COMMENTS

  1. 17.3 Organizing Persuasive Speeches

    One of the most commonly cited and discussed organizational patterns for persuasive speeches is Alan H. Monroe's motivated sequence. The purpose of Monroe's motivated sequence is to help speakers "sequence supporting materials and motivational appeals to form a useful organizational pattern for speeches as a whole" (German et al., 2010).

  2. PDF 5 Organization Patterns for Persuasive Speeches

    Source: Lucas, S.E. (2012). The art of public speaking.New York City, NY: McGraw-Hill. 5 Organization Patterns for Persuasive Speeches 5 Steps • Attention: gain attention of your audience • Need: demonstrate the problem and a need for change • Satisfaction: provide a solution • Visualization: use vivid imagery to show the benefits of the solution

  3. Patterns of Organization: Persuasive Speeches

    The problem-solution pattern will be explored in more depth in the chapter on Persuasive Speaking because that is where it is used the most. Then, we will see that there are variations on it. The principle behind problem-solution pattern is that if you explain a problem to an audience, you should not leave them hanging without solutions.

  4. 12.3: Organizing Persuasive Speeches

    One of the most commonly cited and discussed organizational patterns for persuasive speeches is Monroe's motivated sequence. The purpose of Monroe's motivated sequence is to help speakers "sequence supporting materials and motivational appeals to form a useful organizational pattern for speeches as a whole" (German et al., 2010, p. 279).

  5. Organizing Persuasive Messages

    Outlines are organized according to the particular speech, and the following organizational patterns are used routinely for persuasive speeches. Monroe's Motivated Sequence. Monroe's Motivated Sequence is an organizational pattern that attempts to convince the audience to respond to a need that is delineated in the speech. [1]

  6. Organizational Styles

    The topical, spatial, causal, comparative and chronological methods of arrangement may be better suited to informative speeches, whereas the refutation pattern may work well for a persuasive speech. Additionally, Chapter 16 offers additional organization styles suited for persuasive speeches, such as the refutation speech and Monroe's ...

  7. 16.8: Organizing Persuasive Messages

    Outlines are organized according to the particular speech, and the following organizational patterns are used routinely for persuasive speeches. Monroe's Motivated Sequence. Monroe's Motivated Sequence is an organizational pattern that attempts to convince the audience to respond to a need that is delineated in the speech (Monroe, 1949).

  8. PDF Commonly Used Forms of Persuasive Speech Organization

    Brief: Though persuasive speeches can be organized in a variety of ways, there are certain forms of organization that are especially effective in supporting the development of a reasoned argument. Learning Objective: Identify and select a recognized persuasive speech organizational form. Key Terms: • Monroe's Motivated Sequence: A method of ...

  9. PDF Organizing Persuasive Speeches (UW-La Crosse Public Speaking Center)

    In persuasive speeches, speakers make an argument to their audience. Here are four primary ways to organize a persuasive speech: Problem-solution • Speaker identifies a specific problem and offer a specific solution • Solution should be the most effective • Solution should resolve the problem outlined in the speech Problem-cause-solution

  10. 16.3: Organizing Persuasive Speeches

    Alan H. Monroe's (1935) motivated sequence is a commonly used speech format that is used by many people to effectively organize persuasive messages. The pattern consists of five basic stages: attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, and action. In the first stage, a speaker gets an audience's attention.

  11. Chapter 10: Persuasive Speaking

    Persuasive Speech Organizational Patterns. There are several methods of organizing persuasive speeches. Remember, you must use an organizational pattern to outline your speech (think back to chapter eight). Some professors will specify a specific pattern to use for your assignment. ... Another effective form of reasoning is through the use of ...

  12. Chapter 15: Organizing

    Alan H. Monroe's motivated sequence is one of the most commonly cited and discussed organizational patterns for persuasive speeches. The purpose of Monroe's motivated sequence is to help speakers "sequence supporting materials and motivational appeals to form a useful organizational pattern for speeches as a whole" (German et al., 2010).

  13. Organizational Patterns

    These are referred to as organizational patterns for arranging your main points in a speech. The chronological, topical, spatial, or causal patterns may be better suited to informative speeches, whereas the Problem-Solution, Monroe's Motivated Sequence (Monroe, 1949) would work best for persuasive speeches.

  14. Structure of a Persuasive Speech

    A persuasive speech, in other words, is an argument supported by well-thought-out reasons and relevant, appropriate, and credible supporting evidence. ... The informative speech organizational patterns we covered earlier can work for a persuasive speech as well. In addition, the following organization patterns are especially suited to ...

  15. 11.2 Persuasive Speaking

    Some persuasive speech topics lend themselves to a topical organization pattern, which breaks the larger topic up into logical divisions. Earlier, in Chapter 9 "Preparing a Speech", we discussed recency and primacy, and in this chapter we discussed adapting a persuasive speech based on the audience's orientation toward the proposition ...

  16. Persuasive Speaking

    Monroe's motivated sequence is an organizational pattern designed for persuasive speaking that appeals to audience members' needs and motivates them to action (Watt & Barnett, 2021). If your persuasive speaking goals include a call to action, you may want to consider this organizational pattern. ... The most effective persuasive messages ...

  17. 14.7: Organizing Persuasive Messages

    Outlines are organized according to the particular speech, and the following organizational patterns are used routinely for persuasive speeches. Monroe's Motivated Sequence Pattern Monroe's Motivated Sequence is an organizational pattern that attempts to convince the audience to respond to a need that is delineated in the speech.

  18. Chapter Nine

    By far the most common pattern for organizing a speech is by categories or topics. The topical organizational pattern is a way to help the speaker arrange the message in a consistent fashion. The goal of a topical organization is to create categories (or chunks) of information that go together to help support your original specific purpose.

  19. Organizing Persuasive Speeches

    Monroe's Motivated Sequence. One of the most commonly cited and discussed organizational patterns for persuasive speeches is Alan H. Monroe's motivated sequence. The purpose of Monroe's motivated sequence is to help speakers "sequence supporting materials and motivational appeals to form a useful organizational pattern for speeches as a ...

  20. 7.3 Organizational Patterns of Arrangement

    The chronological (or temporal), topical, spatial, or causal patterns may be better suited to informative speeches, whereas the Problem-Solution, Monroe's Motivated Sequence (Monroe, 1949), Claim-to-Proof (Mudd & Sillar, 1962), or Refutation pattern would work best for persuasive speeches. Sample outlines for persuasive speeches can be found ...

  21. Organizational Pattern for Persuasive Speeches

    Causal: Causal persuasive speeches are most effective when discussing the relationship between two things. For instance, if the speaker wants to address vandalism as a problem to society, it will ...

  22. 9.3 Organizing

    The five steps are (1) attention, (2) need, (3) satisfaction, (4) visualization, and (5) action (Monroe & Ehninger, 1964). The attention step is accomplished in the introduction to your speech. Whether your entire speech is organized using this pattern or not, any good speaker begins by getting the attention of the audience.