is personally relevant authentic engaging

392 views • 26 slides

Explaining Second Language Learning

Explaining Second Language Learning. Contexts for Language Learning Behaviorism Innatism Cognitive/developmental perspective Information Processing Connectionism The Competition Model The Sociocultural Perspective. Contexts for Language Learning.

1.06k views • 43 slides

Developmental Sequences in Second Language Learning

Developmental Sequences in Second Language Learning

Developmental Sequences in Second Language Learning. Presenters: Jacqueline dos Anjos, Hanna Heseker, Dana Meyer. Let ‘ s assume. Second Language Acquisition. Table of Contents. 1. Background: Influences in SLA 2. Grammatical Morphemes 3. Stages of Development 3.1 Negations 3.2 Questions

527 views • 22 slides

SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION/LEARNING

SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION/LEARNING

SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION/LEARNING. English Methodology II Mg Roxanna Correa P. 2009. SLA depends on many factors some pertaining to : The learner Learning situation. Learner/ Learning situation.

600 views • 14 slides

Enhancing English Language Learning in the classroom

Enhancing English Language Learning in the classroom

Enhancing English Language Learning in the classroom. June 27-30th And September 17th Randolph Public Schools Leah Palmer ELL teacher/Coordinator Wellesley Public Schools ELL Consultant Randolph Public Schools [email protected]. Outcomes of the course:. Educators will be able to:

1.13k views • 93 slides

Using music in the English Second Language (ESL) classroom

Using music in the English Second Language (ESL) classroom

Using music in the English Second Language (ESL) classroom. Music is said. To be history, it’s an indication of the time and environment in which it was created. To be a foreign language, it has its own language and uses symbols to represent ideas.

1.05k views • 21 slides

Second Language Acquisition/Learning

Second Language Acquisition/Learning

Second Language Acquisition/Learning. Lecture # 30. Review of last lecture. It is no wonder that parents take such joy in observing their children ’ s first step in the acquisition of language. Consider the following sequence between a mother and her 3-month-old daughter.

785 views • 27 slides

Culture in the Second-Language Writing Classroom

Culture in the Second-Language Writing Classroom

Culture in the Second-Language Writing Classroom. Tania Pattison, Trent University TESL Ontario, Nov. 13, 2008. Consider…. “Except for language , learning , and teaching , there is perhaps no more important concept in the field of TESOL than culture ” (Atkinson, 1999)

440 views • 27 slides

Computers in the Second Language Writing Classroom

Computers in the Second Language Writing Classroom

Computers in the Second Language Writing Classroom. A Summary of “Exploring the Virtual World: Computers in the Second Language Writing Classroom” by Marianne Phinney from the book The Power of CALL edited by Martha Pennington. Focus of early research.

155 views • 15 slides

Classroom  Research  in  Autonomous  Language Learning

226 views • 22 slides

Language and Culture in the Second Language Classroom

Language and Culture in the Second Language Classroom

Language and Culture in the Second Language Classroom. Anthony J. Liddicoat University of South Australia. Communication is an act of sociality. Language use is an act of social identity. Language learners are also language users. Second language communication is intercultural communication.

1.64k views • 18 slides

IMAGES

  1. PPT

    presentation second language learning

  2. 5 Stages of second language acquisition infographic

    presentation second language learning

  3. Why You Should Learn a Second Language Infographic

    presentation second language learning

  4. PPT

    presentation second language learning

  5. Language Teaching and learning.pptx

    presentation second language learning

  6. PPT

    presentation second language learning

VIDEO

  1. Individual differences in second language learning

  2. Individual Differences in Second Language Learning

  3. SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNING / 220111100

  4. Multilingual Speaking Activity in EVS from Grade 2

  5. Second Language Learning Theories

  6. Motivation in Second Language Learning

COMMENTS

  1. Second language learning

    Krashen's Theory Basic Tenets • Adults have two ways of developing competence in the second language: acquisition (subconscious learning) and learning (conscious learning). • The natural order hypothesis: acquisition of grammatical structures follow a predicable order when is natural (Hadley 2001). • The monitor Hypothesis: Acquisition ...

  2. Second Language learning

    5. o The starting age for learning a second/ foreign language is a debatable issue about which different ideas have been proposed by various stakeholders and scholars. o Some scholars refer to the critical period hypothesis for L1 acquisition and believe that before puberty is the best time to start learning/ teaching a foreign language. o From another point of view, scholars reject the ...

  3. How to Use Oral Presentations to Help English Language Learners ...

    Research confirms that in order for ELLs to acquire English they must engage in oral language practice and be given the opportunity to use language in meaningful ways for social and academic purposes (Williams & Roberts, 2011). Teaching students to design effective oral presentations has also been found to support thinking development as "the ...

  4. PDF PowerPoint Presentation

    Provide focused second language instruction that is designed to teach a particular aspect of the language; more effective than mere exposure (e.g., Ballinger, 2013; Lyster, 2007; Swain & Lapkin, 2013). Promote highly developed oral language skills by providing both structured and unstructured opportunities for oral.

  5. PDF Second-Language Learners' Vocabulary and Oral Language Development

    Oral Language Development. An essential component of second-language learning is helping students (a) understand what is being said (input) and (b) for-mulate appropriate verbal utterances (output). Vocabulary is an important part of this, but other dimensions of oral language are required for communicative competence, for example, syn-tax ...

  6. (PPT) Explaining Second Language Learning

    Cambridge University Press, 2018. This book, a follow-up to the editors' successful guide to second language (L2) teacher education (Burns and Richards 2009), is a clear and concise introduction to the research and scholarship across 36 topics related to learning English as an L2. Although the title indicates that the focus is on English ...

  7. How to Improve Oral Presentations in a Second Language

    Improving your oral presentation skills in a second language requires dedication, practice, and a growth mindset. By expanding your vocabulary, practicing pronunciation, structuring your ...

  8. Individual Differences in Second Language Learning: the Road Ahead

    In the past few years, several special issues on individual differences (IDs) in language learning have been published in the field of language education [6, 17], Oga-Baldwin, Fryer, & Larson-Hall [].These publications range from a broad scope of theme collections to a specific focus of topic modeling.

  9. Second Language Learning

    The study of second language learning/acquisition is a fairly recent phenomenon, belonging to the second half of the twentieth century. In the various periods of SLL research, there were conflicting views about the nature and development of the learner's language knowledge, depending on the prevailing linguistic theory of the time (for a detailed discussion, see Ellis 2008).

  10. VISUAL INPUT ENHANCEMENT AND GRAMMAR LEARNING: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Input enhancement and rule presentation in second language acquisition. In Schmidt, R. (Ed.), Attention and awareness in foreign language learning (pp. 259 - 302). Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Second Language Teaching & Curriculum Center.Google Scholar

  11. How learning a new language changes your brain

    Let's take a look at how learning a second language affects your brain. A neurological perspective on language learning . Bilingual people, who have learned two languages side by side from early childhood, have been studied by scientists for decades. They are keen to understand how speaking two languages fluently affects people on a cognitive ...

  12. Second language learning_classroom

    Get it right from the beginning • Introduction - This proposal emphasizes the importance of accuracy in second language teaching and the use of structure-based or form-based approaches. - It includes the two most common traditional approaches to second language teaching: grammar translation and audiolingual approaches. 8. 8/50 Proposal 1.

  13. College: English-as-a-Second-Language

    Free Google Slides theme and PowerPoint template. Your college students who are learning English as a second language understood that this skill will be essential to building a bright future and accessing better opportunities. Strive to plan a great class using this wonderfully illustrated template to teach about terminology and types, student ...

  14. PPT

    Presentation Transcript. Definitions • Native Language (NL or L1) - the language first learned as a child • Target Language (TL) - the language being learned • Second Language Acquisition - the process of learning another language after the native language has been learned. Also called L2 regardless if it is the third, fourth or ...

  15. PPT

    For More Information Contact: Dr. Frank Lucido Program Director Institute for Second Language Achievement [email protected] 361-825-2672 Graphics and slide design by: JoAnn McDonald and Sheryl Roehl. Second Language Acquisition. Prepared By: Dr. Emma Alicia Garza Assistant Professor Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

  16. PPT

    580 likes | 1.92k Views. Explaining Second Language Learning. Contexts for Language Learning Behaviorism Innatism Cognitive/developmental perspective Information Processing Connectionism The Competition Model The Sociocultural Perspective . Contexts for Language Learning. Download Presentation. affective filter hypothesis. learner characteristics.

  17. Input enhancement: Issues in grammar and vocabulary learning

    Alanen, R. (1995), 'Input Enhancement and Rule Presentation in Second Language Acquisition', in R. W. Schmidt, (ed), Attention and Awareness in Foreign Language Learning, 259-

  18. Second Language Learning

    4. 1. Distinction Between Acquisition and Learning Acquisition refers to subconscious process of 'picking up' a language through exposure, whereas, learning is the conscious process of studying it (Ellis, 2014). Language acquisition is based on the neuro-psychological processes (Maslo, 2007). Language acquisition is opposed to learning and is a subconscious process similar to that by which ...

  19. Second Language Learning

    Contexts for Language Learning A young child learning a first language A child learning a second language in day care or on the playground Adolescents taking a foreign language class in their own country An adult immigrant with limited or disrupted education working in a second language environment and having no opportunity to go to language classes.

  20. Second language acquisition

    2. Language Acquisition Language acquisition is the study of the processes through which humans acquire language. By itself, language acquisition refers to first language acquisition, which studies infants' acquisition of their native language, when you are still in infinite 3, 4, or 5 years of age. whereas second language acquisition is ...

  21. Explaining Second Language Learning I

    Explaining Second Language Learning I. An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. Download presentation by click this link.

  22. Sora

    Introducing Sora, our text-to-video model. Sora can generate videos up to a minute long while maintaining visual quality and adherence to the user's prompt. 1 of 9. Prompt: A stylish woman walks down a Tokyo street filled with warm glowing neon and animated city signage. She wears a black leather jacket, a long red dress, and black boots, and ...

  23. Second Language Learning & Theories

    During download, if you can't get a presentation, the file might be deleted by the publisher. E N D . Presentation Transcript. Second Language Learning& Theories Dr. AnsaHameed. ... • Second Language acquisition means to learn a language other than the mother tongue. • Second language can be a 3rd or 4th language in a bilingual ...

  24. Second Language Learning in the Classroom

    Second Language Acquisition/Learning. Second Language Acquisition/Learning. Lecture # 30. Review of last lecture. It is no wonder that parents take such joy in observing their children ' s first step in the acquisition of language. Consider the following sequence between a mother and her 3-month-old daughter. 785 views • 27 slides