university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

Apply as a First-Year Student

A first-year student includes anyone who is currently a student in high school or who has not taken college coursework since graduating from high school.

Starting on August 1 every year, you can begin applying to the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

As a first-year applicant, you can apply using either the Common Application or the  UW System Application . There is no preference between applications.

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First-Year Application and Materials Deadline

Applications and all required application materials must arrive in our office by 11:59 p.m. Pacific Time on the noted deadline dates.

Please note that it may take up to 72 hours for our system to reflect that you have submitted an application; you will receive an email the next business day acknowledging its receipt.

Students who submit their application within 5 days of the deadline will not receive a reminder of materials that are missing from their application.

Early Action is non-binding. You’ll receive your admissions decision earlier but will not be required to commit until the national deadline of May 15.

Wisconsin Guaranteed Admission Program

Beginning in the fall 2025 semester, first-year applicants from Wisconsin high schools who are in the top 5% of their class at the end of 11th grade, or Wisconsin residents who are homeschooled and receive an ACT score in the top 98% of the nation or are a National Merit Scholarship finalist will be guaranteed admission to the University of Wisconsin–Madison through the Wisconsin Guaranteed Admission Program .

Academic Requirements

Our admissions counselors review each application individually and are looking for students who demonstrate strong academic ability, as well as leadership, community service, creativity, talent, and enthusiasm. We also consider personal characteristics that will contribute to the strength and diversity of our university.

Academic Course Preparation

Your high school record should demonstrate both rigor and breadth in the types of course work you pursue. A competitive academic record should show some of the most challenging advanced-level work offered at or through your school in as many areas as possible, while maintaining a strong GPA. The following chart shows the number of years that most admitted students studied in each subject area.

*Math requirement includes at least one year each of algebra, geometry, and advanced math, or an integrated sequence of courses. If you take any of these courses in middle school, that will count toward the requirement. Courses that will not fulfill this requirement include: statistics, business math, and computer classes.

**Students who are not native English language speakers can satisfy the world language application requirement with an official transcript verifying their education in that language. If they were educated in their native language through grade seven, they will receive two units of world language. Those who were educated in their native language through grade eight, will be awarded four units.

Students who have studied a world language using only Rosetta Stone have not fulfilled the world language requirement.

American Sign Language (ASL) may be accepted to meet the world language requirement for admission if it is taken through the student’s school and is reflected on an official transcript.

In rare circumstances, students may be admitted without two units of a single world language. When this happens, students should call the Office of Admissions and Recruitment or meet with an advisor at SOAR to discuss options for clearing the deficiency within the first 60 credits on campus.

Integrity in Applying

Academic Integrity is valued in our community and in the admission process. By signing your application, you certify that it is complete and accurate. We hold you accountable to ensure the authenticity and honesty of your application; essays; self-reported grades, courses, and test scores; and additional materials subsequently submitted.

Senior Course Changes

The University of Wisconsin–Madison Office of Admissions and Recruitment does not “approve” or “deny” senior-year course schedule changes. You should consult with your high school counselor and other advisors and consider the pros, cons, and repercussions of a course change. Once you have made course changes, please submit the Senior Year Course Change Webform to notify us of the change. Please note that you may only submit this form once.

Be aware that a change that results in a drastically less academically rigorous course of study may jeopardize your admissibility or offer of admission. Admission to UW–Madison is based on our evaluation of a number of factors, including reported senior-year (or college) course work and your predicted continued academic success. Any changes in curriculum or declining grades may be cause for revoking admission prior to the start of the term. 

Required First-Year Application Materials

We cannot begin to review your application until all required materials are received. These deadlines and requirements pertain to both domestic and international applicants.

Application requirements for admission to the university are the same for all students, regardless of the academic major/area of interest.*

*Students who wish to be considered for direct admission to a program in the areas of dance or music, will also need to complete an additional application and an audition. Learn more about our Direct Entry  process.

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1. Admissions Application

First-year applicants can apply using either the Common Application  or the UW System Application

UW–Madison does not prefer one application over the other. Please choose only one application and use only that application all the way through to submission.

We strongly recommend that you apply with an email that is not affiliated with your high school and that you check often.

Please note that we do not start processing fall term applications until September 1.

Applicants will be asked to identify both a first and second choice major when completing the application for admission. If we are unable to offer you admission to your first choice major, your second choice will be considered in our application review to assess interest and preparation. Due to the competitive nature of some of our programs, admissions expectations may be different for students pursuing majors in business, engineering, dance, and music. We encourage you to visit our direct entry page to learn more.

2. Application Fee

The application fee is $70.00 US and is non-refundable.

Electronic payment is preferred. If you apply using the UW System Application, the fee can be paid by check or money order, drawn on a bank located in the United States and payable to the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Send the check or money order to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment . Please include the applicant’s name with payment. Do not send cash.

Application fee waivers are available for applicants with financial hardship. Eligible students can request a fee waiver as part of their application. If you did not request an application fee waiver at the time of application, but are eligible to have your fee waived, you may print the Application Fee Waiver Request Form and have your counselor/advisor submit it to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. If the College Board or ACT grant you a fee waiver, we will also accept it.

3. Two Essays

As part of our holistic review, we refer to the essays you submit to understand more about you. What you choose to share gives us an idea of who you are and what you want to accomplish as part of our community. Tell us about you and your unique story to help us know you beyond your GPA and test scores. Your essays might also be used for campus program and scholarship review.

If you apply using the Common Application, you will be asked to respond to one of the  first-year Common Application essays . If you apply with the UW System Application, you will need to answer the following prompt:

  • This part is all about you. Tell us about something you’ve done—academically or personally—and what you’ve learned from it. Was it a success or a challenge? Did it represent a turning point in your life? How did this particular moment in your life influence you, and how will it continue to influence you as you pursue your college education?

All applicants will also need to respond to this prompt:

  • Tell us why you would like to attend the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major(s) you have selected. If you selected undecided, please describe your areas of possible academic interest.

Keep these tips in mind as you work on your writing:

  • Develop your thoughts before you begin the writing process, and create an outline.
  • The maximum word count for each essay is 650, but we recommend planning for 300–500 words.
  • Do not type directly into the web form. Instead, work on your draft in word processing software.
  • Allow time to develop and revisit your writing.
  • Check for spelling mistakes and ask someone to proofread your final version.
  • Be genuine and honest in your writing.

4. Course and Grade Information

We require course and grade information from all schools you attended for grades 9–12.

If you apply via the Common Application, you may meet this requirement one of two ways*:

  • Self-report your coursework within the application to meet the course and grade information requirement to complete your application for admission

– OR – 

  • Have your school submit an official transcript from your school(s).

If you apply via the UW System Application, you may meet this requirement one of two ways*:

  • Submit an unofficial transcript within the UW System Application at the time you complete it

       – OR – 

*If you have already graduated from high school, an official final transcript with your graduation date is needed to meet this requirement.

How to Send Official Transcripts

Students applying from outside the United States can find country-specific official transcript requirements here .

If you were or are homeschooled, we will need additional documentation to complete a full, holistic review of your application. Learn more about specific application policies and requirements and how to send your official materials.

If you earned your General Educational Development (GED) certificate or a High School Equivalency Diploma (HSED) , submit your official score report in addition to all high school or home school transcripts.

Note: official transcripts from all schools and colleges attended (including dual credit) will be required prior to enrollment. Incorrect reporting of courses and/or grades may result in your admission offer being revoked and scholarship awards being forfeited. Official college transcripts are also required to award college credit. Official transcripts should be sent directly from each school attended.

GPA and Class Rank:  Applicants are expected to achieve a high level of performance in the course work they pursue and an increasingly strong academic record. We ask for your GPA and class rank. We also realize that many schools consider GPA on different scales and some do not report GPA or class rank at all. We consider both GPA and rank in the context of your school. We typically see unweighted, academic GPAs between a 3.8 and a 4.0, and a class rank in the 85–97 percentile.

5. One Required Letter of Recommendation

We require you to submit one letter of recommendation written by someone who can attest to your academic ability, such as a teacher, school counselor, or faculty member. If you choose, you can also submit another letter of recommendation from an additional source, such as an employer, coach, research mentor, community leader, or clergy. Students with an interest in engineering are encouraged to obtain a letter of recommendation from a math or science teacher. Remember to have a discussion with your chosen recommender first to see if they are willing and able to provide a letter.

We encourage applicants who have been away from formal classroom teaching for an extended period to request a letter of recommendation from someone who can speak to their academic potential, such as an employer (preferably a supervisor or manager), a program or departmental trainer, or some other individual in an official instructional capacity.

Those who apply using the Common Application should request a recommendation through that system.

If you apply using the UW System Application, select the link that best describes your situation:

  • Invite someone to submit a recommendation  (I have my NetID)
  • Invite someone to submit a recommendation  (no NetID)

Recommendations that are mailed to our office  Letters of recommendation must be sent directly from the school and/or recommender, in a sealed envelope. Recommendations  must include the applicant’s full name, birth date, and campus ID number (if known). Additionally, letters of recommendation from a school staff member may also be sent through Naviance. Please note that letters of recommendation expire after one year from the date it is written.

6. TOEFL, IELTS, AND DET Scores (English Language Proficiency)

First-year applicants educated in non-English speaking countries must submit an official TOEFL, IELTS, or Duolingo English Test (DET) score, unless English was the primary language of instruction in all four years of secondary school.

All English proficiency exams should be sent electronically, directly from the testing service.

Please note: Sending official test scores from the testing agency does have an additional costs and will add 3-6 weeks to the application completion process. Plan to send your test scores early to ensure your scores arrive before the the materials deadline.

How to Send Official Test Scores

We do not superscore any English Proficiency exam and score reports cannot be older than two years from the time you apply.

Duolingo English Test (DET)

  • Minimum accepted score: 115+.
  • When submitting your score(s): Search category should be “Undergraduate,” then select “University of Wisconsin–Madison.”
  • Please do not send to offices listed under “Other,” as we are unable to retrieve those scores.
  • The DET should be sent with sub-scores.
  • Minimum accepted score: 6.5+.
  • IELTS does not require a code.
  • Select our account name, “University of Wisconsin, Madison Undergraduate”
  • Please do not send paper copies of your IELTS scores.
  • We do accept the IELTS Indicator.
  • Minimum accepted score: 80+.
  • When submitting your score(s): TOEFL test code is 1846.
  • We do not accept “MyBest” score from TOEFL nor any English Proficiency exam.
  • For each TOEFL you submit, we will require the full score report. Wisconsin does not accept the TOEFL iTP Plus for China but we will accept the iBT Special Home Edition.

If you feel that you qualify for an English Proficiency Exam waiver based upon the requirements above, please submit all required transcripts to our office. Other test scores such as ACT, SAT, or AP (Advanced Placement) scores do not meet the requirements for a waiver. Once your transcripts are received in our office (are no longer displayed on your to-do list in your Student Center), we will determine your waiver eligibility. Waivers will not be processed prior to receipt of both the admissions application and transcripts.

Optional First-Year Application Materials

Act and sat scores (test optional through the spring 2025 term).

Including scores from either the ACT or the SAT with your application is optional for students applying for admission through the spring 2025 term, with an application deadline of October 1, 2024. You will not be disadvantaged in our evaluation process if you do not include these scores for consideration in your application.

More information on our test optional policy can be found by viewing our  ACT/SAT Test Optional FAQs .

You will indicate your choice regarding including test scores at the time of application. The choice that you indicate on your application is final.

If choosing to include ACT or SAT test scores with your application, you are encouraged to self-report your test scores. If self reporting scores: official test scores for each test date self-reported will be required prior to enrollment. Incorrect reporting of test scores may result in your admission offer being revoked and scholarship awards being forfeited.

If applying with the Common Application, you can do so within the application or after in the MyUW Student Center (beginning September 1 and after your application is received and processed). If applying with the UW System Application, in the MyUW Student Center (beginning September 1 and after your application is received and processed). You may also submit your official scores directly from the testing site.

Please note sending official test scores from the testing agency does have an additional costs and will add 2–4 weeks to the application completion process.  Our test code is 4656 for the ACT and 1846 for the SAT. Do not send your results rush (SAT) or priority (ACT); we receive all scores electronically on a daily basis so there is not an advantage to rush or priority delivery.

If you wish to add updated score(s), you can do so by self-reporting in the  MyUW  Student Center.

To assure that your test score(s) are considered with your application, you must either self-report your scores or have official scores sent from the testing agency, received in our office by our  deadlines .

Statement on Score Choice:  Students choosing to include test scores with their application are encouraged to submit all exam scores. It can be a benefit to see your complete testing history as part of our comprehensive review, and since we will only consider your highest score (by test date), there is nothing to be gained by suppressing scores through Score Choice. However, applicants are free to use the College Board’s Score Choice option for the SAT and/or the similar option offered by ACT. Superscores are not considered in our review.

Prepare Your Essay

You are more than facts and figures.

It doesn’t get said enough, but your UWs are literally looking for reasons to admit you. That’s why they ask for an essay. They simply want to hear about you. Take your time. Give it some thought, share it with a few people you trust, and revise.

In the end, it’ll be worth it.

All Universities of Wisconsin ask the following question of freshmen and transfer applicants:

All UWs This part is all about you. Tell us about something you’ve done — academically or personally — and what you’ve learned from it. Was it a success or a challenge? Did it represent a turning point in your life? How did this particular moment in your life influence you, and how will it continue to influence you as you pursue your college education?

If you apply to UW-La Crosse or UW-Madison, you’ll need to answer a second question, as well:

UW-Madison Tell us why you would like to attend the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major(s) you have selected. If you selected undecided, please describe your areas of possible academic interest.
UW-La Crosse Please respond to ONE of the following: (1) How will your life experiences or commitments enrich the UW-La Crosse campus community? OR (2) Tell us why you are interested in attending UW-La Crosse and what aspects of the campus are especially important to you.

Tips & Recommendations

We’ve collected some of the best tips and recommendations for writing a great essay.

university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

Madison, Wisconsin

University of wisconsin-madison | wisconsin.

  • Cost & scholarships
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  • Essay prompts

Want to see your chances of admission at University of Wisconsin-Madison | Wisconsin?

We take every aspect of your personal profile into consideration when calculating your admissions chances.

University of Wisconsin-Madison | Wisconsin’s 2023-24 Essay Prompts

Why this college essay.

Tell us why you decided to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major(s) you have selected. If you selected undecided please describe your areas of possible academic interest.

Life Experience Essay

Tell a story from your life, describing an experience that either demonstrates your character or helped to shape it. (UW Application Only)

Diversity Short Response

Our families and communities often define us and our individual worlds. Community might refer to your cultural group, extended family, religious group, neighborhood or school, sports team or club, co-workers, etc. Describe the world you come from and how you, as a product of it, might add to the diversity of the UW. (UW Application Only)

Common App Personal Essay

The essay demonstrates your ability to write clearly and concisely on a selected topic and helps you distinguish yourself in your own voice. What do you want the readers of your application to know about you apart from courses, grades, and test scores? Choose the option that best helps you answer that question and write an essay of no more than 650 words, using the prompt to inspire and structure your response. Remember: 650 words is your limit, not your goal. Use the full range if you need it, but don‘t feel obligated to do so.

Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?

Reflect on something that someone has done for you that has made you happy or thankful in a surprising way. How has this gratitude affected or motivated you?

Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.

Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?

Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you‘ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

What will first-time readers think of your college essay?

Home — Application Essay — University — UW–Madison

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UW–Madison Admission Essays

Understanding the intricacies of university application essays is crucial for aspiring students. The University of Wisconsin–Madison, renowned for its rigorous academic environment, demands essays that reflect a student's intellectual capabilities and personal growth. In fact, analyzing UW Madison essay examples can offer significant insights into the level of depth and articulation expected by such prestigious institutions. These essays are a vital component of the application process, offering a unique opportunity for students to showcase their individuality, experiences, and aspirations. In this guide, we'll explore various aspects of the University of Wisconsin–Madison essay requirements, providing insights and examples, including those akin to UW Madison essay examples, to help students navigate this critical aspect of their university applications.

Key Features of UW–Madison Essays

The University of Wisconsin–Madison's essay requirements are strategically designed to assess a candidate's alignment with the university's educational ethos and academic vigor. These essays, transcending mere writing tasks, provide a window into an applicant's personality, intellectual curiosity, and potential impact on the university's dynamic community. In this context, UW Madison application essay examples can serve as invaluable guides, illustrating how to effectively engage with the essay prompts. These prompts encourage deep reflection on personal growth, academic objectives, and societal responsibilities, allowing students to demonstrate their suitability for the rigorous academic environment of UW–Madison. Engaging with the essence of these essays and crafting responses that resonate with the admissions committee are crucial for enhancing admission chances, underlining their significance in UW–Madison's holistic application process.

  • Essays emphasize personal development, academic aspirations, and community involvement.
  • Annually updated prompts reflect current topics and values.
  • They provide a platform for students to express their individual viewpoints.

University of Wisconsin–Madison Admission Requirements

Securing admission to the esteemed University of Wisconsin–Madison involves fulfilling a range of stringent criteria. The university selects students who exhibit academic excellence, well-rounded personalities, leadership skills, and alignment with its core principles and culture. These criteria aim to identify not only academically adept students but also those ready to positively contribute to the campus community. Every application aspect, from scholastic achievements to extracurricular involvement and personal essays, undergoes thorough evaluation to ensure the selected candidates are ideally suited for UW–Madison's diverse and dynamic environment.

  • High academic performance, evidenced in GPA and standardized tests.
  • Diverse extracurricular engagement demonstrating leadership and initiative.
  • Impactful personal statement and supplemental essays.
  • Recommendation letters from academic or professional mentors.
  • Proof of adherence to the university's values and ethos.

Role of UW-Madison Supplemental Essay Examples in Applications

UW-Madison supplemental essay examples in the application process is instrumental for prospective students. These examples serve as a vital guide, illustrating the depth of analysis, personal reflection, and writing quality expected by the University of Wisconsin–Madison. By studying these examples, applicants gain crucial insights into crafting essays that go beyond academic metrics, highlighting their unique personalities and experiences. Effective UW Madison supplemental essay examples showcase critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and an understanding of the university's core values, such as community engagement and academic excellence. They teach the art of storytelling and the importance of specific details for impactful narratives. While these examples are valuable resources, it's essential for applicants to maintain authenticity and originality in their essays. The examples should inspire, not be replicated, guiding students to produce essays that are true to their experiences and resonate with UW-Madison's ethos.

UW-Madison Supplemental Essay Examples: Prompts for 2023

Committed to a comprehensive and all-encompassing review process, UW–Madison has introduced several thought-provoking supplemental essay prompts for the 2023 cycle. These prompts aim to allow applicants to display various facets of their personalities, experiences, and future plans. The prompts are crafted to elicit responses that showcase the applicant's self-reflection abilities, challenges they've overcome, and their vision for the future. They also provide a glimpse into how applicants envision their contributions to the university community. Collectively, these prompts are vital in the application, offering a stage for applicants to persuasively argue why they are an excellent match for UW–Madison.

  • Challenge and Growth: Applicants share a significant challenge they've overcome and the lessons learned, demonstrating resilience and personal growth.
  • Academic and Career Aspirations: This prompt asks students to detail their goals and how UW–Madison can aid in achieving them, focusing on the alignment of the applicant's plans with the university's resources.
  • Community Contribution: Applicants discuss how they plan to contribute to the UW–Madison community, showcasing their understanding of community values and social responsibility.

These prompts encourage applicants to provide thoughtful, personal responses, illustrating their readiness for university life and their potential to enrich the UW–Madison community. Effective responses range from narratives about overcoming personal adversities and articulating clear academic and career pathways to well-planned community engagement and leadership roles within the university.

Guidelines for Writing UW–Madison Supplemental Essays

Writing compelling supplemental essays for UW–Madison is a vital part of the application process. These essays offer an opportunity to stand out and show the admissions committee your unique identity beyond academic metrics. To gain a clearer perspective, reviewing University of Wisconsin Madison supplemental essay examples can be extremely beneficial. These examples provide practical insights into effective storytelling and structuring, helping you understand how to convey your experiences and aspirations authentically. Here are essential tips to help craft impactful and memorable essays, inspired by the strategies evident in University of Wisconsin Madison supplemental essay examples:

  • Interpreting the Prompts: Carefully read and understand each essay prompt. Reflect on how your experiences and aspirations align with the questions posed.
  • Self-Reflection: Engage in introspection about your experiences, challenges, and accomplishments. Authentic, self-aware essays often leave a lasting impression.
  • Authentic Voice: Write in a manner that's true to your personality. Authenticity is crucial for connecting with the admissions officers.
  • Specific Examples: Use detailed examples and stories to bring your essays to life. Specific experiences add depth and relatability to your narrative.
  • Structured Approach: A well-organized essay with a clear beginning, middle, and end enhances readability and impact. Ensure your essay flows logically.

Remember, UW–Madison's supplemental essays are your chance to provide the admissions committee with a deeper understanding of your character, values, and ambitions. A well-crafted essay can significantly impact your application.

Leveraging UW–Madison Essay Examples for Success

UW–Madison essay examples are invaluable resources for understanding what the admissions committee seeks. These examples often showcase creativity, depth, and a strong connection with the university's values. Utilizing these essays as models can aid in developing your own narratives, while emphasizing the importance of maintaining originality and authenticity in your writing:

  • Reflecting on Challenges and Growth at UW–Madison
  • Learning from Failures: A Journey to Success
  • Charting a Path in Environmental Advocacy
  • Community Service: Lessons in Leadership
  • The Influence of Personal Research on Academic Choices
  • Promoting Educational Inclusivity: A Personal Mission
  • Harmonizing Music with Academic and Career Goals
  • Resilience: Turning Obstacles into Opportunities
  • Embracing Multilingualism and Global Perspectives
  • Envisioning Sustainable Practices at UW–Madison

Maximizing Impact with UW–Madison Essay Examples

In conclusion, UW–Madison essays are an integral part of the application, offering a platform for students to express their individuality and suitability for the university. To effectively navigate this crucial aspect, examining University of Wisconsin Madison essay examples can be incredibly instructive. These examples provide a clearer understanding of the expected caliber and style, aiding students in crafting their narratives. Understanding and adhering to the essay requirements, drawing inspiration from such examples, and infusing personal experiences and insights into your writing can significantly enhance your chances of admission. Remember, well-written essays, much like the University of Wisconsin Madison essay examples, can profoundly influence the admissions committee's decision, emphasizing the importance of dedicating time and effort to develop compelling, authentic stories.

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university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

How to Get Into UW Madison: Acceptance Rate & Strategies

July 4, 2023

university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

Twenty years ago, the University of Wisconsin-Madison was hardly a hot-ticket destination for stellar students from all over the country/world. While always a popular and sound choice for locals, only 17,727 teens applied for a chance to become Badgers back in 2001, and 12,791, or 72%, were ultimately accepted. That year, the 75th percentile standardized test scores among attending freshmen were 1350 on the SAT and 29 on the ACT. Today, those scores, while strong, would barely place you in the average range of admitted students. This complicates the question of how to get into the University of Wisconsin Madison in 2022-23 as the UW Madison acceptance rate is now under 50%.

In 2015, the state legislature increased the university’s allowable cap on out-of-state enrollment, which had previously limited nonresidents to a maximum of 27.5% of the undergraduate population. By the start of the 2021-22 school year, just 45% of freshmen were Wisconsin residents, with thousands flocking to Madison from all 50 U.S. states and 80+ countries from around the globe.

Given this increased desirability and selectivity at UW-Madison, the intent of this article is to give those considering applying to the university an understanding of the following topics:

  • UW Madison’s acceptance rate
  • SAT, ACT, GPA, and class rank of accepted Wisconsin applicants
  • Admissions trends
  • UW Madison’s system for rating applicants
  • A look at the demographics of current UW-Madison undergraduates
  • The percentage of accepted students that attend UW-Madison (yield rate)
  • Tips for applying to the University of Wisconsin
  • UW-Madison essay prompts and tips
  • How to assess whether applying to UW Madison is even worth the $60 application fee (for you)

Students applying to UW Madison may also find the following blogs to be of interest:

How to Get Into:

  • Boston University
  • University of Michigan
  • Northwestern University 

UW Madison Acceptance Rate 

There were an all-time high of 60,260 applications for admission into the Badger Class of 2026. Overall, the UW Madison acceptance rate was 49%. Traditionally, it is much easier to gain acceptance as a Wisconsin resident.

UW Madison Admissions – SAT, ACT, GPA, and Class Rank

According to the most recent statistics available (Class of 2026), the mid-50% SAT range for enrolled freshmen was 1370-1500; the ACT range was 28-33. Only 18% of applicants submitted an SAT score while 38% included an ACT result in their application. An impressive 54% of freshmen hailed from the top 10%, while 87% earned a place in the top 25%. The average high school GPA was 3.88; an astonishing 48% of entering freshmen possessed above 4.0. Only 5% of the Class of 2026 earned lower than a 3.5 cumulative GPA.

Admissions Trends & Notes 

  • Firstly, the Class of 2026 was made up of 8,628 freshmen, up from 8,465 the prior year.
  • The number of applicants rose by more than 12% in a single year.
  • New students included 3,787 Wisconsin residents.

University of Wisconsin Acceptance Rate (Continued)

  • The 1,431 underrepresented domestic students in the Class of 2026 was up from 1,251 the prior year.
  • The number of National Merit Scholars enrolled has increased by 175% in the last five years.
  • Lastly, the university has extended its test-optional policy through 2024-25.

How UW Madison Rates Applicants

UW-Madison considers only two factors as “very important” to the admissions process: rigor of high school course load and GPA. Further, items that are “important” as part of the admissions process are: essays, recommendations, extracurriculars, character, and state residency. “Considered” factors are: test scores, class rank,  talent/ability, first-generation status, and work/volunteer experience.

The UW-Madison admission staff reads every application carefully and, in their own words, “We don’t use formulas or charts. We read each application thoroughly, one by one.” In reviewing each applicant, they focus first on “academic excellence and preparation.” Straight from the admissions office: “Beyond academics, we look for qualities such as leadership, contributions to your community, and achievement in the arts, athletics, and other areas. We’re also seeking diversity in personal background and experience and your potential for positive contribution to the Wisconsin community.”

It is also worth highlighting that recruited athletes enjoy a huge edge. This is because UW-Madison takes great pride in their 23 NCAA Division I sports teams . Overall, approximately 900 student-athletes are presently attending the university.

For advice about how to stand out on the extracurricular front, check out our previous blog entitled How Many Extracurricular Activities Do I Need for College?

Who Gets Into UW-Madison?

Let’s look at the demographics of current freshmen (2022-23)

  • In-State: 44%
  • Out-of-State: 56%

The greatest number of students from one recent freshman cohort hailed from the following states:

  • Wisconsin: 2,856
  • Illinois: 695
  • Minnesota: 449
  • California: 368
  • New York: 217

Among non-residents, competition is stiffest among those hailing from states with endless streams of qualified applicants (the entire Northeast & the West Coast). However, if you hail from the Deep South like Alabama (1 current freshman) or Mississippi (1 current freshman) or a less-populated state like Wyoming (2 current freshmen) or North Dakota (0 current freshmen), your location is more likely to provide a boost to your admissions chances at UW-Madison.

Within the state, the high schools producing the Badger first-years are (most recent data available):

  • Middleton High School: 105
  • James Madison Memorial High School: 90
  • Arrowhead High School: 84
  • Madison East High School: 61
  • Brookfield East High School: 58
  • Homestead High School: 56
  • West High School: 55
  • Waunakee Community High School: 55

Shifting to ethnic identity, the breakdown is as follows:

  • Caucasian/White: 66%
  • Asian American: 8%
  • Hispanic: 7%
  • African American: 2%
  • International: 10%

UW Madison Acceptance Rate (Continued)

Current international students are citizens of the following countries:

  • South Korea
  • Saudi Arabia

Looking at the gender breakdown, the university presently enrolls more women than men:

UW-Madison’s “Yield Rate”

UW-Madison’s yield rate—the percentage of accepted students who elect to enroll, divided by the total number of students who are admitted is 29%. This figure is significantly lower than other powerhouse state universities like the University of Michigan, UVA, and UCLA.

Tips for Applying to UW-Madison

If you plan on joining the 60,000 UW-Madison hopefuls for the next admissions cycle, you should know the following:

  • You can apply using either the Common Application or the UW System Application .
  • UW-Madison does not use interviews as part of its evaluation process.
  • The university does not officially grant any favor to children of alumni, however, recent data reveals that legacy students enjoy an acceptance rate 20% higher than non-legacies.
  • UW-Madison does not consider “demonstrated interest” so you will not be judged on whether or not you made a campus visit, contacted an admissions officer, etc.
  • Lastly, make sure to dedicate sufficient time and effort to the supplemental essay required by UW-Madison. In the 2022-23 cycle, the prompt for those applying through the Common App was as follows:

1) Tell us why you would like to attend the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major(s) you have selected. If you selected undecided, please describe your areas of possible academic interest.

For detailed advice on how to write a winning essay, visit our blog: University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essay Prompts and Tips . 

UW Madison Acceptance Rate – Final Thoughts

Those with SAT/ACT scores within the mid-50% mark for UW-Madison who are also at the very top of their respective high school class are absolutely viable candidates to UW-Madison. If you live in Wisconsin, your road to acceptance will be much smoother than if you are an out-of-state or international applicant. Therefore, you will need to bring forward even better academic credentials if you do not hail from the Badger State. Of course, it goes without saying that all teens applying to a school of the University of Wisconsin’s ilk also need to also have a proper mix of “target” and “safety” schools on their college list. More on creating a balanced college list can be found here .

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How to Write the University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essays

Tell us why you decided to apply to the university of wisconsin-madison. in addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major(s) you have selected. if you selected undecided please describe your areas of possible academic interest. (you may enter up to 650 words, but 300-500 is recommended)..

The University of Wisconsin-Madison’s supplemental essay is a great opportunity to showcase your voice to the admissions committee and convey your academic passions and knowledge of the school. When writing your UW-Madison supplement, be sure to address both parts of the prompt: explain your interest in the majors you’ve selected and discuss what draws you to UW-Madison. UW-Madison generously provides a word count of up to 650, so you have ample space to elaborate on the past experiences and values that have led you to your area of study, and also write about the school-specific resources at UW-Madison that you would like to take advantage of during your undergraduate career.

Before you begin drafting your UW-Madison supplemental essay, you’ll want to do some “why school” research. UW-Madison offers 20+ schools with many niche majors and certificates ; therefore, you’ll want to spend some time on the website to identify the specific program that is the best fit for you. If UW-Madison offers programs that can’t be found at any other universities that align with your interests, you can cite these and make an even stronger case for why UW-Madison is the best school for you! Some particular academic strengths of UW-Madison include its programs in Education, Agriculture, Communication, Biological Sciences, Social Sciences, Business, Engineering, and Economics. You can look through the web pages of specific departments and schools, and see if there are general resources that are well-suited to you. For instance, UW-Madison’s Integrated Liberal Studies programs, Living-Learning Communities, First Year Interest Groups, and Honors programs integrate communal life with academic pursuits in a way that may be appealing to you.

As with any “why school” essay, you’ll want to not only cite school-specific resources, but also share what you know about the school’s values and reflect upon how these values align with your own. UW-Madison often emphasizes the “Wisconsin Idea”, or the idea that a successful state university should inspire its students to seek truth and apply the resulting knowledge to benefit themselves and society. UW-Madison students are highly involved with their communities and the causes that matter to them. In your UW-Madison supplemental essay, you’ll want to explore how your academic and personal journey to date has reflected the principles of the Wisconsin Idea, and discuss which academic course of study, extracurriculars, and other opportunities at UW-Madison will put you in a position to serve others and bring positive change to society.

If you apply with the UW System Application, you will need to answer the following prompt:

This part is all about you. tell us about something you’ve done—academically or personally—and what you’ve learned from it. was it a success or a challenge did it represent a turning point in your life how did this particular moment in your life influence you, and how will it continue to influence you as you pursue your college education.

If you apply to UW-Madison through the UW system rather than the Common Application, this is the equivalent of the Common Application’s personal statement. Unlike the Common App, you won’t get a choice of prompts to respond to–you must answer this question, and the “why school” supplement if you are applying to UW-Madison.

For this UW essay, carefully examine the wording of the prompt before you dive into writing. UW admissions readers are looking for you to discuss something you’ve actively done rather than something that’s happened to you, so to select a strong topic, you’ll want to reflect on any memorable accomplishments, initiatives you started, intellectual interests you’ve pursued, or risks you’ve taken in the past four years. These can be in the context of your academics, extracurriculars, or personal life. Then, it’d be best to gravitate towards a specific moment–rather than a story that covers a long span of time–and select one that was highly influential in determining your academic path, personal values, or worldview.

This is a multi-part prompt, so ensure that you are answering each question within the prompt. You should respond directly to all parts of the prompt, including “something you’ve done,” “what you’ve learned,” “how did this particular moment in your life influence you,” and “how will it continue to influence you [in college].” While you don’t need to answer the questions of “success or challenge” or “turning point” in language that’s as head-on (e.g. sentences like “My accomplishment was a success” or “This was a turning point for me”), it should be very clear and obvious to admissions readers whether you’re writing about a success or challenge, and how that event worked as a turning point in your life.

If you have already written a personal statement for the Common Application, you’re in luck if you’ve responded to prompt #2 (“The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?”), prompt #5 (“Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.”), or potentially even prompt #3 (“Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?”). There is significant overlap between these prompts and UW’s, so it’s likely that you can recycle your Common App essay with some light modifications. In particular, make sure that you add material that addresses the final part of the prompt, discussing how the moment you selected will influence your approach to your journey as an undergraduate. That being said, if you’ve already written an essay for the Common App, we definitely recommend applying to UW through the Common App! Best of luck with your UW-Madison essays!

university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

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Master the University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essays '23-'24

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Hello future Badgers! If you're eager to join the vibrant community at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, acing your supplemental essays is crucial. In this blog post, we'll guide you through the UW-Madison essay prompts, offering expert advice to help you write compelling and impactful responses.

University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essay Prompts

Tell us why you decided to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, share with us the academic, extracurricular, or research opportunities you would take advantage of as a student. (650 words)

Optional: If applicable, provide details of any circumstance that could have had an impact on your academic performance and/or extracurricular involvement. (300 words)

Approach to Each Prompt

Why are you interested in the University of Wisconsin-Madison? In this prompt, UW-Madison wants to understand your motivations for choosing the university and how you plan to seize the opportunities it offers. Your essay should reflect a clear understanding of what makes UW-Madison unique and how it aligns with your academic, career, or personal aspirations. Detail specific academic programs, clubs, research opportunities, or campus traditions that have caught your interest and explain why.

From the buzz of Camp Randall on game days to the unceasing research opportunities, the University of Wisconsin-Madison's vibrant spirit of curiosity, community, and collaboration resonates with me. As a prospective Biochemistry major with an intent to delve into research, I find the breadth and depth of UW-Madison's academic and research offerings particularly compelling.

UW-Madison's Biochemistry department stands out with its cutting-edge facilities, extensive research opportunities, and faculty renowned for their pioneering contributions. I am particularly drawn to Dr. Michael Sussman's groundbreaking work on plant genomics. Given my experience studying the genetic modification of plants during a high school internship, the prospect of participating in similar research under his mentorship excites me.

Beyond academics, I am eager to immerse myself in the Wisconsin Idea, the principle that education should influence people’s lives beyond the boundaries of the classroom. Inspired by this concept, I aim to join the Morgridge Center for Public Service. The Center's commitment to connecting campus and community through service aligns with my passion for community service, as demonstrated by my role as a tutor for underprivileged kids in my local community. I am particularly interested in the Badger Volunteers program, through which I can consistently engage with local non-profit organizations.

I am also excited about the opportunity to explore my love for the outdoors through Hoofers, UW-Madison's oldest and largest outdoor recreation club. As an avid hiker and climber, I look forward to not only participating in their adventure trips but also leading initiatives within the Hiking and Mountaineering sections of the club.

From a spirited community and unparalleled academics to countless opportunities for research and service, UW-Madison offers the ideal environment for my growth, both academically and personally. By engaging with the many resources and opportunities available, I look forward to contributing to the Badger community and embodying the Wisconsin Idea.

Optional: Impact on your academic performance and/or extracurricular involvement This is your opportunity to discuss any significant challenges that have impacted your academic journey. It could be personal, financial, or health-related issues, or perhaps a learning disability. Be candid, but focus on resilience and how you've learned or grown from these experiences.

The second semester of my sophomore year was challenging due to a severe case of mononucleosis. My health affected my academics and extracurricular involvement, leading to a slight dip in my grades and a hiatus from club activities.

During this time, I had to learn to manage my limited energy levels and prioritize tasks effectively. I worked closely with my teachers to catch up on coursework and leveraged online resources to compensate for missed classroom discussions. With time, my health improved, and I was able to resume my extracurricular commitments.

Despite the temporary setback, the experience was pivotal. It taught me resilience, resourcefulness, and the importance of self-care. As I navigated the challenge, I also developed a more profound appreciation for health, education, and the support of my community.

Today, I am not only fully recovered, but I am also a stronger student and individual because of the experience. I look forward to bringing this resilience and perspective to the diverse challenges and opportunities that await at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Top Tips for Your Essays

  • Research Thoroughly : To write convincingly about why you want to attend UW-Madison, you need to understand the university well. Dig deep into the university's website, student blogs, and social media to discover unique opportunities that genuinely excite you.
  • Be Specific : Don't make vague statements about how great UW-Madison is. Highlight specific opportunities that align with your interests and explain how you plan to leverage them.
  • Reflection is Vital : For the optional essay, recounting the challenge isn't enough. You must reflect on your experiences, demonstrating growth, resilience, and how you've overcome obstacles.

Remember, the supplemental essays are your opportunity to show UW-Madison what you bring to the table and how you'll contribute to their dynamic Badger community. Good luck, and On, Wisconsin!

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university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

How to Write the University of Wisconsin-Madison Application Essays 2017-2018

university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

The University of Wisconsin–Madison (the official state university of Wisconsin) is a public university that was founded in 1848, directly following Wisconsin’s acquisition of statehood. Wisconsin is well known not only for its excellent academics, but also for its hugely successful NCAA athletic teams. The 936-acre campus is located right next to downtown Madison, which is consistently ranked as one of the best college towns in the country.

With nearly 5,000 unique courses and over 200 distinct majors, it’s no wonder that the University of Wisconsin–Madison attracted 32,887 applicants to the Class of 2016. The 52.6% acceptance rate necessitates strong supplemental essays, and we at CollegeVine are here to help you break them down step by step!

Students can apply online, using either the Common Application or the University of Wisconsin Application System. Both application options require two supplemental pieces of writing: a short prompt and a long prompt. Below, you’ll find the two prompts along with our take on the best way to tackle the essays, as well as some tips on what you should (and shouldn’t) include in your supplements.

Want to learn what University of Wisconsin Madison will actually cost you based on your income? And how long your application to the school should take?  Here’s what every student considering University of Wisconsin Madison needs to know.

University of Wisconsin Application Essay Prompts

Short essay prompt, briefly explain which activity you entered in the common app activities section is the most important to you. (50-100 words).

This prompt shouldn’t be too difficult — with a limit of 100 words, you’re going to be writing no more than a few sentences. While you should use this short essay as an opportunity to elaborate on the activity that portrays you in the best light, make sure that the selected activity is actually “important to you.” If the extracurricular that you select appears impressive (think three-time section leader in your all-state band, or coordinator of a peer tutoring program that works with nearly one hundred kids), but you’re not able to articulate why it’s relevant to your life and your journey through high school, the admissions committee won’t be impressed.

Don’t feel like the activity you write about needs to be one in which you held leadership; while leadership in the activity is of course looked highly upon, the genuine story you tell about its importance to you is key.

Take this scenario: You were elected student body president as a junior and presided over all student council meetings. While you enjoyed the position, you’re planning on majoring in biology and not government. Last summer, you were one of the few interns at a local research hospital, where you helped discover a previously unknown bacterium. Even though you’ll likely put “student body president” as the first item on your activity list, you may want to write the short essay about your experience at the hospital, which led you to decide on a biology major.

If you participated in any type of volunteer work, at a local soup kitchen or homeless shelter, and feel that those experiences had a profound impact on you, you could write about the volunteer work. That being said, you don’t necessarily need to write about volunteer/community service activities! If you were the president of your high school’s school store, or the captain of your town’s travel soccer team, and that significantly defined your past few years, you can absolutely choose it as your activity. The key is just to make sure admissions officers get a more in-depth look at who you are through the lens of the activity.

Whichever activity you choose, be sure that your writing is clear, concise, and effective. There’s no need for complex metaphors, nor overly intense descriptions. As long as it’s evident to the reader that your activity had a meaningful impact on your development as an individual, you’ve done your job!

university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

Long Essay Prompt

Tell us why you decided to apply to the university of wisconsin–madison. in addition, share with us the academic, extracurricular, or research opportunities you would take advantage of as a student. if applicable, provide details of any circumstance that could have had an impact on your academic performance and/or extracurricular involvement. (80-650 words).

In the long essay prompt, the University of Wisconsin-Madison is looking for a modified version of the “why us” supplement. Even if Wisconsin isn’t your top choice, for the purposes of this essay, you should put yourself in the shoes of a student that’s wanted to attend Wisconsin for the past few years. If you have family ties to the university, or live in Wisconsin and have grown up rooting for the Badgers in sporting events, don’t hesitate to mention it! The admissions committee wants to see commitment and genuine interest in the school—they should instantly feel your passion for Wisconsin as they read through your essay.

While the prompt appears to pose two questions: “Why Us?,” and “What opportunities would you take advantage of as a student?” you should be blending the two questions together throughout your supplement. Show your passion by mentioning specific courses, clubs, or programs that you are interested in. The university website will be your greatest resource for this — there’s a wealth of information available!

Explain how your experiences throughout high school qualify you for admission to the University of Wisconsin. Articulate how those experiences demonstrate, in the words of the admissions website, “leadership, concern for others and the community, and achievement in the arts, athletics, and other areas.”

Try to provide an example of each of those three areas (or, better yet, find an activity that combines multiple). Serving as the captain of a school athletic team demonstrates both leadership and athletic achievement while selling handmade crafts at charity auctions demonstrates concern for community and artistic achievement. Don’t try to make the entire essay just about these three facets of your personality, but do make sure that you adequately explain how your activities exemplify each character trait.

Also, don’t be afraid to talk about experiences unrelated to your major: If you’re applying to the School of Education, you can absolutely bring up an organization in the School of Business that focuses on entrepreneurship, like the WAVE or WEB program, or a research opportunity, like the Grainger Institute in the School of Engineering — the more well-rounded your interests are at Wisconsin, the more likely you are to be accepted.

The last, and optional, component of the prompt asks you to explain any “circumstance that could have had an impact on your academic performance and/or extracurricular involvement.” Be very careful with what you write here, and remember that it’s completely optional. If you choose not to include it, there’s really no harm done (and, if anything, it eliminates the possibility of writing something that could decrease your chances of admission). If there was a situation throughout high school that was thrust upon you (think family/personal medical emergency or moving schools), you can absolutely write about that, as it will help to establish sympathy with the reader.

If you’ve had any experiences that could reflect negatively on you, including them in the essay may not be wise. Writing about depression, drug/alcohol use, or criminal activity could raise red flags and prevent you from being accepted. If you feel strongly about including one of these topics (or something similar), definitely reach out to a guidance counselor, teacher, or trusted adult to ensure that you’re crafting your message in the best possible way.

We hope our analysis of the two supplemental essay prompts has helped you to fine-tune your plans for your Wisconsin-Madison application!

Best of luck with your application, and GO BADGERS!

Want help with your college essays to improve your admissions chances? Sign up for your free CollegeVine account and get access to our essay guides and courses. You can also get your essay peer-reviewed and improve your own writing skills by reviewing other students’ essays.

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Higher education has never been more confusing or expensive. Our goal is to help you navigate the very big decisions related to higher ed with objective information and expert advice. Each piece of content on the site is original, based on extensive research, and reviewed by multiple editors, including a subject matter expert. This ensures that all of our content is up-to-date, useful, accurate, and thorough.

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What GPA do you need to get into Wisconsin-Madison?

High school grades are a very important factor in college admissions, but your overall GPA is not a great indicator of your chances of admission. That’s because colleges weigh the classes you took, your extracurriculars, the reputation of your high school, and many other factors when they make their admissions decisions. They typically take a holistic look at your transcript rather than relying on your GPA.

Read more: High school and college GPA guide

Does Wisconsin-Madison have a supplemental essay?

Yes, applicants to University of Wisconsin-Madison will have to write a supplemental essay in order to complete their application. Luckily, we have a guide to help you through that essay prompt and stand out in the application process.

Is Wisconsin-Madison test-optional?

University of Wisconsin-Madison is test-optional, which means that it does not require applicants to submit their SAT or ACT scores. That means that some students will submit their test scores and others will not. If you choose not to submit your ACT or SAT score, the admissions officers will weigh your grades, extracurricular activities, essays, and interviews more heavily. If you are not sure whether you should submit your standardized test scores, our guide on submitting scores to test-optional schools can help.

What SAT/ACT score do you need to get into University of Wisconsin-Madison?

Colleges use standardized tests like the SAT and ACT as one of many factors to determine their admissions decisions. A high score on one of these tests does not guarantee admission to a college, and a low score does not guarantee rejection. However, the majority of accepted applicants to University of Wisconsin-Madison receive between a 26 and a 32 on their ACT, or a 1295 and a 1485 on their SAT.

Regular Decision

Early Action

What is the application deadline at Wisconsin-Madison?

Students must apply by January 16 to enroll at Wisconsin-Madison during the fall semester. Remember that college applications involve many pieces, including essays, a transcript, letters of recommendation, and more. Be sure to start your application as soon as you can to make sure you have enough time to make it as compelling as possible.

And if you’re considering applying Early Action at Wisconsin-Madison, remember that the deadline is November 1.

Should I apply Early Action at Wisconsin-Madison?

Early Action is a great option for students who want to hear back from a college before the Regular Decision admissions are released. At some colleges, applying Early Action can also help your admissions chances. However, this varies on a college-by-college basis, so it will not always give you a boost.

Be on the lookout for Single Choice Early Action or Restricted Early Action options. These are not the same as Early Action, and although they can be great options for some students, they are not a good fit for everyone. If you’re considering applying for Single Choice Early Action or Restricted Early Action, be sure to read the college’s admissions website carefully. Make sure that these restrictions fit with your college admissions plan.

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2023-24 Three Minute Thesis winners announced

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Congratulations to the winners of the UW-Madison 2023-24 Three Minute Thesis competition!

First Place and People’s Choice Award: Rudy Dieudonne

Rudy Dieudonne

Rudy Dieudonne

PhD student in Design Studies

Talk title: “Lighting, Noise & Behaviors”

Second Place: Katie Ryan

PhD student in Cellular and Molecular Pathology

Talk title: “Microbes vs Worms: Searching Nature for New Antiparasitic Compounds”

Third Place: Kristen Kehl-Floberg

Kristen Kehl-Floberg

PhD student in the School of Medicine and Public Health and the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research

Talk title: “Getting the Signal: Brain fog and disability in Long COVID”

Read more about Three Minute Thesis at UW–Madison.
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university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

Wisconsin Watch partners with  Gigafact  to produce fact briefs — bite-sized fact checks of trending claims. Read our methodology to learn how we check claims.

An Israeli Defense Forces officer acknowledged at a Feb. 18 Chabad of Madison speech that Israeli soldiers have killed babies, but immediately added it was unintentional and “horrible.”

An Instagram video clip of former Chabad of Madison Israel fellow Oz Bin Nun’s speech, which garnered more than 706,000 views, misconstrued his comments by omitting important context.

“Everyone seeing our soldiers now in Gaza fighting can’t say words like genocide or baby killers. We do, however, and it’s important to say, kill babies,” Bin Nun says in the original video.

A longer clip shows he continued, “This is horrible. It’s awful. We never did this on purpose. Never ever. But it’s happening and it’s horrible.”

The video caption and reposts from Students for Justice in Palestine UW also inaccurately stated that University of Wisconsin-Madison hosted the speaker. Chabad of Madison is independent of UW-Madison. This fact brief is responsive to conversations such as  this one .

Editor’s note: This story corrects an earlier version that misquoted Oz Bin Nun’s statement. He said “can’t say words,” not “can.” Also, the speech took place on Feb. 18.

Instagram:  #Africa4Palestine on Instagram: “We just received this leaked video….. Why did @uwmadison host this baby killer? @uwchancellor”

Students for Justice in Palestine – UW-Madison:  Students for Justice in Palestine – UW Madison

Full speech clip – Chabad of Madison:  Full speech clip – Chabad of Madison

Read more Fact Briefs

Do nongovernmental organizations use federal tax money to transport migrants in the US?

Do nongovernmental organizations use federal tax money to transport migrants in the US?

Did syphilis in the US increase 80% in four years and cause 231 stillbirths in 2022?

Did syphilis in the US increase 80% in four years and cause 231 stillbirths in 2022?

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by Rachel Hale / Wisconsin Watch, Wisconsin Watch February 26, 2024

This <a target="_blank" href="https://wisconsinwatch.org/2024/02/israel-gaza-killing-babies-university-of-wisconsin-madison-chabad-fact-brief/">article</a> first appeared on <a target="_blank" href="https://wisconsinwatch.org">Wisconsin Watch</a> and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.<img src="https://i0.wp.com/wisconsinwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/cropped-WCIJ_IconOnly_FullColor_RGB-1.png?fit=150%2C150&amp;quality=100&amp;ssl=1" style="width:1em;height:1em;margin-left:10px;"><img id="republication-tracker-tool-source" src="https://wisconsinwatch.org/?republication-pixel=true&post=1287683&amp;ga4=G-D2S69Y9TDB" style="width:1px;height:1px;">

Rachel Hale / Wisconsin Watch Reporting intern Reporting intern

Rachel Hale joined Wisconsin Watch as a reporting intern in June 2023. She is currently a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison studying Journalism and Political Science with certificates in Jewish studies and Middle East studies. Rachel previously worked at The Forward and The Times of Israel and was a member of the POLITICO Journalism Institute’s 2023 cohort. She is interested in reporting that spans the intersection of cultural identity and political impact.

Issue 4 – Fall 2023

The mob lawyer’s constitution.

by Sara Mayeux

In investigating constitutional history, legal scholars often focus on elite legal actors and Supreme Court doctrine. This article draws upon pop-culture sources to reconstruct the constitutional rhetoric of mob lawyers, drug lawyers, and other icons of the high-priced criminal defense bar, from the 1970s through the 1990s—the heyday of federal organized crime prosecutions and thus, of the lawyers who defended against them.

Thomas Burke and State Sovereignty, 1777

by Aaron N. Coleman and Adam L. Tate

By exploring the context of Thomas Burke’s words and actions in 1777 to understand better his call for what became Article II of the Articles of Confederation, this article challenges long-held scholarly opinions, allowing Burke to emerge as an important theorist of federalism, rather than a neglected or dismissed member of the American founding.

The International Law Origins of Compact Theory: A Critique of Bellia & Clark on Federalism

by David S. Schwartz

The thesis in “The International Law Origins of American Federalism” is mistaken: the Framers consistently and systematically rejected an international law conception of federalism. While Bellia & Clark’s article could offer a serviceable origin story for compact theory, it fails as an origin story for American federalism.

Peerless History, Meaningless Origins

by Martin S. Flaherty

The founding history set out in “The International Law Origins of American Federalism” has the potential of influencing, or at least legitimating, major doctrinal trends at the Supreme Court—yet it does so with little to no evidence, at least from historical, rather than legal, scholarly standards.

Federalism, The Law of Nations, and The Excluded Middle

by Ryan C. Williams

This essay seeks to steer a middle path between the extremes of “The International Law Origins of American Federalism” and Professor David Schwartz’s response piece; while the Constitution of 1787 reflected a clear break with the “pure” treaty model, law-of-nations principles might usefully guide and inform modern under-standings of federalism—at least to some degree.

  • CEU PU - Deutsch
  • Közép-európai Egyetem

The Case for Going against the Stream

Painting Excommunicated Spinoza by Hirszenberg

André Gide once said that “the real value of an author consists in his revolutionary force, or more exactly… in his quality of opposition. A great artist is of necessity a ‘nonconformist’ and he must swim against the current of his day.”  What Gide says about “the great artist” applies to the great philosopher, too. The ability to “swim against the current” should be seen as an absolute prerequisite for the thinking profession. A thinker will make no difference unless she goes against what her society treasures and celebrates as established knowledge, and exposes the substantial herding involved not only in its making, but also in the rituals of its preservation and sanctification. While deeply rooted in biology and useful for survival, herding can have devastating consequences when it comes to philosophical reflection.

Costică Brădăţan is a Professor of Humanities in the  Honors College  at  Texas Tech University  and an Honorary Research Professor of Philosophy at the  University of Queensland , Australia. He has also held faculty appointments at  Cornell University ,  University of Notre Dame ,  University of Wisconsin-Madison ,  Miami University , and  Arizona State University , as well as at various universities in Europe, South America, and Asia.

He is the author or editor (co-editor) of more than a dozen  books , among which  Dying for Ideas. The dangerous Lives of the Philosophers   (Bloomsbury, paperback, 2018) and  In Praise of Failure. Four Lessons in Humility   (Harvard University Press, 2023). He is currently at work on two new book projects:  Against Conformity  (Princeton University Press) and  The Prince and the Hermit  (Penguin, UK & WW Norton, USA). 

Brădăţan also writes  essays, book reviews, and op-eds  for such publications as the  New York Times, Washington Post, The Globe & Mail, TIME Magazine, Boston Review, Aeon, Literary Review ,  Times Literary Supplement, Commonweal Magazine ,   and  Times Higher Education . His work has been translated into many  languages , including German, Italian, Hungarian, Turkish, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Farsi.

He is  the philosophy/religion editor for the  Los Angeles Review of Books  and the curator of two book series:  Philosophical Filmmakers  (Bloomsbury) and  No Limits  (Columbia University Press).

Image credit: Excommunicated Spinoza , 1907 painting by Samuel Hirszenberg. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

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University of Wisconsin-Madison 2020-21 Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

Regular Decision: 

University of Wisconsin-Madison 2020-21 Application Essay Question Explanation

The Requirements: 1 essay of 650 words (or less)

Supplemental Essay Type(s): Why

Tell us why you decided to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major(s) you have selected. If you selected undecided please describe your areas of possible academic interest. (You may enter up to 650 words, but 300-500 is recommended).

This sneaky prompt is a twofer, though both parts cover classic why essay territory: admissions wants to know just what appeals to you about the University of Wisconsin-Madison. So, take a moment to look inside. What exactly do you want out of your college experience? Research opportunities? Weekend football games? To dip your toe into city life? Now, if you were to imagine a Venn diagram of your expectations and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s offerings, what would land in the overlap? The only way to know for sure is to do your research! As you dig through the school’s website, you’ll naturally uncover “academic, extracurricular, or research opportunities” to describe how you’ll turn your vision into a reality in Madison.

The goal is to show admissions that you’ve done your homework. Pick out classes, professors, research projects, internships, sports leagues, clubs, events, and residences that appeal to you. Make sure Admissions Officers know that you’ve already thought about what you want to do when you get there and that you’re ready to act on those hopes and dreams and so forth. Bonus points if you can honestly say that the pizza in their dining hall is not abysmal.

But, wait, there’s more! The second part of the prompt gives you the opportunity to include information about specific academic programs at Madison that appeal to you. So just as before, utilize the school’s website, but this time pay careful attention to the specific majors and academic offerings that catch your eye. What do you love about your chosen major and/or minor? If you’re interested in UW’s Gender & Women’s Studies pr ogram, can you describe what you will take away from this program and how it relates to your long-term ambitions ? How did you become interested in this field, and what resources does Madison provide that will help you achieve your goals? Finally, if you’re undecided, think about what makes Madison the ideal environment for your academic exploration. How do you plan to hone in on the perfect major as you attend? Remember, the more details you include, the better.

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university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

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2023-2024 Newsletter

The Department’s Winter 2023-2024 Newsletter is now available here

IMAGES

  1. #Transizion University of Wisconsin

    university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

  2. How to Write the University of Wisconsin Essay 2020-2021

    university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

  3. CEA's Guide to the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Supplemental Essay

    university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

  4. 2023-2024 MBA Essays: Tips for Madison, University of Wisconsin

    university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

  5. University of Wisconsin

    university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

  6. College Supplemental Essay Examples for a Successful Paper

    university of wisconsin madison supplemental essay 2023

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write the University of Wisconsin Madison Essays 2023-2024

    1. Highlight your authentic reasons for wanting to attend the University of Wisconsin at Madison. 2. Highlight your authentic reasons for wanting to study your major of choice.

  2. 2023-24 U of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

    Regular Decision Deadline: Jan 15 We can help you draft in time for submission! University of Wisconsin-Madison 2023-24 Application Essay Question Explanation The Requirements: 1 essay of 650 words (or less) Supplemental Essay Type (s): Why Tell us why you would like to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  3. Required Application Materials and Documents

    Every year, we are fortunate to receive thousands of applications from a diverse range of students who are incredibly bright, engaged, and passionate. They have challenged themselves and those around them to make a difference in the world. They know that the University of Wisconsin-Madison is their next step toward something extraordinary—a place where they can lead,…

  4. University of Wisconsin-Madison: Supplemental Essays 2023-24

    The 2022-23 University of Wisconsin-Madison supplemental essay offers applicants a chance to improve their admissions chances at UW-Madison.

  5. How to Write the University of Wisconsin Madison Supplemental Essays

    (click to skip ahead) What are the U Wisconsin Madison supplemental essay prompts? How to write each supplemental essay prompt for U Wisconsin Madison Prompt #1: Personal statement Prompt #2: "Why us?" essay If you're looking for something special from your college experience, the University of Wisconsin-Madison probably has it.

  6. How to Write the University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplement 2023-2024

    We know how to help. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has one question in addition to the Common App essay, and it's in a format you'll be getting pretty used to while writing college applications. It is, as you've probably guessed, a "why us" essay.

  7. How to Respond to the 2023/2024 University of Wisconsin Supplemental

    Updated: November 2nd, 2023 The University of Wisconsin-Madison, also known as UW Madison, is a public land-grant research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. It has a 88% graduation rate, so you know that students are thriving there. Writing stellar UW Madison supplemental essays is the first step toward admission, so let's get started!

  8. UW-Madison Essay Example from an Accepted Student

    Read our UW Madison essay breakdown to get a comprehensive overview of this year's supplemental prompts. Essay Example - Why UW Madison, and Why This Major? Prompt: Tell us why you decided to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major (s) you have selected.

  9. Apply as a First-Year Student

    Starting on August 1 every year, you can begin applying to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As a first-year applicant, you can apply using either the Common Application or the UW System Application. There is no preference between applications. Academics What We Look For How to Apply Finance Your Education Student Life FAQs Plan Your Visit

  10. Prepare Your Essay

    Your UWs want to hear about the whole you — from the little victories, stumbles, and lessons learned to what makes you excited for college and life after high school. You are more than facts and figures It doesn't get said enough, but your UWs are literally looking for reasons to admit you. That's why they ask for an essay.

  11. Guide to the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Supplemental Essay

    Coalition Application's Essay Prompt #6: Topic of Your Choice (2022-23) The 2022-23 Coalition Application essay prompts have been announced, which means you can start writing your personal statement right away! CEA Founder and Chief Advisor, Stacey Brook, is here to talk you through the Coalition App's sixth and final essay prompt.

  12. University of Wisconsin-Madison

    650 Words Tell us why you decided to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major (s) you have selected. If you selected undecided please describe your areas of possible academic interest. Read our essay guide to get started.

  13. UW-Madison Admission Essays

    UW-Madison Supplemental Essay Examples: Prompts for 2023. ... Remember, well-written essays, much like the University of Wisconsin Madison essay examples, can profoundly influence the admissions committee's decision, emphasizing the importance of dedicating time and effort to develop compelling, authentic stories. ...

  14. UW Madison Acceptance Rate 2023

    Lastly, make sure to dedicate sufficient time and effort to the supplemental essay required by UW-Madison. In the 2022-23 cycle, the prompt for those applying through the Common App was as follows: 1) Tell us why you would like to attend the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  15. How to Write The University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essay

    Of all the colleges I've visited, University of Wisconsin-Madison stands out in terms of beauty, opportunity, and politically active students. I'm 0% surprised you've decided to apply. ... in a way that connects directly back to UW-Madison. If you have a supplemental essay you've already worked on with a great hook sentence or opening paragraph ...

  16. CEA's Guide to the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Supplemental Essay

    Admissions wants to know just what appeals to you about the University of Wisconsin-Madison. CEA's Founder and Chief Advisor, Stacey Brook, is here to lend t...

  17. How to Write the University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essays

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison's supplemental essay is a great opportunity to showcase your voice to the admissions committee and convey your academic passions and knowledge of the school. When writing your UW-Madison supplement, be sure to address both parts of the prompt: explain your interest in the majors you've selected and ...

  18. How to Write the University of Wisconsin Madison Supplemental Essays

    Learn how to start the University of Wisconsin Madison supplemental essay prompt with exercises and essay examples to how you along an way. Hear how up write that University from Wisconsin Madison supplemental essay inspire at practise and essay examples to assistance you along the way.

  19. the WHY UW MADISON supplemental essay

    The 'why uw madison' supplemental essay is one that freaks a lot of people (incl. me) out cuz who likes writing college essays 🙃 Here's to hoping this video...

  20. Master the University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essays '23-'24

    University of Wisconsin-Madison Supplemental Essay Prompts. Tell us why you decided to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, share with us the academic, extracurricular, or research opportunities you would take advantage of as a student. ... Mastering the Tufts University Supplemental Essays 2023-2024. College Application ...

  21. How to Write the University of Wisconsin-Madison Application Essays

    Briefly explain which activity you entered in the Common App Activities section is the most important to you. (50-100 words) This prompt shouldn't be too difficult — with a limit of 100 words, you're going to be writing no more than a few sentences. While you should use this short essay as an opportunity to elaborate on the activity that ...

  22. University of Wisconsin-Madison

    A high score on one of these tests does not guarantee admission to a college, and a low score does not guarantee rejection. However, the majority of accepted applicants to University of Wisconsin-Madison receive between a 26 and a 32 on their ACT, or a 1295 and a 1485 on their SAT.

  23. 2023-24 Three Minute Thesis winners announced

    Graduate Programs & Services at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Search. ... Eleven students competed in UW-Madison's 2023-24 Three Minute Thesis final competition on February 16. Three winners were selected by a panel of industry and campus judges based on the content, comprehension, and audience engagement demonstrated through their ...

  24. Wisconsin's Medicaid postpartum protection lags most of US

    She is currently a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison studying Journalism and Political Science with certificates in Jewish studies and Middle East studies. Rachel previously worked at The Forward and The Times of Israel and was a member of the POLITICO Journalism Institute's 2023 cohort.

  25. Did an Israeli military officer speaking to UW-Madison students

    She is currently a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison studying Journalism and Political Science with certificates in Jewish studies and Middle East studies. Rachel previously worked at The Forward and The Times of Israel and was a member of the POLITICO Journalism Institute's 2023 cohort.

  26. Issue 4

    University of Wisconsin Law School. by Ryan C. Williams. This essay seeks to steer a middle path between the extremes of "The International Law Origins of American Federalism" and Professor David Schwartz's response piece; while the Constitution of 1787 reflected a clear break with the "pure" treaty model, law-of-nations principles might usefully guide and inform modern under ...

  27. The Case for Going against the Stream

    Monday, March 4, 2024 - 3:00PM - Monday, March 4, 2024 - 4:30PM Add to Calendar 2024-03-04 15:00:00 2024-03-04 16:30:00 The Case for Going against the Stream André Gide once said that "the real value of an author consists in his revolutionary force, or more exactly… in his quality of opposition. A great artist is of necessity a 'nonconformist' and he must swim against the current of ...

  28. University of Wisconsin-Madison 2020-21 Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

    The Requirements: 1 essay of 650 words (or less) Supplemental Essay Type (s): Why. Tell us why you decided to apply to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major (s) you have selected. If you selected undecided please describe your areas of possible academic interest.

  29. 2023-2024 Newsletter

    Contact Us. Department of Philosophy University of Wisconsin-Madison 5185 Helen C. White Hall 600 North Park Street Madison, WI 53706; Email: [email protected] Phone: 608-263-3700