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40 Strong Persuasive Writing Examples (Essays, Speeches, Ads, and More)

Learn from the experts.

The American Crisis historical article, as an instance of persuasive essay examples

The more we read, the better writers we become. Teaching students to write strong persuasive essays should always start with reading some top-notch models. This round-up of persuasive writing examples includes famous speeches, influential ad campaigns, contemporary reviews of famous books, and more. Use them to inspire your students to write their own essays. (Need persuasive essay topics? Check out our list of interesting persuasive essay ideas here! )

  • Persuasive Essays
  • Persuasive Speeches
  • Advertising Campaigns

Persuasive Essay Writing Examples

First paragraph of Thomas Paine's The American Crisis

From the earliest days of print, authors have used persuasive essays to try to sway others to their own point of view. Check out these top persuasive essay writing examples.

Professions for Women by Virginia Woolf

Sample lines: “Outwardly, what is simpler than to write books? Outwardly, what obstacles are there for a woman rather than for a man? Inwardly, I think, the case is very different; she has still many ghosts to fight, many prejudices to overcome. Indeed it will be a long time still, I think, before a woman can sit down to write a book without finding a phantom to be slain, a rock to be dashed against. And if this is so in literature, the freest of all professions for women, how is it in the new professions which you are now for the first time entering?”

The Crisis by Thomas Paine

Sample lines: “These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value.”

Politics and the English Language by George Orwell

Sample lines: “As I have tried to show, modern writing at its worst does not consist in picking out words for the sake of their meaning and inventing images in order to make the meaning clearer. It consists in gumming together long strips of words which have already been set in order by someone else, and making the results presentable by sheer humbug.”

Letter From a Birmingham Jail by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Sample lines: “We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was ‘well timed’ in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word ‘Wait!’ It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This ‘Wait’ has almost always meant ‘Never.’ We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that ‘justice too long delayed is justice denied.'”

Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau

Sample lines: “Even voting for the right is doing nothing for it. It is only expressing to men feebly your desire that it should prevail. A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority. There is but little virtue in the action of masses of men.”

Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Roger Ebert

Sample lines: “‘Kindness’ covers all of my political beliefs. No need to spell them out. I believe that if, at the end of it all, according to our abilities, we have done something to make others a little happier, and something to make ourselves a little happier, that is about the best we can do. To make others less happy is a crime.”

The Way to Wealth by Benjamin Franklin

Sample lines: “Methinks I hear some of you say, must a man afford himself no leisure? I will tell thee, my friend, what Poor Richard says, employ thy time well if thou meanest to gain leisure; and, since thou art not sure of a minute, throw not away an hour. Leisure is time for doing something useful; this leisure the diligent man will obtain, but the lazy man never; so that, as Poor Richard says, a life of leisure and a life of laziness are two things.”

The Crack-Up by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Sample lines: “Of course all life is a process of breaking down, but the blows that do the dramatic side of the work—the big sudden blows that come, or seem to come, from outside—the ones you remember and blame things on and, in moments of weakness, tell your friends about, don’t show their effect all at once.”

Open Letter to the Kansas School Board by Bobby Henderson

Sample lines: “I am writing you with much concern after having read of your hearing to decide whether the alternative theory of Intelligent Design should be taught along with the theory of Evolution. … Let us remember that there are multiple theories of Intelligent Design. I and many others around the world are of the strong belief that the universe was created by a Flying Spaghetti Monster. … We feel strongly that the overwhelming scientific evidence pointing towards evolutionary processes is nothing but a coincidence, put in place by Him. It is for this reason that I’m writing you today, to formally request that this alternative theory be taught in your schools, along with the other two theories.”

Open Letter to the United Nations by Niels Bohr

Sample lines: “Humanity will, therefore, be confronted with dangers of unprecedented character unless, in due time, measures can be taken to forestall a disastrous competition in such formidable armaments and to establish an international control of the manufacture and use of the powerful materials.”

Persuasive Speech Writing Examples

Many persuasive speeches are political in nature, often addressing subjects like human rights. Here are some of history’s most well-known persuasive writing examples in the form of speeches.

I Have a Dream by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Sample lines: “And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

Woodrow Wilson’s War Message to Congress, 1917

Sample lines: “There are, it may be, many months of fiery trial and sacrifice ahead of us. It is a fearful thing to lead this great peaceful people into war, into the most terrible and disastrous of all wars, civilization itself seeming to be in the balance. But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts—for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments, for the rights and liberties of small nations, for a universal dominion of right by such a concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety to all nations and make the world itself at last free.”

Chief Seattle’s 1854 Oration

Sample lines: “I here and now make this condition that we will not be denied the privilege without molestation of visiting at any time the tombs of our ancestors, friends, and children. Every part of this soil is sacred in the estimation of my people. Every hillside, every valley, every plain and grove, has been hallowed by some sad or happy event in days long vanished. Even the rocks, which seem to be dumb and dead as they swelter in the sun along the silent shore, thrill with memories of stirring events connected with the lives of my people, and the very dust upon which you now stand responds more lovingly to their footsteps than yours, because it is rich with the blood of our ancestors, and our bare feet are conscious of the sympathetic touch.”

Women’s Rights Are Human Rights, Hillary Rodham Clinton

Sample lines: “What we are learning around the world is that if women are healthy and educated, their families will flourish. If women are free from violence, their families will flourish. If women have a chance to work and earn as full and equal partners in society, their families will flourish. And when families flourish, communities and nations do as well. … If there is one message that echoes forth from this conference, let it be that human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights once and for all.”

I Am Prepared to Die, Nelson Mandela

Sample lines: “Above all, My Lord, we want equal political rights, because without them our disabilities will be permanent. I know this sounds revolutionary to the whites in this country, because the majority of voters will be Africans. This makes the white man fear democracy. But this fear cannot be allowed to stand in the way of the only solution which will guarantee racial harmony and freedom for all. It is not true that the enfranchisement of all will result in racial domination. Political division, based on color, is entirely artificial and, when it disappears, so will the domination of one color group by another. … This then is what the ANC is fighting. Our struggle is a truly national one. It is a struggle of the African people, inspired by our own suffering and our own experience. It is a struggle for the right to live.”

The Struggle for Human Rights by Eleanor Roosevelt

Sample lines: “It is my belief, and I am sure it is also yours, that the struggle for democracy and freedom is a critical struggle, for their preservation is essential to the great objective of the United Nations to maintain international peace and security. Among free men the end cannot justify the means. We know the patterns of totalitarianism—the single political party, the control of schools, press, radio, the arts, the sciences, and the church to support autocratic authority; these are the age-old patterns against which men have struggled for 3,000 years. These are the signs of reaction, retreat, and retrogression. The United Nations must hold fast to the heritage of freedom won by the struggle of its people; it must help us to pass it on to generations to come.”

Freedom From Fear by Aung San Suu Kyi

Sample lines: “Saints, it has been said, are the sinners who go on trying. So free men are the oppressed who go on trying and who in the process make themselves fit to bear the responsibilities and to uphold the disciplines which will maintain a free society. Among the basic freedoms to which men aspire that their lives might be full and uncramped, freedom from fear stands out as both a means and an end. A people who would build a nation in which strong, democratic institutions are firmly established as a guarantee against state-induced power must first learn to liberate their own minds from apathy and fear.”

Harvey Milk’s “The Hope” Speech

Sample lines: “Some people are satisfied. And some people are not. You see there is a major difference—and it remains a vital difference—between a friend and a gay person, a friend in office and a gay person in office. Gay people have been slandered nationwide. We’ve been tarred and we’ve been brushed with the picture of pornography. In Dade County, we were accused of child molestation. It is not enough anymore just to have friends represent us, no matter how good that friend may be.”

The Union and the Strike, Cesar Chavez

Sample lines: “We are showing our unity in our strike. Our strike is stopping the work in the fields; our strike is stopping ships that would carry grapes; our strike is stopping the trucks that would carry the grapes. Our strike will stop every way the grower makes money until we have a union contract that guarantees us a fair share of the money he makes from our work! We are a union and we are strong and we are striking to force the growers to respect our strength!”

Nobel Lecture by Malala Yousafzai

Sample lines: “The world can no longer accept that basic education is enough. Why do leaders accept that for children in developing countries, only basic literacy is sufficient, when their own children do homework in algebra, mathematics, science, and physics? Leaders must seize this opportunity to guarantee a free, quality, primary and secondary education for every child. Some will say this is impractical, or too expensive, or too hard. Or maybe even impossible. But it is time the world thinks bigger.”   

Persuasive Writing Examples in Advertising Campaigns

Ads are prime persuasive writing examples. You can flip open any magazine or watch TV for an hour or two to see sample after sample of persuasive language. Here are some of the most popular ad campaigns of all time, with links to articles explaining why they were so successful.

Nike: Just Do It

Nike

The iconic swoosh with the simple tagline has persuaded millions to buy their kicks from Nike and Nike alone. Teamed with pro sports-star endorsements, this campaign is one for the ages. Blinkist offers an opinion on what made it work.

Dove: Real Beauty

Beauty brand Dove changed the game by choosing “real” women to tell their stories instead of models. They used relatable images and language to make connections, and inspired other brands to try the same concept. Learn why Global Brands considers this one a true success story.

Wendy’s: Where’s the Beef?

Today’s kids are too young to remember the cranky old woman demanding to know where the beef was on her fast-food hamburger. But in the 1980s, it was a catchphrase that sold millions of Wendy’s burgers. Learn from Better Marketing how this ad campaign even found its way into the 1984 presidential debate.

De Beers: A Diamond Is Forever

Diamond engagement ring on black velvet. Text reads "How do you make two months' salary last forever? The Diamond Engagement Ring."

A diamond engagement ring has become a standard these days, but the tradition isn’t as old as you might think. In fact, it was De Beers jewelry company’s 1948 campaign that created the modern engagement ring trend. The Drum has the whole story of this sparkling campaign.

Volkswagen: Think Small

Americans have always loved big cars. So in the 1960s, when Volkswagen wanted to introduce their small cars to a bigger market, they had a problem. The clever “Think Small” campaign gave buyers clever reasons to consider these models, like “If you run out of gas, it’s easy to push.” Learn how advertisers interested American buyers in little cars at Visual Rhetoric.

American Express: Don’t Leave Home Without It

AmEx was once better known for traveler’s checks than credit cards, and the original slogan was “Don’t leave home without them.” A simple word change convinced travelers that American Express was the credit card they needed when they headed out on adventures. Discover more about this persuasive campaign from Medium.

Skittles: Taste the Rainbow

Bag of Skittles candy against a blue background. Text reads

These candy ads are weird and intriguing and probably not for everyone. But they definitely get you thinking, and that often leads to buying. Learn more about why these wacky ads are successful from The Drum.

Maybelline: Maybe She’s Born With It

Smart wordplay made this ad campaign slogan an instant hit. The ads teased, “Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline.” (So many literary devices all in one phrase!) Fashionista has more on this beauty campaign.

Coca-Cola: Share a Coke

Seeing their own name on a bottle made teens more likely to want to buy a Coke. What can that teach us about persuasive writing in general? It’s an interesting question to consider. Learn more about the “Share a Coke” campaign from Digital Vidya.

Always: #LikeaGirl

Always ad showing a young girl holding a softball. Text reads

Talk about the power of words! This Always campaign turned the derogatory phrase “like a girl” on its head, and the world embraced it. Storytelling is an important part of persuasive writing, and these ads really do it well. Medium has more on this stereotype-bashing campaign.   

Editorial Persuasive Writing Examples

Original newspaper editorial

Newspaper editors or publishers use editorials to share their personal opinions. Noted politicians, experts, or pundits may also offer their opinions on behalf of the editors or publishers. Here are a couple of older well-known editorials, along with a selection from current newspapers.

Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus (1897)

Sample lines: “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! How dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias.”

What’s the Matter With Kansas? (1896)

Sample lines: “Oh, this IS a state to be proud of! We are a people who can hold up our heads! What we need is not more money, but less capital, fewer white shirts and brains, fewer men with business judgment, and more of those fellows who boast that they are ‘just ordinary clodhoppers, but they know more in a minute about finance than John Sherman,’ we need more men … who hate prosperity, and who think, because a man believes in national honor, he is a tool of Wall Street.”

America Can Have Democracy or Political Violence. Not Both. (The New York Times)

Sample lines: “The nation is not powerless to stop a slide toward deadly chaos. If institutions and individuals do more to make it unacceptable in American public life, organized violence in the service of political objectives can still be pushed to the fringes. When a faction of one of the country’s two main political parties embraces extremism, that makes thwarting it both more difficult and more necessary. A well-functioning democracy demands it.”

The Booster Isn’t Perfect, But Still Can Help Against COVID (The Washington Post)

Sample lines: “The booster shots are still free, readily available and work better than the previous boosters even as the virus evolves. Much still needs to be done to build better vaccines that protect longer and against more variants, including those that might emerge in the future. But it is worth grabbing the booster that exists today, the jab being a small price for any measure that can help keep COVID at bay.”

If We Want Wildlife To Thrive in L.A., We Have To Share Our Neighborhoods With Them (Los Angeles Times)

Sample lines: “If there are no corridors for wildlife movement and if excessive excavation of dirt to build bigger, taller houses erodes the slope of a hillside, then we are slowly destroying wildlife habitat. For those people fretting about what this will do to their property values—isn’t open space, trees, and wildlife an amenity in these communities?”   

Persuasive Review Writing Examples

Image of first published New York Times Book Review

Book or movie reviews are more great persuasive writing examples. Look for those written by professionals for the strongest arguments and writing styles. Here are reviews of some popular books and movies by well-known critics to use as samples.

The Great Gatsby (The Chicago Tribune, 1925)

Sample lines: “What ails it, fundamentally, is the plain fact that it is simply a story—that Fitzgerald seems to be far more interested in maintaining its suspense than in getting under the skins of its people. It is not that they are false: It is that they are taken too much for granted. Only Gatsby himself genuinely lives and breathes. The rest are mere marionettes—often astonishingly lifelike, but nevertheless not quite alive.”

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (The Washington Post, 1999)

Sample lines: “Obviously, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone should make any modern 11-year-old a very happy reader. The novel moves quickly, packs in everything from a boa constrictor that winks to a melancholy Zen-spouting centaur to an owl postal system, and ends with a scary surprise. Yet it is, essentially, a light-hearted thriller, interrupted by occasional seriousness (the implications of Harry’s miserable childhood, a moral about the power of love).”

Twilight (The Telegraph, 2009)

Sample lines: “No secret, of course, at whom this book is aimed, and no doubt, either, that it has hit its mark. The four Twilight novels are not so much enjoyed, as devoured, by legions of young female fans worldwide. That’s not to say boys can’t enjoy these books; it’s just that the pages of heart-searching dialogue between Edward and Bella may prove too long on chat and too short on action for the average male reader.”

To Kill a Mockingbird (Time, 1960)

Sample lines: “Author Lee, 34, an Alabaman, has written her first novel with all of the tactile brilliance and none of the preciosity generally supposed to be standard swamp-warfare issue for Southern writers. The novel is an account of an awakening to good and evil, and a faint catechistic flavor may have been inevitable. But it is faint indeed; novelist Lee’s prose has an edge that cuts through cant, and she teaches the reader an astonishing number of useful truths about little girls and about Southern life.”

The Diary of Anne Frank (The New York Times, 1952)

Sample lines: “And this quality brings it home to any family in the world today. Just as the Franks lived in momentary fear of the Gestapo’s knock on their hidden door, so every family today lives in fear of the knock of war. Anne’s diary is a great affirmative answer to the life-question of today, for she shows how ordinary people, within this ordeal, consistently hold to the greater human values.”   

What are your favorite persuasive writing examples to use with students? Come share your ideas in the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, the big list of essay topics for high school (120+ ideas) ..

Find strong persuasive writing examples to use for inspiration, including essays, speeches, advertisements, reviews, and more.

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay for Middle School

David raudenbush, 26 sep 2017.

Middle school students need strong persuasive writing skills.

Because most states require persuasive writing in their curriculum standards, this writing genre pops up frequently during the middle school years. Students need to know how to take a stance on a topic, gather supporting evidence and structure an argument in essay form. With a blend of strong content and logical organization, a student can make a convincing argument on topics assigned in class and on standardized tests.

Explore this article

  • Planning and Research
  • The Introduction
  • The Closing

1 Planning and Research

Persuasive writing requires taking a side on a controversial topic and convincing readers to join that side. In the essay, middle school students might argue for changing the school lunch menu, for example. After choosing a position, the student gathers supporting evidence including relevant facts, interesting statistics, quotes from experts and personal anecdotes. On a timed writing test, a student may have to rely on given information or prior knowledge for evidence. On a long-term assignment, students can use library and Internet research along with interviewing knowledgeable experts. For example, a student writing to convince the administration to improve school lunches could get statistics from the Food and Drug Administration website, facts from a nutrition book in the library and expert quotes from the school's home economics teacher as evidence.

2 The Introduction

The first few sentences should grab the readers’ attention with vivid word choices and figurative language that sets a tone. The introductory paragraph clearly introduces the essay's topic and in most middle school essays, it ends with a thesis sentence stating the writer’s position on the topic. For example, the thesis might say “Middle school students should be provided cafeteria lunches that appeal to the tastes of young teenagers and provide a nutritious meal.”

Each paragraph begins with a topic sentence that clearly states one reason why the reader should agree with the student's claim. The rest of the paragraph presents supporting evidence from the research that elaborates on the topic sentence. For the school lunch topic, a paragraph might focus on comparing the calories, fat and sodium content of current school lunches with healthier alternatives using statistical information. The next paragraph could discuss how healthier food can also taste better using quotes from a home economics teacher. Some persuasive writing assignments require middle school students to include a rebuttal paragraph in which the writer anticipates possible counter claims against the thesis and uses evidence to explain why the counter claims are not valid.

4 The Closing

The closing is the last chance the student has to make a memorable statement about the topic that will convince the reader to think or act differently, focusing on a call to action in a sentence or two that states the change the student has argued for in the essay. For example, a persuasive essay about cafeteria food could end with "The principal and school board should require the middle school cafeteria to revise its menu to reflect healthy choices that will also be popular with students who eat there every day."

  • 1 Read Write Think: Developing Persuasive Strategies

About the Author

David Raudenbush has more than 20 years of experience as a literacy teacher, staff developer and literacy coach. He has written for newspapers, magazines and online publications, and served as the editor of "Golfstyles New Jersey Magazine." Raudenbush holds a bachelor's degree in journalism and a master's degree in education.

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writing a persuasive essay middle school

How to Teach Argument Writing Step-By-Step

writing a persuasive essay middle school

No doubt, teaching argument writing to middle school students can be tricky. Even the word “argumentative” is off-putting, bringing to mind pointless bickering. But once I came up with argument writing lessons that were both fun and effective, I quickly saw the value in it. And so did my students.

You see, we teachers have an ace up our sleeve. It’s a known fact that from ages 11-14, kids love nothing more than to fire up a good ole battle royale with just about anybody within spitting distance.

Yup. So we’re going to use their powers of contradiction to OUR advantage by showing them how to use our argument writing lessons to power up their real-life persuasion skills. Your students will be knocking each other over in the hall to get to the room first!

I usually plan on taking about three weeks on the entire argument writing workshop. However, there are years when I’ve had to cut it down to two, and that works fine too.

Here are the step-by-step lessons I use to teach argument writing. It might be helpful to teachers who are new to teaching the argument, or to teachers who want to get back to the basics. If it seems formulaic, that’s because it is. In my experience, that’s the best way to get middle school students started.

Prior to Starting the Writer’s Workshop

A couple of weeks prior to starting your unit, assign some quick-write journal topics. I pick one current event topic a day, and I ask students to express their opinion about the topic.

Quick-writes get the kids thinking about what is going on in the world and makes choosing a topic easier later on.

Define Argumentative Writing

I’ll never forget the feeling of panic I had in 7th grade when my teacher told us to start writing an expository essay on snowstorms. How could I write an expository essay if I don’t even know what expository MEANS, I whined to my middle school self.

We can’t assume our students know or remember what argumentative writing is, even if we think they should know. So we have to tell them. Also, define claim and issue while you’re at it.

Establish Purpose

I always tell my students that learning to write an effective argument is key to learning critical thinking skills and is an important part of school AND real-life writing.

We start with a fictional scenario every kid in the history of kids can relate to.

ISSUE : a kid wants to stay up late to go to a party vs. AUDIENCE : the strict mom who likes to say no.

The “party” kid writes his mom a letter that starts with a thesis and a claim: I should be permitted to stay out late to attend the part for several reasons.

By going through this totally relatable scenario using a modified argumentative framework, I’m able to demonstrate the difference between persuasion and argument, the importance of data and factual evidence, and the value of a counterclaim and rebuttal.

Students love to debate whether or not strict mom should allow party kid to attend the party. More importantly, it’s a great way to introduce the art of the argument, because kids can see how they can use the skills to their personal advantage.

Persuasive Writing Differs From Argument Writing

At the middle school level, students need to understand persuasive and argument writing in a concrete way. Therefore, I keep it simple by explaining that both types of writing involve a claim. However, in persuasive writing, the supporting details are based on opinions, feelings, and emotions, while in argument writing the supporting details are based on researching factual evidence.

I give kids a few examples to see if they can tell the difference between argumentation and persuasion before we move on.

Argumentative Essay Terminology

In order to write a complete argumentative essay, students need to be familiar with some key terminology . Some teachers name the parts differently, so I try to give them more than one word if necessary:

  • thesis statement
  • bridge/warrant
  • counterclaim/counterargument*
  • turn-back/refutation

*If you follow Common Core Standards, the counterargument is not required for 6th-grade argument writing. All of the teachers in my school teach it anyway, and I’m thankful for that when the kids get to 7th grade.

Organizing the Argumentative Essay

I teach students how to write a step-by-step 5 paragraph argumentative essay consisting of the following:

  • Introduction : Includes a lead/hook, background information about the topic, and a thesis statement that includes the claim.
  • Body Paragraph #1 : Introduces the first reason that the claim is valid. Supports that reason with facts, examples, and/or data.
  • Body Paragraph #2 : The second reason the claim is valid. Supporting evidence as above.
  • Counterargument (Body Paragraph #3): Introduction of an opposing claim, then includes a turn-back to take the reader back to the original claim.
  • Conclusion : Restates the thesis statement, summarizes the main idea, and contains a strong concluding statement that might be a call to action.

Mentor Texts

If we want students to write a certain way, we should provide high-quality mentor texts that are exact models of what we expect them to write.

I know a lot of teachers will use picture books or editorials that present arguments for this, and I can get behind that. But only if specific exemplary essays are also used, and this is why.

If I want to learn Italian cooking, I’m not going to just watch the Romanos enjoy a holiday feast on Everybody Loves Raymond . I need to slow it down and follow every little step my girl Lidia Bastianich makes.

The same goes for teaching argument writing. If we want students to write 5 paragraph essays, that’s what we should show them.

In fact, don’t just display those mentor texts like a museum piece. Dissect the heck out of those essays. Pull them apart like a Thanksgiving turkey. Disassemble the essay sentence by sentence and have the kids label the parts and reassemble them. This is how they will learn how to structure their own writing.

Also, encourage your detectives to evaluate the evidence. Ask students to make note of how the authors use anecdotes, statistics, and facts. Have them evaluate the evidence and whether or not the writer fully analyzes it and connects it to the claim.

This is absolutely the best way for kids to understand the purpose of each part of the essay.

Research Time

Most of my students are not very experienced with performing research when we do this unit, so I ease them into it. (Our “big” research unit comes later in the year with our feature article unit .)

I start them off by showing this short video on how to find reliable sources. We use data collection sheets and our school library’s database for research. There are also some awesome, kid-friendly research sites listed on the Ask a Tech Teacher Blog .

Step-By-Step Drafting

The bedrock of drafting is to start with a solid graphic organizer. I have to differentiate for my writers, and I’ve found they have the most success when I offer three types of graphic organizers.

1- Least Support: This is your standard graphic organizer. It labels each paragraph and has a dedicated section for each part of the paragraph.

2- Moderate Support: This one has labels and sections, but also includes sentence stems for each sentence in the paragraph.

3- Most Support: This one has labels and sections and also includes fill-in-the-blank sentence frames . It’s perfect for my emerging writers, and as I’ve mentioned previously, students do NOT need the frames for long and soon become competent and independent writers.

Writing the Introduction

The introduction has three parts and purposes.

First, it has a hook or lead. While it should be about the topic, it shouldn’t state the writer’s position on the topic. I encourage students to start with a quote by a famous person, an unusual detail, a statistic, or a fact.

Kids will often try to start with a question, but I discourage that unless their question also includes one of the other strategies. Otherwise, I end up with 100 essays that start with, “Do you like sharks?” Lol

Next, it’s time to introduce the issue. This is the background information that readers need in order to understand the controversy.

Last, students should state the claim in the thesis statement. I call it a promise to the reader that the essay will deliver by proving that the claim is valid.

Writing the Supporting Body Paragraphs

Each supporting body paragraph should start with a topic sentence that introduces the idea and states the reason why the claim is valid. The following sentences in the paragraph should support that reason with facts, examples, data, or expert opinions. The bridge is the sentence that connects that piece of evidence to the argument’s claim. The concluding sentence should restate the reason.

Writing the Counterclaim Paragraph

The counterclaim paragraph is a very important aspect of argument writing. It’s where we introduce an opposing argument and then confidently take the reader back to the original argument. I tell students that it’s necessary to “get in the head” of the person who might not agree with their claim, by predicting their objections.

It can be tough for kids to “flip the switch” on their own argument, so I like to practice this a bit. I give them several pairs of transitions that go together to form a counterclaim and rebuttal. I also switch up what I call this part so that they use the terminology interchangeably.

  • It might seem that [ counterargument . ]However, [ turn-back .]
  • Opponents may argue that [ counterargument .] Nevertheless, [ turn back .]
  • A common argument against this position is [ counterargument .] Yet, [ turn-back .]

A great way for kids to practice this is to have them work with partners to write a few counterarguments together. I let them practice by giving them easy role-playing topics.

  • Your cousins want to jump into a poison ivy grove for a TikTok challenge. Choose your position on this and write a counterargument and turn-back.
  • Your friend wants to get a full-face tattoo of their boyfriend’s name. Choose your position on this and write a counterargument and turn-back.

This kind of practice makes the counterargument much more clear.

The concluding paragraph should remind the reader of what was argued in the essay and why it matters. It might also suggest solutions or further research that could be done on the topic. Or students can write a call to action that asks the reader to perform an action in regard to the information they’ve just learned.

My students write about local issues and then turn the essays into letters to our superintendent, school board, or state senators. It’s an amazing way to empower kids and to show them that their opinion matters. I’ve written about that here and I’ve included the sentence frames for the letters in my argumentative writing unit.

I hope this gives you a good overview of teaching argument writing. Please leave any questions below. Please also share your ideas, because we all need all the help we can give each other!

And one more thing. Don’t be surprised if parents start asking you to tone down the unit because it’s become harder to tell their kids why they can’t stay up late for parties. 🙂

Stay delicious!

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How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps

Persuasive essay | LEarn how to write a perfect persuasive essay 1 | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

WHAT IS A PERSUASIVE ESSAY?

What is a persuasive essay?

A persuasive text presents a point of view around a topic or theme that is backed by evidence to support it.

The purpose of a persuasive text can be varied.  Maybe you intend to influence someone’s opinion on a specific topic, or you might aim to sell a product or service through an advertisement.

The challenge in writing a good persuasive text is to use a mix of emotive language and, in some cases, images that are supported by hard evidence or other people’s opinions.

In a persuasive essay or argument essay, the student strives to convince the reader of the merits of their opinion or stance on a particular issue. The student must utilise several persuasive techniques to form a coherent and logical argument to convince the reader of a point of view or to take a specific action.

Persuasive essay | persuasive essays | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

PERSUADING PEOPLE REQUIRES A CONSISTENT APPROACH…

Persuasive texts are simple in structure.  You must clearly state your opinion around a specific topic and then repeatedly reinforce your opinions with external facts or evidence.  A robust concluding summary should leave little doubt in the reader’s mind.  ( Please view our planning tool below for a detailed explanation. )

TYPES OF PERSUASIVE TEXT

We cover the broad topic of writing a general persuasive essay in this guide, there are several sub-genres of persuasive texts students will encounter as they progress through school. We have complete guides on these text types, so be sure to click the links and read these in detail if required.

  • Argumentative Essays – These are your structured “Dogs are better pets than Cats” opinion-type essays where your role is to upsell the positive elements of your opinions to your audience whilst also highlighting the negative aspects of any opposing views using a range of persuasive language and techniques.
  • Advertising – Uses persuasive techniques to sell a good or service to potential customers with a call to action.
  • Debating Speeches – A debate is a structured discussion between two teams on a specific topic that a moderator judges and scores. Your role is to state your case, sell your opinions to the audience, and counteract your opposition’s opinions.
  • Opinion Articles, Newspaper Editorials. – Editorials often use more subtle persuasive techniques that blur the lines of factual news reporting and opinions that tell a story with bias. Sometimes they may even have a call to action at the end.
  • Reviews – Reviews exist to inform others about almost any service or product, such as a film, restaurant, or product. Depending on your experiences, you may have firm opinions or not even care that much about recommending it to others. Either way, you will employ various persuasive techniques to communicate your recommendations to your audience.
  • Please note a DISCUSSION essay is not a traditional persuasive text, as even though you are comparing and contrasting elements, the role of the author is to present an unbiased account of both sides so that the reader can make a decision that works best for them. Discussions are often confused as a form of persuasive writing.

A COMPLETE TEACHING UNIT ON PERSUASIVE WRITING SKILLS

Persuasive essay | opinion writing unit 1 | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

Teach your students to produce writing that  PERSUADES  and  INFLUENCES  thinking with this  HUGE  writing guide bundle covering: ⭐ Persuasive Texts / Essays ⭐ Expository Essays⭐ Argumentative Essays⭐ Discussions.

A complete 140 PAGE unit of work on persuasive texts for teachers and students. No preparation is required.

THE STRUCTURE OF A PERSUASIVE ESSAY

Persuasive essay | persuasive essay template | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

1. Introduction

In the introduction, the student will naturally introduce the topic. Controversial issues make for great topics in this writing genre. It’s a cliche in polite society to discourage discussions involving politics, sex, or religion because they can often be very divisive. While these subjects may not be the best topics of conversation for the dinner table at Thanksgiving, they can be perfect when deciding on a topic for persuasive writing. Obviously, the student’s age and abilities should be considered, as well as cultural taboos, when selecting a topic for the essay. But the point holds, the more controversial, the better.

Let’s take a look at some of the critical elements of the introduction when writing a persuasive essay:

Title: Tell your audience what they are reading.

This will often be posed as a question; for example, if the essay is on the merits of a vegetarian lifestyle, it may be called something like: To Eat Meat or Not?

Hook : Provide your audience with a reason to continue reading.

As with any genre of writing, capturing the reader’s interest from the outset is crucial. There are several methods of doing this, known as hooks. Students may open their essays with anecdotes, jokes, quotations, or relevant statistics related to the topic under discussion.

Background: Provide some context to your audience.

In this introductory section, students will provide the reader with some background on the topic. This will place the issue in context and briefly weigh some opinions on the subject.

Thesis statement: Let the audience know your stance.

After surveying the topic in the first part of the introduction, it is now time for the student writer to express their opinion and briefly preview the points they will make later in the essay.

2. Body Paragraphs

The number of paragraphs forming this essay section will depend on the number of points the writer chooses to make to support their opinion. Usually three main points will be sufficient for beginning writers to coordinate. More advanced students can increase the number of paragraphs based on the complexity of their arguments, but the overall structure will largely remain intact.

Be sure to check out our complete guide to writing perfect paragraphs here .

The TEEL acronym is valuable for students to remember how to structure their paragraphs.  Read below for a deeper understanding.

Topic Sentence:

The topic sentence states the central point of the paragraph. This will be one of the reasons supporting the thesis statement made in the introduction.

These sentences will build on the topic sentence by illustrating the point further, often by making it more specific.

These sentences’ purpose is to support the paragraph’s central point by providing supporting evidence and examples. This evidence may be statistics, quotations, or anecdotal evidence.

The final part of the paragraph links back to the initial statement of the topic sentence while also forming a bridge to the next point to be made. This part of the paragraph provides some personal analysis and interpretation of how the student arrived at their conclusions and connects the essay as a cohesive whole.

3. Conclusion

The conclusion weaves together the main points of the persuasive essay. It does not usually introduce new arguments or evidence but instead reviews the arguments made already and restates them by summing them up uniquely. It is important at this stage to tie everything back to the initial thesis statement. This is the writer’s last opportunity to drive home their point, to achieve the essay’s goal, to begin with – persuade the reader of their point of view.

Persuasive essay | 7 top 5 essay writing tips | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

Ending an essay well can be challenging, but it is essential to end strongly, especially for persuasive essays. As with the hooks of the essay’s opening, there are many tried and tested methods of leaving the reader with a strong impression. Encourage students to experiment with different endings, for example, concluding the essay with a quotation that amplifies the thesis statement.

Another method is to have the student rework their ending in simple monosyllabic words, as simple language often has the effect of being more decisive in impact. The effect they are striving for in the final sentence is the closing of the circle.

Several persuasive writing techniques can be used in the conclusion and throughout the essay to amp up the persuasive power of the writing. Let’s take a look at a few.

ETHOS, PATHOS & LOGOS TUTORIAL VIDEO (2:20)

Persuasive essay | RHETORIC | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

TIPS FOR WRITING A GREAT PERSUASIVE ESSAY

Persuasive writing template and graphic organizer

PERSUASIVE TECHNIQUES

In this article, we have outlined a basic structure that will be helpful to students in approaching the organization of their persuasive writing. It will also be helpful for the students to be introduced to a few literary techniques that will help your students to present their ideas convincingly. Here are a few of the more common ones:

Repetition: There is a reason why advertisements and commercials are so repetitive – repetition works! Students can use this knowledge to their advantage in their persuasive writing. It is challenging to get the reader to fully agree with the writer’s opinion if they don’t fully understand it. Saying the same thing in various ways ensures the reader gets many bites at the ‘understanding’ cherry.

Repetition Example: “The use of plastic bags is not only bad for the environment, but it is also bad for our economy. Plastic bags are not biodegradable, meaning they will not decompose and will continue to take up space in landfills. Plastic bags are also not recyclable, meaning they will not be reused and will instead end up in landfills. Plastic bags are not only bad for the environment, but they are also bad for our economy as they are costly to dispose of and take up valuable space in landfills.”

In this example, the phrase “not only bad for the environment but also bad for our economy” is repeated multiple times to reinforce the idea that plastic bags are not just a problem for the environment but also the economy. The repetition of the phrase emphasizes the point and makes it more persuasive.

It is also important to note that repetition could be used differently, such as repeating a word or phrase to create rhythm or emphasis.

Storytelling: Humans tend to understand things better through stories. Think of how we teach kids important values through time-tested fables like Peter and the Wolf . Whether through personal anecdotes or references to third-person experiences, stories help climb down the ladder of abstraction and reach the reader on a human level.

Storytelling Example: “Imagine you are walking down the street, and you come across a stray dog clearly in need of food and water. The dog looks up at you with big, sad eyes, and you cannot help but feel a twinge of compassion. Now, imagine that same scenario, but instead of a stray dog, it’s a homeless person sitting on the sidewalk. The person is clearly in need of food and shelter, and their eyes also look up at her with a sense of hopelessness.

The point of this story is to show that just as we feel compelled to help a stray animal in need, we should also feel compelled to help a homeless person. We should not turn a blind eye to the suffering of our fellow human beings, and we should take action to address homelessness in our community. It is important to remember that everyone deserves a roof over their head and a warm meal to eat. The story is designed to elicit an emotional response in the reader and make the argument more relatable and impactful.

By using storytelling, this passage creates an image in the reader’s mind and creates an emotional connection that can be more persuasive than just stating facts and figures.

Persuasive essay | Images play an integral part in persuading an audience in advertisements | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

Dissent: We live in a cynical age, so leaving out the opposing opinion will smack of avoidance to the reader. Encourage your students to turn to that opposing viewpoint and deal with those arguments in their essays .

Dissent Example: “Many people argue that students should not have to wear uniforms in school. They argue that uniforms stifle creativity and individuality and that students should be able to express themselves through their clothing choices. While these are valid concerns, I strongly disagree.

In fact, uniforms can actually promote individuality by levelling the playing field and removing the pressure to dress in a certain way. Furthermore, uniforms can promote a sense of community and belonging within a school. They can also provide a sense of discipline and structure, which can help to create a more focused and productive learning environment. Additionally, uniforms can save families money and eliminate the stress of deciding what to wear daily .

While some may argue that uniforms stifle creativity and individuality, the benefits of uniforms far outweigh the potential drawbacks. It is important to consider the impact of uniforms on the school as a whole, rather than focusing solely on individual expression.”

In this example, the writer presents the opposing viewpoint (uniforms stifle creativity and individuality) and then provides counterarguments to refute it. By doing so, the writer can strengthen their own argument and present a more convincing case for why uniforms should be worn in school.

A Call to Action: A staple of advertising, a call to action can also be used in persuasive writing. When employed, it usually forms part of the conclusion section of the essay and asks the reader to do something, such as recycle, donate to charity, sign a petition etc.

A quick look around reveals to us the power of persuasion, whether in product advertisements, newspaper editorials, or political electioneering; persuasion is an ever-present element in our daily lives. Logic and reason are essential in persuasion, but they are not the only techniques. The dark arts of persuasion can prey on emotion, greed, and bias. Learning to write persuasively can help our students recognize well-made arguments and help to inoculate them against the more sinister manifestations of persuasion.

Call to Action Example: “Climate change is a pressing issue that affects us all, and it’s important that we take action now to reduce our carbon footprint and protect the planet for future generations. As a society, we have the power to make a difference and it starts with small changes that we can make in our own lives.

I urge you to take the following steps to reduce your carbon footprint:

  • Reduce your use of single-use plastics
  • Use public transportation, carpool, bike or walk instead of driving alone.
  • Support clean energy sources such as solar and wind power
  • Plant trees and support conservation efforts

It’s easy to feel like one person can’t make a difference, but the truth is that every little bit helps. Together, we can create a more sustainable future for ourselves and for the planet.

So, let’s take action today and make a difference for a better future, it starts with minor changes, but it all adds up and can make a significant impact. We need to take responsibility for our actions and do our part to protect the planet.”

In this example, the writer gives a clear and specific call to action and encourages the reader to take action to reduce their carbon footprint and protect the planet. By doing this, the writer empowers the reader to take action and enables them to change.

Now, go persuade your students of the importance of perfecting the art of persuasive writing!

A COMPLETE UNIT ON TEACHING FACT AND OPINION

Persuasive essay | fact and opinion unit 1 | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

This  HUGE 120 PAGE  resource combines four different fact and opinion activities you can undertake as a  WHOLE GROUP  or as  INDEPENDENT READING GROUP TASKS  in either  DIGITAL  or  PRINTABLE TASKS.

20 POPULAR PERSUASIVE ESSAY TOPICS FOR STUDENTS

Writing an effective persuasive essay demonstrates a range of skills that will be of great use in nearly all aspects of life after school.

Persuasive essay | persuasive essays | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

In essence, if you can influence a person to change their ideas or thoughts on a given topic through how you structure your words and thoughts, you possess a very powerful skill.

Be careful not to rant wildly.  Use facts and other people’s ideas who think similarly to you in your essay to strengthen your concepts.

Your biggest challenge in getting started may be choosing a suitable persuasive essay topic.  These 20 topics for a persuasive essay should make this process a little easier.

  • WHY ARE WE FASCINATED WITH CELEBRITIES AND WEALTHY PEOPLE ON TELEVISION AND SOCIAL MEDIA?
  • IS IT RIGHT FOR SCHOOLS TO RAISE MONEY BY SELLING CANDY AND UNHEALTHY FOODS TO STUDENTS?
  • SHOULD GIRLS BE ALLOWED TO PLAY ON BOYS SPORTING TEAMS?
  • IS TEACHING HANDWRITING A WASTE OF TIME IN THIS DAY AND AGE?
  • SHOULD THERE BE FAR GREATER RESTRICTIONS AROUND WHAT CAN BE POSTED ON THE INTERNET?
  • SHOULD PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES HAVE TO TAKE DRUG TESTS?
  • ARE TEENAGE PREGNANCY SHOWS A NEGATIVE OR POSITIVE INFLUENCE ON VIEWERS?
  • SHOULD GAMBLING BE PROMOTED IN ANY WAY IN SPORTS EVEN THOUGH IT BRINGS IN LARGE AMOUNTS OF REVENUE?
  • SHOULD SPORTING TEAMS THAT LOSE BE REWARDED BY RECEIVING INCENTIVES SUCH AS HIGH DRAFT PICKS AND / OR FINANCIAL BENEFITS?
  • SHOULD SHARKS THAT ATTACK PEOPLE BE DESTROYED? SHOULD WE GET INVOLVED IN FOREIGN CONFLICTS AND ISSUES THAT DON’T DIRECTLY AFFECT OUR COUNTRY?
  • SHOULD WE GET INVOLVED IN FOREIGN CONFLICTS AND ISSUES THAT DON’T DIRECTLY AFFECT OUR COUNTRY?
  • COULD VIDEO GAMES BE CONSIDERED AS A PROFESSIONAL SPORT?
  • IF YOU WERE THE LEADER OF YOUR COUNTRY AND HAD A LARGE SURPLUS TO SPEND, WHAT WOULD YOU DO WITH IT?
  • WHEN SHOULD A PERSON BE CONSIDERED AND TREATED AS AN ADULT?
  • SHOULD SMOKING BECOME AN ILLEGAL ACTIVITY?
  • SHOULD THE VOTING AGE BE LOWERED?
  • DOES PROTECTIVE PADDING IN SPORTS MAKE IT MORE DANGEROUS?
  • SHOULD CELL PHONES BE ALLOWED IN THE CLASSROOM?
  • IS TEACHING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE A WASTE OF TIME?
  • SHOULD WE TEACH ETIQUETTE IN SCHOOLS?

PERSUASIVE PROMPTS FOR RELUCTANT WRITERS

If your students need a little more direction and guidance, here are some journal prompts that include aspects to consider.

  • Convince us that students would be better off having a three-day weekend .  There are many angles you could take with this, such as letting children maximize their childhood or trying to convince your audience that a four-day school week might actually be more productive.
  • Which is the best season?  And why?   You will really need to draw on the benefits of your preferred season and sell them to your audience.  Where possible, highlight the negatives of the competing seasons.  Use lots of figurative language and sensory and emotional connections for this topic.
  • Aliens do / or don’t exist?  We can see millions of stars surrounding us just by gazing into the night sky, suggesting alien life should exist, right? Many would argue that if there were aliens we would have seen tangible evidence of them by now.  The only fact is that we just don’t know the answer to this question.  It is your task to try and convince your audience through some research and logic what your point of view is and why.
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory? Do your research on this popular and divisive topic and make your position clear on where you stand and why.  Use plenty of real-world examples to support your thoughts and points of view.  
  • Should Smartphones be banned in schools?   Whilst this would be a complete nightmare for most students’ social lives, maybe it might make schools more productive places for students to focus and learn.  Pick a position, have at least three solid arguments to support your point of view, and sell them to your audience.

VISUAL JOURNAL PROMPTS FOR PERSUASIVE WRITING

Try these engaging, persuasive prompts with your students to ignite the writing process . Scroll through them.

Persuasive writing prompts

Persuasive Essay Examples (Student Writing Samples)

Below are a collection of persuasive essay samples.  Click on the image to enlarge and explore them in greater detail.  Please take a moment to read the persuasive texts in detail and the teacher and student guides highlight some of the critical elements of writing a persuasion.

Please understand these student writing samples are not intended to be perfect examples for each age or grade level but a piece of writing for students and teachers to explore together to critically analyze to improve student writing skills and deepen their understanding of persuasive text writing.

We recommend reading the example either a year above or below, as well as the grade you are currently working with, to gain a broader appreciation of this text type.

Persuasive essay | year 4 persuasive text example 1536x1536 1 | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

VIDEO TUTORIALS FOR PERSUASIVE WRITING

Persuasive essay | persuasive writing tutorial video | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

OTHER GREAT ARTICLES RELATED TO PERSUASIVE ESSAY WRITING

Persuasive essay | LITERACY IDEAS FRONT PAGE 1 | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

Teaching Resources

Use our resources and tools to improve your student’s writing skills through proven teaching strategies.

WHERE CAN I FIND A COMPLETE UNIT OF WORK ON HOW TO WRITE PERSUASIVE ESSAYS?

persuasive writing unit

We pride ourselves on being the web’s best resource for teaching students and teachers how to write a persuasive text. We value the fact you have taken the time to read our comprehensive guides to understand the fundamentals of writing skills.

We also understand some of you just don’t have the luxury of time or the resources to create engaging resources exactly when you need them.

If you are time-poor and looking for an in-depth solution that encompasses all of the concepts outlined in this article, I strongly recommend looking at the “ Writing to Persuade and Influence Unit. ”

Working in partnership with Innovative Teaching Ideas , we confidently recommend this resource as an all-in-one solution to teach how to write persuasively.

This unit will find over 140 pages of engaging and innovative teaching ideas.

PERSUASIVE ESSAY WRITING CHECKLIST AND RUBRIC BUNDLE

writing checklists

The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers

Persuasive essay | PersuasiveWritingSkills | Top 5 Persuasive Writing Techniques for Students | literacyideas.com

Top 5 Persuasive Writing Techniques for Students

Persuasive essay | persuasiveWriting | 5 Top Persuasive Writing Lesson Plans for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

5 Top Persuasive Writing Lesson Plans for Students and Teachers

Persuasive essay | persuasive writing prompts | 23 Persuasive writing Topics for High School students | literacyideas.com

23 Persuasive writing Topics for High School students

Persuasive essay | 1 reading and writing persuasive advertisements | How to Write an Advertisement: A Complete Guide for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

How to Write an Advertisement: A Complete Guide for Students and Teachers

Persuasive essay | how to start an essay 1 | How to Start an Essay with Strong Hooks and Leads | literacyideas.com

How to Start an Essay with Strong Hooks and Leads

The content for this page has been written by Shane Mac Donnchaidh.  A former principal of an international school and English university lecturer with 15 years of teaching and administration experience. Shane’s latest Book, The Complete Guide to Nonfiction Writing , can be found here.  Editing and support for this article have been provided by the literacyideas team.

Save 10% today on your lessons using the code GIVEME10

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Middle School Persuasive Writing Lessons

Learn about three persuasive writing lessons that offer solid instruction while also being engaging to your students.

Finding engaging and rigorous persuasive writing lessons should not be a challenge to find. Unfortunately, not all writing curriculums and activities draw the attention of our students and encourage their engagement. Consequently, the lessons they learn in these classes are not as solid or memorable as they could be.  

From the time we are old enough to talk, persuasion is a skill that we use on a regular basis. As we get older, the stakes become much higher than a simple “Let me have an extra cookie after dinner tonight, please.”  From the everyday discussions with a partner about where to go on vacation to the much more significant ones like convincing a boss to give you a raise, persuasion is a part of all of our lives and a skill that has a tangible and significant impact. 

Making sure our students have a solid foundation in persuasion and these persuasive writing lessons will help set them up for success in the future.

Let’s look at three persuasive writing lessons that offer solid instruction while also being particularly engaging to your students.

Persuasive Writing Lessons

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Persuasive Pitch Assignment

If your students like the TV show Shark Tank or Dragon’s Den , they will love this assignment.  In it, students develop an idea of how to improve their school (e.g., installing recycling bins, creating a snack program, etc.), and then they pitch their idea to the judges (their classmates).  

After watching all the presentations, students will vote on which idea they like best.  This assignment is scaffolded into five different lessons.  The familiar format, as well as the element of competition, encourages students to do their best and helps drive home the curricular lessons on persuasion.

Find the Persuasive Pitch Assignment on Shopify CAD or Teachers Pay Teachers USD .

Teacher Feedback

“My students loved the idea of Dragon’s Den style product pitches to learn persuasive techniques! They had a blast while watching the two show episodes and analyzing the products, as well as creating their own products and pitching them. They created excellent advertisements and came up with great ideas!”

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Persuasive Writing – Michael vs. LeBron

Oftentimes the problem with persuasive writing lessons is that students don’t really care (or care much) about the topic about which they are writing.  This is not the case with this lesson. In it, students practise gathering evidence from a podcast (an oral text) and use that evidence to support their writing.  

After listening to the evidence presented by the podcast, students must decide who is the greatest basketball player of all time – LeBron James or Michael Jordan. By grabbing your students’ attention with a topic they are interested in and one that may be rather unexpected in the language arts classroom, you help students be excited and want to learn more about effective persuasive writing.

Find the Michael vs. LeBron Persuasive Writing lesson on Shopify CAD or Teachers Pay Teachers USD .

“Loved this persuasive writing unit so much! I have quite a few basketball fans in the class and so it was quite the hit. Thanks!”

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Rant Writing Unit

Rant writing is an engaging way to bring public speaking and persuasive writing into the classroom.  Students rant and complain to each other daily – why not channel that creative energy into some high-quality writing? By utilizing things that students are already engaged with and encouraging students to share their thoughts and opinions, this unit is an effective way to teach persuasive writing.

Whether you choose to use these lessons or something else, the importance of a solid foundation in persuasion cannot be overstated. Helping students remember the lessons they learn in your class going forward and throughout their lives sets them up for future success.

You can grab this Rant Writing Unit for free here .

“My communications class absolutely loved this activity and even asked at the end to do it again!! It was very engaging.”

Additional Resources

  • Middle School Writing Lessons
  • Creative Writing Lesson Plans

Related Posts

writing a persuasive essay middle school

This FREE persuasive writing unit is

  • Perfect for engaging students in public speaking and persuasive writing
  • Time and energy saving
  • Ideal for in-person or online learning

By using highly-engaging rants, your students won’t even realize you’ve channeled their daily rants and complaints into high-quality, writing!

FREE persuasive writing unit is

  • Chess (Gr. 1-4)
  • TV (Gr. 1-4)
  • Metal Detectors (Gr. 2-6)
  • Tetris (Gr. 2-6)
  • Seat Belts (Gr. 2-6)
  • The Coliseum (Gr. 2-6)
  • The Pony Express (Gr. 2-6)
  • Wintertime (Gr. 2-6)
  • Reading (Gr. 3-7)
  • Black Friday (Gr. 3-7)
  • Hummingbirds (Gr. 3-7)
  • Worst Game Ever? (Gr. 4-8)
  • Carnivorous Plants (Gr. 4-8)
  • Google (Gr. 4-8)
  • Honey Badgers (Gr. 4-8)
  • Hyperinflation (Gr. 4-8)
  • Koko (Gr. 4-8)
  • Mongooses (Gr. 5-9)
  • Trampolines (Gr. 5-9)
  • Garbage (Gr. 5-9)
  • Maginot Line (Gr. 5-9)
  • Asian Carp (Gr. 5-9)
  • Tale of Two Countries (Gr. 6-10)
  • Kevlar (Gr. 7-10)
  • Tigers (Gr. 7-11)
  • Statue of Liberty (Gr. 8-10)
  • Submarines (Gr. 8-12)
  • Castles (Gr. 9-13)
  • Gutenberg (Gr. 9-13)
  • Author's Purpose Practice 1
  • Author's Purpose Practice 2
  • Author's Purpose Practice 3
  • Fact and Opinion Practice 1
  • Fact and Opinion Practice 2
  • Fact and Opinion Practice 3
  • Idioms Practice Test 1
  • Idioms Practice Test 2
  • Figurative Language Practice 1
  • Figurative Language Practice 2
  • Figurative Language Practice 3
  • Figurative Language Practice 4
  • Figurative Language Practice 5
  • Figurative Language Practice 6
  • Figurative Language Practice 7
  • Figurative Language Practice 8
  • Figurative Language Practice 9
  • Figurative Language of Edgar Allan Poe
  • Figurative Language of O. Henry
  • Figurative Language of Shakespeare
  • Genre Practice 1
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84 comments.

Thank you so much. This has truly helped me in my exams and throughout the beneficial journey of my school year.

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How will I be able to check my work, when I print it out to work on them? Where are the answers?

I guess it depends on what you are working on. On what are you working?

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Ummm the pdf version is not working…is the link still valid?

Which link?

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Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge and your work with us. As teachers, we are always in need of fresh material. I teach college level creative writing classes, and your worksheets help my students. Sometimes I change the essay topics to fit their particular age group or interest, but having these examples laid out for us and made available for use in our classrooms is wonderful.

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Thank you for these great step by step resources

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Despite all the negative comments above, you should keep up for the ones (like me) who are absolutely grateful for these material.

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I give your comment 0 stars because your position lacks support or evidence of any kind. Complete some of these worksheets and begin your argument again.

that’s stupid from where do u get the worksheets

I wrote them.

I did not see any activities that required the student to write an entire essay.

https://www.ereadingworksheets.com/writing/persuasive-essay-topics/

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Developing Evidence-Based Arguments from Texts

Developing Evidence-Based Arguments from Texts

About this Strategy Guide

This guide provides teachers with strategies for helping students understand the differences between persuasive writing and evidence-based argumentation. Students become familiar with the basic components of an argument and then develop their understanding by analyzing evidence-based arguments about texts. Students then generate evidence-based arguments of texts using a variety of resources. Links to related resources and additional classroom strategies are also provided.

Research Basis

Strategy in practice, related resources.

Hillocks (2010) contends that argument is “at the heart of critical thinking and academic discourse, the kind of writing students need to know for success in college” (p. 25). He points out that “many teachers begin to teach some version of argument with the writing of a thesis statement, [but] in reality, good argument begins with looking at the data that are likely to become the evidence in an argument and that give rise to a thesis statement or major claim” (p. 26).  Students need an understanding of the components of argument and the process through which careful examination of textual evidence becomes the beginnings of a claim about text.

  • Begin by helping students understand the differences between persuasive writing and evidence-based argumentation: persuasion and argument share the goal of asserting a claim and trying to convince a reader or audience of its validity, but persuasion relies on a broader range of possible support. While argumentation tends to focus on logic supported by verifiable examples and facts, persuasion can use unverifiable personal anecdotes and a more apparent emotional appeal to make its case. Additionally, in persuasion, the claim usually comes first; then the persuader builds a case to convince a particular audience to think or feel the same way. Evidence-based argument builds the case for its claim out of available evidence. Solid understanding of the material at hand, therefore, is necessary in order to argue effectively. This printable resource provides further examples of the differences between persuasive and argumentative writing.
  • One way to help students see this distinction is to offer a topic and two stances on it: one persuasive and one argumentative. Trying to convince your friend to see a particular movie with you is likely persuasion. Sure, you may use some evidence from the movie to back up your claim, but you may also threaten to get upset with him or her if he or she refuses—or you may offer to buy the popcorn if he or she agrees to go. Making the argument for why a movie is better (or worse) than the book it’s based on would be more argumentative, relying on analysis of examples from both works to build a case. Consider using resources from the ReadWriteThink lesson plan Argument, Persuasion, or Propaganda: Analyzing World War II Posters
  • The claim (that typically answers the question: “What do I think?”)
  • The reasons (that typically answer the question: “Why do I think this?”)
  • The evidence (that typically answers the question: “How do I know this is the case?”).
  • Deepen students’ understanding of the components of argument by analyzing evidence-based arguments about texts. Project, for example, this essay on Gertrude in Hamlet and ask students to identify the claim, reasons, and evidence. Ask students to clarify what makes this kind of text an argument as opposed to persuasion. What might a persuasive take on the character of Gertrude sound like? (You may also wish to point out the absence of a counterargument in this example. Challenge students to offer one.)
  • Point out that even though the claim comes first in the sample essay, the writer of the essay likely did not start there. Rather, he or she arrived at the claim as a result of careful reading of and thinking about the text. Share with students that evidence-based writing about texts always begins with close reading. See Close Reading of Literary Texts strategy guide for additional information.
  • Guide students through the process of generating an evidence-based argument of a text by using the Designing an Evidence-based Argument Handout. Decide on an area of focus (such as the development of a particular character) and using a short text, jot down details or phrases related to that focus in the first space on the chart. After reading and some time for discussion of the character, have students look at the evidence and notice any patterns. Record these in the second space. Work with the students to narrow the patterns to a manageable list and re-read the text, this time looking for more instances of the pattern that you may have missed before you were looking for it. Add these references to the list.
  • Use the evidence and patterns to formulate a claim in the last box. Point out to students that most texts can support multiple (sometimes even competing) claims, so they are not looking for the “one right thing” to say about the text, but they should strive to say something that has plenty of evidence to support it, but is not immediately self-evident. Claims can also be more or less complex, such as an outright claim (The character is X trait) as opposed to a complex claim (Although the character is X trait, he is also Y trait). For examples of development of a claim (a thesis is a type of claim), see the Developing a Thesis Handout for additional guidance on this point.
  • Modeling Academic Writing Through Scholarly Article Presentations
  • And I Quote
  • Have students use the Evidence-Based Argument Checklist to revise and strengthen their writing.

More Ideas to Try

  • This Strategy Guide focuses on making claims about text, with a focus on literary interpretation. The basic tenets of the guide, however, can apply to argumentation in multiple disciplines—e.g., a response to a Document-Based Question in social science, a lab report in science.
  • For every argumentative claim that students develop for a text, have them try writing a persuasive claim about the text to continue building an understanding of their difference.
  • After students have drafted an evidence-based argument, ask them to choose an alternative claim or a counterclaim to be sure their original claim is argumentative.
  • Have students use the Evidence-Based Argument checklist to offer feedback to one another.
  • Lesson Plans
  • Professional Library
  • Student Interactives
  • Strategy Guides

Students prepare an already published scholarly article for presentation, with an emphasis on identification of the author's thesis and argument structure.

While drafting a literary analysis essay (or another type of argument) of their own, students work in pairs to investigate advice for writing conclusions and to analyze conclusions of sample essays. They then draft two conclusions for their essay, select one, and reflect on what they have learned through the process.

The Essay Map is an interactive graphic organizer that enables students to organize and outline their ideas for an informational, definitional, or descriptive essay.

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94 Excellent Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School 

December 4, 2023 //  by  Brittany Ray

Middle schoolers are always ready for a feisty debate and to argue their points! This list of excellent argumentative essay topics for middle school is sure to give your students the practice they need in getting their arguments down on paper, in a persuasive way. With a variety of topics ranging from whether or not to outlaw animal testing to debating a 3-day weekend, this curated collection will give your kiddos lots of fun choices to explore! Take a look and see which topics are sure to spark some interest in your classroom!

School Rules and Policies

1. should cell phones be allowed at school.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

2. Should gym class (physical education) be a requirement?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

3. Explain why or why not: Should students have homework on weekends?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

4. Should the school day be extended in exchange for a long weekend?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

5. Do you feel the government should dictate what you get for school lunch?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

6. Do you believe brick-and-mortar schools are still necessary for today’s post-pandemic society?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

7. Is the student-per-class limit too high?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

8. Should high school students be required to take a civics exam before graduation?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

9. Should school security be improved?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

10. Should students be allowed to use smartwatches during examinations?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

11. Should there be a limit to the amount of homework a school can assign to students?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

12. Is the traditional grading system effective, or does it need an overhaul?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

13. Should schools offer more extracurricular activities to cater to diverse interests?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

14. Do schools place too much emphasis on sports and athletes at the expense of academic pursuits?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

15. Explain your stance as to whether schools should or should not require students to wear uniforms.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

16. Do you believe that school field trips are beneficial or merely recreational?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

17. Should students be required to learn a second language starting in middle school?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

18. Should the government have the ability to ban certain books in the classroom?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

19. Should school cafeterias serve exclusively vegetarian meals to promote health?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

20. Should schools have mandatory classes on financial literacy?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

21. Should schools have strict policies against cyberbullying?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

22. Should schools have mandatory mental health classes and counseling sessions?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

23. Should students be allowed to grade their teachers?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

24. Should schools have mindfulness and meditation sessions as part of the daily routine?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

25. Should schools emphasize more on teaching critical thinking skills rather than just memorizing things?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

26. Should there be more emphasis on vocational training in middle school?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

27. Should students be taught the dangers of misinformation and “fake news” as part of their curriculum?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

28. Should schools introduce mandatory community service as part of the curriculum?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

29. Should schools allow students to bring their pets to school?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

30. Should schools be allowed to monitor students’ online activities?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

31. Should education about global warming and environmental conservation be a mandatory part of the curriculum?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

32. Should schools introduce more practical skills courses like basic cooking, sewing, or home repair?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

33. Do school dress codes infringe on personal expression?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

34. Should middle school students be allowed to bring and use laptops in class?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

35. Is homeschooling a better option than traditional schooling for some students?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

36. Is learning to write in cursive still a necessary skill in the digital age?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

37. Should school libraries invest in more digital resources or in physical books?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

38. Should students be taught about controversial historical figures objectively or with a critical lens?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

39. Should students have a more significant say in the creation of school rules and policies?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

40. Do schools focus too much on college preparation at the expense of life skills?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

41. Should parents be held more accountable for their children’s misbehavior at school?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

42. Are parent-teacher conferences still effective or have they become outdated?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

43. Should middle schools have later start times to accommodate adolescent sleep patterns?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

College Admission and Tuition 

44. should excellent grades guarantee a scholarship.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

45. Should a college degree earned through online education have the same worth as a degree earned at a brick-and-mortar university?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

46. Do you feel art courses should be a required part of earning a college degree?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

47. Should college admission criteria be less stringent?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

48. Should college athletes be paid?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

49. Do you believe that a college education is necessary for everyone?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

50. Should public education at the college level be tuition-free?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Health and Wellbeing

51. do parents put too much pressure on their children to excel academically.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

52. Should cigarettes be illegal?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

53. Should employers have the right to require a Covid-19 vaccine?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

54. Is milk beneficial to a person’s health?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

55. Are hot dogs bad for you?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

56. Do you agree or disagree that parents should be held responsible for childhood obesity?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

57. Should the FDA allow GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) in our food?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

58. Does the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) do a good job of regulating the production of food?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

59. Should junk food advertisements be banned during children’s TV shows?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

60. Should students be allowed to take “mental health days” off from school?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Government, Politics, and Civic Responsibilities

61. do you think electronic voting machines make the election procedure fair or unfair.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

62. Explain whether or not the Electoral College should be eliminated.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

63. Should the government have more say in what is or is not “fake news”?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

64. Should a felon have the right to vote?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

65. Should all political offices have term limits?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

66. Should the voting age be lowered?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

67. The moral stain of the slavery of African American people in early American History is undoubtedly present. Do you feel the government promotes hate or love with the way it currently speaks about racism?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

68. Should the minimum wage be raised to $15 an hour?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

69. Should the government have more strict gun control policies?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

70. With the separation of church and state, should churches be exempt from paying taxes?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

71. Do you feel undocumented immigrants should be granted all the same rights as naturalized citizens?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

72. Have Native American communities been given proper reparations for the United States’ long history of seizing land?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

73. Do you think that the government should do more to fight against human trafficking?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Environmental and Moral Issues

74. is climate change something we can truly make a difference with.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

75. If protecting the environment is of utmost importance, should bottled water be banned?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

76. Should exotic animals be kept in captivity?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

77. Explain your stance on whether wind farms are a good or bad idea.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

78. Do “participation trophies” diminish the value of real achievement?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

79. Should there be harsher punishments for bullying?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

80. Explain whether or not animal testing should be outlawed.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

81. Should the death penalty exist?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

82. Should an individual be able to keep wild animals as pets if they have the means to care for them?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

83. Do curfews for teenagers prevent them from getting in trouble or infringe on personal freedom?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

84. Is scientific research on cloning DNA ethical?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

85. Is daylight saving something the U.S. should keep, or should it be abolished?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

86. Should schools ban single-use plastics?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Digital and Media

87. do children currently have too much screen time, and is it harmful.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

88. Do you believe that the media and/or social media negatively impact body image among teens?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

89. Do social media platforms need stricter age verification processes?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

90. Should parents have access to their children’s social media accounts for monitoring purposes?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

91. Should parents limit the time their children spend on video games?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

92. Should violent video games be banned in the United States?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

93. Do violent cartoons and animations impact a child’s behavior negatively?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

94. Do video games have educational potential or are they merely distractions?

writing a persuasive essay middle school

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by Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.  

A Plethora Of Writing Examples For Middle School (& High School)

October 14, 2014 in  Pedagogy

Middle School Writing Samples

When I started my first job as a professional newspaper reporter (This job also served as an internship during my junior year in college — I just didn’t leave for about 6 years.), I quickly realized that all my experience, and all my years of journalism education had not been enough to help me write stories about drug busts, fatal car accidents and tornadoes. All the theoretical work I’d done, and all of the nifty little scholastic and collegiate stories I had done, did not prepare me for real world writing.

At that point, I had to find a solution quickly. After all, I had a deadline to meet, and it was only a few hours away.

One of my colleagues, who also served as a mentor, had the solution. She introduced me to the newspaper’s “morgue.” This was a room filled with filing cabinets in which we kept old — dead — stories arranged by reporter. Whenever I wasn’t’ sure how to write a story, all I had to do was check the morgue for similar stories. If I needed to write a story about a local drug bust, for example, I’d find another story on a similar incident, study its structure, and mentally create a formula in which to plugin the information I’d gathered.

Once I’d gained more experience, and had internalized the formula for that particular type of story, I felt free to branch out as the situation — and my training — warranted.

I do the same thing when I want to write a type of letter, brochure, or report that I’ve never written before.

This is what writing looks like in the real world.

Of course, if you’re a new teacher like me, there is one problem with providing mentor texts to my students: I have a dearth of middle school level writing sitting around in my file cabinets.

Fortunately, the Internet is full of sources, so I scoured the bowels of Google to find examples. I know how busy you are, so I’m sharing.

Expository writing examples for middle school

Below are several sources of expository writing samples for middle school students.

  • The Write Source Expository Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Expository Essay Models

Finally, here is an article in the New York Times that will help you teach your students  real-world expository writing skills .

Descriptive writing examples for middle school

  • Descriptive Writing Samples from Novels
  • Milwaukee Public Schools Descriptive Essay Samples (p. 137)
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Descriptive Essay Models

Narrative writing examples for middle school

  • Writing Samples by Steve Peha (PDF)
  • The Write Source Narrative Writing Samples
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Ideas and Organization)
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Sentence Fluency and Conventions)
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Voice and Word Choice)
  • Oregon Department of Education High School Scored Narrative and Argumentative Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Narrative Essay Models

Argumentative/persuasive writing examples for middle school

  • The Write Source Persuasive Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Persuasive Essay Models

Reflective writing examples for middle school

  • Reflective essay examples from Lake Washington Girls Middle School

If you know of any other online writing example sources, please feel free to share them in the comments below.

Related topics: Argumentative Writing , Informative Writing , Mentor Texts , Narrative Writing

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About the author 

Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.

I am a secondary English Language Arts teacher, a University of Oklahoma student working on my doctorate in Instructional Leadership and Academic Curriculum with an concentration in English Education and co-Editor of the Oklahoma English Journal. I am constantly seeking ways to amplify students' voices and choices.

This is very, very helpful. Thank you for sharing!

As a new middle school teacher (coming from elementary) this was very helpful and encouraging.

Thank you very much for letting me know. I’m glad that I was able to help you!

Thank you! I’m glad I can help.

Your welcome

This is super helpful. Thank you!

These links are a fantastic help. Thank you!

This helped me BUNCHES! Thanks so much!

thanks so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! XD

These links are now dead 🙁

Thank you for notifying me! I have updated the post to include new (live!) links. Some of them are geared towards high school, but I think we can still use them as exemplars of what we want our students to aim for.

Comments are closed.

writing a persuasive essay middle school

Key Takeaways:

  • For middle school students, acquiring the critical-thinking and communication skills they need to evaluate both sides of a debate and write persuasive essays isn’t always easy.
  • With Junior Scholastic ’s free Social Studies Debate Kit, learning how to debate and craft an effective argument essay will be an exciting and inspiring experience for your students.
  • Featuring teacher-approved stories, middle school teaching resources, and engaging activities, Junior Scholastic makes teaching your students the essential skills they need for success not only fun, but easy too!

Looking for a fun, yet effective, way to teach your students the art of debating and how to craft the perfect argument essay? With this free Social Studies Debate Kit from Junior Scholastic , you’ll help your students acquire the essential critical-thinking and communication skills they need to ensure their success inside and outside the classroom. Featuring teacher-approved articles, free middle school teaching resources, and engaging activities, Junior Scholastic is the perfect teaching tool for helping middle school students evaluate both sides of a debate and write a powerful and persuasive essay.

Try print and digital resources from Junior Scholastic , the social studies magazine for grades 6–8, for free in your classroom!

A Reheated Argument

The argument surrounding the food dished out to your students has certainly been heated over the years. In our story, “ Food Fight! ,” your teens will learn how the debate has been reheated after the government recently changed school lunch requirements. With engaging infographics, informative photos showing school lunches from around the world, and a “Pick a Side” persuasive writing activity, this lesson is the perfect way to kick off debate season in your classroom.

Tossing a Ball vs. Saving Lives

“Someone who tosses a ball shouldn’t earn 700 times as much as someone who saves lives.”

In this lesson, we present students two compelling arguments related to how much professional athletes earn . Of course, after reading the article your students will have to choose a side and back up their own arguments on why or why not they believe pro athletes are overpaid. Follow our step-by-step lesson plan, including close-reading questions and differentiation tips. Then extend the lesson with our “What’s Your Opinion?” writing activity.

In our story, “ Should We Try to Send Humans to Mars? ,” your students will have to decide whether sending humans to Mars will help us learn more about Earth or if it’s just a waste of time and money. With compelling arguments on both sides, an informative video, an “Analyzing Authors’ Claims” activity, and more, your students will have all the supporting evidence they need to craft a persuasive and informed response that could alter the future of space exploration.

Staying on Track

Privacy is always a hot topic for debate. With this engaging story and lesson , your students will take on tracking apps that allow parents to follow their teens’ movements in real time. Is it a matter of safety? Or are kids unwillingly giving up their right to privacy? Follow our step-by-step lesson plan and accompanying teaching resources to help your students decide where to draw the line when it comes to privacy. 

Try Junior Scholastic for Free

Once your students master the art of debating and writing argument essays, you’ll know why so many teachers use Junior Scholastic in their middle school classrooms. With each issue, we help create learning excitement about curricular topics from history to civics, geography, science, social-emotional learning, and more. Plus, every issue comes with flexible, timesaving print and digital teaching tools to help you meet your instructional goals. Try Junior Scholastic in your classroom and make history relevant to today’s teens. Start a FREE 30-Day Trial !

100 Persuasive Essay Topics

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

Persuasive essays are a bit like argument essays and persuasive speeches , but they tend to be a little kinder and gentler. Argument essays require you to discuss and to attack an alternate view, while persuasive essays are attempts to convince the reader that you have a believable argument. In other words, you are an advocate, not an adversary.

A Persuasive Essay Has 3 Components

  • Introduction : This is the opening paragraph of your essay. It contains the hook, which is used to grab the reader's attention, and the thesis, or argument, which you'll explain in the next section.
  • Body : This is the heart of your essay, usually three to five paragraphs in length. Each paragraph examines one theme or issue used to support your thesis.
  • Conclusion : This is the final paragraph of your essay. In it, you'll sum up the main points of the body and connect them to your thesis. Persuasive essays often use the conclusion as a last appeal to the audience.

Learning how to write a persuasive essay is an essential skill that people use every day in fields from business to law to media and entertainment. English students can begin writing a persuasive essay at any skill level. You're sure to find a sample topic or two from the list of 100 persuasive essays below, sorted by degree of difficulty.

Watch Now: 12 Ideas for Great Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Kids should get paid for good grades.
  • Students should have less homework.
  • Snow days are great for family time.
  • Penmanship is important.
  • Short hair is better than long hair.
  • We should all grow our own vegetables.
  • We need more holidays.
  • Aliens probably exist.
  • Gym class is more important than music class.
  • Kids should be able to vote.
  • Kids should get paid for extra activities like sports.
  • School should take place in the evenings.
  • Country life is better than city life.
  • City life is better than country life.
  • We can change the world.
  • Skateboard helmets should be mandatory.
  • We should provide food for the poor.
  • Children should be paid for doing chores.
  • We should populate the moon .
  • Dogs make better pets than cats.

Intermediate

  • The government should impose household trash limits.
  • Nuclear weapons are an effective deterrent against foreign attack.
  • Teens should be required to take parenting classes.
  • We should teach etiquette in schools.
  • School uniform laws are unconstitutional.
  • All students should wear uniforms.
  • Too much money is a bad thing.
  • High schools should offer specialized degrees in arts or sciences.
  • Magazine advertisements send unhealthy signals to young women.
  • Robocalling should be outlawed.
  • Age 12 is too young to babysit.
  • Children should be required to read more.
  • All students should be given the opportunity to study abroad.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory past age 65.
  • Cell phones should never be used while driving.
  • All schools should implement bullying awareness programs.
  • Bullies should be kicked out of school.
  • Parents of bullies should have to pay a fine.
  • The school year should be longer.
  • School days should start later.
  • Teens should be able to choose their bedtime.
  • There should be a mandatory entrance exam for high school.
  • Public transit should be privatized.
  • We should allow pets in school.
  • The voting age should be lowered to 16.
  • Beauty contests are bad for body image.
  • Every American should learn to speak Spanish.
  • Every immigrant should learn to speak English.
  • Video games can be educational.
  • College athletes should be paid for their services.
  • We need a military draft .
  • Professional sports should eliminate cheerleaders.
  • Teens should be able to start driving at 14 instead of 16.
  • Year-round school is a bad idea.
  • High school campuses should be guarded by police officers.
  • The legal drinking age should be lowered to 19.
  • Kids under 15 shouldn't have Facebook pages.
  • Standardized testing should be eliminated.
  • Teachers should be paid more.
  • There should be one world currency.
  • Domestic surveillance without a warrant should be legal.
  • Letter grades should be replaced with a pass or fail.
  • Every family should have a natural disaster survival plan.
  • Parents should talk to kids about drugs at a young age.
  • Racial slurs should be illegal.
  • Gun ownership should be tightly regulated.
  • Puerto Rico should be granted statehood.
  • People should go to jail when they abandon their pets.
  • Free speech should have limitations.
  • Members of Congress should be subject to term limits.
  • Recycling should be mandatory for everyone.
  • High-speed internet access should be regulated like a public utility.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory for the first five years after getting a license.
  • Recreational marijuana should be made legal nationwide.
  • Legal marijuana should be taxed and regulated like tobacco or alcohol.
  • Child support dodgers should go to jail.
  • Students should be allowed to pray in school.
  • All Americans have a constitutional right to health care.
  • Internet access should be free for everyone.
  • Social Security should be privatized.
  • Pregnant couples should receive parenting lessons.
  • We shouldn't use products made from animals.
  • Celebrities should have more privacy rights.
  • Professional football is too violent and should be banned.
  • We need better sex education in schools.
  • School testing is not effective.
  • The United States should build a border wall with Mexico and with Canada.
  • Life is better than it was 50 years ago.
  • Eating meat is unethical.
  • A vegan diet is the only diet people should follow.
  • Medical testing on animals should be illegal.
  • The Electoral College is outdated.
  • Medical testing on animals is necessary.
  • Public safety is more important than an individual's right to privacy.
  • Single-sex colleges provide a better education.
  • Books should never be banned.
  • Violent video games can cause people to act violently in real life.
  • Freedom of religion has limitations.
  • Nuclear power should be illegal.
  • Climate change should be the president's primary political concern.
  • Arizona State University Writing Center staff. " Persuasive Essay Structure ." ASU.edu, June 2012.
  • Collins, Jen, and Polak, Adam. " Persuasive Essays ." Hamilton.edu.
  • 100 Persuasive Speech Topics for Students
  • Middle School Debate Topics
  • 50 Argumentative Essay Topics
  • 40 Writing Topics for Argumentative and Persuasive Essays
  • How to Write a Solid Thesis Statement
  • Controversial Speech Topics
  • How to Write a Persuasive Essay
  • Tips on How to Write an Argumentative Essay
  • The Ultimate Guide to the 5-Paragraph Essay
  • 30 Writing Topics: Persuasion
  • Write a Compare and Contrast Essay
  • Write an Attention-Grabbing Opening Sentence for an Essay
  • How to Write a Great Essay for the TOEFL or TOEIC
  • What Is Expository Writing?
  • Bad Essay Topics for College Admissions
  • How to Write a Narrative Essay or Speech

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Chariho Middle School Library: Persuasive Writing

  • Welcome to the library
  • Citing Sources
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  • Early Agriculture/ Rise of Civilizations /Empires of Mesopotamia
  • Earthquakes, Volcanoes & Tsunamis
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  • Holes Related Research
  • Lightbox eBook/multimedia
  • Mr. Vincent's Research Project
  • Persuasive Writing
  • Sayer Research
  • Spanish/Latin Cuisine
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  • Atlantic Salmon
  • Argument Writing
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  • Charles Dickens
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  • Middle Ages Roles and LIfestyle
  • Piping Plover
  • Renaissance - Creating the Ideal Renaissance Person
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  • Aztec, Incan, and Mayan Civilizations
  • Healthy Lifestyle
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  • Destiny Discover

Techniques/Advice for Persuasive Writng

  • EBSCO/Explora article: A Bare Bones Guide to Persuasive Writing The article presents information on persuasive writing. In this case, the writer take a position on an issue and convince the audience or the reader about his position. The art of persuasion is more like the art of debate. One can begin by stating one's opinion and then present evidence to support it. The author also offers eight techniques to become an effective persuasive writer.
  • EBSCO/Explora article: How Advertisers Persuade Discusses the art of persuasive writing used in advertising. Writing testimonials; Stories in slice-of-life advertisements; Demonstration as a advertising technique.
  • Persuasive Words and Phrases Here are some words and phrases that may come in handy for a persuasive essay.

Pro/Con Argument Resources

  • Teachers Info on Classrooms Joining Newsela
  • Pro/Con Argument Resources Newsela These resources can be used if your teacher has joined Newsela.
  • Website - Pro/Con.org This site has many topics and facts for both sides of many issues. Topics will need to be approved by teacher. The reading level will be challenging.
  • Database - Points of View Reference Center The reading level will be high for sixth grade and topics will need to be approved by the teacher.

Persuasive Writing Examples

writing a persuasive essay middle school

  • Samples of Persuasive Writing This site has very short examples of persuasive writing.
  • Student Model - Persuasive Writing - Cell Phone Use When Driving This is an example of a persuasive essay by a student.
  • Student Model - Persuasive Writing - Length of Summer Vacation This is a persuasive essay on the school calendar.
  • 5/6 Persuasive Writing Examples This page has examples of persuasive writing on students under 13 having cell phones and one about cats.
  • Newsela - Opinion Bottled water hurts the Earth; tap water is cheap and healthy too Are you for or against bottled water? Your teacher will need to join Newsela so you can see this article.
  • Newsela - Opinion - The Athlete as Agent of Change This opinion piece addresses athletes making political protests. Your teacher will need to join Newsela for you to read this article.
  • Newsela - Opinon -Disney embraces culturally aware and diverse casting in "Moana" This article discusses casting actors to match the background of the character they play. Your teacher will need to join Newsela for you to read the article.
  • Newsela - Opinon -Women in the football booth is a long time coming This article discusses the role of woman in sports broadcasting. Your teacher will need to join Newsela for you to be able to read this article.
  • Newsela - Opinion -Sharks need protection from people before it's too late This piece argues for the protection of sharks. Your teacher will need to join Newsela for you to read this article.
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  • Last Updated: Feb 1, 2024 1:01 PM
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Persuasive Essay Guide

Persuasive Essay Examples

Caleb S.

30+ Free Persuasive Essay Examples To Get You Started

Published on: Jul 25, 2018

Last updated on: Nov 22, 2023

persuasive essay examples

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Are you looking to improve your persuasive writing skills?

One of the best ways to do that is by reading persuasive essay examples. These examples can show you how to structure your arguments effectively.

But finding good examples can be a challenge. Don't worry, though – we've gathered some helpful persuasive essays for you right here!

So, if you're in search of persuasive essay examples to help you write your own, you're in the right place. 

Keep reading this blog to explore various examples

On This Page On This Page -->

Persuasive Essay Examples For Students

A persuasive essay aims to convince the reader of the author’s point of view. 

To find the right path for your essay, it's helpful to go through some examples. Similarly, good essay examples also help to avoid any potential pitfalls and offer clear information to the readers to adopt. 

Here are some persuasive essay examples pdf:

3rd-grade Persuasive Essay Example

4th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Example 5th-grade pdf

Persuasive Essay Examples for 6th Grade pdf

7th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

8th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Examples Grade 10

11th-grade Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Writing Example For Kids

Persuasive Essay Examples High School

The following are good persuasive essay examples for high school. Having a look at them will help you understand better.

High-school Persuasive Essay Example

Examples of Persuasive Essay in Everyday Life

Persuasive Essay Examples for Middle School

Check out these persuasive essay examples for middle school to get a comprehensive idea of the format structure. 

Persuasive Essay Examples Middle School

Short Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Examples for College Students

Essay writing at the college level becomes more difficult and complicated. We have provided you with top-notch college persuasive and argumentative essay examples here.

Read them to understand the essay writing process easily. 

Persuasive Essay Examples College

Higher English Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay About Smoking

Argumentative and Persuasive Examples

Persuasive Essay Examples For University

It becomes even more challenging to draft a perfect essay at the university level. Have a look at the below examples of a persuasive essay to get an idea of writing one.

University Persuasive Essay Example

5 Paragraph Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Examples for Different Formats

A persuasive essay can be written in several formats. For instance, you can write the usual 5-paragraph essay, or even something longer or shorter.

Below are a few sample essays in various common formats.

Persuasive Essay Examples 5 Paragraph

Persuasive Essay Examples 3 Paragraph

Short Persuasive Essay Examples

These examples tell you how to remain convincing and persuasive regardless of the essay format you use.

Persuasive Essay Outline Examples

Creating an impressive outline is the most important step for writing a persuasive essay. It helps to organize thoughts and make the writing process easier.

 A standard outline consists of the following sections.

  • Introduction
  • Body Paragraphs

Have a look at the following persuasive essay outline template examples.

Persuasive Essay Outline

Persuasive Essay Template

Persuasive Essay Format Example

A persuasive essay outline is bound to follow a specific format and structure. The main elements of a persuasive essay format are as follows.

  • Font: Times New Roman, Georgia, or Arial
  • Font Size: 16pt for the headlines and 12pt for the rest of the text
  • Alignment: Justified
  • Spacing: Double spacing
  • Word Count: It usually contains 500 to 2000 words

How to Write A Persuasive Essay With Examples

Planning an essay before starting writing is essential to produce an organized and structured writing piece. So, it is better to understand the concept beforehand to impress your instructor.  

The below example will show a good starting to an essay.

A Good Start for a Persuasive Essay - Short Example

How to Start a Persuasive Essay Examples

The introduction is the first part of an essay and your first chance to grab the reader's attention. It should clearly state the essay's purpose and give the reader a clear idea of what to expect.

A compelling persuasive essay introduction must have the following elements.

  • Hook statement + topic
  • A strong thesis statement
  • Your arguments

Here are some examples of persuasive essay introductions to help you make a compelling start:

Introduction Persuasive Essay Example

Persuasive Essay Thesis Statement Examples

Persuasive Essay Hook Examples

How to End a Persuasive Essay Examples

Just like the introduction, the conclusion of the persuasive essay is equally important. It is considered as the last impression of your writing piece to the audience.

A good conclusion paragraph must include the following aspects.

  • Restate the thesis statement or hypothesis
  • Summarize the key arguments
  • Avoid being obvious
  • Include a call to action

Have a look at the document to explore the sample conclusions of a persuasive essay.

Conclusion Persuasive Essay Examples

Catchy Persuasive Essay Topics

Now that you have read some good examples, it's time to write your own persuasive essay.

But what should you write about? You can write persuasive essays about any topic, from business and online education to controversial topics like abortion , gun control , and more.

Here is a list of ten persuasive essay topics that you can use to grab your reader's attention and make them think:

  • Should the government increase taxes to fund public health initiatives?
  • Is the current education system effective in preparing students for college and the workplace?
  • Should there be tighter gun control laws?
  • Should schools have uniforms or a dress code?
  • Are standardized tests an accurate measure of student performance?
  • Should students be required to take physical education courses?
  • Is undocumented immigration a legitimate cause for concern in the United States?
  • Is affirmative action still necessary in today’s society?
  • How much, if any, regulation should there be on technology companies?
  • Is the death penalty an appropriate form of punishment for serious crimes?

Check out two examples on similar topics:

Political Persuasive Essay Examples

Persuasive Essay Examples About Life

Need more topic ideas? Check out our extensive list of unique persuasive essay topics and get started!

But if you're still feeling stuck, don't worry. Our persuasive essay writing service is here to the rescue!

Our experienced writers specialize in creating top-notch essays on a wide range of topics. Whether it's a challenging persuasive essay or any other type, we've got you covered.

Take advantage of our reliable essay writing service today!

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Washington Examiner

Teachers must embrace open-mindedness and doubt

I n the fall of 2020, I taught a course at an independent high school in Boulder, Colorado , on persuasive essay writing. It won’t stun anyone familiar with the town, affectionately known by locals as the People’s Republic of Boulder, that I was the only openly non-progressive in the entire school, teacher or student. If there were any other non-progressives in the building, they wisely kept it to themselves.

This was in the aftermath of the summer of 2020, when anything short of total submission to progressive ideology was taken as a declaration of deplorability. If you weren’t actively “anti-racist” in a very particular way as defined by a very particular type of academic, you were considered one of the moral monsters populating “the wrong side of history.”

It was in this environment of extreme uniformity that I was tasked with teaching seniors the subtle art of persuasion through argument. We forget now how quickly civil discourse fell out of fashion among liberals at the time. A trio of psychologically traumatic events, the Trump presidency, George Floyd’s death, and the COVID-19 outbreak, had convinced them that the time for talk was over. Deep thinking on the part of anyone from the "oppressor class" was dubbed “intellectualization” — and you can be sure that all the students and teachers in the school at Boulder were white.

Perhaps subconsciously, I developed the course in such a way as to challenge the stultifying atmosphere directly. I was determined to make my students embrace the unthinkable: the possibility that they were wrong.

On the first day of class, I scrawled the following quote by John Stuart Mill across the whiteboard:

He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not know so much as what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion.

In any prior moment in American history, Mill’s advocacy for intellectual rigor would be celebrated by liberals. But in my class, the quote drew disbelieving glances and uncomfortable murmuring. My announcement that students would need to write a well-researched and tightly reasoned essay arguing against their most deeply held conviction drew outright protestation. One student semi-tearfully commented that such a project would be tantamount to “literal violence.” Another said she would have a psychological breakdown if she were forced to defend the Second Amendment. A parent emailed me that night asking what I “was trying to prove.” The experience was demoralizing.

By the end of the first week, a handful of students flat-out refused to do the coursework as outlined. Following some difficult conversations, I agreed to amend the syllabus for those students. Perhaps I shouldn’t have, but since they were seniors and graduation was on the line, I caved.

But what I’ll always remember from the experience is the exemplary work done quietly by a number of students, including some of the most progressive “activist” types. One student, who was so politically minded that she had pro-choice slogans painted across the outside of her car, turned in a magnificently insightful essay that argued in favor of life. She later confided to me that the concept of “steelmanning,” which is the process of articulating the best possible argument of the other side, struck a chord with her. She understood that allowing herself the space to doubt her own presuppositions and uncover the best arguments of the opposition in full enabled her to become a more powerful advocate for the causes she held dear.

Another student who identified as “nonbinary” turned in an essay that argued for the utility of the gender binary. I remember feeling delightedly shocked by her willingness to engage with arguments when so many of her generation would refuse to consider what might “deny their existence.”

Despite the plummeting achievement and ideological uniformity that currently defines American education, I have remained hopeful thanks to the students from my persuasive essay class who took the intellectual risk of challenging their views — even if they kept their efforts to themselves. These students were brave enough to experience the state of doubt in order to be drawn deeper into the intellectual life.

For too long, students have been trained to follow the precepts of a single ideology when they should be educated to understand multiple viewpoints and respected enough to form their own views. In order to revivify the humanities, educators must once again heed Mill’s call to embrace open-mindedness and doubt.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Peter Laffin is a contributor at the  Washington Examiner . His work has also appeared in  RealClearPolitics , the Catholic Thing , and the  National Catholic Register .

Tags: Opinion , Beltway Confidential , Blog Contributors , Opinion , Education , Leftism , Free Speech

Original Author: Peter Laffin

Original Location: Teachers must embrace open-mindedness and doubt

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IMAGES

  1. 51 Great Persuasive Writing Prompts for Middle School

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  2. Persuasive Writing Scheme Suitable for Yr 7-8

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  4. Wonderful Middle School Persuasive Essay Topics ~ Thatsnotus

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  6. Step-by-step pack to help Middle School and Secondary School Students

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  4. Writing a Persuasive Essay

  5. English Parent Guide to Writing Persuasive Essay

  6. Are reality shows good for us?

COMMENTS

  1. Can You Convince Me? Developing Persuasive Writing

    Persuasion Map: Students can use this online interactive tool to map out an argument for their persuasive essay.: Persuasive Strategy Presentation: This handy PowerPoint presentation helps students master the definition of each strategy used in persuasive writing.: Check the Strategies: Students can apply what they know about persuasive writing strategies by evaluating a persuasive piece and ...

  2. 101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    Sep 26, 2023 Persuasive writing is one of those skills that can help students succeed in real life. Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative, but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader. It's important to know your audience so you can anticipate any counterarguments they might make and try to overcome them.

  3. 40 Persuasive Writing Examples (Essays, Speeches, and More)

    By Jill Staake Nov 29, 2023 The more we read, the better writers we become. Teaching students to write strong persuasive essays should always start with reading some top-notch models. This round-up of persuasive writing examples includes famous speeches, influential ad campaigns, contemporary reviews of famous books, and more.

  4. How to Write a Persuasive Essay for Middle School

    1 Planning and Research Persuasive writing requires taking a side on a controversial topic and convincing readers to join that side. In the essay, middle school students might argue for changing the school lunch menu, for example.

  5. Persuasive Writing

    Persuasive writing is a form of writing where the writer attempts to convince or persuade the audience to adopt a particular point of view or take a specific action by presenting logical reasoning, supporting evidence, and compelling arguments.

  6. 51 Great Persuasive Writing Prompts for Middle School

    Persuasive Writing Prompts for Middle School 1. Persuade your friends to join a school club or extracurricular activity. 2. Persuade someone to pick you to be on his/her sports team. 3. Tell why basketball is better than football. 4. Convince a friend to attend a sporting event with you. 5.

  7. How to Teach Argument Writing Step-By-Step

    I teach students how to write a step-by-step 5 paragraph argumentative essay consisting of the following: Introduction: Includes a lead/hook, background information about the topic, and a thesis statement that includes the claim. Body Paragraph #1: Introduces the first reason that the claim is valid. Supports that reason with facts, examples ...

  8. How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps

    Thesis statement: Let the audience know your stance. After surveying the topic in the first part of the introduction, it is now time for the student writer to express their opinion and briefly preview the points they will make later in the essay. 2. Body Paragraphs.

  9. Persuasive Essay Writing

    This video illustrates the step-by-step process of writing a persuasive essay, including how to write a thesis statement, an introduction paragraph, body paragraphs, and a concluding...

  10. Middle School Persuasive Writing Lessons

    Persuasive Writing - Michael vs. LeBron. Oftentimes the problem with persuasive writing lessons is that students don't really care (or care much) about the topic about which they are writing. This is not the case with this lesson. In it, students practise gathering evidence from a podcast (an oral text) and use that evidence to support ...

  11. Teaching Persuasive Writing

    6-8 Teaching Persuasive Writing In this session, participants visit two middle-level classrooms to see how teachers can help young writers develop effective and authentic persuasive pieces based on their own experiences and interests - for example, using cell phones in schools or altering their homework schedule. View Transcript Workshop 4 Overview

  12. Persuasive Essay Worksheets & Activities

    Beyond that, there are a few more tricks that one can use to enhance one's skills quickly. These persuasive essay worksheets and activities will help students master these tricks. Creating Persuasive Attention Catchers Activity - Students practice creating persuasive leads that immediately push the reader toward their side of the argument.

  13. Developing Evidence-Based Arguments from Texts

    Use these ReadWriteThink resources to help students build their plans into a fully developed evidence based argument about text: Modeling Academic Writing Through Scholarly Article Presentations. And I Quote. Essay Map. Have students use the Evidence-Based Argument Checklist to revise and strengthen their writing.

  14. 33 Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

    Argumentative essays tend to require a little more research and logic than their cousin, the persuasive essay—but your middle school students will enjoy the opportunity to argue convincingly to readers all the same. And…

  15. PDF Middle School (6-8) Persuasive Writing Prompts

    In a multi-paragraph essay, present your position on the colonies remaining under British rule. Be sure to use facts and details to support your position. A Four-Day School Week Recently, a school district in Pennsylvania became the first in the state to change the traditional school schedule from a five-day week to a four-day week.

  16. 94 Excellent Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

    This list of excellent argumentative essay topics for middle school is sure to give your students the practice they need in getting their arguments down on paper, in a persuasive way. With a variety of topics ranging from whether or not to outlaw animal testing to debating a 3-day weekend, this curated collection will give your kiddos lots of ...

  17. PDF SAMPLE PERSUASIVE ESSAY

    Tablets for San Antonio Independent School District (SAISD) Maggie Durham Purdue University Global CM220: Composition Two Dr. Thomas Huston August 1, 2015 Please note that this is a sample essay to help inspire and guide your own original writing of a persuasive essay assignment. Be sure to review your assignment instructions and grading rubric,

  18. A Plethora Of Writing Examples For Middle School (& High School)

    Below are several sources of expository writing samples for middle school students. The Write Source Expository Writing Samples Holt, Rinehart, Winston Expository Essay Models Finally, here is an article in the New York Times that will help you teach your students real-world expository writing skills. Descriptive writing examples for middle school

  19. How to Teach Middle School Students the Art of Debating and Persuasive

    June 4, 2019 Grades 6 - 8 Key Takeaways: For middle school students, acquiring the critical-thinking and communication skills they need to evaluate both sides of a debate and write persuasive essays isn't always easy.

  20. 100 Persuasive Essay Topics

    Updated on August 21, 2019 Persuasive essays are a bit like argument essays and persuasive speeches, but they tend to be a little kinder and gentler. Argument essays require you to discuss and to attack an alternate view, while persuasive essays are attempts to convince the reader that you have a believable argument.

  21. RILINK Schools: Chariho Middle School Library: Persuasive Writing

    Student Model - Persuasive Writing - Length of Summer Vacation. This is a persuasive essay on the school calendar. 5/6 Persuasive Writing Examples. This page has examples of persuasive writing on students under 13 having cell phones and one about cats. Newsela - Opinion Bottled water hurts the Earth; tap water is cheap and healthy too.

  22. 30+ Persuasive Essay Examples

    1. Persuasive Essay Examples For Students 2. Persuasive Essay Examples for Different Formats 3. Persuasive Essay Outline Examples 4. Persuasive Essay Format Example 5. How to Write A Persuasive Essay With Examples 6. How to End a Persuasive Essay Examples 7. Catchy Persuasive Essay Topics Persuasive Essay Examples For Students

  23. Persuasive Essay Guide: How to Write a Persuasive Essay

    Outline your argument. Outlining your entire essay before you get to writing it can help you organize your thoughts, research, and lay out your essay structure. Detail all your main points and pair them with all of the relevant, supporting evidence from your sources cited. 5. Write your introduction.

  24. Teachers must embrace open-mindedness and doubt

    I n the fall of 2020, I taught a course at an independent high school in Boulder, Colorado, on persuasive essay writing.It won't stun anyone familiar with the town, affectionately known by ...