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the case study house program

Case Study Houses

The Case Study Houses served as a blueprint and inspiration for Mid-Century homes in Southern California.

In 2013, ten Case Study House program residences were added to the National Register of Historic Places.

the case study house program

Relevant Places

the case study house program

Bailey House (Case Study House #21)

the case study house program

Bass House (Case Study House #20B)

Case Study House #1

Case Study House #1

Case Study House #10

Case Study House #10

Case Study House #16

Case Study House #16

Case Study House #28

Case Study House #28

CaseStudyHouse9

Entenza House (Case Study House #9)

A view of the pool and the Stahl house

Stahl House (Case Study House #22)

Case Study House 23A

Triad (Case Study House #23A)

Triad (Case Study House #23C)

Triad (Case Study House #23C)

West House (Case Study House #18)

West House (Case Study House #18)

Launched in 1945 by John Entenza’s  Arts + Architecture  magazine, the Case Study House program commissioned architects to study, plan, design, and ultimately construct houses in anticipation of renewed building in the postwar years.

While the Case Study House program did not achieve its initial goals for mass production and affordability, it was responsible for some of Los Angeles’ most iconic and internationally recognized modern residences, such as the  Eames House (Case Study House #8)  by Charles and Ray Eames and the Pierre Koenig-designed  Stahl House (Case Study House #22) , famously photographed by Julius Shulman.

After a decade-long effort, L.A. Conservancy’s Modern Committee succeeded in listing ten Case Study residences on the National Register of Historic Places.

About This Issue

With an emphasis on experimentation, and a goal of promoting good, modern, affordable design for single-family homes, the program helped to disseminate the midcentury modern aesthetic through its thirty-five published plans. Of these, twenty-five houses and one apartment building were built in California and Arizona.

The program offered an unparalleled opportunity for commissions and publicity for established architects including Richard Neutra, J. R. Davidson, Sumner Spaulding, and William Wurster. It helped raise the profile of then-lesser-known designers including Craig Ellwood, A. Quincy Jones, Edward Killingsworth, Ralph Rapson, Eero Saarinen, and Raphael Soriano.

Our Position

On November 21, 2013, the  Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee was awarded a Governor’s Historic Preservation Award to recognize its work in nominating eleven Case Study Houses to the National Register of Historic Places.

Through the efforts of the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee, eleven Case Study House residences in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Ventura counties are now recognized as nationally historic. Ten are officially listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and an eleventh was deemed eligible for listing.

Few of the Case Study Houses currently have preservation protections, and some have been demolished or significantly altered. This proactive step recognizes the eleven nominated homes and raises greater awareness about the Case Study House program while providing a historic context for future designation of the remaining eligible properties.

On May 1, 2013, the State Historical Resources Commission voted to recommend listing of ten Case Study Houses in the National Register of Historic Places.  These ten residences with certifying recommendations were submitted to the National Park Service for final review and listing by the Keeper of the National Trust.  They were formally listed on July 24, 2013.

An eleventh nominated residence, Case Study House #23A, was not formally listed because of owner objection, but it received a determination of eligibility for listing in the National Register. All eleven residences will be considered historic resources and will enjoy the same protections under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

Several Case Study Houses were not included in the nomination — if they’ve been altered or demolished, or for other reasons — but with this platform in place, it will be easier for other CSH homes to be nominated in the future.

Likewise, a few CSH houses, such as the  Eames House  (CSH #8), weren’t included because they’re already individually listed.

Case Study House residences included in nomination:

Los Angeles County

  • Case Study House #1 , 10152 Toluca Lake Ave., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #9 , 205 Chautauqua Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #10 , 711 S. San Rafael Ave., Pasadena
  • Case Study House #16 , 1811 Bel Air Rd., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #18 , 199 Chautauqua Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #20 , 2275 N. Santa Rosa Ave., Altadena
  • Case Study House #21 , 9038 Wonderland Park Ave., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #22 , 1635 Woods Dr., Los Angeles

San Diego County 

  • Case Study House #23A , 2342 Rue de Anne, La Jolla, San Diego (determined eligible)
  • Case Study House #23C , 2339 Rue de Anne, La Jolla, San Diego

Ventura County

  • Case Study House #28 , 91 Inverness Rd., Thousand Oaks

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Case Study Houses. The Complete CSH Program 1945-1966

Case Study House Program

The case study house program: origins, meanings, and protagonists, on the participation of northern california architects to the case study house program.

________________________________________

Case Study House #3

Information Description Plan Photos Architect’s Biography

Case Study House #19

Case study house #26.

Information Description Plans Photos Architect’s Biography

Case Study House #27

References & further reading, bay area architects’ designs for the, case study house program, 1949 – 1963.

Case Study House Architects

By Pierluigi Serraino

The Case Study House program and the magazine Arts and Architecture are two inseparable twins in the historical narratives of California Modernism in its post-war phase. Common denominator of both was John Entenza (1905-1984), as editor from 1940 to 1962 of the magazine California Arts and Architecture, a title he changed in 1945 to Arts and Architecture, gave an international manner — both in terms of its compellingly lanky graphics and its cerebral content — to what had been mostly a regional periodical of limited distribution. Both the magazine and the Case Study House Program he masterminded hinged upon the recognition that the architecture of his time was rooted in technology, a symbolic source of its outer expression in the public realm.  

The long span, steel, joinery, plywood, modularity, open plan, car mobility, aluminum, and glazing systems, were the tools and the lexicon of the post-war architect and the citizen of a technological society. For Entenza, the environmental habitat of California had to arise from the civilian application of the radical innovations in mechanical systems, new materials, and building science advancements gained during the World War II, especially because of the military industry’s major presence in California.

The Case Study House program started as Entenza’s personal project, partially financed through his own resources, that lasted two decades. This initiative was the game-changer in the authoritative aura that California Modernism acquired worldwide. Entenza led the program from 1945 to 1962 till he moved to Chicago to head the Graham Foundation. David Travers continued it from 1962 until its end in 1966. They both handpicked the architects that were going to be included in the program, absent of a truly objective criteria or checklist. While Entenza wrote the program’s manifesto himself and published it, the houses and architects chosen for inclusion are an eclectic mix of design expressions.

While most of the built (and unbuilt) residential projects of the Case Study House program are located in Southern California, the design community behind this renown cultural initiative is far from regional. In fact, the roaster of architects Entenza and Travers selected during their respective tenure offers a revealing picture of both the composite nature of signatures called to fulfill the promises of the January 1st , 1945, manifesto and of what flavor of modernism was being disseminated for the post-war home.

Some household names are from California- William Wurster from Stockton, Ray Kaiser from Sacramento, Pierre Koenig from San Francisco- as well as some lesser-known, such as Ed Killingsworth. John Rex, Worley Wong, and Calvin Straub, among others. A sizeable group of CSH architects was from out of state and had a cultural connection with the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan, the legendary design school founded by Eliel Saarinen. From that milieu, the list is truly impressive: Charles Eames, Eero Saarinen, Ralph Rapson, Don Knorr. Others were from other parts of the country and landed either for family reasons or for college to Southern California. Additionally, others

came from Europe, most notably Richard Neutra from Vienna, Julius Ralph Davidson from Berlin, and Raphael Soriano from Rhodes, Greece. In this eclectic mix, various gradations of common themes- relationship with WWII technology, and material, open planning, one-level single-family homes, and an overall permeable relationship between indoor and outdoor, found specific manifestations in the talent of these creatives. These prototypes for living were conceived as models to shape much of post-war living for present and future generations.

Four teams of Bay Area architects were involved in the CSH Program. Under the Entenza’s era, there was the now-demolished CSH #3 in Los Angeles designed and built in 1945 by William Wurster and Theodore Bernardi and the unbuilt CSH #19 by Don Knorr for a site in the San Francisco South Bay in 1957. During the Traver’s lead, Beverley David Thorne’s CSH #26 was realized in 1962 in San Rafael, whereas CSH #27 by Campbell & Wong, in association with Don Allen Fong, of 1963 for a site in Smoke Rise, New Jersey, remained on paper. These Bay Area contributions have been intermittently acknowledged in the publications surrounding this one-of-a-kind initiative.

Yet, they provide documentary evidence of the commitment of the local community of designers to offering updated architectural propositions consistent with the changing needs of the California, and American, post-war society.

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A Virtual Look Into Beverley David Thorne's Case Study House #26

the case study house program

  • Written by Madlaina Kalunder and Cord Struckmann, Archilogic
  • Published on June 23, 2016

the case study house program

The biggest surprise in this Archilogic model is the spectrum of color. Anyone who has visited the Case Study House 26 in San Rafael , California during the last 40 years would be familiar with the building’s classic all-white steel frame look, but the architect, Beverley David Thorne , had originally picked a very different color scheme: “Dull Gold” for the steel, saffron and other more vivid colors for the interiors. “The choice of exterior colors,” wrote Thorne in Arts & Architecture magazine , “was dictated by the climate and the character of the surrounding landscape.” This Archilogic model recreates the original 1963 conditions, down to the bedroom wall and tile colors.

With the all-white scheme, Case Study House 26 resembles Mies’ Farnsworth House or one of modern architecture’s favorite references, the ocean liner. This is never more prominent than when you step out on the deep deck that floats over the site and offers a sweeping panoramic view of the Marin County hills, virtually denying that the house is built on solid earth.

The Case Study House program was an initiative sponsored by the Arts & Architecture magazine to address the housing shortage after World War II. Its mission was to provide a vision of how families might live in modern homes built with contemporary materials and technologies. With the post-war population and building boom, buildable land in California became scarce and more expensive, resulting in builders looking to hillsides as cheaper alternatives. For Case Study House 26, addressing the steeply sloped site was a self-imposed criteria that qualified the building for inclusion in the series. Ironically, the series resulted in architectural gems that did not shape mass housing, but rather influenced the tastes of discerning fans of high design. Steel frame construction was too expensive, and required too much precision, to be applied to cheap tract housing. Material-intensive details, like solid wood floors, made such houses unaffordable for most American families.

the case study house program

However, steel is an ideal material for construction on a steep slope. The large spans made possible by steel required fewer foundations, and by having the floor levels follow the terrain, the design avoided both expensive excavation or an unattractive “toothpick” look with exposed floor undersides.

“Touching the ground lightly” signaled an early environmentalist position and was a very important aspect for Thorne, who expressed this key intention in the A&A article as “resolving the integration of a space platform to the site without affecting the contours or natural state of the land or the occupants feeling that they are living on a hillside.”

A single drawing showing the section is enough to explain the entire house. It details the overall compositions and most construction details. Using only this section and a basic floor plan, the house could have been built. It is hard to imagine today, but the entire drawing set consisted of only four sheets. Many key decisions were made directly between the architect and contractor during construction, without the use of drawings. On site, the floor plan layout was flipped and prominent corners got windows instead of walls. Fittingly, the architect even got his hands dirty, helping to weld the steel frame himself.

the case study house program

Originally commissioned by the CEO of Bethlehem Steel, the first owners of Case Study House 26 were the Ketcham family, a TWA pilot and flight attendant couple, who raised their family there. The modern design corresponded perfectly to their profession. They equipped the home with cutting edge technology, like an intercom system and Jetson-esque kitchen appliances. Thorne, in addition to a few alterations, made plans to add a lower floor and pool, though they were never realized. With a few exceptions, like the current almost monochrome color scheme and a kitchen remodel, the house is preserved in its original 1963 condition.

The current owners maintain a website with more information, images and literature references on www.csh26.info , or follow them on Instagram .

We encourage you to experience Archilogic's Virtual Experience in your Browser, create your own designs and share your tours online. To join the Archilogic Platform Sign up here and enjoy the free trial version of the pro subscription .

Archilogic transforms 2D floor plans into interactive, accessible and customizable 3D virtual tours in 24 hours from $69 upwards. Don't miss Archilogic's previous models shared on ArchDaily:

  • Case Study House #1 / Julius Ralph Davidson
  • Case Study House #9 / Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen
  • Case Study House #6 / Richard Neutra
  • Case Study House #22 / Pierre Koenig
  • Case Study House #21 / Pierre Koenig
  • Case Study House #8 / Charles & Ray Eames
  • Farnsworth House / Mies van der Rohe
  • Barcelona Pavilion / Mies van der Rohe

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the case study house program

The Eames House (also known as Case Study House No. 8) is a landmark of mid-20th century modern architecture located in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles. It was designed and constructed in 1949 by husband-and-wife Charles and Ray Eames to serve as their home and studio.

It was one of roughly two dozen homes built as part of The Case Study House Program. Begun in the mid-1940s and continuing through the early 1960s, the program was spearheaded by John Entenza, the publisher of  Arts & Architecture magazine. It was developed to address a looming issue: a housing crisis. Millions of soldiers would be returning from the battlefields of World War II, and were wanting to start families. John Entenza recognized that houses needed to be built quickly, inexpensively, yet without sacrificing good design. In a challenge to the architectural community, the magazine announced that it would be the client for a series of homes designed to express man’s life in the modern world. These homes were to be built and furnished using materials and techniques derived from the experiences of the Second World War. Each home was designed with a real or hypothetical client in mind, taking into consideration their particular housing needs.

Click here to see their design brief more clearly from the December 1945 issue of Arts & Architecture .

First Design: Bridge House (unbuilt)

The first plan of the Eameses’ home, known as the Bridge House, was designed in 1945 by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen. The design used pre-fabricated materials ordered from catalogues, a continuation of the idea of mass-production. The parts were ordered and the Bridge House design was published in the December 1945 issue of the magazine, but due to a war-driven shortage, the steel did not arrive until late 1948.

While they were waiting for delivery, Charles and Ray picnicked in the meadow with family and friends, flew kites and did archery.  By then, Charles and Ray had “fallen in love with the meadow,” in Ray’s words, and they realized that they wanted to avoid what many architects had done: destroy what they loved most about a site by building across it.

Second Design: Eames House

Charles and Ray then set themselves a new problem: How to build a house that would 1) not destroy the meadow and trees, and 2) “maximize volume from minimal materials”.  Using the same off-the-shelf parts, but notably ordering one extra steel beam, Charles and Ray re-configured the House. The new design integrated the House into the landscape, rather than imposing the House on it. These plans were published in the May 1949 issue of Arts & Architecture .  It is this design that was built and is seen today.

Charles and Ray moved into the House on Christmas Eve, 1949, and lived there for the rest of their lives.  The interior, its objects and its collections remain very much the way they were in Charles and Ray’s lifetimes.  The house they created offered them a space where work, play, life, and nature co-existed.

While many icons of the modern movement are depicted as stark, barren spaces devoid of human use, photographs and motion pictures taken at the Eames house reveal a richly decorated, almost cluttered space full of folk art, thousands of books, shells, rocks, prisms, etc. The Eameses’ gracious live-work lifestyle continues to be an influential model.

The House has now become something of an iconographic structure visited by people from around the world.  The charm and appeal of the House is perhaps best explained in the words of the Case Study House Program founder, John Entenza, who felt that the Eames House “represented an attempt to state an idea rather than a fixed architectural pattern.”

Help us share the Eameses’ joy and rigor with future visitors, so they may have a direct experience of Charles and Ray’s approach to life and work.

the case study house program

The Case Study Houses Program

We selected the best Case Study Houses ever built from the famous post-war architectural program. The Case Study Houses program aimed to bring Modernist principles to the masses.

Architects as Richard Neutra, Pierre Koenig, Craig Ellwood and Rodney Walker participated into the program with one or more projects. Unfortunately not all projects proposed were built but many still stand, we selected the most representative ones.

the case study house program

The Case Study Houses Program, Raphael Soriano CSH 1950

[tie_slideshow] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [/tie_slideshow] All the Case Study Houses were designed…

Case Study House - Bailey House Richard Neutra

The Case Study Houses Program: Richard Neutra’s Bailey House

case-stud-house-18 - craig ellwood

The Case Study Houses Program: Craig Ellwood’s Case Study House 18

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case-study-house-22-stahl-house

The Case Study Houses Program: Pierre Koenig’s Stahl House

[tie_slideshow] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] t [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [/tie_slideshow] Probably one…

Eames and Saarinen’s Case Study House #9

The Case Study House 9 by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen

The Case Study House #9, was part of John Entenza’s Case Study House Program launched…

the case study house program

The Case Study House 25 by Killingsworth, Brady and Smith

[tie_slideshow] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide][/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide][/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [tie_slide] [/tie_slide] [/tie_slideshow] Completed…

the case study house program

Case Study House 10. Kemper and Nomland Kemper Jr

The Case Study House #10 epitomises the aspirations of the program.

Designed by a father and son team of architects, Kemper and Nomland Kemper Jr, the house is a simple, low-cost modern building.

the case study house program

Case Study House 20. Buff, Straub and Hensman

Case Study House #20, dubbed ‘The Bass House” was constructed in 1958 and can be…

the case study house program

Case Study House 8. Charles and Ray Eames

Made a National Historic Landmark in 2006 and included on the top 10 all-time list…

the case study house program

Case Study House 28. Conrad Buff and Donald Hensman

The only house of its kind to be built in Ventura County, California, Case Study…

the case study house program

Case Study House 16. Rodney Walker

Sponsored by Arts & Architecture Magazine, the Case Study House program in the United States…

the case study house program

The Origins of The Case Study House Program.

The best place to start researching and learning about the Case Study House Program is…

the case study house program

Three Houses In One, the Case Study House 23

The Case Study House #23 stands out from the other houses of the Program as…

the case study house program

The Case Study House 3

Today I will share another stunning house included in the Case Study House Program: the house…

the case study house program

Case Study House 21. Pierre Koenig

Within the Case Study House Program, the #21 represents an experiment that the architect Pierre…

the case study house program

The Case Study Houses Program: Mid-Century Modern Architecture

The Case Study Houses Program, promoted by the magazine Arts and Architecture in 1945, represented…

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the case study house program

The Case Study houses that made Los Angeles a modernist mecca

Mapping the homes that helped to define an era

Los Angeles is full of fantastic residential architecture styles, from Spanish Colonial Revival to Streamline Moderne. But the modernist Case Study Houses , sponsored by Arts & Architecture and designed between the 1940s and 1960s, are both native to Southern California and particularly emblematic of the region.

The Case Study series showcased homes commissioned by the magazine and designed by some of the most influential designers and architects of the era, including Charles and Ray Eames, Richard Neutra, and Pierre Koenig. The residences were intended to be relatively affordable, replicable houses for post-World War II family living, with an emphasis on “new materials and new techniques in house construction,” as the magazine’s program intro put it.

Technological innovation and practical, economical design features were emphasized—though the homes’ scintillating locations, on roomy lots in neighborhoods like Pacific Palisades and the Hollywood Hills , gave them a luxurious allure.

With the help of photographer Julius Shulman , who shot most of the homes, the most impressive of the homes came to represent not only new styles of home design, but the postwar lifestyle of the booming Southern California region.

A total of 36 houses and apartment buildings were commissioned; a couple dozen were built, and about 20 still stand in the greater Los Angeles area (there’s also one in Northern California, a set near San Diego, and a small apartment complex in Phoenix). Some have been remodeled, but others have been well preserved. Eleven were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

Here’s a guide to all the houses left to see—but keep in mind that, true to LA form, most are still private residences. The Eames and Stahl houses, two of the most famous Case Study Houses, are regularly open to visitors.

As for the unconventional house numbering, post-1962 A&A publisher David Travers writes that the explanation is “inexplicable, locked in the past.”

Case Study House No. 1

J.R. Davidson (with Greta Davidson) designed this house in 1948 (it was actually his second go at Case Study House No. 1). It was intended for “a hypothetical family" with two working parents and was designed to require "minimum maintenance.”

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The exterior of a house that is only one level. The roof is flat. There is a lawn and a path leading to the front door. There is a garage with a driveway.

Case Study House No. 2

Case Study House No. 2 was designed in 1947 by Sumner Spaulding and John Rex. Arts & Architecture wrote that the home’s layout “achieves a sense of spaciousness and flexibility,” with an open living area and glass doors that lead out to adjoining terraces.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Samuel Dematraz (@samueldematraz) on Oct 28, 2018 at 1:07am PDT

Case Study House No. 7

Case Study House No. 7 was designed in 1948 by Thornton M. Abell. It has a “three-zone living area,” with space for study, activity, and relaxation/conversation; the areas can be separated by sliding panels or combined.

The aerial view of a group of buildings. All the buildings have flat roofs. There is a yard in the center of the group of buildings.

Eames House (Case Study House No. 8)

Legendary designer couple Charles and Ray Eames designed the Eames House in 1949 and even Arts & Architecture seemed kind of blown away by it. The home is built into a hillside behind a row of Eucalyptus trees on a bluff above Pacific Palisades. It's recognizable by its bright blue, red, and yellow panels. The Eameses lived in the house until their deaths. It’s now open to visitors five days per week, though reservations are required.

The Eames house with blue, red, and yellow panels on the exterior. There is a large tree outside of the house.

Entenza House (Case Study House No. 9)

The Entenza House was built in 1949 and designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen for Arts & Architecture editor John Entenza. According to the magazine, “In general, the purpose was to enclose as much space as possible within a reasonably simple construction.”

The Entenza House exterior. The roof is flat and the exterior has floor to ceiling windows. There are trees surrounding the house. There is an outdoor seating area.

Case Study House No. 10

Case Study House No. 10 was designed in 1947 by Kemper Nomland. The house is built on several levels to mold into its sloping site. Recently restored, the home sold to Kristen Wiig in 2017.

The exterior of Case Study House Number 10. There is a wide staircase leading up to the house. The house has floor to ceiling windows. There are lights on in the house.

Case Study House No. 15

Designed by J.R. Davidson in 1947, Case Study House No. 15 has south walls made of huge glass panels. Its flagstone patio and indoor floor are at the same level for that seamless indoor-outdoor feel. According to the magazine, the floorplan “is basically that of another Davidson house, Case Study House No. 11,” which has been demolished.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Samuel Dematraz (@samueldematraz) on Nov 15, 2018 at 6:13am PST

Case Study House for 1953

Craig Ellwood’s Case Study House for 1953 is usually numbered as 16 in the Case Study series . It has a modular steel structure and “the basic plan is a four-foot modular rectangle.” But the interior walls stick out past the exterior walls to bring the indoors out and the outdoors in. The Bel Air house hit the market in November with a $3 million price tag.

A photo of a single-story house with frosted panels of glass in front, shielding the house from the street.

Case Study House No. 17 (A)

Case Study House No. 17 (A) was designed by Rodney Walker in 1947. A tight budget kept the house at just 1,560 square feet, “but more space was gained through the use of many glass areas.” The house also has a large front terrace with a fireplace that connects the indoor living room fireplace. The house has been remodeled .

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Case Study House #17, 1947 (@casestudy17) on Jun 11, 2016 at 2:20pm PDT

Case Study House No. 17 (B)

Case Study House No. 17 (B) was designed in 1956 by Craig Ellwood, but “governed by a specific program set forth by the client.” Ellwood took into account the clients' collection of contemporary paintings and made the living room “purposely undersized” to work best for small gatherings. The house was extensively remodeled in the sixties by Hollywood Regency architect John Elgin Woolf and his partner, interior designer Robert Koch Woolf.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by BAUKUNST™ El Arte de Construir (@i_volante) on Aug 13, 2017 at 4:42pm PDT

West House (Case Study House No. 18 [A])

Case Study House No. 18 (A) was designed by Rodney Walker in 1948. The house is oriented toward the ocean, but set back from the cliff edge it sits on to avoid noise issues. As A&A says, "High above the ocean, the privacy of the open south and east exposures of Case Study House No. 18 can be threatened only by an occasional sea-gull." The house features a "bricked garden room" separated from the living room by a two-sided fireplace.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by CaseStudyHouse18A (@casestudyhouse18a) on Oct 6, 2018 at 8:44pm PDT

Fields House (Case Study House No. 18 [B])

Case Study House No. 18 (B) was designed by Craig Ellwood in 1958. Ellwood didn’t attempt to hide that the house was prefabricated (the magazine explains that he believed “that the increasing cost of labor and the decline of the craftsman will within not too many years force a complete mechanization of residential construction methods”). The components of the house, however, are “strongly defined with color: ceiling and panels are off-white and the steel framework is blue.” According to A&A' s website, the house has been remodeled.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by MCM Daily (@dc_hillier) on Oct 29, 2018 at 8:32pm PDT

Case Study House No. 20 [A])

This two-bedroom house was meant “to serve young parents who find they can afford just that much,” according to architect Richard Neutra’s description. He also wrote that he used several different kinds of natural wood in the house.

A living room that opens out to a patio, where a woman watches a young child ride a tricycle

Bass House (Case Study House No. 20 [B])

The Bass House was designed in 1958 by Buff, Straub, and Hensman for famed graphic designer Saul Bass. It's “unique in that it was based upon the experimental use of several prefabricated Douglas fir plywood products as part of the structural concept,” including hollow-core plywood vaults that covered the central part of the house.

A house with glass walls and a canopy with an opening to let in sunlight

Case Study House No. 21

Pierre Koenig designed Case Study House No. 21 in 1958. It was originally completely surrounded by water, with a walkway and driveway spanning the moat at the front door and carport, respectively. The house was severely messed with over the years, but restored in the ’90s with help from Koenig.

A woman sits on a black sofa in a sparsely furnished room. A man standing at a long bureau looks at her.

Stahl House (Case Study House No. 22)

Pierre Koenig's Stahl House , designed in 1960, is probably the most famous house in Los Angeles, thanks to an iconic photo by Julius Shulman . The house isn't much to look at from the street, but its backside is mostly glass surrounding a cliff's-edge pool. Tours are available Mondays, Wednesdays, and Friday—but book well ahead of time, as they sell out quickly.

The exterior of the Stahl house in Los Angeles. There is a swimming pool next to the house with a lounge area. The pool is situated on a cliff edge.

Case Study House for 1950

The unnumbered Case Study House for 1950 was designed by Raphael Soriano. It's rectangular, with living room and bedrooms facing out to the view. However, in the kitchen and eating areas, the house “turns upon itself and living develops around a large kitchen-dining plan opening upon a terrace which leads directly into the living room interrupted only by the mass of two fireplaces.” According to A&A 's website, the house has been remodeled.

A simple, rectangular house with a long flat roof under construction.

Frank House (Case Study House No. 25)

The two-story Frank House was designed by Killingsworth, Brady, and Smith and Associates in 1962 and it sits on a canal in Long Beach. A reflecting pool with stepping stones leads to its huge front door and inside to an 18-foot high courtyard. The house sold in 2015 with some unfortunate remodeling .

A white living room furnished with a rectangular sofa and a grand piano. A glass sliding door leads outside.

Case Study House No. 28

Case Study House No. 28 was designed in 1966 by Conrad Buff and Donald Hensman. According to the magazine, “the architects were asked to design a house that incorporated face brick as the primary structural material to demonstrate its particular advantages.” They came up with a plan for two symmetrical wings joined by glass galleries.

A living room furnished with a green sofa and yellow chairs. A woman on the outside patio looks through the glass doors.

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The Case Study House program, initiated by Arts & Architecture magazine in 1945 in Los Angeles remains one of America’s most significant contributions to architecture at mid-century. Conceived as low-cost, experimental modern prototypes, the thirty-six designs of the program epitomized the aspirations of a generation of modern architects active durning the buoyant years of America’s post World War II building boom.

The motivating force behind the Case Study House program was John Entenza, a champion of modernism and editor of the avant-garde monthly magazine Arts & Architecture . Entenza envisioned the Case Study effort as a way to offer the public and the building industry models for low-cost housing in the modern idiom, forseeing the coming building boom as inevitable in the wake of drastic housing shortages  during the depression and the war years. Using the magazine as a vehicle, Entenza’s goal was to enable architects to design and build low-cost modern houses for actual clients, using donated materials from industry and manufacturers, and to extensively publish and publicize their efforts.

Architects who participated in the program did so at the invitation of Entenza himself, and therefore the roster of participants clearly reflects his personal predilections rather than a comprehensive overview of American, or even Californian, approaches to low-cost modern housing design.

- Excerpt from the book Case Study Houses

by Elizabeth A.T. Smith , Published by Taschen

Case Study House Program 1945-1966

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Virtual Open House with the Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences

Join representatives from Case Western Reserve University’s Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences to get information on the Master of Science in Biomedical and Health informatics, and Master of Public Health in Population and Quantitative Health Sciences programs.

The event will take place virtually on Sunday, Feb. 25, at 7:30 p.m.

Register to attend.

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George privalov

Dr. George Privalov is the Chief Technology Officer and responsible for the development and implementation of the company's technology offerings to include remote monitoring software as well as artificial intelligence relating to data analytics and video and thermal imaging.  Previously Dr. Privalov served as the CTO of axonX Fike and has developed the SigniFire video detection algorithms for flame and smoke.  He is recognized as a world expert in the video analytics field and remote software monitoring.  Dr. Privalov was the founder of axonX LLC and developed patented algorithms that include digital signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network development.  Before axonX, Dr. Privalov founded Applied Thermodynamics LLC, where he designed the hardware, control, and analysis software for Nano-DSP Differential Scanning Calorimeters and Nano-ITC Isothermal Titration Calorimeters.  Dr. Privalov received his master's degree in Electrical Engineering from Moscow's Institute of Electronics and Mathematics and holds a PhD in Bio-physics from Johns Hopkins University.

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Jen Bailey has over 12 years of office administrative and marketing experience. Her main goal is to insure the daily operations run smoothly. She has been with the owners / officers since 2006 where she served as Office Manager at axonX and then axonX Fike Corp. Throughout her time with the team, she has worn many hats handling marketing, billing, accounts receivable, quality control, shipping, etc. In her free time, Jen creates and sells jewelry through her own company, WireStruck.

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Chris Sengstacke has over 25 years of experience with systems administration and integration. He was formerly the President of DataScan Corp, a full-service document imaging company, which he founded in 1996 based upon an original systems design architecture that facilitated the exchange of imaged data over corporate networks. Prominent clients included Chicago Title Insurance Co., Stewart Title Guaranty Co., MedStar Physicians Partners, and the Aberdeen Proving Ground. Chris has also worked as an information systems consultant for OnCourse Learning, a nationally based learning management company. Chris graduated from Towson University and the Johns Hopkins University. 

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Reynel is a Senior Software Engineer with domain experience in IOT, Enterprise and Cloud architectures, Security surveillance, Facilities management, Video analytics, Medical modeling. He also has expertise in IT application and project management for large-scale video security projects. He holds patents in Augmented Reality for Medical Simulation. He most recently served as a Solutions Architect for the Council of Better Business Bureau and regularly lends his expertise to the FDA for their Safety Reporting Portal. He earned his Masters degree in Electrical Engineering from Old Dominion University and Bachelors in Electronics Engineering from MIT, Manipal.

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Mac Mottley is the Chief Executive Officer and has responsibility for strategy, business development and overseeing the company's day to day operations.  Mr. Mottley has over 30 years of military and business leadership experience developing innovative organizations that provide a clear differentiation and added value compared to competitors.  Most recently Mr. Mottley served as the President of axonX Fike, and before that was the CEO of axonX LLC.  AxonX was acquired by Fike and is the leading supplier of video analytics for the video flame and smoke detection industry.  Previously, Mr. Mottley served as the President and CEO of Mottley Enterprises, LLC.  The company grew to be one of Ingersoll-Rand's largest air compressor distributors.  Mottley Enterprises, LLC was sold to Ingersoll-Rand in 2001.  Mr Mottley also served as the President of the Association of Ingersoll-Rand Distributors and was a founding board member of the Department of Energy's Compressed Air Challenge initiative.  Mottley Air Power was the leading compressed air vendor that participated in Baltimore Gas & Electric's Conserve 2000 Energy Rebate Program.  He is a certified energy manager through the Association of Energy Engineers.  Mr. Mottley is a distinguished graduate (top 5%) from the United States Military Academy at West Point with a BS in engineering and was awarded a Fellowship and MBA from the Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. 

the case study house program

the case study house program

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Boeing ousts head of 737 jetliner program, appoints new vice president of quality

FILE - The head of Boeing's 737 Max program has been ousted.

SEATTLE (AP) — Boeing said Wednesday that the head of its 737 program is leaving the company in an executive shake-up weeks after a door panel blew out on a flight over Oregon, renewing questions about safety at the company.

Boeing announced the departure of Ed Clark, who had been with the company for 18 years.

Katie Ringgold will succeed him as vice president and general manager of the 737 program, and the company’s Renton, Washington site.

The moves are part of the company’s “enhanced focus on ensuring that every airplane we deliver meets or exceeds all quality and safety requirements,” Boeing Commercial Airplanes President Stan Deal wrote in an email to employees. “Our customers demand, and deserve, nothing less.”

In January, an emergency door panel blew off a Boeing 737 Max 9 over Oregon. Bolts that helped secure a panel to the frame of the 737 Max 9 were missing before the panel blew off the AlasSEATTLE (AP) — Boeing said Wednesday that the head of its 737 jetliner program is leaving the company in an executive shake-up weeks after a door panel blew out on a flight over Oregon, renewing questions about safety at the company.

Boeing announced that Ed Clark, who had been with the company for nearly 18 years and led the 737 program since early 2021, was leaving immediately.

Clark oversaw the factory in Renton, Washington, where final assembly took place on the Alaska Airlines 737 Max 9 involved in last month’s accident. Federal investigators said bolts needed to help keep a panel called a door plug in place  were missing after repair work  on the plane.

Katie Ringgold, a vice president in charge of delivering 737s to airlines, will succeed Clark as vice president and general manager of the 737 program and the Renton factory, according to an email to employees from Stan Deal, the CEO of Boeing’s commercial airplanes division.

The company announced several other appointments, including naming longtime executive Elizabeth Lund to the new position of senior vice president for commercial airplanes quality.

The moves are part of the company’s “enhanced focus on ensuring that every airplane we deliver meets or exceeds all quality and safety requirements,” Deal said in his email to staff. “Our customers demand, and deserve, nothing less.”

The blowout of a panel on the Alaska Airlines Max 9 has led to  more scrutiny of Boeing  by regulators, Congress and airlines.

The Federal Aviation Administration grounded all Max 9s in the U.S. for about three weeks for inspections of the emergency door panels, and the agency is limiting Boeing production until other quality concerns are resolved. FAA Administrator Mike Whitaker said Boeing is  not paying enough attention to safety  as it tries to build more planes to meet demand from airlines.

The CEOs of Alaska Airlines and United Airlines — the two U.S. carriers affected by the Max 9 grounding — expressed  outrage and frustration  with the company. They asked what Boeing intends to do about improving the quality of its manufacturing.

“We caused the problem and we understand that,” Boeing CEO David Calhoun said on Jan. 31. “We understand why they are angry and we will work to earn their confidence.”

Calhoun said the company has increased inspections in its plants and at suppliers, appointed a retired Navy admiral to review quality management, and shut down the 737 assembly line for one day so workers could discuss quality and safety.

Criticism of Boeing has reached levels not seen since the aftermath of  two deadly crashes  involving Max 8 jetliners in Indonesia and Ethiopia in 2018 and 2019. The crashes killed 346 people and led to the ouster of Boeing’s then-CEO.

Shares of The Boeing Co., which is based in Arlington, Virginia, closed down 1% on Wednesday. They have lost 19% — and about $27 billion in stock-market value — since the door blowout.ka Airlines plane last month, according to accident investigators.

The shake-up comes after the head of the Federal Aviation Administration said Boeing — under pressure from airlines to produce large numbers of planes — is not paying enough attention to safety .

Boeing Co., which is based in Arlington, Virginia, also named longtime executive Elizabeth Lund to the new position of senior vice president for BCA Quality, where she will lead quality control and quality assurance efforts.

Copyright 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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IMAGES

  1. Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study

    the case study house program

  2. The Case Study House Program and Its Impact on Modern Architecture Today

    the case study house program

  3. Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study

    the case study house program

  4. The Case Study House Program at Modernism Week 2019

    the case study house program

  5. Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study

    the case study house program

  6. Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study

    the case study house program

COMMENTS

  1. Case Study Houses

    The Case Study Houses were experiments in American residential architecture sponsored by Arts & Architecture magazine, which commissioned major architects of the day, including Richard Neutra, Raphael Soriano, Craig Ellwood, Charles and Ray Eames, Pierre Koenig, Eero Saarinen, A. Quincy Jones, Edward Killingsworth, and Ralph Rapson to design and...

  2. The Case Study Houses Forever Changed American Architecture

    The Case Study Houses Forever Changed American Architecture Michelle Hofmann Former Contributor I specialize in real estate features, trends, and celebrity homes. Click to save this article....

  3. Arts & Architecture: Case Study House Program Introduction

    Not much more need be written about the Case Study House Program of Arts & Architecture.It has been documented by Esther McCoy wonderfully in "Modern California Houses; Case Study Houses, 1945-1962" (Reinhold, 1962; reissued as "Case Study Houses 1945-1962" by Hennessey & Ingalls, 1977) and fully and beautifully in recent books from TASCHEN Gmbh and M.I.T. Press.

  4. Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study

    Between 1945 and 1966, the Case Study Houses program, following the Weißenhof-siedlung exposition, commissioned a study of economic, easy-to-build houses. The study included the creation...

  5. Ten Things You Should Know About the Case Study House Program

    Click here to call us about your project (949) 506-1525 The case study house program was an experimental program set up by John Entenza through Arts and Architecture Magazine, that facilitated the design, construction and publishing of modern single-family homes.

  6. Case Study Houses

    Overview Launched in 1945 by John Entenza's Arts + Architecture magazine, the Case Study House program commissioned architects to study, plan, design, and ultimately construct houses in anticipation of renewed building in the postwar years.

  7. Case Study Houses

    Case Study House 22. Image via Flickr user: mbtrama Licensed under CC BY 2.0. Between 1945 and 1966, the Case Study Houses program, following the Weißenhof-siedlung exposition, commissioned a ...

  8. The Case Study Houses Program: Mid-Century Modern Architecture

    The Case Study Houses Program, promoted by the magazine Arts and Architecture in 1945, represented the most important American contribution to the Mid-Century Modern architecture. Last month I wrote about the CSH #20, today I want to give you the big picture about the Case Study Houses Program, its origins and inspirations.

  9. The Case Study House Program and Its Impact on Modern Architecture Today

    The Case Study House program ended when the magazine closed in 1966, making its mark on residential design worldwide as one of the most successful modern housing programs ever undertaken.

  10. Case Study Houses. The Complete CSH Program 1945-1966

    The Case Study House program (1945-66) was an exceptional, innovative event in the history of American architecture and remains to this day unique.

  11. Case Study House Program

    The Case Study House program started as Entenza's personal project, partially financed through his own resources, that lasted two decades. This initiative was the game-changer in the authoritative aura that California Modernism acquired worldwide. Entenza led the program from 1945 to 1962 till he moved to Chicago to head the Graham Foundation.

  12. A Virtual Look Into Beverley David Thorne's Case Study House #26

    The Case Study House program was an initiative sponsored by the Arts & Architecture magazine to address the housing shortage after World War II. Its mission was to provide a vision of how...

  13. Eames House and the CSH program

    The Eames House (also known as Case Study House No. 8) is a landmark of mid-20th century modern architecture located in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of Los Angeles. It was designed and constructed in 1949 by husband-and-wife Charles and Ray Eames to serve as their home and studio. It was one of roughly two dozen homes.

  14. The Case Study Houses Program

    June 19, 2015 The Case Study House 9 by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen The Case Study House #9, was part of John Entenza's Case Study House Program launched… Read more The Case Study Houses Program May 7, 2015 The Case Study House 25 by Killingsworth, Brady and Smith

  15. Arts & Architecture: Case Study House Program Introduction

    Designed the 1947 Case Study House while working with father; was licensed three years later, Pierre Koenig (1925-2004) Born in San Francisco, California. Bachelor of Architecture degree, University of Southern California, 1952. Several months in office of Raphael Soriano. Office of Jones and Emmons.

  16. Southern California'S Architectural Gems: the Case Study Houses

    The Case Study House program remains one of Southern California's most significant contributions to the field of Architecture. One of the most notable Case Study homes, Case Study 22 the Stahl House by Pierre Koenig, is available for public tours. In the summer months we suggest taking the evening tour where you will get to experience the sun ...

  17. Los Angeles Case Study houses: Mapping the midecentury modern

    Case Study House No. 17 (B) was designed in 1956 by Craig Ellwood, but "governed by a specific program set forth by the client." Ellwood took into account the clients' collection of ...

  18. Case Study House Program 1945-1966

    The Case Study House program, initiated by Arts & Architecture magazine in 1945 in Los Angeles remains one of America's most significant contributions to architecture at mid-century. Conceived as low-cost, experimental modern prototypes, the thirty-six designs of the program epitomized the aspirations of a generation of modern architects active durning the buoyant years of America's post ...

  19. Case Study Houses: The Complete CSH Program 1945-1966

    The Case Study House program (1945-1966) was an exceptional, innovative event in the history of American architecture and remains to this day unique. The program, which concentrated on the Los Angeles area and oversaw the design of 36 prototype homes, sought to make available plans for modern residences that could be easily and cheaply ...

  20. PDF Role Playing as a Leadership Development Tool

    Graham, Sincoff, Baker, & Ackerman, 2003), and case-studies. Bass (1990b) also identified lecture-discussion, role-playing, in-basket activities, living cases games, computer-assisted and programmed instruction, behavior modeling, and sensitivity training as methods of training leaders. According to Bass, "the purpose of playing a

  21. Virtual Open House with the Department of Population and Quantitative

    Join representatives from Case Western Reserve University's Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences to get information on the Master of Science in Biomedical and Health informatics, and Master of Public Health in Population and Quantitative Health Sciences programs.

  22. Sparks Dynamics Team

    CTO. Dr. George Privalov is the Chief Technology Officer and responsible for the development and implementation of the company's technology offerings to include remote monitoring software as well as artificial intelligence relating to data analytics and video and thermal imaging. Previously Dr. Privalov served as the CTO of axonX Fike and has ...

  23. Most British companies stick with four-day workweek after world's

    A groundbreaking experiment with the four-day workweek has made lasting changes among British companies, with an extensive study showing the majority of the firms that participated in the trial ...

  24. PDF Moscow Case Study v2-s

    Objectives. The estimation of the current status of Moscow as a Smart City. The identification of current weaknesses in Moscow's smart strategy for the benefit of future planning. The identification of new directions for Smart City development based on expert opinions. Determining the most efficient way to share best practices in the Smart ...

  25. PDF Medical Analytical System for Moscow City Hospital #31

    Firebird SQL Case Study Medical Analytical System for Moscow City Hospital #31 About us Moscow City Hospital #31 is a modern, 620 bed medical institution providing emergency and in-patient medical services with a staff of over 400. The hospital is equipped with modern medical instruments and computers. Our hospital information system is one of ...

  26. Boeing removes head of 737 Max program

    Boeing removed the head of its 737 Max program. ... 3 displaced after Surfside Beach-area house fire . Myrtle Beach man uses homemade sonar device to find sunken car in 40-year-old cold case.