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35 Thought-Provoking Persuasive Writing Prompts For 6th Graders

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Looking for a solid persuasive essay topic for your 6th grader?

The below post contains tons of great ideas that will get your 6th-grade students thinking, researching, debating, and writing!

I’m not talking about simple opinion writing topics – like their favorite food, favorite book, or how much money they should get for an allowance.

That is the the thing that my 3rd grade student would delight in arguing. 

No, sixth graders are ready for more meaty topics that require a bit of research and thought. The more they dig into the topic and refine their point of view, the more they will sharpen their critical thinking and writing skills!

Don’t miss the free pdf printable at the bottom of this page with all of the ideas in one place!

Persuasive Writing Prompts For The 6th Grade Student

boxing gloves facing each other showing oppostie opinions

1. Is a dress code ever necessary?

In this prompt, students will be asked to take a stance on whether or not they think there is ever a time to enforce a dress code. Are there times when someone should be told how to dress? Such as a school dress code or wedding? Or should people be allowed to dress in any way that expresses themselves or their personality? 

2. Should recycling be mandatory instead of suggested?

Students will be asked to consider whether the government should be more aggressive about recycling. They will  be working with the concepts of the benefits of recycling vs. the freedoms of people.

3. Should  vending machines ban junk food?

6th grade students will be asked to argue for or against the ban of junk food in vending machines. Vending machines are often used by people who are hungry and in a hurry. The vending options are usually less than healthy. Should vending machine owners be required to provide better choices? Or should they be allowed to stock their machines as they see fit?

4. Is it okay to keep exotic animals as pets?

This persuasive topic will have students take a stance on whether or not it is a good idea to keep exotic animals as pets. They will need to consider the benefits and drawbacks of keeping exotic pets and present a strong argument for their position. Make sure the student has a good understanding of the topic and the different types and sizes of animals that some people keep as pets.

5. Should the federal government impose a tax on sugary drinks?

In this prompt, students will be asked to argue for or against a government tax on sugary drinks – similar to the tax on cigarettes. They will need to consider the potential benefits of such a tax. What would the tax money be spent on? Or should people be free to drink any kind of beverage they wish, no matter how healthy or unhealthy? 

6. Should life skills be a greater focus for education?

In this prompt, students will be asked to take a stance on what should be taught in school. Should the schools be doubling down on the basics of reading, writing, and math since test scores have dipped? Or should schools start allotting more time for important life skills, like time management, personal finance, and cooking, which are things many young adults struggle with.

7. Should there be age limits to use social media? 

Students will list specific reasons why there should or should not be age restrictions for facebook pages and other forms of social media.

8. Is it important to save endangered species?

Students will be asked argue why enndangered animals should or should not be protected. They may be quick to make up their mind, but make sure they do research and find factual reasons that support their opinions.

9. Should video games be considered a sport?

Even though video games do not require the physical activity of traditional sports, does it still require focus, skill, and grit that would make it a modern sport? Or should that title only be awarded to an activity that requires you to sweat?

10. Should there be a ban on plastic bags?

Everyone knows plastic bags are bad for the environment, but should they be banned? What would the alternative be? 

11. Is it necessary to have physical books anymore?

In the age of digital everything, are paper books still necessary? College students are already buying digital books instead of expensive physical ones. What benefits would come from doing away with paper books? What drawbacks would there be for those without a computer or solid internet?

12. Is it important to teach physical education in schools?

What is the goal of physical education? Does it have a place in the academic environment of education? Should those things be taught at home or on a sports team instead of during school hours? Shouldn’t physical activity be optional? Or is PE a vital piece of knowledge for a well-rounded education?

13. Should zoos be banned?

Do zoos raise money and awareness for animal conservation…or do they imprison animals for a lifetime that should be free and in the wild?

14. Should recess be scheduled for all kids in school? Even high school students?

What are the benefits of taking an outside break with fresh air for students? Are other subjects too important to sacrifice the time? Could older students be more productive with some sunshine and fresh air during the day?

15. If a student has good grades all school year, should they still have to take standardized tests?

If a student has shown that they are learning and progressing academically, should they have to take a long standardized test? Are there other reasons to take these tests? 

16. Is hunting cruel to animals?

Most people buy their meat at grocery stores these days, so is there really any reason to still hunt animals? Does harvesting animals keep humans safe? Or does it make sport of animal lives?

17. Should gas powered cars be outlawed?

Fossil fuels are wreaking havoc on the planet, so should gasoline powered vehicles become illegal? Are electric cars a better option? Do electric cars have any drawbacks? 

18. Is a rewards program or discipline more effective to motivate students?

What incentivizes kids to dive into their work, when maybe they don’t want to? Is it a really strong rewards program that will motivate them to finish a difficult task? Or fear of a consequence if they don’t complete their work?

19. Should the United States require military service for men and women, like other countries do?

Many countries require their population to do some form of federal service. America has a draft registration for men, but not for women. Should both genders be required to serve our country? Would it strengthen our nation and our people to have a common experience with service? Or is it unfair to require people to pause their lives for 2 years during the prime of their youth?

20. Should healthcare be free for everybody?

Is it a human right to get healthcare for free? If the patient doesn’t pay, then who should pay for the treatment? What benefits and/or consequences could come from reshaping our healthcare system?

21. Should candy purchases be limited based on how many cavities you have?

Dental health is very serious. Should a kid’s candy be rationed based on their dental records? The more cavities, the less candy you can have – and vice versa?

22. Is it appropriate to let kids work at younger ages, like 10 or 12, if they can do the job?

Many kids today have a strong desire to work, make money, and be successful. We have child labor laws in place to protect kids, but could that be holding them back? If they can do a job, should they be allowed to be hired? Or would that be robbing a kid of their right to a carefree childhood?

23. Should foreign language be required in school or should it be one of the elective courses?

English is spoken nearly worldwide, as it is taught in many countries around the world. What benefits come from learning another language? Should students be able to choose another elective if they don’t want to learn a new language? Or should American children try harder to be multilingual?

24. Should students be allowed to use their cell phones during tests?

You cannot get away from cell phones these days. Even small children have them! They will be a readily available resource in most work places, so shouldn’t they be allowed during tests? Or are memorization and internalization of information important skills for students to learn?

25. Should plastic water bottles be banned?

Plastic water bottles are a huge problem in our environment. Should we outlaw them to help the Earth? What kind of things are one-use water bottles used for that might be important? 

26. Is it more important to continue exploration of space or the ocean?

Many wonderful advancements and knowledge have come from space exploration, but we know precious little about our ocean which covers 2/3 of the planet. Should governments be investing money into finding what lies beneath the surface instead of what’s above our heads?

27. Should reading an analog clock still be taught in school?

Digital clocks are everywhere – on your phone, stove, microwave, computer, cable box. Do you really need to learn how an analog clock works anymore? Are there times that digital clocks may not be available? Or are they becoming as archaic as a sundial?

28. Is learning  proper handwriting or fast typing more important in today’s world?

Many have stopped learning cursive handwriting, so should schools also stop focusing so much on print handwriting? Should kids be spending that time learning how to type on a keyboard instead? 

29. Should the voting age be lowered so elementary school students can vote?

Kids today are developing opinions and beliefs at younger ages and want to be heard. Should we lower the voting age so that children can make more of a difference? Or are most children not quite ready to handle the responsibility of voting?

30. Should AI be allowed in writing school papers if calculators are allowed in math?

Many teachers are concerned about how to tell the difference between an AI-written essay and one written by a student. Should that be a concern? If math allows calculators, can’t English classes allow help from another form of artificial intelligence? What drawback could come from not expecting kids to write their own essays?

31. Are cell phones good or bad for your health?

Cell phones are common around the world now, but are they good for us? How do they benefit our health? How might they hurt our overall health?

32. Should bees become a protected species?

Many scientists have expressed concern about the dwindling number of bees. Should these important pollinators become a protected species like the bald eagle? Or is it unreasonable to expect a person not to kill a bee that is buzzing around them?

33. Is it ever appropriate to ban a book?

Many heated discussions have come up recently about banning books. Is there ever a time that certain books should be kept from kids – like an R rating on a movie? Or should kids be allowed to read whatever they are interested in? Should offensive content be censored or should it be learned from?

34. Should community service be required for kids, middle schoolers and up?

What good could come of requiring community service from children? Or should people only serve because they genuinely want to help their community?

35. Is reading or math more important in today’s world?

Which is a more crucial skill to master? Should kids be focused on reading at the highest levels? Or should they be focused on learning the language of math at the highest levels?

Click Here To Download A One Page PDF Printable Of All The Argumentative Essay Topics

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The above text link will take you to a new window where you can download and print the topics today. No email required! Terms of Use : Homeschool, classroom, co-op, and personal use only.

These essay topics will go along with any persuasive writing unit in your  writing curriculum ! Let your student go through the list and find the one that really gets them excited.

If you’re looking for more fun writing prompts, be sure to check out the picture writing prompts below. There are 40 images with corresponding text that will get your kid excited to write!

Picture Writing Prompts for Kids Pin

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6th Grade Argumentative Essay Topics

Argumentative essays require more logic and research than persuasive essays, but the 6th-grade student will enjoy the chance to articulate convincingly to readers in 6th grade argumentative writing prompts . It may look like a complicated assignment for a 6th grader. To be the best writer, you should start writing your 6th grade essay . As you investigate popular essays, collect evidence, and solidify your stand and arguments, you will be practicing and learning many crucial critical thinking and writing skills which is important when you tackle 6th grade argumentative essay topics. As you explore 6th grade argumentative essay topic ideas such as methods in which schools solve bullying, you will have an option to reflect on the unfairness of some sources and how you can interpret the references to back up a specific side of an argument.

You will learn a lot about the contents of an interesting debate and 6th grade debate topics if you choose to articulate for or against a particular subject. It can be challenging to write about argumentative essays. For the process to be easy, argumentative essays have two significant steps. The first step is to get the correct essay topic, and the second step is to pen down a well-thought argumentative essay about the subject. It is possible to write an argumentative essay on various argumentative essay topics for 6th graders .

Compelling 6th Grade Argumentative Essay Topics

To help you find what to write about, you should have guidelines on how to pen down the best article on the chosen topic. An argumentative essay is about debating and arguing on a debatable subject. The aim and focus of the argumentative essay are to persuade readers to believe your ideas on the topic. The following list is the theme proposal examples of 6th grade argumentative essay topics.

Middle school argumentative essay topics can be a challenge to everyone, and especially sixth graders. Because it is an age at which one is learning how to properly write and structure their essays, choosing a good persuasive essay topics for 6th graders can be a challenge. But the options are endless, and here are some 6th grade argumentative essay topic ideas:

  • Are abortions ethical?
  • Should cloning be strictly regulated?
  • Marriages cutting across races help mitigate racial intolerance
  • Global warming is affecting every facet of our lives
  • Every one student should learn the principles of first aid
  • It is OK for a man to marry an old woman
  • Online dating is not safe
  • Parents have an overriding right to influence the lives of their children
  • People who are good at heart live longer
  • Role of partners in their relationship and family
  • Majority of scientist have married their computers
  • Incest should attract the death penalty
  • Is Internet access a right in accessing government services?
  • Impart of watching violent video games by teens
  • Effects of affording special treatment to minorities
  • Should students control or influence what they learn
  • Between boys and girls who face more peer pressure?
  • Do schools have measures of preventing bullying?
  • Do reality TV shows affect teens positively?
  • How significant is the contribution nature to our well being
  • Is it a rationale for celebrities, athletes, and CEOs to earn more?
  • What is the relative importance of arts education in solving societal problems?
  • Do modern students face more significant challenges today?
  • Do people have a responsibility in helping each other?
  • Are household responsible for conserving energy
  • Are there values to learn from pop culture?
  • Do parents have an obligation to monitor their teenagers’ Internet usage?
  • Is citizens’ privacy more important than national security?
  • Does a certificate of participation in an event have any material value?
  • Is continuous watching harmful to teens in the long run?
  • Are the effects of climate change real or its media hype?
  • Should the government prohibit cigarette smoking?
  • Is the knowledge of the second language beneficial to students?
  • What issues should global lawmakers take into considerations?
  • Should we divorce religion from politics?
  • Should celebrities have privacy?
  • Keep peanut products be kept out of children products
  • Government is wholly responsible for her citizens well being
  • It is illegal for students to photocopy library books

The above topics will perfectly guide you to writing the best essay.

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6th Grade Essay Prompts: A Comprehensive Guide

By: Author Paul Jenkins

Posted on August 2, 2023

Categories Writing , Education

As a 6th grader, you are at an exciting stage of academic and personal growth. One of the most important skills you’ll develop during this time is essay writing.

Essay writing is an essential skill that will help you communicate your thoughts and ideas effectively. It will also help you develop critical thinking skills, research skills, and creativity.

Essay writing prompts are a great way to get started with essay writing. They provide you with a topic or idea to write about, which can be helpful if you’re not sure what to write about. There are many different types of writing prompts, including narrative, descriptive, persuasive, and expository.

Each type of prompt requires a different approach, so it’s important to understand the different types of prompts and how to approach them. With the right guidance and practice, you can become a confident and skilled essay writer.

Key Takeaways

  • Writing prompts are an excellent way to improve your essay writing skills.
  • There are many different types of writing prompts, each requiring a different approach.
  • With practice and guidance, you can become a confident and skilled essay writer.

33 6th Grade Essay Prompts

Here are 33 essay prompts for 6th grade students:

1. Write about a time you tried something new. What did you learn from this experience?

2. Describe your ideal day. Where would you go, what would you do, and who would you be with?

3. Who is someone you admire? Why do you look up to this person?

4. What is your biggest accomplishment so far in life? Why does it make you proud?

5. What is the most important lesson you’ve learned in school? Explain.

6. What do you want to be when you grow up? What steps will you need to take to achieve this goal?

7. If you could switch places with anyone for a day, who would it be and why?

8. What is your favorite book or movie? Describe the plot and explain why you like it.

9. Describe a challenging situation you’ve faced. How did you handle it and what did you learn?

10. What is one thing you would change about your school? Explain why.

11. What is the most amazing place you’ve ever visited? Describe what you saw and did there.

12. What personal qualities make someone a good friend? Describe a friend who has these qualities.

13. Explain three goals you have set for yourself this year. Why are they important to you?

14. If you could give advice to a younger sibling or friend, what would you say? Why?

15. Describe your favorite holiday tradition. Why is it meaningful to you?

16. What is your favorite subject in school? Explain why you enjoy it.

17. Describe your dream vacation. Where would you go and what would you do?

18. What is a cause you care about? Why is it important to you?

19. What challenges do tweens/teens face today? How can they overcome them?

20. What is one thing that makes you special? How does it impact your life?

21. Describe an act of kindness you did for someone. How did it make you and the other person feel?

22. What is your favorite memory with your family or friends? Why was it meaningful?

23. What is your dream job when you grow up? Describe what you would do.

24. What is a time you made a mistake or failed at something? What did you learn?

25. What are you most proud of about yourself? Explain why.

26. What is your favorite thing to do for fun? Describe why you enjoy it.

27. Pick an inspiring quote. Explain what it means and why it inspires you.

28. Describe a time you stood up for someone else. What motivated you to help them?

29. What are some small things people can do to make the world a better place? Give specific examples.

30. What is one goal you have for improving yourself this school year? Why is this goal meaningful to you?

31. Describe the cover of a book that hasn’t been written about your life. What would the title and imagery represent?

32. What makes you laugh? Describe something funny that happened to you recently.

33. What is one thing you are looking forward to in the future? Why does it excite you?

Understanding Essay Writing

If you’re a 6th grader, you’re just starting to learn about essay writing. Essays are a way to express your thoughts and ideas in a structured way. They can be fun to write, but they can also be challenging. In this section, we’ll cover the basics of essay writing to help you get started.

The Three Parts of an Essay

Every essay has three parts: the beginning, the middle, and the end. The beginning is where you introduce your topic and give some background information. The middle is where you present your arguments and evidence. The end is where you summarize your points and give your opinion.

Writing Skills

To write a good essay, you need to have good writing skills. This means you need to be able to write clearly and concisely, use proper grammar and punctuation, and organize your thoughts in a logical way. If you’re not sure where to start, try reading some essays by other writers to get a sense of how they structure their writing.

Essay Writing Process

The process of writing an essay can be broken down into several steps. First, you need to choose a topic. This can be anything from a personal experience to a current event. Once you have your topic, you need to do some research to gather information and evidence to support your arguments.

Then, you need to organize your thoughts into an outline. This will help you stay on track and make sure you cover all of your points. Finally, you can start writing your essay. Remember to start with a strong introduction, use evidence to support your arguments, and end with a clear conclusion.

6th Grade Writing Prompts

If you’re looking for some ideas to get started with your essay, try some of these 6th grade writing prompts:

  • What is your greatest aspiration?
  • What do you want to be when you grow up? How will you get there?
  • What challenges do immigrants in our country face? What unique challenges do they face living in a new country?
  • What is the most important lesson you’ve learned in your life so far?
  • Describe a time when you had to make a difficult decision. How did you handle it?

Remember, the key to writing a good essay is to stay organized, use evidence to support your arguments, and end with a clear conclusion. With practice, you’ll become a great essay writer in no time!

Types of Writing Prompts

As a 6th grader, you will encounter different types of writing prompts. Understanding the different types of prompts will help you prepare for the challenges ahead and develop your writing skills. Here are some of the most common types of writing prompts:

Narrative Writing Prompts

Narrative writing prompts require you to write a story or describe an event from your life. These prompts may ask you to write about a personal experience, a fictional story, or a historical event. Narrative writing prompts allow you to use your imagination and creativity to develop characters, plot, and setting.

Expository Writing Prompts

Expository writing prompts require you to explain or describe a topic. These prompts may ask you to write about a process, a cause and effect relationship, or a comparison between two things. Expository writing prompts help you develop your analytical and critical thinking skills.

Creative Writing Prompts

Creative writing prompts allow you to explore your creativity and imagination. These prompts may ask you to write a poem, a short story, or a script for a play. Creative writing exercises help you develop your writing style and voice.

Research Writing Prompts

Research writing prompts require you to conduct research and write an informative essay. These prompts may ask you to write about a historical event, a scientific discovery, or a social issue. Research writing prompts help you develop your research skills and learn how to cite sources.

Reflective Writing Prompts

Reflective writing prompts require you to reflect on a personal experience or a topic. These prompts may ask you to write about your feelings, thoughts, or opinions. Reflective writing prompts help you develop your self-awareness and critical thinking skills.

Procedural Writing Prompts

Procedural writing prompts require you to write instructions for a process. These prompts may ask you to write about how to make something, how to do something, or how to solve a problem. Procedural writing prompts help you develop your organizational and communication skills.

Informational Writing Prompts

Informational writing prompts require you to write an informative essay about a topic. These prompts may ask you to write about a historical event, a scientific discovery, or a social issue. Informational writing prompts help you develop your research and writing skills.

In conclusion, understanding the different types of writing prompts will help you prepare for the challenges ahead and develop your writing skills. By practicing different types of prompts, you will become a more confident and knowledgeable writer.

Developing Writing Skills

In 6th grade, students are expected to have developed basic writing skills, including grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. However, developing these skills is not enough to become a good writer.

To become a creative and critical writer, students need to practice writing regularly and be motivated to do so.

One way to motivate students is by providing them with interesting and thought-provoking writing prompts. These prompts can help students explore their thoughts, feelings, and ideas and develop their writing skills.

Additionally, writing prompts can help students develop their critical thinking skills by challenging them to think deeply about a topic and express their thoughts clearly.

To develop writing skills, it is important to practice regularly. Encourage students to write every day, even if it is just a few sentences. You can also assign longer writing assignments, such as essays or research papers, to help students improve their writing skills.

In addition to regular practice, it is important to provide students with feedback on their writing. This feedback should be constructive and focus on areas where the student can improve. Encourage students to revise their writing based on feedback and to ask for help if they are struggling.

Overall, developing writing skills takes time and practice. By providing students with interesting prompts, regular practice, and constructive feedback, you can help them become confident and knowledgeable writers.

Topics for Writing Prompts

When it comes to writing prompts for 6th graders, there are a variety of topics that can inspire creativity and help students develop their writing skills. Here are some ideas for different types of writing prompts that can be used in the classroom.

Personal Experiences

One type of writing prompt that can be effective for 6th graders is a personal experience prompt. These prompts ask students to reflect on their own lives and write about a specific memory or experience. For example, you could ask students to write about their favorite book, a memorable experience they had with their family, or a surprising thing that happened to them.

Imaginative Scenarios

Another type of writing prompt that can be fun and engaging for 6th graders is an imaginative scenario prompt. These prompts ask students to use their imaginations to create a story or situation. For example, you could ask students to write about what their future self might be like, what their dream career would be, or what a new holiday they invent might look like.

Current Events

Writing prompts that are related to current events can help students develop their critical thinking skills and engage with the world around them. For example, you could ask students to write about a social media trend that is popular right now, or to reflect on the civil rights movement and its impact on society.

Historical Events

Finally, writing prompts that focus on historical events can help students develop a deeper understanding of the past and its relevance to the present. For example, you could ask students to write about a historical figure they admire, or to reflect on a field trip they took to a historic site. You could also ask students to imagine what it would be like to be the oldest person they know, and to write about their life experiences.

Overall, there are many different types of writing prompts that can be used to inspire creativity and help 6th graders develop their writing skills. By using a variety of prompts that focus on personal experiences, imaginative scenarios, current events, and historical events, you can help students explore different topics and find their own unique voice as writers.

Writing Techniques

As a 6th grader, you will be expected to use various writing techniques to create engaging and informative essays. Here are some techniques you can use to make your essays stand out:

When writing an essay, you can use the plot technique to create a storyline that keeps your readers engaged. You can use the plot structure to organize your essay into a beginning, middle, and end. In the beginning, introduce your topic and provide some background information. In the middle, present your arguments and provide supporting evidence. In the end, summarize your arguments and provide a conclusion.

Descriptive

The descriptive technique can help you create vivid images in the minds of your readers. You can use descriptive language to paint a picture of your topic, such as describing the sights, sounds, and smells. This technique can be especially useful when writing about a place or a person.

Compare and Contrast

The compare and contrast technique can help you analyze two or more things and highlight their similarities and differences. This technique can be useful when writing about two different topics, such as two books or two historical events. You can use a table or a bullet point list to compare and contrast the two topics.

The letter technique can be used to write a persuasive essay in the form of a letter. You can address your essay to a specific person or group of people and use persuasive language to convince them of your point of view. This technique can be especially useful when writing about a social issue or a current event.

Story Starters

The story starter technique can help you come up with an interesting and engaging beginning to your essay. You can use a story starter to grab your reader’s attention and create a sense of intrigue. For example, you can start your essay with a question, a quote, or a surprising fact.

Instructions

The instructions technique can be used to write a how-to essay. You can provide step-by-step instructions on how to do something, such as how to make a recipe or how to play a game. This technique can be especially useful when writing about a practical topic.

The resolution technique can be used to provide a satisfying conclusion to your essay. You can use this technique to tie up loose ends and provide closure to your arguments. You can also use this technique to provide a call to action or a final thought.

Storytelling

The storytelling technique can be used to create a narrative essay. You can use this technique to tell a story about a personal experience or a historical event. This technique can be especially useful when writing about a topic that has an emotional or personal connection.

The Role of Research in Writing

Research plays a vital role in writing, especially when it comes to nonfiction and research writing. As a 6th grader, you will be expected to investigate and use credible sources to support your arguments and ideas.

Research helps you to find and understand information, and it allows you to use that information to write a well-informed and thoughtful essay.

When conducting research, it is important to use credible sources. This means using sources that are reliable and trustworthy. Credible sources can include books, articles, and websites that are written by experts in the field. You can also use primary sources, such as interviews or surveys, to gather information.

As you conduct your research, it is important to investigate natural resources. This includes things like water, air, and land, as well as the plants and animals that live in these environments. Understanding natural resources can help you to write about environmental issues, such as pollution, conservation, and climate change.

When writing your essay, make sure to cite your sources properly. This means giving credit to the authors or creators of the sources you used. You can do this by including a bibliography or works cited page at the end of your essay.

In conclusion, research is an essential part of writing. It allows you to gather information, use credible sources, and write a well-informed and thoughtful essay. By investigating natural resources and using credible sources, you can write about important issues and make a meaningful contribution to your field of study.

Importance of Self-Expression in Writing

As a 6th grader, you are at a stage where you are developing your writing skills and learning how to express yourself through words. Self-expression is a crucial aspect of writing because it allows you to communicate your thoughts, feelings, and ideas effectively.

Writing is not just about putting words on paper; it is about conveying your message to your reader in a way that is clear and concise.

One of the best ways to practice self-expression in writing is through personal narrative and reflective writing. Personal narrative is a type of writing that tells a story about a personal experience. It allows you to share your emotions and experiences with your reader, giving them a glimpse into your life.

Reflective writing, on the other hand, is a type of writing that requires you to reflect on a particular topic or experience. It helps you to understand your thoughts and feelings on a deeper level and communicate them effectively.

Journaling is another great way to practice self-expression in writing. It allows you to write freely without worrying about grammar, spelling, or punctuation.

Journaling is a safe space where you can express your thoughts and feelings without fear of judgment. It is a great way to explore your emotions and ideas, which can help you to become a better writer.

Self-expression in writing is essential because it allows you to communicate your ideas and thoughts effectively. It also helps you to develop your writing skills and become a better writer.

When you express yourself in writing, you are not only communicating with your reader, but you are also learning more about yourself. Writing can be a powerful tool for self-discovery and personal growth.

In conclusion, self-expression is a fundamental aspect of writing, and it is essential for 6th graders to develop this skill. Personal narrative, reflective writing, and journaling are great ways to practice self-expression in writing. By expressing yourself through writing, you can communicate your thoughts and ideas effectively, develop your writing skills, and learn more about yourself.

Understanding Different Essay Types

As a 6th grader, you will be expected to write different types of essays for your assignments. Understanding the different types of essays will help you choose the best approach for your topic and write a well-structured and effective essay.

Narrative Essays

Narrative essays are all about telling a story. They are usually written in the first person and follow a specific structure with a clear beginning, middle, and end. Narrative essays can be based on personal experiences, fictional stories, or real-life events. They are a great way to practice your storytelling skills and engage your readers.

Persuasive Essays

Persuasive essays are written with the goal of convincing the reader to agree with your opinion or take a specific action. They require a clear thesis statement and strong evidence to support your argument. Persuasive essays are often used in debates, speeches, and editorials. They are a great way to develop your critical thinking and persuasive skills.

Argument Writing

Argument writing is similar to persuasive writing, but it focuses more on presenting a balanced argument with both sides of an issue. It requires research and analysis to present a well-rounded and informed perspective. Argument writing can be used in essays, research papers, and debates.

Essay Topics

The topic of your essay is important because it sets the tone and direction for your writing. When choosing a topic, consider your audience, your interests, and the purpose of your essay. Some popular essay topics for 6th graders include:

  • The importance of recycling
  • The effects of social media on teenagers
  • The benefits of reading
  • The impact of video games on children
  • The role of technology in education

In conclusion, understanding the different types of essays and choosing the right topic is essential for writing a successful essay. Whether you are telling a story, persuading your reader, or presenting a balanced argument, following a clear structure and providing strong evidence will help you achieve your writing goals.

The Use of Technology in Writing

As a 6th grader, you are growing up in a world where technology is an integral part of your daily life. It is no surprise that technology has also made its way into the classroom, including the writing process. The use of technology in writing can be beneficial in many ways, but it is important to understand how to use it effectively.

The internet is a vast resource for information and research. You can use search engines like Google to find articles, videos, and other sources of information to support your writing. However, it is important to evaluate the credibility of the sources you find. Make sure to check the author, publication date, and any biases that may be present.

Cell phones are also a common tool for writing. Many students use their phones to take notes, write reminders, or even draft essays. However, it is important to avoid distractions like social media or texting while writing. If you find yourself getting distracted, consider using an app or website blocker to help you stay focused.

Video games can also be a source of inspiration for writing prompts. Games often have complex stories and characters that can be used as a starting point for creative writing. However, it is important to remember that video games should not be a substitute for reading and writing.

Social media can also be a useful tool for writing. Many writers use social media to connect with other writers, share their work, and receive feedback. However, it is important to remember that social media can also be a distraction. Make sure to set boundaries and avoid spending too much time on social media while writing.

In conclusion, the use of technology in writing can be beneficial, but it is important to use it effectively. Make sure to evaluate sources, avoid distractions, and set boundaries when using technology to support your writing.

Writing about Favorite Things

One of the best ways to get started with writing is to write about your favorite things. This can be anything from your favorite book to your favorite food, animal, or sport. Writing about things that you love can help you to develop your writing skills and express your thoughts and feelings in a clear and concise way.

When writing about your favorite book, think about what makes it special to you. Is it the characters, the plot, or the setting? What emotions does the book evoke in you? Use descriptive language to bring your favorite book to life on the page.

If you’re writing about your favorite food, describe the taste, texture, and aroma of the dish. What memories or emotions does this food bring up for you? Is it a food that you associate with a particular time or place in your life?

When writing about your favorite animal, consider what draws you to this creature. Is it their appearance, behavior, or habitat? Use sensory language to describe the animal and its surroundings.

If you have a pet, writing about them can be a great way to practice your writing skills. Describe their personality, habits, and quirks. What do you love most about your pet?

Writing about your favorite sport can be a great way to explore your passion for the game. Describe the rules, equipment, and strategies involved in the sport. What do you enjoy most about playing or watching this sport?

No matter what your favorite thing is, writing about it can help you to develop your writing skills and express yourself in a clear and concise way. So grab a pen and paper, and start writing about the things that you love!

The Impact of Reading and Math on Writing

As a 6th grader, you may not realize it yet, but reading and math skills can have a significant impact on your writing abilities. Both reading and math are essential components of writing, and they can help improve your writing skills in various ways.

Reading and Writing

Reading and writing go hand in hand. When you read, you are exposed to different writing styles, sentence structures, and vocabulary. You can learn a lot about how to write clearly and effectively by reading different types of books, articles, and essays.

Reading also helps improve your comprehension skills, which are essential for understanding writing prompts and crafting well-written responses.

As a 6th grader, you should aim to read a variety of books, including fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. Reading different genres can help you develop a more diverse vocabulary and improve your understanding of different writing styles.

It can also help you identify different literary devices and techniques that you can use in your own writing.

Math and Writing

Math may not seem like it has much to do with writing, but it can actually help improve your writing skills. Math helps develop critical thinking skills, which are essential for analyzing writing prompts and crafting well-reasoned arguments.

Math can also help you develop problem-solving skills, which can come in handy when you encounter difficult writing assignments.

As a 6th grader, you should aim to develop your math skills by practicing regularly. Math can be challenging, but with practice and perseverance, you can improve your skills and develop a better understanding of mathematical concepts. This can help you become a better writer by developing your critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

In conclusion, reading and math skills can have a significant impact on your writing abilities. By reading regularly and practicing math, you can improve your comprehension, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills, which are all essential for becoming a better writer. As a 6th grader, it’s important to develop these skills early on to set yourself up for success in the future.

Writing about School Life

Writing about your school life can be an excellent way to reflect on your experiences and share your perspective with others. Here are some essay prompts that will help you explore your thoughts and feelings about your middle school experience:

  • What is your favorite subject in school? Why do you enjoy it?
  • Describe a time when you faced a challenge in school. How did you overcome it?
  • What do you think is the most important thing you have learned so far in middle school?
  • Write about a teacher who has had a positive impact on your life. What did they do to inspire you?
  • Do you think standardized tests accurately measure your knowledge and abilities? Why or why not?
  • How do you feel about moving on to high school next year? What are you most excited or nervous about?

When writing about school life, it’s essential to be honest and reflective. Don’t be afraid to share your opinions or experiences, even if they are different from what others might think or feel. Use specific examples and details to support your ideas and make your writing more engaging.

Remember to follow standard essay writing conventions, such as starting with an introduction, including a clear thesis statement, and organizing your ideas logically. Use transitions between paragraphs to help the reader follow your train of thought.

Whether you love or hate school, writing about your experiences can help you gain a deeper understanding of yourself and your place in the world. So take some time to reflect on your middle school years and share your thoughts with others through your writing.

Writing about Society and Culture

As a 6th grader, you are at an age where you can start exploring and writing about societal and cultural issues. One topic that you can explore is the concept of empathy. Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of others.

You can write about the importance of empathy in society and how it can help people understand each other better. You can also explore ways to develop empathy, such as volunteering, reading books, and watching movies that showcase different cultures and perspectives.

Another topic to consider is immigration. You can write about the challenges that immigrants face when they move to a new country. You can explore the reasons why people immigrate, the impact of immigration on society, and the ways in which immigrants contribute to their new communities.

You can also write about the debates surrounding immigration policies and how they affect immigrant families.

When writing about society and culture, it is important to remain neutral and present different perspectives. You can use bullet points or tables to compare and contrast different viewpoints on a particular issue.

This will help you develop a well-rounded understanding of the topic and make your writing more informative.

In conclusion, writing about society and culture can be a great way to explore important issues and develop your writing skills. By exploring topics such as empathy and immigration, you can gain a better understanding of the world around you and become a more informed and empathetic individual.

Writing about Future Aspirations

As a 6th grader, you are at a stage of your life where you are beginning to think about your future aspirations. It’s important to start thinking about what you want to be when you grow up, as this can help you set goals and work towards achieving them.

Writing about your future aspirations can be a great way to explore your dreams and goals. Here are a few tips to help you get started:

1. Think about your future self

When writing about your future aspirations, it’s important to think about your future self. What kind of person do you want to be? What kind of life do you want to lead? What kind of impact do you want to make in the world?

2. Dream career

One of the most common things 6th graders write about when exploring their future aspirations is their dream career. What kind of job do you want to have when you grow up? What kind of work do you want to do? What kind of impact do you want to make in your chosen field?

3. Set specific goals

When writing about your future aspirations, it’s important to set specific goals. What steps do you need to take to achieve your dreams? What kind of education or training do you need? What kind of skills do you need to develop?

4. Be realistic

While it’s important to dream big, it’s also important to be realistic when writing about your future aspirations. Make sure that your goals are achievable and that you have a clear plan for how you will achieve them.

5. Stay positive

Finally, when writing about your future aspirations, it’s important to stay positive. Believe in yourself and your ability to achieve your dreams. Remember that anything is possible if you work hard and stay focused.

Writing about Personal Interests

When it comes to writing about personal interests, the possibilities are endless. You can write about your favorite movie, video game, book, short story, or poem. The key is to choose something that you are passionate about and that you can write about in detail.

To get started, make a list of your favorite movies, video games, books, short stories, or poems. Then, choose one that you want to write about. Next, brainstorm some ideas for your essay.

Think about what you want to say about the movie, video game, book, short story, or poem. What themes or ideas does it explore? What do you like about it? What don’t you like about it?

Once you have some ideas, it’s time to start writing. Begin by introducing the movie, video game, book, short story, or poem. Give some background information and explain why you chose it. Then, dive into your analysis.

Use specific examples from the movie, video game, book, short story, or poem to support your points.

When writing about personal interests, it’s important to be clear and concise. Avoid making exaggerated or false claims. Stick to the facts and use evidence to support your arguments. Use formatting tools like bullet points or tables to organize your ideas and make your essay easier to read.

In conclusion, writing about personal interests is a great way to showcase your passion and creativity. Choose something that you are passionate about and that you can write about in detail. Brainstorm some ideas, be clear and concise, and use evidence to support your arguments.

With these tips, you can write an engaging and informative essay that showcases your writing skills and your love for your favorite movie, video game, book, short story, or poem.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some creative writing prompts for 6th graders.

When it comes to creative writing prompts for 6th graders, the possibilities are endless. You can encourage your students to write about their favorite hobbies, memories, or even their dreams. Some prompts to consider include:

  • Write a story about a magical creature that you discover in your backyard.
  • Describe your favorite place in the world and why it means so much to you.
  • Write a letter to your future self, detailing what you hope to accomplish in the next few years.

How can reading passages be incorporated into 6th grade writing prompts?

Reading passages can be an excellent source of inspiration for 6th grade writing prompts. You can have your students read a short story or article, and then ask them to write a response or analysis. Some prompts to consider include:

  • Write a character analysis of the protagonist in the story you just read.
  • Summarize the article you just read and provide your opinion on the topic.
  • Write a short story inspired by the themes or ideas in the reading passage.

What are some argumentative writing prompts for 6th graders?

Argumentative writing prompts can help 6th graders develop critical thinking skills and learn to express their opinions effectively. Some prompts to consider include:

  • Should students be allowed to have cell phones in school? Why or why not?
  • Is it ethical to keep animals in zoos? Why or why not?
  • Should junk food be banned from school cafeterias? Why or why not?

What are some fun and engaging writing topics for 6th graders?

To keep 6th graders engaged and interested in writing, it’s important to choose topics that are fun and relevant to their lives. Some prompts to consider include:

  • Write a story about a time when you had to overcome a fear.
  • Describe your dream vacation and what you would do there.
  • Write a letter to your favorite celebrity, telling them why you admire them.

What are some tips for developing a 6th grade writing curriculum?

When developing a 6th grade writing curriculum, it’s important to keep in mind the needs and abilities of your students. Some tips to consider include:

  • Incorporate a variety of writing styles, such as creative writing, persuasive writing, and analytical writing.
  • Provide frequent opportunities for students to give and receive feedback on their writing.
  • Encourage students to write about topics that are meaningful to them.

How can 6th graders be encouraged to write about meaningful topics?

To encourage 6th graders to write about meaningful topics, it’s important to provide them with prompts and assignments that are relevant to their lives. Some strategies to consider include:

  • Ask students to write about their own experiences and perspectives.
  • Provide prompts that relate to current events or issues that are important to the students.
  • Encourage students to explore their own values and beliefs through their writing.

argumentative essay topics 6th grade

Home » Tips for Teachers » The 9 Best Creative and Argumentative Writing Prompts for 6th Grade

The 9 Best Creative and Argumentative Writing Prompts for 6th Grade

Keeping middle schoolers excited about writing is important. Writing is such an essential skill that students will need as they complete their education and move on to finding a real job.Many middle school-age students, however, often begin seeing writing as something that isn’t fun or worthwhile. Other students get discouraged about their abilities as a writer and may stop trying their best.

Use These Writing Prompts to Develop Creative and Critical Thinking Skills

Finding the best writing prompts for 6th grade is so important in keeping students excited and writing and seeing it as something that is worth their time.A few years ago, I took a job as a 6th grade writing teacher. I almost immediately noticed that many of my students seemed bored with writing, while others seemed to shut down when asked to write.I searched and found some engaging writing prompts that sparked my students’ interest. What a difference it made! Students that claimed writing was ‘useless’ were now engaged and sharing their work with others!

I’d love to help you bring about this change in your students, too! Continue reading, and I’ll share:

  • The 6th grade writing standards →
  • Advantages of using writing prompts with your lessons →
  • My favorite creative writing prompts for 6th grade →
  • My favorite argumentative writing prompts for 6th grade →

5 Creative Writing Prompts for 6th Grade

Providing students with opportunities for creative writing is important. Creative writing can help students process their emotions, build their confidence, express their individuality, and increase their imagination.

Let's turn on our imagination

Below are some of my favorite creative writing prompts for 6th grade.  You can use document cameras in order to follow your student’s writing.

Prompt: When you become disappointed, what do you do to manage your emotions?

Before having students begin writing, brainstorm some possible reactions as a class. These may include crying, breathing deeply, counting to 10, taking a break/removing oneself from the situation. After brainstorming, have students select the strategy (or strategies) that best describe their reactions and write about what they do.

2. Flying Superpower

Prompt: One morning, you wake up and realize that you are suddenly able to fly. What adventures would you like to go on?

This writing prompt will really tap into students’ creativity and imagination. Since flying is something they clearly have never done, they will have to think about all the things that would be possible and choose a few to write about.

Have you ever dreamed of having superpowers?

3. Letter to Future Self

Prompt: Write a letter to your future self. What would you want yourself to know?

Tell students that they will be writing a letter to themselves to read when they are older. You can either pick an age/milestone (graduating from college, getting their first job, having children, etc.), or allow students to pick. Ask students to think about what they believe would be important to know at that juncture in their life and include it in their letter.

You could also modify this by having students write a letter to their past selves. What would they have wanted to know at the beginning of the school year, before they lost their first tooth, or before they even learned how to walk?

4. No Internet for a Month

Prompt: If there was no internet available for a month, what would you do?

This could be a fun one to do with middle schoolers who are so dependent on technology and the internet. Before students begin writing, get them to brainstorm a list of all the ways their lives are dependent on the internet.

Are you an Internet addict?

Encourage them to think beyond the ‘obvious’ online game play and video streaming to consider other impacts such as ordering items online or communicating via email with friends and family.

5. Genie in a Bottle

Prompt: You released a genie from her magic bottle, and she said she would give you any talent that you ask for. What talent would you want and why?

This is another great creative writing prompt for sixth graders. They’ll have fun thinking about a talent they would like and what they would like to do with that talent.

You have three wishes

4 Argumentative Writing Prompts for 6th Grade

Argumentative writing is another important skill for students to practice and develop. With argumentative writing, students must decide their opinion or position related to an issue and provide reasons that support their position. These reasons should be evidenced based, so research to find the support is often required.

Let kids share their opinions

You’ll find some of my favorite argumentative writing prompts to use with 6th grade students below.

Prompt: Which animal makes the best pet? Support your opinion with facts and examples.

I like this writing prompt for introducing students to argumentative writing. The topic of pets is something all students are familiar with, even if they don’t personally own a pet.

Kids like pet

You can also use this topic to introduce students to providence factual reasons, versus opinions, to support their answers. For example, if students want to say that a cat is the best pet, a factual reason can’t be that cats are cute. However, they could say something like cats are the best pet because they do not have to be taken outside to go to the bathroom on a cold or rainy day.

2. Teaching Math in School

Prompt: Is it necessary to teach math in school? Why or why not?

I liked using this writing prompt with my 6th graders. Before I had students start, I took an initial poll by having the students raise their hands. Not surprisingly, a fair number of hands went up to vote against teaching math in school.

Do you like math?

However, after we discussed the pros and cons of eliminating math instruction and students had to make their final decision before starting on their prompt, a lot of students changed their minds. It was encouraging to see them looking at the stronger reasons for leaving math in the curriculum and letting them outweigh their desire for ‘easier’ school.

3. Screen Time Limits

Prompt: Should parents place limits on how much screen time their children can have? Why or why not?

Interesting question to think of

However, once they start thinking about reasons to limit screen time and examine evidence showing the impact of too much screen time on children, they may change their mind.

4. Conserving Energy

Prompt: What is the most important thing all households should be doing to conserve energy?

This writing prompt can pair nicely with a science unit on energy conservation. Clearly, there are a number of things that families can do to reduce their environmental impact.

We should take care of our planet

However, for this writing prompt, students must decide which one thing is the most important and provide evidence to support their opinion.

Writing Standards for 6th Grade

Sixth graders will continue to build on the knowledge and skills they learned in elementary school. As the first of the middle school years, the writing expectations for sixth grade will be greater than those during the elementary school years.

Don't forget about standarts

Sixth grade is a critical year for students in regards to writing and other subject matters. They are transitioning from elementary school to the upper grades and will need the right supports to help them master the grade-level standards.

Below is an overview of the writing standards for 6th grade related to the writing process, writing purposes, writing evaluation, conventions, and research and inquiry.

Writing Process

Students should receive instruction and practice on each stage of the writing process. They should independently implement each of the stages when producing their own written work.

Do you enjoy writing?

The stages of the writing process that sixth graders are expected to know and use include:

Writing Purposes

Sixth graders should be composing texts for a variety of purposes and intents. Many of these texts should be at least 500 to 700 words long.

You should know why you're writing

Some of the different forms/intents that students should be writing about in sixth grade include:

  • Research Reports
  • Responses to Literature

Writing Evaluation

In sixth grade, students should practice evaluating and giving constructive feedback for another student’s wiring.

Evaluation is important

They should also begin evaluating their own work and identify their strengths and weaknesses as a writer. Then, they should use this information to set persona writing goals for improving their work.

Conventions

Below are some of the key convention skills that sixth graders should be proficient with:

  • Sentence structure
  • Capitalization
  • Punctuation
  • Cursive or manuscript

Research and Inquiry

Research and inquiry is another important standard for sixth graders to show proficiency with. By the end of the year, students should be able to:

  • Compile information from multiple sources to complete a report
  • Use graphic organizer to show prior knowledge about a subject
  • Create a plan for research and take notes about a topic
  • Create appropriate questions to research
  • Choose appropriate and authoritative sources
  • Locate relevant information from resources
  • Summarize the information found from various sources
  • Document and cite sources
  • Understand and articulate the importance of avoiding plagiarism

Research and inquiry is another important standard for sixth graders

Advantages of Writing Prompts at the Lessons

You may be wondering why you should use writing prompts with your sixth graders. There actually are a number of benefits associated with using writing prompts, some of which may surprise you.

There're lots of advantages

A few of the benefits of using writing prompts during your writing instruction include:

  • The ability to focus student writing on a specific form of writing (informative, narrative, expository, etc.).
  • Giving students the opportunity to practice writing and strengthen their skills as a writer.
  • Presenting students with engaging tasks and assignments.
  • Helping us as teachers come up with new ideas to get our students interested and engaged.
  • You can find many writing prompts online for free, which is always a benefit when you are a teacher.
Got to sub in 6th grade today, the predictions were coming fast and furious for today’s writing prompt. Got to love engaged students! pic.twitter.com/nBfzMxxP0T — Nick Jurrens (@NickJurrens) February 20, 2021

argumentative essay topics 6th grade

  • Grades 6-12
  • School Leaders

Free end-of-year letter templates to your students 📝!

101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

Use your words to sway the reader.

Persuasive Essay Topics: Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

Persuasive writing is one of those skills that can help students succeed in real life.  Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative , but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader. It’s important to know your audience so you can anticipate any counterarguments they might make and try to overcome them. Try reading some mentor texts to show kids great examples of opinion writing. Then use these persuasive essay topics for practice.

School and Education Persuasive Essay Topics

Life and ethics persuasive essay topics, science and technology persuasive essay topics, sports and entertainment persuasive essay topics, just for fun persuasive essay topics.

  

  • Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?

Persuasive Essay Topics: Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?

  • Students should/should not be able to use their phones during the school day.
  • Should schools have dress codes?
  • If I could change one school rule, it would be …
  • Is year-round school a good idea?
  • Should we stop giving final exams?
  • Is it better to be good at academics or good at sports?

Is it better to be good at academics or good at sports?

  • Which is better, private schools or public schools?
  • Should every student have to participate in athletics?
  • Do you think schools should ban junk food from their cafeterias?
  • Should students be required to volunteer in their communities?
  • What is the most important school subject?
  • Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

Persuasive Essay Topics: Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

  • Is it ever OK to cheat on homework or a test?
  • Should students get to grade their teachers?
  • Do you think college should be free for anyone who wants to attend?
  • Should schools be allowed to ban some books from their libraries?
  • Which is better, book smarts or street smarts?

Which is better, book smarts or street smarts?

  • Should all students have to learn a foreign language?
  • Are single-gender schools better or worse for students?
  • Is it OK to eat animals?
  • What animal makes the best pet?
  • Visit an animal shelter, choose an animal that needs a home, and write an essay persuading someone to adopt that animal.
  • If you find money on the ground, should you try to find the person who lost it, or is it yours to keep?

If you find money on the ground, should you try to find the person who lost it, or is it yours to keep?

  • Who faces more peer pressure, girls or boys?
  • Should all Americans be required to vote?
  • Is it better to be kind or truthful?
  • Which is better, giving or receiving?
  • Is it OK to keep animals in zoos?
  • Should we change the minimum driving age in the United States?

Should we change the minimum driving age in the United States?

  • Which is more important, happiness or success?
  • Is democracy the best form of government?
  • Is social media helpful or harmful?
  • Should parents be punished for their children’s mistakes or crimes?
  • Should kids have set bedtimes or just go to bed when they’re sleepy?
  • Do you think the government should find a way to provide free health care for everyone?

Do you think the government should find a way to provide free health care for everyone?

  • Is it better to save your allowance or spend it?
  • Should we ban plastic bags and bottles?
  • Which is better, living in the city or in the country?
  • If I could make a new law, it would be …
  • Is Pluto a planet?
  • Should human cloning be legal?
  • Should vaccines be mandatory?
  • Is it right for countries to still maintain nuclear weapon arsenals?

Is it right for countries to still maintain nuclear weapon arsenals?

  • Should testing on animals be made illegal?
  • Will expanded use of artificial intelligence be good for humanity?
  • Should all people have free Internet access in their homes?
  • Is there intelligent life on other planets?
  • Does technology create more jobs than it eliminates?
  • Should parents use their children’s cell phones to track where they are?
  • Should scientists try to develop a way for people to live forever?

Should scientists try to develop a way for people to live forever?

  • What’s the best type of smartphone: Android or iPhone?
  • Which is better, Macs or PCs?
  • Do people rely too much on technology in the modern world?
  • Should cryptocurrencies replace cash?
  • Should there be a minimum age requirement to own a smartphone?
  • Is it important to keep spending money on space exploration, or should we use the money for other things?

Is it important to keep spending money on space exploration, or should we use the money for other things?

  • Should kids under 13 be allowed to use social media sites?
  • Should we ban cigarette smoking and vaping entirely?
  • Is it better to be an animal that lives in the water or on land?
  • Should kids be allowed to watch TV on school nights?
  • Which is better, paper books or e-books?
  • Is the current movie rating system (G, PG, PG-13, etc.) effective?
  • Are video games better than board games?
  • Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

  • Which is better, reading books or watching TV?
  • Does playing violent video games make people more violent in real life?
  • Are graphic novels just as valuable as traditional fictional books?
  • Should everyone play on the same sports teams, regardless of gender?
  • Choose a book that’s been made into a movie. Which was better, the movie or the book?

Choose a book that's been made into a movie. Which was better, the movie or the book?

  • Who is the world’s best athlete, present or past?
  • Are professional athletes/musicians/actors overpaid?
  • Which is better, fiction or nonfiction?
  • The best music genre is …
  • What is one book that everyone should read?
  • What new sport should be added to the Olympics?

What new sport should be added to the Olympics?

  • What’s the best video game system?
  • Does playing video games make you smarter?
  • Does reality TV actually depict real life?
  • Should all neighborhoods have free parks and playgrounds?
  • What’s the best holiday?
  • The very best food of all time is …
  • Which is better, artificial Christmas trees or real ones?

Which is better, artificial Christmas trees or real ones?

  • What’s the best season of the year?
  • Should you put ketchup on a hot dog?
  • Is a taco a sandwich?
  • Does fruit count as dessert?
  • Should people have to go to school or work on their birthday?
  • Are clowns scary or funny?
  • Which is more dangerous, werewolves or vampires?

Which is more dangerous, werewolves or vampires?

  • The best pizza topping is …
  • What would be the best superpower to have?
  • Should everyone make their bed every day?
  • Which came first, the chicken or the egg?
  • Should you put pineapple on a pizza?
  • Should you eat macaroni and cheese with a spoon or a fork?

Should you eat macaroni and cheese with a spoon or a fork?

  • Describe the world’s best ice cream sundae.
  • Is Monday the worst day of the week?
  • Would you rather travel back in time or forward in time?
  • Is it better to be too hot or too cold?
  • Are there aliens living among us here on Earth?

What are your favorite persuasive essay topics for students? Come exchange ideas in the We Are Teachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, check out the big list of essay topics for high school (120+ ideas) ..

Need some ideas for practicing persuasive writing skills? These persuasive essay topics provide lots of scope for students of all ages.

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Argumentative Essay Guide

Argumentative Essay Topics

Last updated on: Dec 19, 2023

Argumentative Essay Topics - Compelling Ideas to Get Started

By: Jared P.

18 min read

Reviewed By: Melisa C.

Published on: Oct 22, 2019

Argumentative Essay Topics

Are you about to write an argumentative essay but still confused about the topic?

Argumentative essays help students learn more about the subject matter of a particular course. This kind of writing is a genuine key to learning argumentative skills. You must pay attention to your subject while choosing a strong topic for your essay.

But what if you don’t even know what to write about? 

Don’t worry! Here is a list of topics and tips to help you decide on the perfect topic for your argumentative paper. 

So read on and make choosing a topic easier!

Argumentative Essay Topics

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Argumentative Essay Topics for students

Argumentative essay writing is one common academic assignment that almost every student will get to draft. In order to help the students, we have prepared a list of argumentative topic ideas. Pick a topic that works the best for you.

Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

  • What age is suitable for kids to start schooling?
  • Should students be allowed to evaluate their teachers?
  • Metal music should be banned due to its violent lyrics.
  • What are the pros and cons of making friends virtually?
  • Can we conserve energy as a society?
  • Does playing violent video games contribute to making a person violent in real life too?
  • How close is reality TV to real life?
  • Do girls face more societal pressure than guys?
  • What is the biggest challenge faced by students today?
  • Should there be cash rewards for getting a good score on standardized tests?
  • The rich should pay more taxes than the poor.
  • Cartoons are better than movies.
  • Teachers Vs. Parents: who plays a bigger role in shaping a child?

Argumentative Essay Topics for Grade 6 

Here are some argumentative essay topics for 6th-grade students:

  • Should schools start later in the morning?
  • Is confining wild animals within zoos a cruel practice?
  • Should there be stricter laws for texting and driving?
  • Are social media sites like Facebook and Twitter bad for our society?
  • Should the voting age be lowered to allow young people a voice in democracy?
  • Should the school year be longer or shorter? 
  • Is it okay for children to play violent video games?
  • Should cell phones be banned from schools?
  • Should recycling become a mandatory practice in all households?

Argumentative Essay Topics for 7th Graders 

  • Should schools provide free meals to all students?
  • Are uniforms necessary for student success?
  • Does standardized testing accurately measure student progress?
  • Are after-school activities important for student development?
  • Is there too much emphasis on social media in education today?
  • Should schools place a stronger emphasis on physical education?
  • Are required classes in high school helpful or harmful to students?
  • Should all students have access to laptops and tablets in the classroom?
  • Is technology taking away from traditional learning methods in the classroom?
  • Should gym classes be mandatory for students?

Argumentative Essay Topics for Grade 8

Looking for argumentative essay topics for teenagers? Check out the ideas below: 

  • Should the drinking age be lowered? Should the death penalty be abolished?
  • Is it necessary for governments to fund childcare?
  • Is there too much emphasis on standardized testing in schools?
  • Are schools doing enough to prevent bullying from happening?
  • Do adolescents need more sleep than adults?
  • Should students be allowed to have cell phones in school?
  • Is social media affecting the way we interact with each other?
  • What should be done about the student loan crisis?

Argumentative Essay Topics for High School

  • Is homeschooling better than the public school educational system?
  • Smartphones help the learning process.
  • Is co-education more advantageous than single-sex education?
  • Are GMOs safe for human consumption?
  • Is fast food healthy or a serious threat to physical health?
  • Teenagers feel more comfortable talking on social media rather than face to face.
  • Should it be legal to get a tattoo for kids younger than 18?
  • Are standardized tests beneficial for school students?
  • A negative high school experience you believe is important when it comes to personality.
  • Does the education system prepare a student for the real world?
  • Is there life after death?
  • Our society works on gender equality.
  • Subjects that should be removed from the high school program.
  • Is hate crime growing in high school?

Argumentative Essay Topics for College Students

  • Is the current taxation system effective or not?
  • Are men paid more than women in our corporate sector?
  • Should Shakespeare still be studied as part of the college curriculum?
  • Is college tuition becoming way too expensive?
  • Are test scores the only way to judge the competency of a student?
  • Getting a College degree is worth the cost.
  • Is the system of the electoral college still viable in the US?
  • Youngsters on social networks don’t realize the significance of privacy on these online sites.
  • Life is incomplete without faith.
  • Students nowadays face greater social pressures compared to the past.
  • Your past does not define you.
  • What can be done about gun control in the United States?
  • Is it ethical to genetically modify children to protect against diseases?
  • Do we need more gender diversity in STEM programs?

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Argumentative Essay Topics for University Students 

  • Should mental health services be made available for free?
  • Is income inequality a necessary part of capitalism?
  • Should the minimum wage be raised in all countries?
  • Does technology have a positive or negative impact on mental health?
  • Should universities be allowed to charge students for taking classes?
  • Is it necessary for governments to fund space exploration?
  • Should religion be taught in public schools?
  • Are animal experiments necessary for medical progress?
  • Should young students join a political party to enhance the democratic process?
  • Does free speech help promote extremism in society?

Argumentative Essay Topics for O Levels 

  • Should the government regulate the use of social media?
  • Is the death penalty an effective way to prevent crime?
  • Are online classes replacing traditional courses in schools?
  • Do standardized tests accurately measure academic achievement?
  • Should abortion be legalized in all countries?
  • Do celebrity role models have a positive or negative influence on young people?
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory in all schools?
  • Should the Internet be censored by governments around the world?
  • Should GMO foods be allowed in supermarkets?
  • Does free trade help or harm developing economies?

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Best Argumentative Essay Topics

Just as important as it is to create compelling content, choosing a great topic is equally important. If you want to score well in academics, you will have to impress your instructor with the best argumentative essay topics.

Below are some great topic ideas for you related to different fields. Choose the right topic for your essay and start the process.

Sports Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Can video gamers be counted as true athletes?
  • By participating in sports, can children be kept out of trouble?
  • Should girls be allowed to participate in the same sports as boys?
  • Should alternatives to steroids be legalized for professional athletes?
  • Do you consider cheerleading a sport?
  • Does your College spend a lot of money in the name of sports programs?
  • Student-athletes should get money for playing.
  • Betting on sports should be illegal.
  • Sports events shouldn’t broadcast alcohol and tobacco ads.
  • Are female athletes looked upon as sexual objects by the media?
  • All athletes should be tested for drugs before their performance.
  • Females should not be allowed to take part in extreme sports.
  • Impact of bodybuilding on a woman’s body in old age.

Argumentative Essay Topics Education

  • Parents should have an active role in their child's education.
  • The grading system shouldn’t exist to judge a student’s abilities.
  • Standardized tests should be abolished in schools.
  • All students must wear a uniform in high school.
  • Does technology benefit the educational system?
  • Studying in a single-sex class is better than studying in a mixed one?
  • All students must be made to learn a foreign language?
  • Programming should be made compulsory for all students.
  • Should students have sex education classes at school?
  • Should schools have the right to test students for drugs?
  • Girls should be equally encouraged to take part in sports in school.
  • The world should have a uniform language.
  • Hard work isn’t enough for being successful in a student’s life.
  • Should teachers be allowed to physically discipline their students?
  • How to bring change in the education system of the United States?

Social Media Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Are social networks an effective platform for communication?
  • Do people really get a job through LinkedIn?
  • Is Facebook legally allowed to leak the private information of its users?
  • Is it possible to earn a good amount of money from YouTube?
  • Should Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter be banned permanently?
  • Social media has successfully increased employment rates.
  • Celebrity endorsements are unethical.
  • Social media has destroyed real-life communication.
  • Social media has made doing business easier.
  • Blogging is an irrelevant profession.
  • How is social media depicting beauty standards?
  • How has social media become a major source of inferiority complex among teenagers?
  • Is it possible to have a life without social media at this time?
  • Should underaged children be allowed to own social media accounts?
  • Pros and cons of social media.

Argumentative Essay Topics Technology

  • Are cell phones harmful to the human race?
  • Are spy applications invading the privacy of users?
  • Are Millennials more dependent on computers than Baby Boomers?
  • Is Typescript the future of front-end development?
  • The impact of microwave tech on our biology.Technology has made us lazier.
  • Should coding be taught from middle school?
  • Cognitive Computers like Watson are unethical.
  • Should a candidate’s social media profiles be considered in the hiring process?
  • Children shouldn’t be given personal mobile phones.
  • Self-driving cars and the future of transportation.
  • Has technology made people less efficient?
  • Technological advancements in the field of psychology.
  • Is the future in the hands of Artificial Intelligence?
  • Pros and cons of depending a lot on technology.

American History Argumentative Essay Topics

  • What was the impact of European colonization on Native Americans?
  • What was the role of women in the movement toward revolution?
  • What were the key causes of the American Revolution?
  • The key issues that caused conflict between North and South and led to the civil war?
  • The effects of the Great Depression on the banking industry in America.
  • Did the Civil Rights Movement reduce or lead to racial violence?
  • Post World War II, how did America grow?
  • 21st-century American foreign policy.
  • Is Barack Obama the first American president who made history?
  • Was slavery an inevitable part of the development of American society?
  • Should the Indian Removal Act be considered an act of genocide?

Mental Health Argumentative Essay Topics 

  • Are antidepressants overprescribed in modern society?
  • Should mental health services be made free for all?
  • Is social media affecting mental health negatively?
  • Is there a stigma attached to seeking out mental health help?
  • What role do genetics and environment play in determining mental illness?
  • Can art and music therapy be effective treatments for mental illness?
  • How can we tackle the stigma associated with mental illness?
  • What can be done to reduce the prevalence of anxiety in young people?
  • Should there be mandatory mental health education in schools?

Social Issues Argumentative Topics

  • Should male workers receive paternity leave too?
  • Is age a major factor in relationship success or failure?
  • Is torture acceptable under any circumstance?
  • What are the primary causes of down syndrome?
  • What should the punishments be for failed parenting?
  • A candidate’s appearance shouldn’t be considered in a job hiring process.
  • Some common stereotypes in your society.
  • Cheating is increasing every day.
  • We are way too dependent on computers and technology.
  • Is boredom the cause of getting into trouble?
  • Beauty magazines should stop photoshopping models.
  • Capitalism vs. socialism. What would benefit society more?
  • Is the women’s rights movement justified?
  • The real objectives of Feminism.
  • Impact of homosexuality on society.

Argumentative Essay Topics Animals

  • Hunting for fun and sports is unethical and must get banned.
  • Aggressive dog breeds such as pit bulls should not be allowed as pets.
  • Testing beauty products on animals is justifiable.
  • Using monkeys for research in labs is a necessary evil.
  • Wearing fur and leather shouldn’t be unethical.
  • Is genetic modification of livestock beneficial?
  • Animal dissection in medical school is a good way to learn.
  • Owning pets reduces the risk of getting diseases. Do you agree?
  • Emotional support animals can truly help lonely people.
  • Keeping exotic animals as pets is inhumane.
  • Stronger laws must be enforced against animal cruelty.
  • Pros and cons of animal testing.
  • How can the emotional support of animals help in treating mental problems?
  • Significance of microchipping the pets.
  • Rights enjoyed by the ESA owners.

Argumentative Research Paper Topics

  • Ways to decrease childcare costs in the United States.
  • Are literate people better parents?
  • Challenges faced by female politicians.
  • Is rehab effective for sex offenders?
  • Is music a form of real art?
  • Spanish is a simple language to learn.
  • Schools should ban vending machines on-campus.
  • Are teachers to blame when a student performs poorly?
  • Are gender stereotypes encouraged by parents?
  • Illegal immigrants and terrorism: is it related?
  • Can imposing a tax on sugar help fight obesity.
  • Should age be a factor in relationships?
  • Do dreams have a symbolic meaning?
  • Should South and North Korea become one?
  • Can depression be cured using natural ways?

Unique Argumentative Essay Topics

Looking for some general argumentative essay topic ideas? Here is an ultimate list of great topics that can make your essay writing fun for you and your readers.

Controversial Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Should same-sex marriage be legal in all 50 states within the United States of America?
  • Is the feminist movement ruining the minds of young girls?
  • Corruption and its effects on increasing wages.
  • Hunting should be banned globally. Do you agree?
  • Which is more beneficial for society, Communism or Capitalism?
  • Should human cloning be allowed or not?
  • Abortion – A pro-life or a pro-choice?
  • Do anti-discrimination laws reinforce discrimination?
  • Should patients be entitled to request medically-assisted suicide in cases of terminal illness?
  • Can beauty standards be more inclusive?
  • Workplace dating should not be allowed, and here’s why.
  • Displaced immigrants and refugees should be given shelter by every country.
  • Is vegan or vegetarian life good for health?
  • Online dating has ruined the essence of old-school romance.
  • Chocolate can help improve our bad mood.
  • Is it ethical to eat meat?
  • Mothers make better parents naturally.
  • Politics can never be clean and fair.
  • Should the drinking age be lowered?

Easy Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Are girls more intelligent than boys?
  • Parents of middle schoolers should control their internet.
  • Was Johnny Depp the best choice for Burton’s Ed Wood?
  • Do religious movements cause the outbreak of war?
  • Are human beings the major source of global climate change?
  • Is it ethical to have kids perform chores?
  • Is using LEDs making a difference?
  • How does being a vegan help the environment?
  • Should teenage marriages be allowed?
  • Social media has brought families closer. Is there any truth to this statement?
  • If the House of Lords had veto power over the House of Commons, Britain would’ve been better off.
  • It’s okay to date multiple people at the same time.
  • HIV is falsely associated with homosexuals. Why?
  • Why are the laws neglecting tobacco and alcohol?
  • Most of the modern-time artists are one-hit wonders.

Fun Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Is panda hugging a viable career option?
  • Does Justin Bieber owe his success to negative PR?
  • Is it true that a way to a man’s heart is through his stomach?
  • Is the Bermuda Triangle a real thing?
  • Is it okay for parents to lie to their children about Santa Claus?
  • Did the feminist movement ever help you?
  • How did the feminist movement ever help you?
  • There is no such thing as organic food.
  • How to make your roommate believe that moving out is the best option.
  • Why should I join a different family?
  • Fans should not judge players after losses or failures.
  • Is social promotion a helpful practice?
  • Is racism a natural condition of human society?
  • Dieting must not be practiced by schoolers.
  • Should tattoos be perceived as a social deviation?

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Argumentative Essay Topics 2022

  • Are US elections always fair?
  • Is the death penalty an effective punishment for criminals?
  • Is it wise to replace soldiers with machines and artificial intelligence on battlefields?
  • Should animals be used for performing experiments?
  • Effects of terrorism on the foreign policy of the United States of America's cosmetic surgery worth the risks?
  • What is your point of view on a terminally ill person having the right to assisted suicide?
  • Life 100 years ago was much easier than it is today.
  • Is religion a factor that contributes to war?
  • A woman who doesn’t have enough resources to raise a child to be allowed to abort?
  • Physical activities are the most convenient way to relax.
  • The best way to enhance education is to decrease the number of classes.
  • Sports classes should become mandatory for everybody.
  • The pros and cons of using gadgets for studying purposes.
  • What is the most important socio-political movement of the modern era?

Argumentative Essay Topics 2023

The following are some amazing topics for argumentative essays. Have a look at them to get a better idea.

  • Fast food is responsible for childhood obesity in the US.
  • Is the United States ready for a female president?
  • Parents need to be very friendly with their kids.
  • Are smartphones harmful to our health?
  • Education needs to be free for all.
  • Is single-sex education still a good idea in 2020?
  • Should all people pursue a university degree worldwide?
  • Internet access must be unlimited and free.
  • Modern education has to eliminate grading systems.
  • Capitalism should acquire more socially significant policies.
  • Tourist tax is mandatory to save cultural heritage.
  • Kindergartens must introduce foreign language instruction.
  • Is hunting good for environmental well-being?
  • Using animals for research must be banned.
  • Women perform better than men in official positions and occupations.

Choosing a Good Argumentative Essay Topic

So you know the importance of choosing the right topic when writing an argumentative essay.

But what are you going to write about?

You sure don’t want to pick an argumentative essay topic that everyone else is working on. And you don’t want to research an argumentative topic where information and data are impossible to find.

You hopefully want to write on a debatable topic that will interest both you and your reader. Here are the criteria we use to choose a topic for argumentative essays:

  • It has to be interesting to the writer. You’ll be outlining, researching, and writing in-depth, so pick an engaging topic for your argument.
  • Have some information to begin with. The more familiar you are with the subject area, the easier it will be for both you and the reader.
  • The best argumentative essay topics are mostly controversial. If there’s no conflict and everyone agrees on everything, it won’t qualify as an argumentative essay.
  • An arguable thesis statement can be created according to the topic.

What Makes a Good Argumentative Essay?

A good argumentative essay is one that presents a well-reasoned and logical argument. It should be supported by facts and evidence, not just speculation or opinion. To create an effective argumentative essay, the writer must provide a strong case for their position on any given topic.

Strong Introduction and Thesis 

The first element of a good argumentative essay is an interesting and clear introduction. This should introduce the topic in a way that engages readers and makes them want to learn more. 

It should also provide an overview of the writer's position on the issue, as well as any evidence they will be using to support their argument.

Good Research and Evidence 

Good argumentation requires good evidence. So a good argumentative essay should be backed up by research and evidence. 

If a writer is making an assertion, they must provide evidence to back it up. This could include physical evidence such as statistics or quotes from experts in the field, as well as logical arguments that support their position.

Organized Structure 

The structure of an argumentative essay is also important. It should be structured in a way that makes it easy to follow and understand. 

This could include using headings, subheadings, and bullet points to break up the text into more manageable pieces. In addition, it should have a clear flow of ideas, with each paragraph logically leading to the next.

Effective Conclusion 

Finally, a good argumentative essay should have an effective conclusion. This should provide a summary of the writer's main points and reiterate their position on the issue.  The conclusion should also leave readers with something to think about, leaving them informed and with new insight.

After reading our list, don’t be surprised if your mind starts coming up with additional topics for an argumentative essay. We recommend that you keep a notebook or journal handy to record these topic ideas for later.

These were some of the most interesting essay topics . Did you find a topic to write on?

Now, before you overwhelm yourself by jumping straight to the writing process, we have a helpful tip for you. Go through this detailed article to learn how to craft an argumentative essay effectively.

Seeking help from professionals is nothing to be ashamed of, especially when your grades are at stake. It is quite common for some students not to have a knack for writing. Also, some might not have the time to complete assignments.

If you can relate to such students, you should consider taking help from a reliable essay writing service such as 5StarEssays.com . You can simply request ‘ write my essay '. And we will have an expert essay writer to provide you with high-quality assignments regardless of type and field.

Or, use our AI Essay Generator , for AI powered writing help to guide your way!

Jared P.

Masters Essay, Literature

Jared P. is a renowned author and writing service provider with over fifteen years of experience in the publishing industry. He has a Ph.D. degree in English Literature and has spent his entire career helping students achieve their academic goals by providing expert writing assistance.

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50 Argumentative Essay Topics

Illustration by Catherine Song. ThoughtCo. 

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

An argumentative essay requires you to decide on a topic and argue for or against it. You'll need to back up your viewpoint with well-researched facts and information as well. One of the hardest parts is deciding which topic to write about, but there are plenty of ideas available to get you started. Then you need to take a position, do some research, and present your viewpoint convincingly.

Choosing a Great Argumentative Essay Topic

Students often find that most of their work on these essays is done before they even start writing. This means that it's best if you have a general interest in your subject. Otherwise, you might get bored or frustrated while trying to gather information. You don't need to know everything, though; part of what makes this experience rewarding is learning something new.

It's best if you have a general interest in your subject, but the argument you choose doesn't have to be one that you agree with.

The subject you choose may not necessarily be one you are in full agreement with, either. You may even be asked to write a paper from the opposing point of view. Researching a different viewpoint helps students broaden their perspectives. 

Ideas for Argument Essays

Sometimes, the best ideas are sparked by looking at many different options. Explore this list of possible topics and see if a few pique your interest. Write those down as you come across them, then think about each for a few minutes.

Which would you enjoy researching? Do you have a firm position on a particular subject? Is there a point you would like to make sure you get across? Did the topic give you something new to think about? Can you see why someone else may feel differently?

List of 50 Possible Argumentative Essay Topics

A number of these topics are rather controversial—that's the point. In an argumentative essay , opinions matter, and controversy is based on opinions. Just make sure your opinions are backed up by facts in the essay.   If these topics are a little too controversial or you don't find the right one for you, try browsing through persuasive essay and speech topics  as well.

  • Is global climate change  caused by humans?
  • Is the death penalty effective?
  • Is the U.S. election process fair?
  • Is torture ever acceptable?
  • Should men get paternity leave from work?
  • Are school uniforms beneficial?
  • Does the U.S. have a fair tax system?
  • Do curfews keep teens out of trouble?
  • Is cheating out of control?
  • Are we too dependent on computers?
  • Should animals be used for research?
  • Should cigarette smoking be banned?
  • Are cell phones dangerous?
  • Are law enforcement cameras an invasion of privacy?
  • Do we have a throwaway society ?
  • Is child behavior better or worse than it was years ago?
  • Should companies market to children?
  • Should the government have a say in our diets?
  • Does access to condoms prevent teen pregnancy?
  • Should members of Congress have term limits?
  • Are actors and professional athletes paid too much?
  • Are CEOs paid too much?
  • Should athletes be held to high moral standards?
  • Do violent video games cause behavior problems?
  • Should creationism be taught in public schools?
  • Are beauty pageants exploitative ?
  • Should English be the official language of the United States?
  • Should the racing industry be forced to use biofuels?
  • Should the alcohol-drinking age be increased or decreased?
  • Should everyone be required to recycle?
  • Is it okay for prisoners to vote (as they are in some states)?
  • Should same-sex marriage be legalized in more countries?
  • Are there benefits to attending a single-sex school ?
  • Does boredom lead to trouble?
  • Should schools be in session year-round ?
  • Does religion cause war?
  • Should the government provide health care?
  • Should abortion be illegal?
  • Should more companies expand their reproductive health benefits for employees?
  • Is homework harmful or helpful?
  • Is the cost of college too high?
  • Is college admission too competitive?
  • Should euthanasia be illegal?
  • Should the federal government legalize marijuana use nationally ?
  • Should rich people be required to pay more taxes?
  • Should schools require foreign language or physical education?
  • Is affirmative action fair?
  • Is public prayer okay in schools?
  • Are schools and teachers responsible for low test scores?
  • Is greater gun control a good idea?

How to Craft a Persuasive Argument

After you've decided on your essay topic, gather evidence to make your argument as strong as possible. Your research could even help shape the position your essay ultimately takes. As you craft your essay, remember to utilize persuasive writing techniques , such as invoking emotional language or citing facts from authoritative figures. 

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105+ 6Th Grade Argumentative Essay Topics and Thought-Provoking Writing Prompts

Sep 22, 2023 | 0 comments

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 Exploring 6th Grade Argumentative Essay Topics offers young students a valuable opportunity to delve into the art of argument and express their thoughts effectively. In this collection of thought-provoking writing prompts, students can argue their points of view on various topics that resonate with their age group, from the role of social media in their lives to whether video games should be banned in school. These prompts encourage students to share their stance on relevant issues, such as the length of the school year or the necessity of homework, fostering critical thinking skills and honing their ability to present persuasive arguments.

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School and Education Argumentative Essay Topics

  • The Impact of Technology in the Classroom: Enhancing or Distracting?
  • The Importance of Teaching Financial Literacy in Schools
  • The Role of Standardized Testing in Measuring Student Knowledge
  • The Need for Comprehensive Sex Education in Schools
  • The Pros and Cons of School Uniforms: Fostering Equality or Limiting Expression?
  • The Debate Over Year-Round Schooling: Academic Advantages and Disadvantages
  • The Value of Homework in Enhancing Learning
  • The Significance of Arts and Music Education in the Curriculum
  • The Influence of Cell Phones in the Classroom: Learning Tool or Disturbance?
  • The Impact of Bullying Prevention Programs in Schools
  • The Ethics of Zero-Tolerance Policies: Effective or Excessive?
  • The Necessity of Inclusive Education for Students with Disabilities
  • The Role of Physical Education in Promoting Healthy Lifestyles
  • The Controversy Surrounding School Vouchers and Choice
  • The Debate Over the Length of the School Year: Benefits and Drawbacks.

Persuasive Writing Prompts For The 6th Grade Student

  • Persuade your classmates to participate in a community service project to benefit your neighborhood.
  • Convince your teacher to allow more creative assignment freedom by choosing your topics.
  • Write a persuasive letter to your principal proposing improvements to the school cafeteria menu.
  • Argue for or against giving students a longer lunch break.
  • Persuade your parents to let you have a later bedtime during the weekends.
  • Convince your classmates to support a school recycling program.
  • Write a persuasive essay on the importance of reading for pleasure.
  • Argue for or against the idea that students should have access to cell phones in school.
  • Persuade your friends to choose a specific book for the next book club meeting.
  • Convince your teacher to replace traditional homework assignments with project-based learning.
  • Write a persuasive letter to your city council advocating for more parks and green spaces.
  • Argue for or against having school uniforms.
  • Persuade your parents to take a family vacation to a destination of your choice.
  • Convince your classmates to participate in a charity run or walk.
  • Write a persuasive essay on the benefits of pet adoption from a shelter rather than buying one from a breeder or pet store.

Argumentative Writing Unit for Grades 5-8

  • The Impact of Screen Time on Children’s Development: Striking a Balance
  • The Need for Stricter Regulations on Junk Food Advertising to Children
  • The Role of Homework in Student Learning: More Harm Than Good?
  • The Benefits and Drawbacks of School Uniforms: Choice or Compulsion?
  • The Pros and Cons of Standardized Testing: Assessing Knowledge or Creativity?
  • The Importance of Teaching Internet Safety in Schools
  • The Debate Over School Start Times: Health vs. Convenience
  • The Significance of Arts Education in a Well-Rounded Curriculum
  • The Impact of Bullying on Mental Health: Zero Tolerance or Restorative Justice?
  • The Role of Cell Phones in the Classroom: Distraction or Learning Tool?
  • The Ethics of Animal Testing in Scientific Research: Necessary Evil or Inhumane?
  • The Influence of Social Media on Teenagers: Connection or Isolation?
  • The Debate Over Year-Round Schooling: Continuous Learning or Burnout?
  • The Necessity of Teaching Financial Literacy in Schools
  • The Pros and Cons of School Vouchers: Choice or Undermining Public Education?

Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School Students

  • Should Students Have a Say in School Policies and Rules?
  • Is Homework Beneficial for Middle School Students?
  • Should School Cafeterias Serve Healthier Food Options?
  • Is It Important to Learn a Second Language in Middle School?
  • Should Students Be Allowed to Choose Their Books for English Class?
  • Is Technology a Distraction or a Helpful Tool in the Classroom?
  • Should Middle School Students Be Required to Wear Uniforms?
  • Is Social Media a Positive or Negative Influence on Middle Schoolers?
  • Should Physical Education Be Mandatory for All Middle School Students?
  • Is Bullying Prevention Education Effective in Schools?
  • Should Cell Phones Be Allowed in Middle School Classrooms?
  • Is Standardized Testing an Accurate Measure of a Student’s Knowledge?
  • Should Middle School Students Learn Financial Literacy?
  • Is Inclusive Education Beneficial for Students with Disabilities?
  • Should Middle Schoolers Have a Later School Start Time?

Argumentative Writing Prompts for Middle School

  • Is it fair for middle school students to have a say in school rules and policies?
  • Should schools assign homework to middle school students, or is it too much for their age?
  • Are school cafeterias providing healthy enough food options for middle schoolers?
  • Should middle school students be required to learn a second language?
  • Is it better for middle school students to choose their books for English class?
  • Are electronic devices like tablets and laptops beneficial tools or distractions in the classroom?
  • Should middle school students wear uniforms to school, or is it unnecessary?
  • Is social media a positive or negative influence on the lives of middle schoolers?
  • Do middle school students need mandatory physical education classes to stay healthy?
  • Are anti-bullying programs in schools effective at preventing bullying?
  • Are standardized tests accurately measuring a student’s knowledge and abilities?
  • Should financial literacy be taught to middle school students?
  • Is inclusive education beneficial for students with disabilities in middle schools?
  • Is it a good idea to have a later start time for middle school to allow students to get more sleep?
  • Are video games good or bad for the cognitive development of middle school students?

Argumentative Essay Prompts About Government and Policy

  • Does the government have a responsibility to provide free healthcare for all citizens?
  • Should the voting age be lowered to 16 to increase youth participation in elections?
  • Is it necessary for governments to implement stricter gun control laws?
  • Should the government regulate the use of social media to protect users’ privacy?
  • Is a universal basic income a feasible solution to address poverty and inequality?
  • Should the government provide financial incentives for renewable energy adoption?
  • Is it ethical for governments to surveil their citizens for national security reasons?
  • Should the government fund space exploration and research?
  • Is affirmative action a fair policy for promoting diversity and addressing historical discrimination?
  • Should the government implement stricter regulations on the use of pesticides and chemicals in agriculture?
  • Is mandatory military service a necessary policy for national defense?
  • Should the government invest in infrastructure projects to stimulate economic growth?
  • Is the death penalty an effective and just punishment for heinous crimes?
  • Should the government provide subsidies for the arts and cultural preservation?
  • Is it ethical for governments to engage in diplomatic negotiations with authoritarian regimes?

Social Justice and Civics Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Does income inequality undermine social justice, and what policies can address it effectively?
  • Should voting be made compulsory to ensure civic participation and equal representation?
  • Is affirmative action necessary for achieving racial and gender equality in education and employment?
  • How can the criminal justice system be reformed to address racial bias and mass incarceration?
  • Should hate speech be protected under the First Amendment, or should there be stricter regulations to prevent harm?
  • Is access to quality healthcare a fundamental right, and how can healthcare disparities be reduced?
  • Should schools teach comprehensive sex education to promote reproductive rights and sexual health?
  • What measures can be taken to address police brutality and promote accountability in law enforcement?
  • Is the death penalty just, and should it be abolished to prevent wrongful executions?
  • Should undocumented immigrants have a path to citizenship and access to social services?
  • How can society address discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community in various aspects of life?
  • Should individuals be allowed to choose their gender identity on official documents?
  • What policies can be implemented to combat human trafficking and protect vulnerable populations?
  • Is climate change a social justice issue, and how can we address its disproportionate impacts on marginalized communities?
  • Should governments take more aggressive measures to address homelessness and provide affordable housing?

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What is a good topic for an argumentative essay?

A good topic for an argumentative essay could be whether violent video games harm children’s behavior.

What is an argumentative essay for Grade 6?

An argumentative essay for Grade 6 is a written piece where students express and support their opinion on a specific topic, presenting arguments and evidence to persuade readers of their point of view.

What is a good argumentative essay topic for kids?

A good argumentative essay topic for kids could be whether cell phones should be allowed in the classroom.

What is an argumentative essay for middle school?

An argumentative essay for middle school is an essay in which students in grades 6-8 present arguments and evidence to support their position on a specific, often controversial, topic, such as whether bullying should be addressed more effectively in public schools or if there should be mandatory physical education classes to promote healthy lifestyles.

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At some point, you’re going to be asked to write an argumentative essay. An argumentative essay is exactly what it sounds like—an essay in which you’ll be making an argument, using examples and research to back up your point.

But not all argumentative essay topics are created equal. Not only do you have to structure your essay right to have a good impact on the reader, but even your choice of subject can impact how readers feel about your work.

In this article, we’ll cover the basics of writing argumentative essays, including what argumentative essays are, how to write a good one, and how to pick a topic that works for you. Then check out a list of argumentative essay ideas to help you get started.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is one that makes an argument through research. These essays take a position and support it through evidence, but, unlike many other kinds of essays, they are interested in expressing a specific argument supported by research and evidence.

A good argumentative essay will be based on established or new research rather than only on your thoughts and feelings. Imagine that you’re trying to get your parents to raise your allowance, and you can offer one of two arguments in your favor:

You should raise my allowance because I want you to.

You should raise my allowance because I’ve been taking on more chores without complaining.

The first argument is based entirely in feelings without any factual backup, whereas the second is based on evidence that can be proven. Your parents are more likely to respond positively to the second argument because it demonstrates that you have done something to earn the increased allowance. Similarly, a well-researched and reasoned argument will show readers that your point has a basis in fact, not just feelings.

The standard five-paragraph essay is common in writing argumentative essays, but it’s not the only way to write one. An argumentative essay is typically written in one of two formats, the Toulmin model or the Rogerian model.

The Toulmin model is the most common, comprised of an introduction with a claim (otherwise known as a thesis), with data to support it. This style of essay will also include rebuttals, helping to strengthen your argument by anticipating counterarguments.

The Rogerian model analyzes two sides of an argument and reaches a conclusion after weighing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Both essay styles rely on well-reasoned logic and supporting evidence to prove a point, just in two different ways.

The important thing to note about argumentative essays as opposed to other kinds of essays is that they aim to argue a specific point rather than to explain something or to tell a story. While they may have some things in common with analytical essays, the primary difference is in their objective—an argumentative essay aims to convince someone of something, whereas an analytical essay contextualizes a topic with research.

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What Makes a Good Argumentative Essay?

To write an effective argumentative essay, you need to know what a good one looks like. In addition to a solid structure, you’ll need an argument, a strong thesis, and solid research.

An Argument

Unlike other forms of essays, you are trying to convince your reader of something. You’re not just teaching them a concept or demonstrating an idea—you’re constructing an argument to change the readers’ thinking.

You’ll need to develop a good argument, which encompasses not just your main point, but also all the pieces that make it up.

Think beyond what you are saying and include how you’re saying it. How will you take an idea and turn it into a complex and well thought out argument that is capable of changing somebody’s mind?

A Strong Thesis

The thesis is the core of your argument. What specific message are you trying to get across? State that message in one sentence, and that will be your thesis.

This is the foundation on which your essay is built, so it needs to be strong and well-reasoned. You need to be able to expand on it with facts and sources, not just feelings.

A good argumentative essay isn’t just based on your individual thoughts, but research. That can be citing sources and other arguments or it can mean direct research in the field, depending on what your argument is and the context in which you are arguing it.

Be prepared to back your thesis up with reporting from scientific journals, newspapers, or other forms of research. Having well-researched sources will help support your argument better than hearsay or assumptions. If you can’t find enough research to back up your point, it’s worth reconsidering your thesis or conducting original research, if possible.

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How to Come Up With an Argumentative Essay Topic

Sometimes you may find yourself arguing things you don’t necessarily believe. That’s totally fine—you don’t actually have to wholeheartedly believe in what you’re arguing in order to construct a compelling argument.

However, if you have free choice of topic, it’s a good idea to pick something you feel strongly about. There are two key components to a good argumentative essay: a strong stance, and an assortment of evidence. If you’re interested and feel passionate about the topic you choose, you'll have an easier time finding evidence to support it, but it's the evidence that's most important. 

So, to choose a topic, think about things you feel strongly about, whether positively or negatively. You can make a list of ideas and narrow those down to a handful of things, then expand on those ideas with a few potential points you want to hit on.

For example, say you’re trying to decide whether you should write about how your neighborhood should ban weed killer, that your school’s lunch should be free for all students, or that the school day should be cut by one hour. To decide between these ideas, you can make a list of three to five points for each that cover the different evidence you could use to support each point.

For the weed killer ban, you could say that weed killer has been proven to have adverse impacts on bees, that there are simple, natural alternatives, and that weeds aren’t actually bad to have around. For the free lunch idea, you could suggest that some students have to go hungry because they can’t afford lunch, that funds could be diverted from other places to support free lunch, and that other items, like chips or pizza, could be sold to help make up lost revenue. And for the school day length example, you could argue that teenagers generally don’t get enough sleep, that you have too much homework and not enough time to do it, and that teenagers don’t spend enough time with their families.

You might find as you make these lists that some of them are stronger than others. The more evidence you have and the stronger you feel that that evidence is, the better the topic.  Of course, if you feel that one topic may have more evidence but you’d rather not write about it, it’s okay to pick another topic instead. When you’re making arguments, it can be much easier to find strong points and evidence if you feel passionate about our topic than if you don't.

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50 Argumentative Essay Topic Ideas

If you’re struggling to come up with topics on your own, read through this list of argumentative essay topics to help get you started!

  • Should fracking be legal?
  • Should parents be able to modify their unborn children?
  • Do GMOs help or harm people?
  • Should vaccinations be required for students to attend public school?
  • Should world governments get involved in addressing climate change?
  • Should Facebook be allowed to collect data from its users?
  • Should self-driving cars be legal?
  • Is it ethical to replace human workers with automation?
  • Should there be laws against using cell phones while driving?
  • Has the internet positively or negatively impacted human society?

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  • Should college athletes be paid for being on sports teams?
  • Should coaches and players make the same amount of money?
  • Should sports be segregated by gender?
  • Should the concept of designated hitters in baseball be abolished?
  • Should US sports take soccer more seriously?
  • Should religious organizations have to pay taxes?
  • Should religious clubs be allowed in schools?
  • Should “one nation under God” be in the pledge of allegiance?
  • Should religion be taught in schools?
  • Should clergy be allowed to marry?
  • Should minors be able to purchase birth control without parental consent?
  • Should the US switch to single-payer healthcare?
  • Should assisted suicide be legal?
  • Should dietary supplements and weight loss items like teas be allowed to advertise through influencers?
  • Should doctors be allowed to promote medicines?

Government/Politics

  • Is the electoral college an effective system for modern America?
  • Should Puerto Rico become a state?
  • Should voter registration be automatic?
  • Should people in prison be allowed to vote?
  • Should Supreme Court justices be elected?
  • Should sex work be legalized?
  • Should Columbus Day be replaced with Indigenous Peoples’ Day?
  • Should the death penalty be legal?
  • Should animal testing be allowed?
  • Should drug possession be decriminalized?

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  • Should unpaid internships be legal?
  • Should minimum wage be increased?
  • Should monopolies be allowed?
  • Is universal basic income a good idea?
  • Should corporations have a higher or lower tax rate?
  • Are school uniforms a good idea?
  • Should PE affect a student’s grades?
  • Should college be free?
  • Should Greek life in colleges be abolished?
  • Should students be taught comprehensive sex ed?

Arts/Culture

  • Should graffiti be considered art or vandalism?
  • Should books with objectionable words be banned?
  • Should content on YouTube be better regulated?
  • Is art education important?
  • Should art and music sharing online be allowed?

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How to Argue Effectively

A strong argument isn’t just about having a good point. If you can’t support that point well, your argument falls apart.

One of the most important things you can do in writing a strong argumentative essay is organizing well. Your essay should have a distinct beginning, middle, and end, better known as the introduction, body and opposition, and conclusion.

This example follows the Toulmin model—if your essay follows the Rogerian model, the same basic premise is true, but your thesis will instead propose two conflicting viewpoints that will be resolved through evidence in the body, with your conclusion choosing the stronger of the two arguments.

Introduction

Your hook should draw the reader’s interest immediately. Questions are a common way of getting interest, as well as evocative language or a strong statistic

Don’t assume that your audience is already familiar with your topic. Give them some background information, such as a brief history of the issue or some additional context.

Your thesis is the crux of your argument. In an argumentative essay, your thesis should be clearly outlined so that readers know exactly what point you’ll be making. Don’t explain all your evidence in the opening, but do take a strong stance and make it clear what you’ll be discussing.

Your claims are the ideas you’ll use to support your thesis. For example, if you’re writing about how your neighborhood shouldn’t use weed killer, your claim might be that it’s bad for the environment. But you can’t just say that on its own—you need evidence to support it.

Evidence is the backbone of your argument. This can be things you glean from scientific studies, newspaper articles, or your own research. You might cite a study that says that weed killer has an adverse effect on bees, or a newspaper article that discusses how one town eliminated weed killer and saw an increase in water quality. These kinds of hard evidence support your point with demonstrable facts, strengthening your argument.

In your essay, you want to think about how the opposition would respond to your claims and respond to them. Don’t pick the weakest arguments, either— figure out what other people are saying and respond to those arguments with clearly reasoned arguments.

Demonstrating that you not only understand the opposition’s point, but that your argument is strong enough to withstand it, is one of the key pieces to a successful argumentative essay.

Conclusions are a place to clearly restate your original point, because doing so will remind readers exactly what you’re arguing and show them how well you’ve argued that point.

Summarize your main claims by restating them, though you don’t need to bring up the evidence again. This helps remind readers of everything you’ve said throughout the essay.

End by suggesting a picture of a world in which your argument and action are ignored. This increases the impact of your argument and leaves a lasting impression on the reader.

A strong argumentative essay is one with good structure and a strong argument , but there are a few other things you can keep in mind to further strengthen your point.

When you’re crafting an argument, it can be easy to get distracted by all the information and complications in your argument. It’s important to stay focused—be clear in your thesis and home in on claims that directly support that thesis.

Be Rational

It’s important that your claims and evidence be based in facts, not just opinion. That’s why it’s important to use reliable sources based in science and reporting—otherwise, it’s easy for people to debunk your arguments.

Don’t rely solely on your feelings about the topic. If you can’t back a claim up with real evidence, it leaves room for counterarguments you may not anticipate. Make sure that you can support everything you say with clear and concrete evidence, and your claims will be a lot stronger!

What’s Next?

No matter what kind of essay you're writing, a strong plan will help you have a bigger impact. This guide to writing a college essay is a great way to get started on your essay organizing journey!

Brushing up on your essay format knowledge to prep for the SAT? Check out this list of SAT essay prompts to help you kickstart your studying!

A bunch of great essay examples can help you aspire to greatness, but bad essays can also be a warning for what not to do. This guide to bad college essays will help you better understand common mistakes to avoid in essay writing!

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Melissa Brinks graduated from the University of Washington in 2014 with a Bachelor's in English with a creative writing emphasis. She has spent several years tutoring K-12 students in many subjects, including in SAT prep, to help them prepare for their college education.

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EL Education Curriculum

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  • ELA 2019 G6:M3:U3

Literary Argument Writing: Gather Evidence and Reflect on Multiple Perspectives

In this unit, ccs standards, the four ts.

  • Habits of Character

Unit-at-a-Glance

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In Unit 3, students begin their work with literary argument essay writing. They apply the Painted Essay® structure to this new type of writing, evaluating how it changes when applied to writing a literary argument. As they have done previously, students deconstruct the model and complete a collaborative practice argument essay. In each lesson, students look at a discrete aspect of the argument essay model and practice using it in their own writing. In response to an open-ended prompt, they brainstorm possible reasons to support two different positions. They collect textual evidence for both sides of the argument and connect the evidence to the reasons with sound reasoning. Finally, students determine their strongest argument and make a claim. Using these skills practiced with a partner, students are then prepared to independently plan and draft an argument essay to answer the prompt: Should Cal return to Challagi Indian Industrial School?

After writing their essay for the mid-unit assessment, students are ready to move towards the culmination of the module, an audio museum exhibit featuring the voices of American Indian boarding school students. First, students will select a text (a poem, personal narrative, etc.) written by a survivor of the boarding schools, one that resonates with them personally. They respond to this reading by writing a preface to provide context and a reflection to explain why the text is meaningful. Using the recording application first introduced in Unit 2, students record themselves reading their preface, text, and reflection aloud using proper and respectful intonation, volume, and pacing. This recording will be used for both the performance task and the End of Unit 3 Assessment. Students record two versions of their performance task contribution and then reflect on and self-assess each for their volume, pronunciation and language use. Students use their observations about their first attempt to improve their performance on the second attempt. Finally, they listen to a peer’s second recording and reflect on and paraphrase the content and assess their peer’s volume, pronunciation, and language use in that second performance.

To showcase their recordings, the class prepares listening stations where guests of the audio museum can listen and learn about American Indian boarding schools. Learning from the module and the performance task synthesizes in a concluding whole class discussion about the importance of honoring diverse experiences and perspectives.

Please note: For the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum, there are Teaching Notes for each unit that contain helpful information for supporting English language learners. These overview notes complement the more specific English language learner supports and differentiated materials within each lesson. You will find the Teaching Notes in the Unit download below.

Reading—Literary Text

  • RL.6.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.6.3: Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.
  • RL.6.10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Reading—Informational Text

  • RI.6.1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.6.6: Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
  • W.6.1: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  • W.6.1a: Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
  • W.6.1b: Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
  • W.6.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.
  • W.6.1d: Establish and maintain a formal style.
  • W.6.1e: Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.
  • W.6.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
  • W.6.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.
  • W.6.9a: Apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics").
  • W.6.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking and Listening

  • SL.6.2: Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.
  • SL.6.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 6 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)
  • L.6.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.6.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • L.6.3b: Maintain consistency in style and tone.
  • L.6.6: Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
  • Topic:  American Indian boarding schools
  • Write a literary argument essay (W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.6, W.6.9a, W.6.10, L.6.2, L.6.3, L.6.6) about whether or not Cal should return to Challagi Indian Industrial School (RL.6.1, RL.6.3, RL.6.10), using reasons and evidence to defend a claim.
  • Record a performance task contribution and then reflect on and self-assess for (W.6.10) volume, pronunciation and language use (SL.6.2, SL.6.6, L.6.6). Provide feedback on a peer's recording (RI.6.1, RI.6.6, W.6.10).
  • Targets: RL.6.1, RL.6.3, RL.6.10, RI.6.1, RI.6.6, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.6, W.6.9a, W.6.10, SL.6.2, SL.6.6, L.6.2, L.6.3b, L.6.6 (optional L.6.1)
  • Texts:   Two Roads by Joseph Bruchac

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Habits of Character/Social-Emotional Learning Focus

Central to the EL Education curriculum is a focus on "habits of character" and social-emotional learning. Students work to become effective learners, developing mindsets and skills for success in college, career, and life (e.g., initiative, responsibility, perseverance, collaboration); work to become ethical people, treating others well and standing up for what is right (e.g., empathy, integrity, respect, compassion); and work to contribute to a better world, putting their learning to use to improve communities (e.g., citizenship, service).

Students focus on becoming effective learners by persevering as they read and analyze a model essay, then collaborate with a peer to plan and draft an essay as practice for the assessment. They contribute to a better world, using their strengths when working with a partner to give and receive feedback on their recordings.

Most importantly, students work to become ethical people by showing respect and compassion when they listen to and reflect upon the recordings of their classmates during the audio museum. Through this performance task, students contribute to a better world by acting as witnesses to this time period, highlighting the experiences and amplifying the voices of American Indian boarding school students.

Each unit is made up of a sequence of between 10-18 lessons. The Unit-at-a-Glance charts, available on the grade-level landing pages, break down each unit's lessons, showing CCS standards, agenda breakdown, daily learning targets, and ongoing assessments. The charts also indicate which lessons include mid- and end of unit assessments and the performance task.

View the unit-at-a-glance chart

Texts and resources that need to be procured. Please download the Required Trade Books and Resources Procurement List for procurement guidance.

See full list of texts, including recommended texts

Review the Argument Writing checklist and Model Literary Argument Essay to become familiar with what students will be required to do in this unit (see Lesson 1 supporting materials).

Determine if students will be allowed to type their literary argument essays, and arrange the necessary devices for them to do so.

Considerations for the Performance Task:

  • Preread the personal narratives provided for students to use as their End of Unit 3 Speaking and Listening Assessment (see Lesson 12). Consider adding more options to the list (i.e., adding excerpts from the Independent Research Reading text list.)
  • Determine what technology is needed for students to record their readings. Preview audio recording tools, such as http://eled.org/0180 or http://eled.org/0211 .
  • Gather equipment needed to set up recording stations for each student for use during the End of Unit 3 Assessment.
  • Determine how visitors to the audio museum will listen to the recordings. Preview a QR code generator site such as http://eled.org/0212 if planning to use codes to link to audio files.
  • Plan ahead for the performance task; secure a location to set up the audio museum and invite guests from the community, offering specific details about the event.
  • Create a model of the types of visuals one might display at their listening station, such as images of the boarding schools or of the author of the text chosen to be recorded.

The following material is introduced in this unit and referenced throughout both the module and the school year:

  • Characteristics of Effective Argument Writing anchor chart

ELA 2019 G6:M3:U3:L1

Analyze a model literary argument essay, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l2, gather evidence and plan collaborative literary argument essay, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l3, collaborative literary argument essay: analyze a model and draft an introduction, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l4, collaborative literary argument essay: analyze a model and draft proof paragraph 1, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l5, collaborative literary argument essay: analyze a model and draft proof paragraph 2, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l6, collaborative literary argument essay: analyze a model and draft conclusion, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l7, gather evidence and plan independent literary argument essay, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l8, mid-unit 3 assessment: write a literary argument essay (lessons 8-9), ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l10, prepare for performance task: analyze a model and select a text, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l11, plan performance task: audio museum, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l12, end of unit 3 assessment: rehearse and refine performance task recording, ela 2019 g6:m3:u3:l13, participate in performance task: audio museum.

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25 Good Persuasive Essay Topics For 6th Graders

The idea behind a persuasive essay is to help the student pass their ideas through to the audience. Even at such an early age, kids today have formed some opinions of the things that they see in the world around them, and it is important to use this as a means to get them to open up. Through a persuasive essay, it is easier to learn what they think, and help them see the world in a better light as they grow up. The following are some of the simplest persuasive essay topics from myhomeworkdone.com that you can choose for 6th grade students:

  • Laws should be placed to ban droopy pants
  • Snow days are better than sunny days for having family fun
  • Having too much money for kids is not a good idea
  • Parenting classes need to be administered to all teenagers
  • Arts and sciences are supposed to be offered as special degrees
  • People who abandon their pets should be charged in jail
  • Children who get terrible grades should be encouraged to do better
  • Freedom of speech should not have limits
  • Homework should be reduced so that kids have more time to relax at home after school
  • Advertisements in magazines should not feature skinny women
  • A woman president would be better than a male president
  • Students should be taught to write more often so that they learn better handwriting
  • Etiquette should be taught as a lesson in classes
  • There should be a law against spam mail, and huge penalties to those who send them
  • Passing into Mexico from America should be easier than it currently is
  • Longer hair is better than shorter hair
  • It should be illegal to make a racial slur
  • Comedians who use foul language to entice their audience should be charged
  • Babysitters should be sent to parenting classes
  • The world needs to appreciate recycling more often
  • Children who read more perform better than children who do not read more often
  • Internet access is supposed to be free for anyone who wishes to gain access
  • Every student should be allowed to study abroad
  • Gun ownership is supposed to be made accessible to most people for security reasons
  • The government should stop invading other countries so that we can have more peace and fewer people who hate us.

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6th Grade Essay Topics – Best 100 Essay Ideas for Sixth Graders

6th grade essay topics don’t have to be boring and uninspiring. With the right essay topics, sixth graders can express themselves in depth and descriptively. This article aims to highlight 100 amazing essay topics for 6th graders that’ll enhance their writing skills and improve their mental performance. These essay topics all meet the Common Core Standards.

100 Great 6th Grade Essay Topics

Since the 6th grade is the bridge to middle school, teachers will ensure students are prepared for middle school. The emphasis will be laid on the quality of writing and frequent writing assignments and tasks. The key to boosting the writing creativity of 6th graders is allowing them to research essay topics in advance. This will enable you to be more prepared and organised. To find the perfect 6th-grade essay topics, you have to allow your students to sift through the list of essay topics and select the one they feel interested in.

Narrative Essay Topic for 6th Grade 

Whether you want your students to recount an event that happened shortly or an adventure that need them to fuel their imaginative spirit, narrative essays tell a story. The narrative essay is structured with a plot, which organizes it into beginning, middle and end.

Here are some narrative essay topic for 6th graders:

  • Think about the best day of your life. What made it so great?
  • Who is the oldest person you know?
  • Describe a friend situation that changed over only one day.
  • Write about how it feels when you’re alone.
  • Describe your favourite vacation.
  • Has a book, movie, or album ever changed your life?
  • Think about your future self. Write about a day in your life, one year from today.
  • Tell a family story from your perspective.
  • Describe a memory you have of extreme weather.
  • Think about a time you had to work hard to learn something.
  • Your first day of school.
  • Your most exciting day of school
  • A field trip that your class took.
  • Your favourite summer vacation.
  • A trip that included something unexpected or surprising.
  • A time that you experienced something spooky.
  • A time that you experienced something truly frightening.
  • A time that you learned something new that changed you in some way.
  • The moment when you met someone who changed your life.
  • The day that you got your first pet.
  • A move from one place to another.
  • Something funny that happened to you.
  • Something funny that happened to one of your family members or friends.
  • Something embarrassing that happened to you.
  • Your favourite birthday party.
  • A birthday that was disappointing.
  • A big storm (rain, snow or even a tornado!).
  • A time that the power went out.
  • A summer day when the temperature got much higher than expected.
  • A time when you went to an amusement park
  • A time when you got lost somewhere.
  • A memorable experience with a favourite family member
  • A sad experience with someone about whom you care
  • Your most exciting moment playing sports
  • Your most exciting moment is performing in a play, singing, playing music, or dancing.
  • An experience that left you feeling frustrated.
  • An experience that was hard but ended up being worth it.
  • A time that you experienced rejection.
  • A weird encounter with a stranger
  • A random act of kindness.
  • A time that you took a stand for someone or for an issue that you care about.
  • A moment when you thought you might get hurt but didn’t.
  • Breaking a bone (or otherwise suffering an injury).
  • Your first time away from home for the night (or longer).
  • A time when you experienced a historic event.
  • Where were you when a major event happened? (Note: You don’t need to have been at the site of the event; this prompt is about where you were when you found out about the event and how you reacted.)
  • A time when you rebelled against your parents or teacher.
  • A dangerous experience.
  • A misunderstanding between yourself and someone else.
  • A difficult decision that you had to make.
  • The end of a friendship or relationship.
  • The beginning of a friendship or relationship.
  • A time when you judged someone first and then realized that you were wrong about the person.
  • A time when someone judged you first and then realized that he or she was wrong about you.
  • A moment when you felt that you were starting to grow up.
  • A time when you saw one or both of your parents in a different light.
  • A time when you looked up to your older sibling
  • A time when your younger sibling looked up to you
  • A time when you were grateful to be an only child.
  • An experience that you think has only ever happened to you!

Expository essay topic for the 6th Grade

Expository essays are informative. They are fantastic tools you can use to teach your 6th graders about the method of exploring and researching. You’d want to build their writing skills. So here are some Expository essay topic for the 6th graders:

  • Write an extended  definition essay  on one of your vocabulary words.
  • Pretend a friend hasn’t seen your favorite TV show. And what is it about?
  • Compare and contrast two of your friends.
  • Describe your school year so far. And what have been the most important events?
  • Choose a problem at your school. And what’s the best solution?
  • What was the cause of a recent argument you had? And what was the effect?
  • Compare and contrast two of your favorite sports or activities.
  • Discuss a conflict in a movie you like. And how was it resolved?
  • Write a definition essay about the concept of empathy.
  • Explain how to send a friendly text message.
  • Teach a reader how to play your favorite board or card game.
  • Write about the steps needed to tie a shoe.
  • Create a user manual for something you use a lot (e.g., hair straightener or cell phone).
  • Describe how you get home after school.
  • Tell a younger reader how to do homework without wasting time.
  • How do you get to the library from your classroom?
  • How do you choose what to watch on a streaming service?
  • Explain how to pass a difficult level in a video game.
  • Write about the steps you follow to listen to your favourite music.

Argumentative essay topic for the 6th Grade

Read:  How to Write a Unique Scholarship Application

The argumentative essay is about debating. It is formal writing that aims to persuade readers to the writer’s line of thought or point of view. It is one way of spurring curiosity in your 6th grader, allowing them to passionately research and boost their writing skills.

Here are some argumentative essay topics for the 6th grade:

  • Would you rather get or give a gift?
  • If you were anybody when you grow up, who’d you be?
  • What is the most selfless thing that you have ever done?
  • Do you believe that there are things that only men or only women can perform? Why or why not?
  • Do you think that astrological horoscopes are true?
  • What are some of the problems faced by immigrants to a new country? How did this experience make you feel?
  • What was the funniest moment you’ve ever experienced? Why?
  • How do you talk to somebody who has political or spiritual beliefs which are different than your own?
  • What is the longest time that you have ever kept a secret? What was the key?
  • Write about an experience where you thought you knew something for certain, but were later turned out to be wrong.
  • Name and explain somebody that has been a inspiration to your life.
  • In 20 years, where do you think you’ll be? What will you do?
  • How do you start a conversation with somebody that you do not know?
  • What is your deepest, darkest fear?
  • What would you believe at the most? How can you create this belief? What’s it about?
  • What is your favorite thing to do after school or on this weekend?
  • Have you ever been lost? How did you end up finding your way?
  • Should kids have homework?
  • Is your city a good place to live?
  • Is it important to learn math?
  • Should school start later?
  • What’s the best way to eat an ice cream cone?
  • Should skateboarding be allowed in private parking lots?
  • Is Monday through Friday the best school schedule?
  • Does pizza make a good breakfast?
  • Are hamsters fun pets?
  • Should students be allowed to go anywhere they want on the Internet?

Narrative essay topic for the 6th Grade

The Narrative essay is used to motivate students to tell a beautiful story and craft pictures in the mind of readers. Here are some Narrative essay topic for the 6th graders,

  • Your favorite summer vacation.
  • Your favorite birthday party.
  • A time when you went to an amusement park.
  • A memorable experience with a favorite family member.
  • A sad experience with someone about whom you care.
  • Your most exciting moment playing sports.
  • Your most exciting moment performing in a play, singing, playing music or dancing.
  • A weird encounter with a stranger.
  • A moment when you thought you might get hurt but didn’t.
  • Where you were when a major event happened. (Note: You don’t need to have been at the site of the event; this prompt is about where you were when you found out about the event and how you reacted.)
  • A time when you looked up to your older sibling.
  • A time when your younger sibling looked up to you.

Descriptive essay topic for the 6th Grade

Here are some fun and inspiring essay topic for 6th graders:

  • Describe your favourite place.
  • Describe your ideal bedroom.
  • Describe the house in which you grew up.
  • Describe what the first house on the moon would look like.
  • Describe some of your favourite places in your hometown.
  • Describe a peaceful place that you’ve visited.
  • Describe a place that exists only in your imagination.
  • Describe a friend’s or family member’s house where you enjoy spending time.
  • Describe your perfect fantasy vacation destination.
  • Describe your favourite store.
  • Describe your favourite teacher’s classroom.
  • Describe a museum that you’ve visited recently.
  • Describe a place you have dreamed about that doesn’t exist in real life.
  • Describe a place where your pet likes spending time.
  • Describe an outdoor place that you know well.
  • Describe your favourite person.
  • Describe each of your family members.
  • Describe a famous person that you would like to meet.
  • Describe one of your friends.
  • Describe one aspect of someone that you like (for example laugh, style of dress, words that the person likes to use, etc.)
  • Describe yourself to someone who has never met you.
  • Describe the average human to an alien who has never before seen a person.
  • Describe your pet.
  • Look at some old family photos and describe an older family member as he or she was when at your age.
  • Describe someone whom you miss.
  • Describe an object that is special to you.
  • Give a tour of one room in your house by describing the most important objects in that room.
  • Describe one of your favorite outfits.
  • Describe your favorite toy as a child.
  • Describe how you get around (for example: a bicycle, skateboard, sneakers, your parents’ car, the school bus).
  • Describe your favorite piece of furniture where you like to spend time and relax.
  • Describe something that you would bury in a time capsule to tell people about what life is like today.
  • Describe an object that has been in your family for a long time.
  • Choose a piece of food to eat; then, write a description of it that includes the way it looks, smells and tastes.
  • Describe a smartphone to a time traveler from the 1900s.
  • Describe your oldest memory.
  • Describe your best summer vacation.
  • Describe a memorable concert you attended.
  • Describe a memorable trip you took.
  • Describe a special time that you and your family had together.
  • Describe the first time you met one of your friends.
  • Describe a time you met someone famous.
  • Describe one of your happiest memories.
  • Describe one of your saddest memories.
  • Describe a time that you felt scared.
  • Describe a time that you felt excited.
  • Describe a time that something totally unexpected happened.
  • Describe a memory of someone whom you miss.
  • Describe one of your most memorable first days of school.
  • Describe one of your most embarrassing moments.

Creative Essay Topics for 6th Grade

  • What is the best thing someone has ever given to you?
  • What is the nicest thing someone has ever done for you?
  • Write about what you can teach others. Everyone is good at something. This question helps children think about what they’re good at and how they can help others.
  •  Did you ever get into an argument with a friend or family member? How did that make you feel?
  • Did you ever hurt someone’s feelings? Explain what happened and how it made you feel.
  •  Did someone ever hurt your feelings? How did it make you feel? Did you talk to that person about it?
  •  Is there anyone you would like to switch places with? who and why?
  • What does it mean to be loyal?
  •  When was a time you were loyal to a friend or a friend who was loyal to you?

Self-Esteem Essay Topics for 6th Grade

  • Has a friend ever betrayed you? How did it make you feel? What do you think your friend should have done differently.
  • Have you ever been friends with someone who was unpopular or not part of the group? This is a great question to ask children when teaching them about acceptance and how it feels not to be part of a group.
  • When was a time you felt you were treated unfairly? How did it make you feel?
  • Is it fair to give someone a head start in a race? When is it fair? When is it not fair?
  • Write about a time when you had a strong opinion about something? Why did you feel so strongly about it?
  • Write about a time you made a big mistake. How did you fix it? Everyone makes mistakes. This writing topic helps children understand that mistakes are part of the learning experience.
  • Write about a time when you were very angry. What happened? How did being angry make you feel? I find that many times children will feel sad when they are angry. Did I make a good choice when I was angry?
  •  If you heard a rumour about a friend that you knew wasn’t true, what would you do? How would it make you feel?
  • \Write about a time when you cheered someone up. What did you do? How did it make you feel? How did it make that person feel?
  • Write about a time when you used your inner strength to get through a tough situation.
  •  Write about 3 things that are hard for you and why.
  • When was the last time you were afraid? What scared you? How did you react?
  •  What is the bravest thing you’ve ever done?
  •  Who is your hero and why?
  • What do you think risk-taking is? Have you ever taken a risk?
  • Write about your best friend. Who are they, how long have you known them, why are they your best friends?
  • What does it mean to have good character? Do you think you have a good character? Why?

Compare and contrast essays for grade 6

  • Group work and individual work
  • Only child vs. having siblings
  • Nature vs. nurture
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Old friends and new friends
  • Your teacher vs. your parent/guardian
  • Car ownership and public transportation
  • Working your way through college as you go or taking out student loans
  • Parents and grandparents
  • Elementary school and high school
  • Learning to read vs. learning to write
  • The importance of any two school subjects
  • Wearing glasses vs. having braces
  • You and your best friend
  • Friendship vs. romantic love
  • Public and private schools
  • Online school and in-person school
  • Any two schools or colleges
  • Going to college vs. starting work full-time

2 thoughts on “6th Grade Essay Topics – Best 100 Essay Ideas for Sixth Graders”

I don’t like those give me feed back how you could give me gaming stuff for narrative essay

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Praxis Core Writing

Course: praxis core writing   >   unit 1, argumentative essay | quick guide.

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Argumentative essay (30 minutes)

  • states or clearly implies the writer’s position or thesis
  • organizes and develops ideas logically, making insightful connections between them
  • clearly explains key ideas, supporting them with well-chosen reasons, examples, or details
  • displays effective sentence variety
  • clearly displays facility in the use of language
  • is generally free from errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics
  • organizes and develops ideas clearly, making connections between them
  • explains key ideas, supporting them with relevant reasons, examples, or details
  • displays some sentence variety
  • displays facility in the use of language
  • states or implies the writer’s position or thesis
  • shows control in the organization and development of ideas
  • explains some key ideas, supporting them with adequate reasons, examples, or details
  • displays adequate use of language
  • shows control of grammar, usage, and mechanics, but may display errors
  • limited in stating or implying a position or thesis
  • limited control in the organization and development of ideas
  • inadequate reasons, examples, or details to explain key ideas
  • an accumulation of errors in the use of language
  • an accumulation of errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics
  • no clear position or thesis
  • weak organization or very little development
  • few or no relevant reasons, examples, or details
  • frequent serious errors in the use of language
  • frequent serious errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics
  • contains serious and persistent writing errors or
  • is incoherent or
  • is undeveloped or
  • is off-topic

How should I build a thesis?

  • (Choice A)   Kids should find role models that are worthier than celebrities because celebrities may be famous for reasons that aren't admirable. A Kids should find role models that are worthier than celebrities because celebrities may be famous for reasons that aren't admirable.
  • (Choice B)   Because they profit from the admiration of youths, celebrities have a moral responsibility for the reactions their behaviors provoke in fans. B Because they profit from the admiration of youths, celebrities have a moral responsibility for the reactions their behaviors provoke in fans.
  • (Choice C)   Celebrities may have more imitators than most people, but they hold no more responsibility over the example they set than the average person. C Celebrities may have more imitators than most people, but they hold no more responsibility over the example they set than the average person.
  • (Choice D)   Notoriety is not always a choice, and some celebrities may not want to be role models. D Notoriety is not always a choice, and some celebrities may not want to be role models.
  • (Choice E)   Parents have a moral responsibility to serve as immediate role models for their children. E Parents have a moral responsibility to serve as immediate role models for their children.

How should I support my thesis?

  • (Choice A)   As basketball star Charles Barkley stated in a famous advertising campaign for Nike, he was paid to dominate on the basketball court, not to raise your kids. A As basketball star Charles Barkley stated in a famous advertising campaign for Nike, he was paid to dominate on the basketball court, not to raise your kids.
  • (Choice B)   Many celebrities do consider themselves responsible for setting a good example and create non-profit organizations through which they can benefit youths. B Many celebrities do consider themselves responsible for setting a good example and create non-profit organizations through which they can benefit youths.
  • (Choice C)   Many celebrities, like Kylie Jenner with her billion-dollar cosmetics company, profit directly from being imitated by fans who purchase sponsored products. C Many celebrities, like Kylie Jenner with her billion-dollar cosmetics company, profit directly from being imitated by fans who purchase sponsored products.
  • (Choice D)   My ten-year-old nephew may love Drake's music, but his behaviors are more similar to those of the adults he interacts with on a daily basis, like his parents and teachers. D My ten-year-old nephew may love Drake's music, but his behaviors are more similar to those of the adults he interacts with on a daily basis, like his parents and teachers.
  • (Choice E)   It's very common for young people to wear fashions similar to those of their favorite celebrities. E It's very common for young people to wear fashions similar to those of their favorite celebrities.

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  1. 33 Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

    Good Argumentative Essay Topic Ideas (and Free, too!) With these 33 new argumentative essay topics for middle school students, you can help your students learn more about what makes a good argument and how to evaluate and decipher so-called "evidence.". As they explore topics like the ways in which schools handle bullying and whether or not ...

  2. 100 Compelling Argumentative Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    100 Thought-Provoking Argumentative Writing Prompts for Kids and Teens. Practice making well-reasoned arguments using research and facts. Writing a strong argumentative essay teaches students to make a case for their own point of view without relying on emotion or passion. These argumentative essay topics provide options for kids of all ages ...

  3. 35 Thought-Provoking Persuasive Writing Prompts For 6th Graders

    Looking for a solid persuasive essay topic for your 6th grader? The below post contains tons of great ideas that will get your 6th-grade students thinking, researching, debating, and writing! I'm not talking about simple opinion writing topics - like their favorite food, favorite book, or how much money they should get for an allowance.

  4. 94 Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School: Protocols, Health

    This list of excellent argumentative essay topics for middle school is sure to give your students the practice they need in getting their arguments down on paper, in a persuasive way. With a variety of topics ranging from whether or not to outlaw animal testing to debating a 3-day weekend, this curated collection will give your kiddos lots of ...

  5. Excellent Essay Topics for 6th Graders » JournalBuddies.com

    Narrative Essay Topic Ideas for Students. Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School. Expository Essay Topic Ideas. Story Writing Topics for Grades 5 - 9. Essay writing curriculum 6th grade. These 37 essay topics for 6th graders will help your kids form opinions, explore their ideas on paper, and express their thoughts confidently.

  6. 6th Grade Argumentative Essay Topics

    Find out how to write an argumentative essay on various debatable subjects for 6th graders. Explore the list of 6th grade argumentative essay topic ideas and get writing help from Topics Base.

  7. Argumentative Writing

    Student learning culminates in the form of a debate, argumentative essay, and optional end of unit project. Sparking Interest With Exciting Topics. The topics for CommonLit 360's argumentative units are designed to be interesting and relevant to students' lives. Here are the topics and essential questions for each grade:

  8. 20 Argumentative Essay Topics for Students

    Engaging and relevant argumentative essay topics for students in upper elementary and middle school. This list of 20 argument writing prompts is appropriate for students in 5th - 8th grades. ... Most states require students make the switch from opinion writing to argument writing in 5th or 6th grade.

  9. 65 Great Persuasive Writing Prompts for 6th Graders

    Persuasive Writing Prompts for 6th Grade. Draft a letter to your hair, persuading it to behave in humid weather. Write a letter to your grandparents persuading them to visit you this summer. Write a letter to the principal of your school persuading her to shorten the school week. Write a letter convincing your dog to behave kindly towards house ...

  10. 6th Grade Essay Prompts: A Comprehensive Guide

    Ask students to write about their own experiences and perspectives. Provide prompts that relate to current events or issues that are important to the students. Encourage students to explore their own values and beliefs through their writing. As a 6th grader, you are at an exciting stage of academic and personal growth.

  11. The 9 Best Creative and Argumentative Writing Prompts for 6th Grade

    This writing prompt will really tap into students' creativity and imagination. Since flying is something they clearly have never done, they will have to think about all the things that would be possible and choose a few to write about. 3. Letter to Future Self. Prompt: Write a letter to your future self.

  12. Printable 6th Grade Argument Writing Worksheets

    Prompt #4. Worksheet. Novel Study: Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry: The Trial of T.J. Avery. Worksheet. Winter Argument Writing Prompt #1: Snow Days. Worksheet. Winter Argument Writing Prompt #2: Work Over Winter Break. Worksheet. Winter Argument Writing Prompt #3: Getting Outside.

  13. 101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    All Grades K-5 All Grades 6-12 PreK 6th Grade Kindergarten 7th Grade 1st Grade 8th Grade 2nd Grade 9th Grade 3rd Grade 10th Grade 4th Grade 11th Grade 5th Grade 12th Grade. ... Then use these persuasive essay topics for practice. Jump to: School and Education Persuasive Essay Topics; Life and Ethics Persuasive Essay Topics;

  14. Awesome 6th Grade Writing Prompts (Updated!)

    These powerful 6 th grade writing prompts are designed to help students think critically about some of the most important issues they face in today's world. With questions on topics like bullying and Internet usage, your students will have the chance to reflect on what it means to be a teenager today and how popular culture influences their ...

  15. 220+ Interesting Argumentative Essay Topics of 2024

    Argumentative Essay Topics Education. Parents should have an active role in their child's education. The grading system shouldn't exist to judge a student's abilities. Standardized tests should be abolished in schools. All students must wear a uniform in high school.

  16. 50 Compelling Argumentative Essay Topics

    Choosing a Great Argumentative Essay Topic . Students often find that most of their work on these essays is done before they even start writing. This means that it's best if you have a general interest in your subject. Otherwise, you might get bored or frustrated while trying to gather information.

  17. PDF 6th Grade Argumentative Writing Prompt

    W.6.1.DEstablish and maintain a formal style. W.6.1.EProvide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented. W.6.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. W.6.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support ...

  18. 105+ 6th Grade Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

    Persuasive Writing Prompts For The 6th Grade Student. Persuade your classmates to participate in a community service project to benefit your neighborhood. Convince your teacher to allow more creative assignment freedom by choosing your topics. Write a persuasive letter to your principal proposing improvements to the school cafeteria menu.

  19. 50 Great Argumentative Essay Topics for Any Assignment

    Imagine that you're trying to get your parents to raise your allowance, and you can offer one of two arguments in your favor: You should raise my allowance because I want you to. You should raise my allowance because I've been taking on more chores without complaining.

  20. Literary Argument Writing: Gather Evidence and Reflect on Multiple

    W.6.1: Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. W.6.1a: Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly. W.6.1b: Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. W.6.1c: Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.

  21. A List Of 25 Persuasive Essay Topics For 6th Graders

    The following are some of the simplest persuasive essay topics from myhomeworkdone.com that you can choose for 6th grade students: Laws should be placed to ban droopy pants. Snow days are better than sunny days for having family fun. Having too much money for kids is not a good idea. Parenting classes need to be administered to all teenagers.

  22. 6th Grade Essay Topics

    Descriptive essay topic for the 6th Grade. Here are some fun and inspiring essay topic for 6th graders: Describe your favourite place. Describe your ideal bedroom. Describe the house in which you grew up. Describe what the first house on the moon would look like. Describe some of your favourite places in your hometown.

  23. Argumentative essay

    A. As basketball star Charles Barkley stated in a famous advertising campaign for Nike, he was paid to dominate on the basketball court, not to raise your kids. Many celebrities do consider themselves responsible for setting a good example and create non-profit organizations through which they can benefit youths. B.

  24. Welcome to the Purdue Online Writing Lab

    Mission. The Purdue On-Campus Writing Lab and Purdue Online Writing Lab assist clients in their development as writers—no matter what their skill level—with on-campus consultations, online participation, and community engagement. The Purdue Writing Lab serves the Purdue, West Lafayette, campus and coordinates with local literacy initiatives.