Reported Speech – Rules, Examples & Worksheet

Photo of author

| Candace Osmond

Photo of author

Candace Osmond

Candace Osmond studied Advanced Writing & Editing Essentials at MHC. She’s been an International and USA TODAY Bestselling Author for over a decade. And she’s worked as an Editor for several mid-sized publications. Candace has a keen eye for content editing and a high degree of expertise in Fiction.

They say gossip is a natural part of human life. That’s why language has evolved to develop grammatical rules about the “he said” and “she said” statements. We call them reported speech.

Every time we use reported speech in English, we are talking about something said by someone else in the past. Thinking about it brings me back to high school, when reported speech was the main form of language!

Learn all about the definition, rules, and examples of reported speech as I go over everything. I also included a worksheet at the end of the article so you can test your knowledge of the topic.

What Does Reported Speech Mean?

Grammarist Article Graphic V3 2022 10 25T162134.388

Reported speech is a term we use when telling someone what another person said. You can do this while speaking or writing.

There are two kinds of reported speech you can use: direct speech and indirect speech. I’ll break each down for you.

A direct speech sentence mentions the exact words the other person said. For example:

  • Kryz said, “These are all my necklaces.”

Indirect speech changes the original speaker’s words. For example:

  • Kryz said those were all her necklaces.

When we tell someone what another individual said, we use reporting verbs like told, asked, convinced, persuaded, and said. We also change the first-person figure in the quotation into the third-person speaker.

Reported Speech Examples

We usually talk about the past every time we use reported speech. That’s because the time of speaking is already done. For example:

  • Direct speech: The employer asked me, “Do you have experience with people in the corporate setting?”

Indirect speech: The employer asked me if I had experience with people in the corporate setting.

  • Direct speech: “I’m working on my thesis,” I told James.

Indirect speech: I told James that I was working on my thesis.

Reported Speech Structure

A speech report has two parts: the reporting clause and the reported clause. Read the example below:

  • Harry said, “You need to help me.”

The reporting clause here is William said. Meanwhile, the reported clause is the 2nd clause, which is I need your help.

What are the 4 Types of Reported Speech?

Aside from direct and indirect, reported speech can also be divided into four. The four types of reported speech are similar to the kinds of sentences: imperative, interrogative, exclamatory, and declarative.

Reported Speech Rules

The rules for reported speech can be complex. But with enough practice, you’ll be able to master them all.

Choose Whether to Use That or If

The most common conjunction in reported speech is that. You can say, “My aunt says she’s outside,” or “My aunt says that she’s outside.”

Use if when you’re reporting a yes-no question. For example:

  • Direct speech: “Are you coming with us?”

Indirect speech: She asked if she was coming with them.

Verb Tense Changes

Change the reporting verb into its past form if the statement is irrelevant now. Remember that some of these words are irregular verbs, meaning they don’t follow the typical -d or -ed pattern. For example:

  • Direct speech: I dislike fried chicken.

Reported speech: She said she disliked fried chicken.

Note how the main verb in the reported statement is also in the past tense verb form.

Use the simple present tense in your indirect speech if the initial words remain relevant at the time of reporting. This verb tense also works if the report is something someone would repeat. For example:

  • Slater says they’re opening a restaurant soon.
  • Maya says she likes dogs.

This rule proves that the choice of verb tense is not a black-and-white question. The reporter needs to analyze the context of the action.

Move the tense backward when the reporting verb is in the past tense. That means:

  • Present simple becomes past simple.
  • Present perfect becomes past perfect.
  • Present continuous becomes past continuous.
  • Past simple becomes past perfect.
  • Past continuous becomes past perfect continuous.

Here are some examples:

  • The singer has left the building. (present perfect)

He said that the singers had left the building. (past perfect)

  • Her sister gave her new shows. (past simple)
  • She said that her sister had given her new shoes. (past perfect)

If the original speaker is discussing the future, change the tense of the reporting verb into the past form. There’ll also be a change in the auxiliary verbs.

  • Will or shall becomes would.
  • Will be becomes would be.
  • Will have been becomes would have been.
  • Will have becomes would have.

For example:

  • Direct speech: “I will be there in a moment.”

Indirect speech: She said that she would be there in a moment.

Do not change the verb tenses in indirect speech when the sentence has a time clause. This rule applies when the introductory verb is in the future, present, and present perfect. Here are other conditions where you must not change the tense:

  • If the sentence is a fact or generally true.
  • If the sentence’s verb is in the unreal past (using second or third conditional).
  • If the original speaker reports something right away.
  • Do not change had better, would, used to, could, might, etc.

Changes in Place and Time Reference

Changing the place and time adverb when using indirect speech is essential. For example, now becomes then and today becomes that day. Here are more transformations in adverbs of time and places.

  • This – that.
  • These – those.
  • Now – then.
  • Here – there.
  • Tomorrow – the next/following day.
  • Two weeks ago – two weeks before.
  • Yesterday – the day before.

Here are some examples.

  • Direct speech: “I am baking cookies now.”

Indirect speech: He said he was baking cookies then.

  • Direct speech: “Myra went here yesterday.”

Indirect speech: She said Myra went there the day before.

  • Direct speech: “I will go to the market tomorrow.”

Indirect speech: She said she would go to the market the next day.

Using Modals

Grammarist Article Graphic V3 2022 10 25T162624.255

If the direct speech contains a modal verb, make sure to change them accordingly.

  • Will becomes would
  • Can becomes could
  • Shall becomes should or would.
  • Direct speech: “Will you come to the ball with me?”

Indirect speech: He asked if he would come to the ball with me.

  • Direct speech: “Gina can inspect the room tomorrow because she’s free.”

Indirect speech: He said Gina could inspect the room the next day because she’s free.

However, sometimes, the modal verb should does not change grammatically. For example:

  • Direct speech: “He should go to the park.”

Indirect speech: She said that he should go to the park.

Imperative Sentences

To change an imperative sentence into a reported indirect sentence, use to for imperative and not to for negative sentences. Never use the word that in your indirect speech. Another rule is to remove the word please . Instead, say request or say. For example:

  • “Please don’t interrupt the event,” said the host.

The host requested them not to interrupt the event.

  • Jonah told her, “Be careful.”
  • Jonah ordered her to be careful.

Reported Questions

When reporting a direct question, I would use verbs like inquire, wonder, ask, etc. Remember that we don’t use a question mark or exclamation mark for reports of questions. Below is an example I made of how to change question forms.

  • Incorrect: He asked me where I live?

Correct: He asked me where I live.

Here’s another example. The first sentence uses direct speech in a present simple question form, while the second is the reported speech.

  • Where do you live?

She asked me where I live.

Wrapping Up Reported Speech

My guide has shown you an explanation of reported statements in English. Do you have a better grasp on how to use it now?

Reported speech refers to something that someone else said. It contains a subject, reporting verb, and a reported cause.

Don’t forget my rules for using reported speech. Practice the correct verb tense, modal verbs, time expressions, and place references.

Grammarist is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. When you buy via the links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no cost to you.

2024 © Grammarist, a Found First Marketing company. All rights reserved.

Seonaid Beckwith

Hello! I'm Seonaid! I'm here to help you understand grammar and speak correct, fluent English.

method graphic

Click here to read more about our learning method

Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions

YouTube video

👉 Quiz 1 / Quiz 2

Advanced Grammar Course

What is reported speech?

“Reported speech” is when we talk about what somebody else said – for example:

  • Direct Speech: “I’ve been to London three times.”
  • Reported Speech: She said she’d been to London three times.

There are a lot of tricky little details to remember, but don’t worry, I’ll explain them and we’ll see lots of examples. The lesson will have three parts – we’ll start by looking at statements in reported speech, and then we’ll learn about some exceptions to the rules, and finally we’ll cover reported questions, requests, and commands.

Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions Espresso English

So much of English grammar – like this topic, reported speech – can be confusing, hard to understand, and even harder to use correctly. I can help you learn grammar easily and use it confidently inside my Advanced English Grammar Course.

In this course, I will make even the most difficult parts of English grammar clear to you – and there are lots of opportunities for you to practice!

Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions Espresso English

Backshift of Verb Tenses in Reported Speech

When we use reported speech, we often change the verb tense backwards in time. This can be called “backshift.”

Here are some examples in different verb tenses:

Reported Speech (Part 1) Quiz

Exceptions to backshift in reported speech.

Now that you know some of the reported speech rules about backshift, let’s learn some exceptions.

There are two situations in which we do NOT need to change the verb tense.

No backshift needed when the situation is still true

For example, if someone says “I have three children” (direct speech) then we would say “He said he has three children” because the situation continues to be true.

If I tell you “I live in the United States” (direct speech) then you could tell someone else “She said she lives in the United States” (that’s reported speech) because it is still true.

When the situation is still true, then we don’t need to backshift the verb.

Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions Espresso English

He said he HAS three children

But when the situation is NOT still true, then we DO need to backshift the verb.

Imagine your friend says, “I have a headache.”

  • If you immediately go and talk to another friend, you could say, “She said she has a headache,” because the situation is still true
  • If you’re talking about that conversation a month after it happened, then you would say, “She said she had a headache,” because it’s no longer true.

No backshift needed when the situation is still in the future

We also don’t need to backshift to the verb when somebody said something about the future, and the event is still in the future.

Here’s an example:

  • On Monday, my friend said, “I ‘ll call you on Friday .”
  • “She said she ‘ll call me on Friday”, because Friday is still in the future from now.
  • It is also possible to say, “She said she ‘d (she would) call me on Friday.”
  • Both of them are correct, so the backshift in this case is optional.

Let’s look at a different situation:

  • On Monday, my friend said, “I ‘ll call you on Tuesday .”
  • “She said she ‘d  call me on Tuesday.” I must backshift because the event is NOT still in the future.

Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions Espresso English

Review: Reported Speech, Backshift, & Exceptions

Quick review:

  • Normally in reported speech we backshift the verb, we put it in a verb tense that’s a little bit further in the past.
  • when the situation is still true
  • when the situation is still in the future

Reported Requests, Orders, and Questions

Those were the rules for reported statements, just regular sentences.

What about reported speech for questions, requests, and orders?

For reported requests, we use “asked (someone) to do something”:

  • “Please make a copy of this report.” (direct speech)
  • She asked me to make a copy of the report. (reported speech)

For reported orders, we use “told (someone) to do something:”

  • “Go to the bank.” (direct speech)
  • “He told me to go to the bank.” (reported speech)

The main verb stays in the infinitive with “to”:

  • She asked me to make a copy of the report. She asked me  make  a copy of the report.
  • He told me to go to the bank. He told me  go  to the bank.

For yes/no questions, we use “asked if” and “wanted to know if” in reported speech.

  • “Are you coming to the party?” (direct)
  • He asked if I was coming to the party. (reported)
  • “Did you turn off the TV?” (direct)
  • She wanted to know if I had turned off the TV.” (reported)

The main verb changes and back shifts according to the rules and exceptions we learned earlier.

Notice that we don’t use do/does/did in the reported question:

  • She wanted to know did I turn off the TV.
  • She wanted to know if I had turned off the TV.

For other questions that are not yes/no questions, we use asked/wanted to know (without “if”):

  • “When was the company founded?” (direct)
  • She asked when the company was founded.” (reported)
  • “What kind of car do you drive?” (direct)
  • He wanted to know what kind of car I drive. (reported)

Again, notice that we don’t use do/does/did in reported questions:

  • “Where does he work?”
  • She wanted to know  where does he work.
  • She wanted to know where he works.

Also, in questions with the verb “to be,” the word order changes in the reported question:

  • “Where were you born?” ([to be] + subject)
  • He asked where I was born. (subject + [to be])
  • He asked where was I born.

Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions Espresso English

Reported Speech (Part 2) Quiz

Learn more about reported speech:

  • Reported speech: Perfect English Grammar
  • Reported speech: BJYU’s

If you want to take your English grammar to the next level, then my Advanced English Grammar Course is for you! It will help you master the details of the English language, with clear explanations of essential grammar topics, and lots of practice. I hope to see you inside!

I’ve got one last little exercise for you, and that is to write sentences using reported speech. Think about a conversation you’ve had in the past, and write about it – let’s see you put this into practice right away.

Master the details of English grammar:

Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions Espresso English

More Espresso English Lessons:

About the author.

' src=

Shayna Oliveira

Shayna Oliveira is the founder of Espresso English, where you can improve your English fast - even if you don’t have much time to study. Millions of students are learning English from her clear, friendly, and practical lessons! Shayna is a CELTA-certified teacher with 10+ years of experience helping English learners become more fluent in her English courses.

logo

What is Reported Speech and how to use it? with Examples

Reported speech and indirect speech are two terms that refer to the same concept, which is the act of expressing what someone else has said. Reported speech is different from direct speech because it does not use the speaker's exact words. Instead, the reporting verb is used to introduce the reported speech, and the tense and pronouns are changed to reflect the shift in perspective. There are two main types of reported speech: statements and questions. 1. Reported Statements: In reported statements, the reporting verb is usually "said." The tense in the reported speech changes from the present simple to the past simple, and any pronouns referring to the speaker or listener are changed to reflect the shift in perspective. For example, "I am going to the store," becomes "He said that he was going to the store." 2. Reported Questions: In reported questions, the reporting verb is usually "asked." The tense in the reported speech changes from the present simple to the past simple, and the word order changes from a question to a statement. For example, "What time is it?" becomes "She asked what time it was." It's important to note that the tense shift in reported speech depends on the context and the time of the reported speech. Here are a few more examples: ●  Direct speech: "I will call you later." Reported speech: He said that he would call me later. ●  Direct speech: "Did you finish your homework?" Reported speech: She asked if I had finished my homework. ●  Direct speech: "I love pizza." Reported speech: They said that they loved pizza.

When do we use reported speech?

Reported speech is used to report what someone else has said, thought, or written. It is often used in situations where you want to relate what someone else has said without quoting them directly. Reported speech can be used in a variety of contexts, such as in news reports, academic writing, and everyday conversation. Some common situations where reported speech is used include: News reports: Journalists often use reported speech to quote what someone said in an interview or press conference. Business and professional communication: In professional settings, reported speech can be used to summarize what was discussed in a meeting or to report feedback from a customer. Conversational English: In everyday conversations, reported speech is used to relate what someone else said. For example, "She told me that she was running late." Narration: In written narratives or storytelling, reported speech can be used to convey what a character said or thought.

How to make reported speech?

1. Change the pronouns and adverbs of time and place: In reported speech, you need to change the pronouns, adverbs of time and place to reflect the new speaker or point of view. Here's an example: Direct speech: "I'm going to the store now," she said. Reported speech: She said she was going to the store then. In this example, the pronoun "I" is changed to "she" and the adverb "now" is changed to "then." 2. Change the tense: In reported speech, you usually need to change the tense of the verb to reflect the change from direct to indirect speech. Here's an example: Direct speech: "I will meet you at the park tomorrow," he said. Reported speech: He said he would meet me at the park the next day. In this example, the present tense "will" is changed to the past tense "would." 3. Change reporting verbs: In reported speech, you can use different reporting verbs such as "say," "tell," "ask," or "inquire" depending on the context of the speech. Here's an example: Direct speech: "Did you finish your homework?" she asked. Reported speech: She asked if I had finished my homework. In this example, the reporting verb "asked" is changed to "said" and "did" is changed to "had." Overall, when making reported speech, it's important to pay attention to the verb tense and the changes in pronouns, adverbs, and reporting verbs to convey the original speaker's message accurately.

How do I change the pronouns and adverbs in reported speech?

1. Changing Pronouns: In reported speech, the pronouns in the original statement must be changed to reflect the perspective of the new speaker. Generally, the first person pronouns (I, me, my, mine, we, us, our, ours) are changed according to the subject of the reporting verb, while the second and third person pronouns (you, your, yours, he, him, his, she, her, hers, it, its, they, them, their, theirs) are changed according to the object of the reporting verb. For example: Direct speech: "I love chocolate." Reported speech: She said she loved chocolate. Direct speech: "You should study harder." Reported speech: He advised me to study harder. Direct speech: "She is reading a book." Reported speech: They noticed that she was reading a book. 2. Changing Adverbs: In reported speech, the adverbs and adverbial phrases that indicate time or place may need to be changed to reflect the perspective of the new speaker. For example: Direct speech: "I'm going to the cinema tonight." Reported speech: She said she was going to the cinema that night. Direct speech: "He is here." Reported speech: She said he was there. Note that the adverb "now" usually changes to "then" or is omitted altogether in reported speech, depending on the context. It's important to keep in mind that the changes made to pronouns and adverbs in reported speech depend on the context and the perspective of the new speaker. With practice, you can become more comfortable with making these changes in reported speech.

How do I change the tense in reported speech?

In reported speech, the tense of the reported verb usually changes to reflect the change from direct to indirect speech. Here are some guidelines on how to change the tense in reported speech: Present simple in direct speech changes to past simple in reported speech. For example: Direct speech: "I like pizza." Reported speech: She said she liked pizza. Present continuous in direct speech changes to past continuous in reported speech. For example: Direct speech: "I am studying for my exam." Reported speech: He said he was studying for his exam. Present perfect in direct speech changes to past perfect in reported speech. For example: Direct speech: "I have finished my work." Reported speech: She said she had finished her work. Past simple in direct speech changes to past perfect in reported speech. For example: Direct speech: "I visited my grandparents last weekend." Reported speech: She said she had visited her grandparents the previous weekend. Will in direct speech changes to would in reported speech. For example: Direct speech: "I will help you with your project." Reported speech: He said he would help me with my project. Can in direct speech changes to could in reported speech. For example: Direct speech: "I can speak French." Reported speech: She said she could speak French. Remember that the tense changes in reported speech depend on the tense of the verb in the direct speech, and the tense you use in reported speech should match the time frame of the new speaker's perspective. With practice, you can become more comfortable with changing the tense in reported speech.

Do I always need to use a reporting verb in reported speech?

No, you do not always need to use a reporting verb in reported speech. However, using a reporting verb can help to clarify who is speaking and add more context to the reported speech. In some cases, the reported speech can be introduced by phrases such as "I heard that" or "It seems that" without using a reporting verb. For example: Direct speech: "I'm going to the cinema tonight." Reported speech with a reporting verb: She said she was going to the cinema tonight. Reported speech without a reporting verb: It seems that she's going to the cinema tonight. However, it's important to note that using a reporting verb can help to make the reported speech more formal and accurate. When using reported speech in academic writing or journalism, it's generally recommended to use a reporting verb to make the reporting more clear and credible. Some common reporting verbs include say, tell, explain, ask, suggest, and advise. For example: Direct speech: "I think we should invest in renewable energy." Reported speech with a reporting verb: She suggested that they invest in renewable energy. Overall, while using a reporting verb is not always required, it can be helpful to make the reported speech more clear and accurate.

How to use reported speech to report questions and commands?

1. Reporting Questions: When reporting questions, you need to use an introductory phrase such as "asked" or "wondered" followed by the question word (if applicable), subject, and verb. You also need to change the word order to make it a statement. Here's an example: Direct speech: "What time is the meeting?" Reported speech: She asked what time the meeting was. Note that the question mark is not used in reported speech. 2. Reporting Commands: When reporting commands, you need to use an introductory phrase such as "ordered" or "told" followed by the person, to + infinitive, and any additional information. Here's an example: Direct speech: "Clean your room!" Reported speech: She ordered me to clean my room. Note that the exclamation mark is not used in reported speech. In both cases, the tense of the reported verb should be changed accordingly. For example, present simple changes to past simple, and future changes to conditional. Here are some examples: Direct speech: "Will you go to the party with me?" Reported speech: She asked if I would go to the party with her. Direct speech: "Please bring me a glass of water." Reported speech: She requested that I bring her a glass of water. Remember that when using reported speech to report questions and commands, the introductory phrases and verb tenses are important to convey the intended meaning accurately.

How to make questions in reported speech?

To make questions in reported speech, you need to use an introductory phrase such as "asked" or "wondered" followed by the question word (if applicable), subject, and verb. You also need to change the word order to make it a statement. Here are the steps to make questions in reported speech: Identify the reporting verb: The first step is to identify the reporting verb in the sentence. Common reporting verbs used to report questions include "asked," "inquired," "wondered," and "wanted to know." Change the tense and pronouns: Next, you need to change the tense and pronouns in the sentence to reflect the shift from direct to reported speech. The tense of the verb is usually shifted back one tense (e.g. from present simple to past simple) in reported speech. The pronouns should also be changed as necessary to reflect the shift in perspective from the original speaker to the reporting speaker. Use an appropriate question word: If the original question contained a question word (e.g. who, what, where, when, why, how), you should use the same question word in the reported question. If the original question did not contain a question word, you can use "if" or "whether" to introduce the reported question. Change the word order: In reported speech, the word order of the question changes from the inverted form to a normal statement form. The subject usually comes before the verb, unless the original question started with a question word. Here are some examples of reported questions: Direct speech: "What time is the meeting?" Reported speech: She asked what time the meeting was. Direct speech: "Did you finish your homework?" Reported speech: He wanted to know if I had finished my homework. Direct speech: "Where are you going?" Reported speech: She wondered where I was going. Remember that when making questions in reported speech, the introductory phrases and verb tenses are important to convey the intended meaning accurately. Here you can find more examples of direct and indirect questions

What is the difference between reported speech an indirect speech?

In reported or indirect speech, you are retelling or reporting what someone said using your own words. The tense of the reported speech is usually shifted back one tense from the tense used in the original statement. For example, if someone said, "I am going to the store," in reported speech you would say, "He/she said that he/she was going to the store." The main difference between reported speech and indirect speech is that reported speech usually refers to spoken language, while indirect speech can refer to both spoken and written language. Additionally, indirect speech is a broader term that includes reported speech as well as other ways of expressing what someone else has said, such as paraphrasing or summarizing.

Examples of direct speech to reported

1. Direct speech: "I am hungry," she said. Reported speech: She said she was hungry. 2. Direct speech: "Can you pass the salt, please?" he asked. Reported speech: He asked her to pass the salt. 3. Direct speech: "I will meet you at the cinema," he said. Reported speech: He said he would meet her at the cinema. 4. Direct speech: "I have been working on this project for hours," she said. Reported speech: She said she had been working on the project for hours. 5. Direct speech: "What time does the train leave?" he asked. Reported speech: He asked what time the train left. 6. Direct speech: "I love playing the piano," she said. Reported speech: She said she loved playing the piano. 7. Direct speech: "I am going to the grocery store," he said. Reported speech: He said he was going to the grocery store. 8. Direct speech: "Did you finish your homework?" the teacher asked. Reported speech: The teacher asked if he had finished his homework. 9. Direct speech: "I want to go to the beach," she said. Reported speech: She said she wanted to go to the beach. 10. Direct speech: "Do you need help with that?" he asked. Reported speech: He asked if she needed help with that. 11. Direct speech: "I can't come to the party," he said. Reported speech: He said he couldn't come to the party. 12. Direct speech: "Please don't leave me," she said. Reported speech: She begged him not to leave her. 13. Direct speech: "I have never been to London before," he said. Reported speech: He said he had never been to London before. 14. Direct speech: "Where did you put my phone?" she asked. Reported speech: She asked where she had put her phone. 15. Direct speech: "I'm sorry for being late," he said. Reported speech: He apologized for being late. 16. Direct speech: "I need some help with this math problem," she said. Reported speech: She said she needed some help with the math problem. 17. Direct speech: "I am going to study abroad next year," he said. Reported speech: He said he was going to study abroad the following year. 18. Direct speech: "Can you give me a ride to the airport?" she asked. Reported speech: She asked him to give her a ride to the airport. 19. Direct speech: "I don't know how to fix this," he said. Reported speech: He said he didn't know how to fix it. 20. Direct speech: "I hate it when it rains," she said. Reported speech: She said she hated it when it rained.

What is Direct and Indirect Speech?

Direct and indirect speech are two different ways of reporting spoken or written language. Let's delve into the details and provide some examples. Click here to read more

Fluent English Grammar

Created by Fluent English Grammar

Privacy Policy

Terms of Service

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser or activate Google Chrome Frame to improve your experience.

FluentU Logo

He Said, She Said: Mastering Reported Speech in English (Both Direct and Indirect)

“Reported speech” might sound fancy, but it isn’t that complicated.

It’s just how you talk about what someone said.

Luckily, it’s pretty simple to learn the basics in English, beginning with the two types of reported speech: direct (reporting the exact words someone said) and indirect (reporting what someone said without using their exact words ).

Read this post to learn how to report speech, with tips and tricks for each, plenty of examples and a resources section that tells you about real world resources you can use to practice reporting speech.

How to Report Direct Speech

How to report indirect speech, reporting questions in indirect speech, verb tenses in indirect reported speech, simple present, present continuous, present perfect, present perfect continuous, simple past, past continuous, past perfect, past perfect continuous, simple future, future continuous, future perfect, future perfect continuous, authentic resources for practicing reported speech, novels and short stories, native english videos, celebrity profiles.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Direct speech refers to the exact words that a person says. You can “report” direct speech in a few different ways.

To see how this works, let’s pretend that I (Elisabeth) told some people that I liked green onions.

Here are some different ways that those people could explain what I said:

Direct speech: “I like green onions,” Elisabeth said.

Direct speech: “I like green onions,” she told me. — In this sentence, we replace my name (Elisabeth) with the pronoun she.

In all of these examples, the part that was said is between quotation marks and is followed by a noun (“she” or “Elisabeth”) and a verb. Each of these verbs (“to say,” “to tell [someone],” “to explain”) are ways to describe someone talking. You can use any verb that refers to speech in this way.

You can also put the noun and verb before what was said.

Direct speech: Elisabeth said, “I like spaghetti.”

The example above would be much more likely to be said out loud than the first set of examples.

Here’s a conversation that might happen between two people:

1: Did you ask her if she liked coffee?

2: Yeah, I asked her.

1: What did she say?

2. She said, “Yeah, I like coffee.” ( Direct speech )

Usually, reporting of direct speech is something you see in writing. It doesn’t happen as often when people are talking to each other. 

Direct reported speech often happens in the past. However, there are all kinds of stories, including journalism pieces, profiles and fiction, where you might see speech reported in the present as well.

This is sometimes done when the author of the piece wants you to feel that you’re experiencing events in the present moment.

For example, a profile of Kristen Stewart in Vanity Fair  has a funny moment that describes how the actress isn’t a very good swimmer:

Direct speech: “I don’t want to enter the water, ever,” she says. “If everyone’s going in the ocean, I’m like, no.”

Here, the speech is reported as though it’s in the present tense (“she says”) instead of in the past (“she said”).

In writing of all kinds, direct reported speech is often split into two or more parts, as it is above.

Here’s an example from Lewis Carroll’s “ Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ,” where the speech is even more split up:

Direct speech: “I won’t indeed!” said Alice, in a great hurry to change the subject of conversation. “Are you—are you fond—of—of dogs?” The Mouse did not answer, so Alice went on eagerly: “There is such a nice little dog near our house I should like to show you!”

Reporting indirect speech is what happens when you explain what someone said without using their exact words.

Let’s start with an example of direct reported speech like those used above.

Direct speech: Elisabeth said, “I like coffee.”

As indirect reported speech, it looks like this:

Indirect speech: Elisabeth said she liked coffee.

You can see that the subject (“I”) has been changed to “she,” to show who is being spoken about. If I’m reporting the direct speech of someone else, and this person says “I,” I’d repeat their sentence exactly as they said it. If I’m reporting this person’s speech indirectly to someone else, however, I’d speak about them in the third person—using “she,” “he” or “they.”

You may also notice that the tense changes here: If “I like coffee” is what she said, this can become “She liked coffee” in indirect speech.

However, you might just as often hear someone say something like, “She said she likes coffee.” Since people’s likes and preferences tend to change over time and not right away, it makes sense to keep them in the present tense.

Indirect speech often uses the word “that” before what was said:

Indirect speech: She said that she liked coffee.

There’s no real difference between “She said she liked coffee” and “She said that she liked coffee.” However, using “that” can help make the different parts of the sentence clearer.

Let’s look at a few other examples:

Indirect speech: I said I was going outside today.

Indirect speech: They told me that they wanted to order pizza.

Indirect speech: He mentioned it was raining.

Indirect speech: She said that her father was coming over for dinner.

You can see an example of reporting indirect speech in the funny video “ Cell Phone Crashing .” In this video, a traveler in an airport sits down next to another traveler talking on his cell phone. The first traveler pretends to be talking to someone on his phone, but he appears to be responding to the second traveler’s conversation, which leads to this exchange:

Woman: “Are you answering what I’m saying?”

Man “No, no… I’m on the phone with somebody, sorry. I don’t mean to be rude.” (Direct speech)

Woman: “What was that?”

Man: “I just said I was on the phone with somebody.” (Indirect speech)

When reporting questions in indirect speech, you can use words like “whether” or “if” with verbs that show questioning, such as “to ask” or “to wonder.”

Direct speech: She asked, “Is that a new restaurant?”

Indirect speech: She asked if that was a new restaurant. 

In any case where you’re reporting a question, you can say that someone was “wondering” or “wanted to know” something. Notice that these verbs don’t directly show that someone asked a question. They don’t describe an action that happened at a single point in time. But you can usually assume that someone was wondering or wanted to know what they asked.

Indirect speech: She was wondering if that was a new restaurant.

Indirect speech: She wanted to know whether that was a new restaurant.

It can be tricky to know how to use tenses when reporting indirect speech. Let’s break it down, tense by tense.

Sometimes, indirect speech “ backshifts ,” or moves one tense further back into the past. We already saw this in the example from above:

Direct speech: She said, “I like coffee.”

Indirect speech: She said she liked coffee.

Also as mentioned above, backshifting doesn’t always happen. This might seem confusing, but it isn’t that difficult to understand once you start using reported speech regularly.

What tense you use in indirect reported speech often just depends on when what you’re reporting happened or was true.

Let’s look at some examples of how direct speech in certain tenses commonly changes (or doesn’t) when it’s reported as indirect speech.

To learn about all the English tenses (or for a quick review), check out this post .

Direct speech: I said, “I play video games.”

Indirect speech: I said that I played video games (simple past) or I said that I play video games  (simple present).

Backshifting into the past or staying in the present here can change the meaning slightly. If you use the first example, it’s unclear whether or not you still play video games; all we know is that you said you played them in the past.

If you use the second example, though, you probably still play video games (unless you were lying for some reason).

However, the difference in meaning is so small, you can use either one and you won’t have a problem.

Direct speech: I said, “I’m playing video games.”

Indirect speech: I said that I was playing video games (past continuous) or I said that I’m playing video games (present continuous).

In this case, you’d likely use the first example if you were telling a story about something that happened in the past.

You could use the second example to repeat or stress what you just said. For example:

Hey, want to go for a walk?

Direct speech: No, I’m playing video games.

But it’s such a nice day!

Indirect speech: I said that I’m playing video games!

Direct speech: Marie said, “I have read that book.”

Indirect speech: Marie said that she had read that book (past perfect) or Marie said that she has read that book (present perfect).

The past perfect is used a lot in writing and other kinds of narration. This is because it helps point out an exact moment in time when something was true.

The past perfect isn’t quite as useful in conversation, where people are usually more interested in what’s true now. So, in a lot of cases, people would use the second example above when speaking.

Direct speech: She said, “I have been watching that show.”

Indirect speech: She said that she had been watching that show (past perfect continuous) or She said that she has been watching that show (present perfect continuous).

These examples are similar to the others above. You could use the first example whether or not this person was still watching the show, but if you used the second example, it’d probably seem like you either knew or guessed that she was still watching it.

Direct speech: You told me, “I charged my phone.”

Indirect speech: You told me that you had charged your phone (past perfect) or You told me that you charged your phone (simple past).

Here, most people would probably just use the second example, because it’s simpler, and gets across the same meaning.

Direct speech: You told me, “I was charging my phone.”

Indirect speech: You told me that you had been charging your phone (past perfect continuous) or You told me that you were charging your phone (past continuous).

Here, the difference is between whether you had been charging your phone before or were charging your phone at the time. However, a lot of people would still use the second example in either situation.

Direct speech: They explained, “We had bathed the cat on Wednesday.”

Indirect speech: They explained that they had bathed the cat on Wednesday. (past perfect)

Once we start reporting the past perfect tenses, we don’t backshift because there are no tenses to backshift to.

So in this case, it’s simple. The tense stays exactly as is. However, many people might simplify even more and use the simple past, saying, “They explained that they bathed the cat on Wednesday.”

Direct speech: They said, “The cat had been going outside and getting dirty for a long time!”

Indirect speech: They said that the cat had been going outside and getting dirty for a long time. (past perfect continuous)

Again, we don’t shift the tense back here; we leave it like it is. And again, a lot of people would report this speech as, “They said the cat was going outside and getting dirty for a long time.” It’s just a simpler way to say almost the same thing.

Direct speech: I told you, “I will be here no matter what.”

Indirect speech: I told you that I would be here no matter what. (present conditional)

At this point, we don’t just have to think about tenses, but grammatical mood, too. However, the idea is still pretty simple. We use the conditional (with “would”) to show that at the time the words were spoken, the future was uncertain.

In this case, you could also say, “I told you that I will be here no matter what,” but only if you “being here” is still something that you expect to happen in the future.

What matters here is what’s intended. Since this example shows a person reporting their own speech, it’s more likely that they’d want to stress the truth of their own intention, and so they might be more likely to use “will” than “would.”

But if you were reporting someone else’s words, you might be more likely to say something like, “She told me that she would be here no matter what.”

Direct speech: I said, “I’ll be waiting for your call.”

Indirect speech: I said that I would be waiting for your call. (conditional continuous)

These are similar to the above examples, but apply to a continuous or ongoing action.

Direct speech: She said, “I will have learned a lot about myself.”

Indirect speech: She said that she would have learned a lot about herself (conditional perfect) or She said that she will have learned a lot about herself (future perfect).

In this case, using the conditional (as in the first example) suggests that maybe a certain event didn’t happen, or something didn’t turn out as expected.

However, that might not always be the case, especially if this was a sentence that was written in an article or a work of fiction. The second example, however, suggests that the future that’s being talked about still hasn’t happened yet.

Direct speech: She said, “By next Tuesday, I will have been staying inside every day for the past month.”

Indirect speech: She said that by next Tuesday, she would have been staying inside every day for the past month (perfect continuous conditional) or She said that by next Tuesday, she will have been staying inside every day for the past month (past perfect continuous).

Again, in this case, the first example might suggest that the event didn’t happen. Maybe the person didn’t stay inside until next Tuesday! However, this could also just be a way of explaining that at the time she said this in the past, it was uncertain whether she really would stay inside for as long as she thought.

The second example, on the other hand, would only be used if next Tuesday hadn’t happened yet.

Let’s take a look at where you can find resources for practicing reporting speech in the real world.

One of the most common uses for reported speech is in fiction. You’ll find plenty of reported speech in novels and short stories . Look for books that have long sections of text with dialogue marked by quotation marks (“…”). Once you understand the different kinds of reported speech, you can look for it in your reading and use it in your own writing.

Writing your own stories is a great way to get even better at understanding reported speech.

One of the best ways to practice any aspect of English is to watch native English videos. By watching English speakers use the language, you can understand how reported speech is used in real world situations.

FluentU takes authentic videos—like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks—and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

You can try FluentU for free for 2 weeks. Check out the website or download the iOS app or Android app.

P.S. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

FluentU Ad

Try FluentU for FREE!

Celebrity profiles, which you can find in print magazines and online, can help you find and practice reported speech, too. Celebrity profiles are stories that focus on a famous person. They often include some kind of interview. The writer will usually spend some time describing the person and then mention things that they say; this is when they use reported speech.

Because many of these profiles are written in the present tense, they can help you get used to the basics of reported speech without having to worry too much about different verb tenses.

While the above may seem really complicated, it isn’t that difficult to start using reported speech.

Mastering it may be a little difficult, but the truth is that many, many people who speak English as a first language struggle with it, too!

Reported speech is flexible, and even if you make mistakes, there’s a good chance that no one will notice.

Enter your e-mail address to get your free PDF!

We hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe

reported speech con did

Learn English

How to use Reported Speech

reported speech con did

We use reported speech when we want to repeat what someone had previously said.

Let's look at the difference between direct speech and reported speech:

Direct Tomie said = ' I am tired.'

Reported Speech = 'Tomie said (that) she was tired.'

In reported speech we need to use the past tense form of the verb. In direct speech the present tense is used. As you can see, in the above sentence 'am' changes to 'was' when we use reported speech.

changing to the past tense to make reported speech

Here are some of the important verb changes we use when making reported speech:

am becomes was

Direct John: 'I am going.' Reported : 'John said that he was going.'

is becomes was

Direct John: 'She is tall.' Reported : 'John said that she was tall.'

do becomes did

Direct John: 'I always do my homework.' Reported : 'John said that he always did his homework.'

does becomes did

Direct John: 'My mother does the cleaning.' Reported : 'John said that his mother did the cleaning.'

have becomes had

Direct John: 'I have your number.' Reported : 'John said that he had my number.'

has becomes had

Direct John: 'He has caught a cold.' Reported : 'John said that he had caught a cold.'

go becomes went

Direct John: 'I go shopping on Sunday.' Reported : 'John said that he went shopping on Sunday.'

will becomes would

Direct John: 'I will call Frank.' Reported : 'John said that he would call Frank.'

can becomes could

Direct John: 'I can ride a horse.' Reported : 'John said that he could ride a horse.'

want becomes wanted

Direct John: 'I want a girlfriend.' Reported : 'John said that he wanted a girlfriend.'

When not to change the verb tense

When direct speech uses the past tense we do not need to make a change:

Direct John: 'I broke my arm.' Reported : 'John said that he broke his arm.'

It is also OK to change the past tense to the past perfect :

Direct John: 'I broke my arm.' Reported : 'John said that he had broken his arm.'

using reported speech for questions

So far we have looked at using 'said' in reported speech . When a question is asked we do not use 'said'. Instead we use 'asked'. We also need to use an interrogative (wh- word) or if / whether. Take a look at the examples:

questions using interrogatives

Direct John: 'What is your name?' Reported : 'John asked me what my name was.'

Direct John: ' Where does she live?' Reported : 'John asked me where she lived.'

questions using if / whether

Direct John: 'Does he play golf?' Reported : 'John asked if he played golf.' Reported : 'John asked whether he played golf.'

using reported speech for requests

As we have seen, 'said' is used for statements and 'asked' is used for requests. We use 'told' for requests and 'to' before the clause:

Direct John: 'Go home' Reported : 'John told me to go.'

Direct John: 'Stop crying' Reported : 'John told me to stop crying.'

using suggestions in reported speech

When someone gives us advice in direct speech we use 'suggested' or 'recommended' in reported speech:

Direct John: 'You should take a holiday' Reported : 'John suggested that I took a holiday.'

Direct John: 'You should take a holiday' Reported : 'John recommended that I took a holiday.'

For stronger language we can use 'insist' or 'demand':

Direct John: 'You must see a doctor.' Reported : 'John insisted that I saw a doctor.' Reported : 'John demanded that I saw a doctor.'

  • 'My brothers are taller than me.' He said that his brothers were taller than him. He said me his brothers were taller than him. He said that brothers are taller than him. He told me that his brothers are tall than him.
  • 'I will see you soon.' He said would see me soon. He said he would see me soon. He asked if he would see me soon. He said I will see me soon.
  • 'I have a cold.' She said has a cold. She asked if I had a cold. She said that she had a cold. She said had a cold.
  • 'I know the way.' He told me he know the way. He said he know the way. He asked me the way. He said that he knew the way.
  • 'He lost his phone.' He said that he had lost his phone. He said he has loses his phone. He said he losts his phone. He said that lost his phone.
  • 'Do you want a coffee?' He asked I wanted a coffee. He asked if I wanted a coffee. He asked if I wants a coffee. He said if I wanted a coffee.
  • 'Are you Simon?' She asked whether I Simon. She asked whether I was Simon. She asked whether am simon. She asked whether if I was Simon.
  • 'Why do you like Jazz?' She asked why I liked Jazz. She asked if I like Jazz. She asked why I likes Jazz. She ask why I like Jazz.
  • 'Bring your ball.' He asked me if I brought my ball. He tells me to bring my ball. He told me bring a ball. He told me to bring my ball.
  • 'You must come to my party.' She insisted that I came to her party. She said that I come to her party. She asked me to come her party. She recommended that I come to her party.

Delicious

  • Lesson Index

Download our Brochure

Seven Letters

Play now

English language Schools

  • Types of Verbs
  • Types of Adjectives
  • Types of Noun
  • Phrases and Clauses
  • Parts of Speech
  • Parts of a Sentence
  • Determiners
  • Parallelism
  • Direct & Indirect Speech
  • Modal Verbs
  • Relative Clauses
  • Nominalisation
  • Substitution & Ellipsis
  • Demonstratives
  • Pronoun Reference
  • Confusing Words
  • Online Grammar Quizzes
  • Printable Grammar Worksheets
  • Courses to purchase
  • Grammar Book
  • Grammar Blog
  • Direct & Indirect Speech

Reported Speech Tenses

Reported speech tenses will change from that of the direct speech in most cases.

This is known as backshifting in reported speech , with the basic rule that a tense is shifted back to its past tense form.

This is because we are usually talking about something in the past. 

You can also watch a video of this lesson:

Backshifting in Reported Speech

Here are some examples of backshifting, with tenses going back from present to past:

Backshifting in Reported Speech

Reported Speech Tenses Change Chart

Below is a reported speech tense change chart with the rules for backshifting for each tense and for modal verbs.

You will see reported speech does not go back a tense if it is already in the past perfect (there is no further back it can go), and some modal verbs also do not change. 

If you are tested on this, though, these are the changes you need to make.

Reported Speech Chart for Tenses

Exceptions to the rules

This is a useful starting point. However, it is a simplification as we may not always decide or need to shift the tense back. 

For instance, if the circumstances we are reporting on  have not changed  since they were directly said, then the tense would not need to be changed. For example:

Direct Speech

  • I  am  happy 
  • (present simple)

Reported Speech

  • She said she is happy 

So if we want to convey that the situation is still true then we may keep the tense the same.

Alternatively, the tense could even forward shift. An example would be in relation to a film or book. In this case, the person may use the past tense to say that the film was good, but the present or past tense could be used when you convey that to someone else:

Direct Speech:

  • The film  was  really good!
  • (past simple)

Reported Speech:

  • He said that the film  was  very good!
  • (past simple) Or
  • He said that the film  is  very good!

As you can see, either reported speech tenses would be ok if you wanted to pass the information on to somebody else. The person said the film was good, and it is still good (it hasn't gone away).

So there are some general rules for reported speech tense changes but it can depend on the context. There may be no need to change it or you may be able to choose either tense.

Click the ' reported speech: practice forming indirect speech ' link below to practice changing tenses. 

More on Reported Speech:

Reported speech imperatives, also known as reported commands, follow a slightly different structure to normal indirect speech. We use imperatives to give orders, advice, or make requests.

Reported Speech Imperatives: Reporting commands in indirect speech

Reported speech imperatives, also known as reported commands, follow a slightly different structure to normal indirect speech. We use imperatives to give orders, advice, or make requests.

This reported speech quiz gives you the chance to practice converting direct speech to reported speech, also known as indirect speech. This involves backshifting with the tenses.

Reported Speech Quiz - Practice forming indirect speech

This reported speech quiz gives you the chance to practice converting direct speech to reported speech, also known as indirect speech. This involves backshifting with the tenses.

Direct and indirect speech are different because in direct speech the exact words said are spoken, but in indirect or reported speech, we are reporting what was said, usually using the past tense.

Direct and Indirect Speech: The differences explained

Direct and indirect speech are different because in direct speech the exact words said are spoken, but in indirect or reported speech, we are reporting what was said, usually using the past tense.

In these examples of direct and indirect speech you are given a sentence in direct speech which is then connected to indirect speech.

Examples of Direct and Indirect Speech

In these examples of direct and indirect speech you are given a sentence in direct speech which is then connected to indirect speech.

Sign up for free grammar tips, quizzes and lessons, straight into your inbox

New! Comments

Any questions or comments about the grammar discussed on this page?

Post your comment here.

reported speech con did

Grammar Rules

Subscribe to grammar wiz:, grammar ebook.

English Grammar Book

This is an affiliate link

Recent Articles

RSS

Discrete vs Discreet

Feb 16, 24 11:01 AM

Lose or Loose Quiz: Multiple Choice

Feb 11, 24 11:08 AM

Lose or Loose: Which to choose?

Feb 08, 24 04:31 AM

Important Pages

Online Quizzes Courses Blog

Connect with Us

Youtube

Search Site

Privacy Policy  / Disclaimer  / Terms of Use

reported speech con did

25,000+ students realised their study abroad dream with us. Take the first step today

Here’s your new year gift, one app for all your, study abroad needs, start your journey, track your progress, grow with the community and so much more.

reported speech con did

Verification Code

An OTP has been sent to your registered mobile no. Please verify

reported speech con did

Thanks for your comment !

Our team will review it before it's shown to our readers.

reported speech con did

Reported Speech: Definition, Rules, Usage with Examples, Tips, Exercises for Students

' src=

  • Updated on  
  • Jan 10, 2024

Reported Speech

Reported Speech: Reported Speech or also known as indirect speech, is typically used to convey what has been said by someone at a particular point of time. However, owing to the nuances of the systems involved, English grammar may be a complicated language to learn and understand. But once you get hold of the grammar fundamentals , you can be a pro. It’s these fundamentals that will help you create a solid base. The rest of the journey becomes much easier once you get a good grip on the english grammar for competitive exams . So, today, we’re going to talk about one of those basics that is an important part of English grammar, i.e., Reported Speech with multiple definition, usage with examples and numerous practise exercicses.

This Blog Includes:

What is reported speech, definition of reported speech, reported speech rules, rules for modal verbs, rules for pronouns, rules for change in tenses, rules for changing statements into reported speech, rules for changing interrogative sentences into reported speech, rules for changing commands and requests into indirect speech, tips to practise reported speech, fun exercises for reported speech with answers.

When we use the exact words spoken by someone, it is known as Direct Speech or Reported Speech. Reporting speech is a way to effectivley communication something that has been spoken, usually in the past, by the speaker. It is also possible to describe it from the speaker’s perspective from the third person. Since you are only communicating the message and are not repeating the speaker’s exact words, you do not need to use quotation marks while using this type of speaking.

For example: Rita said to Seema, “ I am going to bake a cake ”

Here we are using the exact words spoken by Rita, however, reported or Indirect speech is used when we are reporting something said by someone else but we do not use the exact words. So, we use this form of speech to talk about the past. For example:

Rita told Seema that she was going to bake a cake

In this case, we haven’t used the exact words of Rita but conveyed her message.

Difference Between Reporting Clause and Reported Speech

The words that come before the inverted commas are known as the reporting clause, in the example given above, the reporting clause will be – Rita said to Seema, where ‘said’ is the verb and is known as the reporting clause/verb . The words written within the inverted commas are known as the Reported speech, in the above example, the reported speech is “I am going to bake a cake” .

Also Read:  55+ Phrases with Meaning to Boost Your Vocabulary

Here are some common definitions of reported speech for your reference:

➡️ An Oxford Learner’s Dictionary definition of reported speech is “a report of what somebody has said that does not use their exact words.”

➡️ Reporter speech is described as “speech which tells you what someone said but does not use the person’s actual words” by the Collins Dictionary.

➡️ “The act of reporting something that was said, but not using the same words,” according to the Cambridge Dictionary.

➡️ Reported speech is defined as “the words that you use to report what someone else has said” by the Macmillan Dictionary.

Also Read: Adjective: Definition, Usage, Example, Forms, Types

Now let us take a look at the rules for changing direct speech to indirect or reported speech –

➡️ First and foremost, we do not use inverted commas in reported speech which must be clear from the example given above.

➡️ We use conjunctions like ‘if’, and ‘whether’ after the reporting verb in reported speech

➡️ The reporting verb’s tense is never altered.

➡️ The verb of reporting varies according to sense: it can be told, inquired, asked, etc.

For example: Direct : Mohan said to Sohan, “I am going to school” Reported : Mohan told Sohan that he is going to school

Also Read:  Useful Idioms for IELTS Exams That Will Boost Your Score

Modal words are used to show a sense of possibility, intent, necessity or ability. Some common examples of verbs can include should, can and must. These words are used to express hypothetical conditions. Check the table of contents below for rules with examples of modal verbs.

Also Read: Direct and Indirect Speech Exercises With Answers for Class 12

Listed below are some common rules followed in pronouns using reported speech:

✏️ We change the first-person pronouns (I, my, us, our, me, we) as per the subject of the reporting verb in the reported speech. ✏️ We change the second-person pronouns (you, your, yourself) as per the object of the reporting verb in the reported speech. ✏️ There is no change in the third-person pronouns.

For example:

Direct : Rita said, “I like the book.” Reported : Rita said that she likes the book.

Direct : Arun said to me, “Do you like to eat cakes?” Reported : Arun asked me if I liked eating cakes.

Direct : Ravi said, “I enjoy fishing.” Reported : Ravi said that he enjoys fishing.

Also Read: Reported Speech Interrogative: Rules, Examples & Exercise

Here are some common ruled used for change in tenses:

✏️ The tense of the reported speech is not changed if the reporting verb is in the present or the future tense. ✏️ If a historical fact, a universal reality or a habitual fact is conveyed in a direct speech. The indirect speech tense will not change. ✏️ If the reporting verb is in the past tense, then it will change the tense of the reported speech as follows:

Direct : Reema says, “I am going out.” Reported : Reema says that she is going out.

Direct : Ramesh said, “Honesty is the best policy.” Reported : Ramesh said that honesty is the best policy.

Direct : Vishnu said that, “India gained independence in 1947.” Reported : Vishnu said that India gained independence in 1947.

Direct : Akshat will say, “I want a slice of cake.” Reported : Akshat will say that he wants a slice of cake.

Direct : Reena said, “I am writing a novel.” Reported : Reena said that she was writing a novel.

Direct : Ayushi said, “I was working on my project.” Reported : Ayushi said that she had been working on her project.

Also Read: Exploring the Types of Reported Speech: A Complete Guide

Here are some common rules for changing statements into reported speech:

✏️ The “said to” reporting verb is changed to “told,” “replied,” “remarked,” ✏️ We do not change the object i.e., the reporting verb is not followed by an object. ✏️ We drop the inverted commas and use a conjunction to join the reporting clause and speech/ ✏️ The laws are followed for the changing of pronouns, tenses, etc.

Direct: Ramu said, “I saw a lion in the forest.” Indirect: Ramu said that he had seen a lion in the forest.

Direct : Satish said to me, “I am very happy here.” Indirect : Satish told me that he was very happy there.

Direct : He said, “I can do this work.” Indirect: He said that he could do that work.

50 Examples of Direct and Indirect Speech Interrogative Sentences

Here are some common rules followed for changing interrogative sentences into reported speech:

✏️ The reporting verb “say” is transformed into “ask, inquire,” ✏️ By inserting the subject before the verb, the interrogative clause is converted into a declaration and the full stop is inserted at the end of the sentence. ✏️ The wh-word is repeated in the sentence if the interrogative sentence has a wh-word (who, where, where, how, why, etc). This works as a conjunction. ✏️ If the asking phrase is a yes-no answer style phrase (with auxiliary verbs are, were, were, do, did, have, shall, etc.), then if or whether is used as a conjunction. ✏️ In the reported speech, the auxiliaries do, did, does drop in a positive question. ✏️ The conjunction after the reporting clause is not used.

Direct: I said to him, “Where are you going?” Indirect: Tasked him where he was going.

Direct: He said to me, “Will you go there?” Indirect: He asked me if I would go there.

Direct: My friend said to Deepak, “Have you ever been to Agra?” Indirect: My friend asked Deepak if he had ever been to Agra.

How to Change Sentences into Indirect Speech

The reporting verb is changed into command, order, say, enable, submit, etc. in imperative sentences that have commands.

✏️ By positioning it before the verb, the imperative mood is converted into the infinitive mood. The auxiliary ‘do’ is dropped in the case of negative sentences, and ‘to’ is substituted after ‘not

Direct: She said to me, “Open the window.” Indirect: She ordered me to open the window.

Direct: The captain said to the soldiers, “Attack the enemy.” Indirect: The captain commanded the soldiers to attack the enemy.

Direct: I said to him, “Leave this place at once.” Indirect: I told him to leave that place at once.

Also Read: Direct And Indirect Speech Questions

Indirect speech, sometimes referred to as reported speech, is used to communicate ideas without directly quoting another person. The following advice will help you become proficient in reported speech:

👉 Understand the Basics : Ensure you have a solid understanding of direct speech (quoting exact words) before moving on to reported speech.

👉 Identify Reporting Verbs : Recognize common reporting verbs such as “say,” “tell,” “ask,” “inform,” etc. These verbs are often used to introduce reported speech.

👉 Practice with Various Tenses : Work on reported speech with different tenses (present, past, future) to become comfortable with each.

👉 Use Reporting Words Appropriately : Experiment with different reporting words to convey the speaker’s attitude or emotion accurately. For example, “complain,” “admit,” “suggest.”

👉 Write Dialogues : Create dialogues and convert them into reported speech. This will help you practice both creating and transforming speech.

👉 Use Authentic Materials : Practice reported speech by reading books, articles, or watching videos. Try to convert the direct speech in these materials into reported speech.

Here are a few exercises for reported speech along with answers:

Change the following sentences from direct speech to reported speech.

  • Answer: She said that she loved watching movies.
  • Answer: He told me not to forget to buy some milk on my way home.
  • Answer: Peter said that he would visit his grandparents the following weekend.
  • Answer: She announced that she had finished her homework.
  • Answer: They exclaimed that they were going to the beach the next day.

Reported Speech Exercises For Class 9

Combine the following sentences into reported speech.

  • Answer: Mary said that she was going to the store because she needed some groceries.
  • Answer: He remarked that it was raining outside.
  • Answer: She explained that she couldn’t attend the meeting because she had a doctor’s appointment.
  • Answer: They assured us that they would finish the project by Friday.
  • Answer: He admitted that he had never been to Paris.

Transform the sentences into reported speech.

  • Answer: She asked why I was late.
  • Answer: He requested me to help him with that heavy box.
  • Answer: She inquired if I could pass her the salt.
  • Answer: The guide told the visitors not to touch the paintings.
  • Answer: He said that he must finish that report that day.

Direct And Indirect Speech Questions: Comprehensive Guide with Examples

Reporting speech is the way we present our own or other people’s words. Direct speech and indirect speech are the two primary categories of reported speech. Direct communication restates the speaker’s precise words or their words as we recall them: “I didn’t realize it was midnight,” Barbara remarked.

The speech that is being reported may be declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, or imperative.

Quote marks are not used when putting the speaker’s words or ideas into a sentence in reported speech. Typically, noun clauses are employed. When reading a reported speech, the reader should not assume that the words are exactly what the speaker said; frequently, they are paraphrased.

The reported speech can be Assertive/Declarative, Imperative, Interrogative, and Exclamatory.

We hope that this blog helped you learn about the basics of Reported Speech. Planning for English proficiency exams like IELTS or TOEFL ? Our Leverage Edu experts are here to guide you through your exam preparation with the best guidance, study materials and online classes! Sign up for a free demo with us now!

' src=

Vaishnavi has 2+ years of experience in SEO and Content Marketing. She is highly proficient in English, possessing exceptional language skills and a deep understanding of English grammar and communication. Currently working on Ed Tech, Finance, Lifestyle, and other niches. All her works are infused with love for writing!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Contact no. *

i visited this website during my exams so it was really helpful.. my dounts are cleared… Thanks alot to leverageedu.. i will also suggest this website to my frnds..

Thank you Hansini! Your comment just made our day!

I love it, it like the best to me

browse success stories

Leaving already?

8 Universities with higher ROI than IITs and IIMs

Grab this one-time opportunity to download this ebook

Connect With Us

25,000+ students realised their study abroad dream with us. take the first step today..

reported speech con did

Resend OTP in

reported speech con did

Need help with?

Study abroad.

UK, Canada, US & More

IELTS, GRE, GMAT & More

Scholarship, Loans & Forex

Country Preference

New Zealand

Which English test are you planning to take?

Which academic test are you planning to take.

Not Sure yet

When are you planning to take the exam?

Already booked my exam slot

Within 2 Months

Want to learn about the test

Which Degree do you wish to pursue?

When do you want to start studying abroad.

September 2024

January 2025

What is your budget to study abroad?

reported speech con did

How would you describe this article ?

Please rate this article

We would like to hear more.

  • English Grammar
  • Reported Speech

Reported Speech - Definition, Rules and Usage with Examples

Reported speech or indirect speech is the form of speech used to convey what was said by someone at some point of time. This article will help you with all that you need to know about reported speech, its meaning, definition, how and when to use them along with examples. Furthermore, try out the practice questions given to check how far you have understood the topic.

reported speech con did

Table of Contents

Definition of reported speech, rules to be followed when using reported speech, table 1 – change of pronouns, table 2 – change of adverbs of place and adverbs of time, table 3 – change of tense, table 4 – change of modal verbs, tips to practise reported speech, examples of reported speech, check your understanding of reported speech, frequently asked questions on reported speech in english, what is reported speech.

Reported speech is the form in which one can convey a message said by oneself or someone else, mostly in the past. It can also be said to be the third person view of what someone has said. In this form of speech, you need not use quotation marks as you are not quoting the exact words spoken by the speaker, but just conveying the message.

Now, take a look at the following dictionary definitions for a clearer idea of what it is.

Reported speech, according to the Oxford Learner’s Dictionary, is defined as “a report of what somebody has said that does not use their exact words.” The Collins Dictionary defines reported speech as “speech which tells you what someone said, but does not use the person’s actual words.” According to the Cambridge Dictionary, reported speech is defined as “the act of reporting something that was said, but not using exactly the same words.” The Macmillan Dictionary defines reported speech as “the words that you use to report what someone else has said.”

Reported speech is a little different from direct speech . As it has been discussed already, reported speech is used to tell what someone said and does not use the exact words of the speaker. Take a look at the following rules so that you can make use of reported speech effectively.

  • The first thing you have to keep in mind is that you need not use any quotation marks as you are not using the exact words of the speaker.
  • You can use the following formula to construct a sentence in the reported speech.
  • You can use verbs like said, asked, requested, ordered, complained, exclaimed, screamed, told, etc. If you are just reporting a declarative sentence , you can use verbs like told, said, etc. followed by ‘that’ and end the sentence with a full stop . When you are reporting interrogative sentences, you can use the verbs – enquired, inquired, asked, etc. and remove the question mark . In case you are reporting imperative sentences , you can use verbs like requested, commanded, pleaded, ordered, etc. If you are reporting exclamatory sentences , you can use the verb exclaimed and remove the exclamation mark . Remember that the structure of the sentences also changes accordingly.
  • Furthermore, keep in mind that the sentence structure , tense , pronouns , modal verbs , some specific adverbs of place and adverbs of time change when a sentence is transformed into indirect/reported speech.

Transforming Direct Speech into Reported Speech

As discussed earlier, when transforming a sentence from direct speech into reported speech, you will have to change the pronouns, tense and adverbs of time and place used by the speaker. Let us look at the following tables to see how they work.

Here are some tips you can follow to become a pro in using reported speech.

  • Select a play, a drama or a short story with dialogues and try transforming the sentences in direct speech into reported speech.
  • Write about an incident or speak about a day in your life using reported speech.
  • Develop a story by following prompts or on your own using reported speech.

Given below are a few examples to show you how reported speech can be written. Check them out.

  • Santana said that she would be auditioning for the lead role in Funny Girl.
  • Blaine requested us to help him with the algebraic equations.
  • Karishma asked me if I knew where her car keys were.
  • The judges announced that the Warblers were the winners of the annual acapella competition.
  • Binsha assured that she would reach Bangalore by 8 p.m.
  • Kumar said that he had gone to the doctor the previous day.
  • Lakshmi asked Teena if she would accompany her to the railway station.
  • Jibin told me that he would help me out after lunch.
  • The police ordered everyone to leave from the bus stop immediately.
  • Rahul said that he was drawing a caricature.

Transform the following sentences into reported speech by making the necessary changes.

1. Rachel said, “I have an interview tomorrow.”

2. Mahesh said, “What is he doing?”

3. Sherly said, “My daughter is playing the lead role in the skit.”

4. Dinesh said, “It is a wonderful movie!”

5. Suresh said, “My son is getting married next month.”

6. Preetha said, “Can you please help me with the invitations?”

7. Anna said, “I look forward to meeting you.”

8. The teacher said, “Make sure you complete the homework before tomorrow.”

9. Sylvester said, “I am not going to cry anymore.”

10. Jade said, “My sister is moving to Los Angeles.”

Now, find out if you have answered all of them correctly.

1. Rachel said that she had an interview the next day.

2. Mahesh asked what he was doing.

3. Sherly said that her daughter was playing the lead role in the skit.

4. Dinesh exclaimed that it was a wonderful movie.

5. Suresh said that his son was getting married the following month.

6. Preetha asked if I could help her with the invitations.

7. Anna said that she looked forward to meeting me.

8. The teacher told us to make sure we completed the homework before the next day.

9. Sylvester said that he was not going to cry anymore.

10. Jade said that his sister was moving to Los Angeles.

What is reported speech?

What is the definition of reported speech.

Reported speech, according to the Oxford Learner’s Dictionary, is defined as “a report of what somebody has said that does not use their exact words.” The Collins Dictionary defines reported speech as “speech which tells you what someone said, but does not use the person’s actual words.” According to the Cambridge Dictionary, reported speech is defined as “the act of reporting something that was said, but not using exactly the same words.” The Macmillan Dictionary defines reported speech as “the words that you use to report what someone else has said.”

What is the formula of reported speech?

You can use the following formula to construct a sentence in the reported speech. Subject said that (report whatever the speaker said)

Give some examples of reported speech.

Given below are a few examples to show you how reported speech can be written.

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Your Mobile number and Email id will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Request OTP on Voice Call

Post My Comment

reported speech con did

  • Share Share

Register with BYJU'S & Download Free PDFs

Register with byju's & watch live videos.

Live Support

Talk to our experts

1800-120-456-456

  • Reported Speech

ffImage

Reported Speech How does it Work?

Indirect speech or Reported speech is just a way of expressing your intent in questions, statements or other phrases, without essentially quoting them outrightly as the way it is done in indirect speech.

Reported Speech Rules

To understand Reported Speech Grammar and Reported Verbs, you need to first understand reported speech rules and how it works. Here are some types of reported speech:

Reported Statements

Reported speech is used when someone says a sentence, like, "I'm going to the movie tonight". Later, we want to tell a 3rd person what the first person is doing.

It works like this:

We use a reporting verb i.e 'say' or 'tell'. In the present tense, just put in 'he says.

Direct Speech: I like burgers.

Reported Speech: He says (that) he likes burgers.

You don't need to change the tense, but you do need to switch the 'person' from 'I' to 'he’. You also need to change words like 'my' and 'your'.

But, in case the reporting verb is in the past tense, then change the tenses in the reported speech itself.

Reported Questions

Reported questions to go like 

Direct Speech: Where do you reside?

We make the change to reported speech by-

It is similar to reported statements. The tense changes are exact, and we keep the question’s word. But we need to change the grammar of that normal sentence into positive. For eg:

Reported Speech: He asked me where I resided.

The direct speech question is in the present simple tense. We make a present simple question with 'do' or 'does'. For that, I need to take that away. Then change the verb to the past simple. 

Direct Speech: Where is Jolly?

Reported Speech: He asked me where Jolly was.

The direct question is the present simple of 'be'. We change the question form of the present simple of being by changing the position of the subject and the verb. So, change them back before putting the verb into the past simple.

Here Are Some More Examples

Reported Requests

The reported speech goes a long way. What if a person asks you to do something politely or make a request? It’s called a reported request. For example

Direct Speech: Close the door, please / Could you close the door please? / Would you mind closing the door, please?

All these requests mean the same, so we don't need to report every word there when we tell a 3rd person about it. 

We can simply use 'ask me + to + infinitive':

Reported Speech: They asked me to close the door.

Direct Speech: Please be punctual.

Reported Speech: They asked us to be punctual.

Reported Orders

And lastly, how about when someone doesn't ask that politely? This is known as an 'order' in English, which is when someone tells you to do something pretty much directly. This is called a reported order. For example

Direct Speech: Stand up right now!

We make this into a reported speech in the same way as that for a request. Just use 'tell' rather than 'ask':

Reported Speech: She told me to stand up right now.

Time Expressions within the Ambit of Reported Speech

Sometimes when we want to change the direct speech into reported speech, we will have to change the time expressions too. We don't necessarily always have to do that. However, It depends on when we heard the speech in indirect form and when we said the speech in reported form. 

For Example,

It's Sunday. Kiran Ma’am says "I'm leaving today".

If You tell someone on Sunday, You will say "Kiran Ma’am said she was leaving today".

If you tell someone on Tuesday, You will say "Kiran Ma’am said she was leaving yesterday".

If you tell someone on Friday, you will say "Kiran Ma’am said she was leaving on Sunday ".

If you tell someone a month later, you will say "Kiran Ma’am said she was leaving that day".

So, technically there's no easy way to convert. You need to put in real effort and have to think about it when the direct speech is said.

Here's a Table of How Some Conversions can be Made 

now can be converted to then / at that time

today can be converted to yesterday / that day / Tuesday / the 27 th of June

yesterday can be converted to the day before yesterday / the day before / Wednesday / the 5th of December

last night can be converted to the night before, Thursday night

last week can be converted to the week before / the previous week

tomorrow can be converted to today / the next day / the following day / Friday

Now Let us Check our Understanding Through this Table

This is all about reported speech. English grammar is a tricky thing given both the rules and practice. Reading these rules solely will not help you to get a strong grasp of them. You also have to practice reported speech sentences in practical life to know how and when they can be used.

arrow-right

FAQs on Reported Speech

1. How to convert present tenses to reported speech and give some examples.

There are certain rules to follow while converting sentences to reported speech. We need to manage tenses also.

Usually, the present sentences change to simple past tense.

Ex: I do yoga every morning

She said that she did yoga every morning.

I play cricket a lot

He said that he played cricket a lot 

Usually The present continuous tense changes to the past continuous tense. 

Ex: My friend is watching a movie.

She said that her friend was watching a movie.

We are eating dinner

They said that they were eating dinner.

Usually, the  Present Perfect Tense changes into Past Perfect Tense

Ex: I have been to the USA

She told me that she had been to the USA.

She has finished her task.

She said that she had finished her task.

Usually the Present Perfect Progressive Tense changes into Past Perfect Tense

2. How to convert present tenses to reported speech and give some examples.

Usually the Past Simple Tense changes into the Past Perfect Tense.

Ex: He arrived on Friday

He said that he had arrived on Friday.

My mom enjoyed the stay here

He said that his mom had enjoyed the stay there.

Usually, the Past Progressive Tense changes into the Perfect Continuous Tense

Ex: I was playing the cricket

He said that he had been playing cricket.

My husband was cooking

She said that her husband had been cooking.

Usually, the Past Perfect Tense doesn’t change.

Ex: She had worked hard.

She said that she had worked hard.

And also the Past Perfect Progressive Tense doesn’t change.

3. State the rules for conversion of future tenses into reported speech

There are rules to follow while converting the future tenses to reported speech.

In general, the Future Simple Tense changes into would. And also the future Progressive Tense changes into “would be”. The Future Perfect Tense changes into “would have”. The Future Perfect Progressive Tense changes into “would have been”.

Ex: I will be attending the wedding.

She said that she would be attending the wedding.

4. Give examples for conversion of  ‘can ‘, ‘can’t’ and ‘will’,’’won’t’ 

5. Give some examples for reported requests and reported orders.  

agendaweb.org

Reported speech - 1

Reported speech - 2

Reported speech - 3

Worksheets - handouts

Reported speech

Worksheets - pdf exercises.

  • Reported statements - worksheet
  • Worksheet - reported questions
  • Reported yes/no questions
  • Worksheet - reported speech
  • Reported speech - exercises pdf
  • Indirect speech - exercises
  • Reported speech - exercises
  • Mixed reported speech 1
  • Mixed reported speech 2
  • Reported speech 1 
  • Reported speech 2  
  • Reported speech 3 
  • Reported speech 4
  • Reported speech 5
  • Reported wh- questions
  • Reported speech - worksheet 
  • Reported commands
  • Reported questions
  • Reported speech 1
  • Reported speech 2
  • Reported requests and orders
  • Reported speech exercise
  • Reported questions - worksheet
  • Indirect speech - worksheet
  • Worksheets pdf - print
  • Grammar worksheets - handouts

Grammar - lessons

  • Reported speech - grammar notes
  • How to use reported speech - lesson
  • Tense changes - grammar

Reported Speech – Free Exercise

Write the following sentences in indirect speech. Pay attention to backshift and the changes to pronouns, time, and place.

  • Two weeks ago, he said, “I visited this museum last week.” → Two weeks ago, he said that   . I → he|simple past → past perfect|this → that|last …→ the … before
  • She claimed, “I am the best for this job.” → She claimed that   . I → she|simple present→ simple past|this→ that
  • Last year, the minister said, “The crisis will be overcome next year.” → Last year, the minister said that   . will → would|next …→ the following …
  • My riding teacher said, “Nobody has ever fallen off a horse here.” → My riding teacher said that   . present perfect → past perfect|here→ there
  • Last month, the boss explained, “None of my co-workers has to work overtime now.” → Last month, the boss explained that   . my → his/her|simple present→ simple past|now→ then

Rewrite the question sentences in indirect speech.

  • She asked, “What did he say?” → She asked   . The subject comes directly after the question word.|simple past → past perfect
  • He asked her, “Do you want to dance?” → He asked her   . The subject comes directly after whether/if |you → she|simple present → simple past
  • I asked him, “How old are you?” → I asked him   . The subject comes directly after the question word + the corresponding adjective (how old)|you→ he|simple present → simple past
  • The tourists asked me, “Can you show us the way?” → The tourists asked me   . The subject comes directly after whether/if |you→ I|us→ them
  • The shop assistant asked the woman, “Which jacket have you already tried on?” → The shop assistant asked the woman   . The subject comes directly after the question word|you→ she|present perfect → past perfect

Rewrite the demands/requests in indirect speech.

  • The passenger requested the taxi driver, “Stop the car.” → The passenger requested the taxi driver   . to + same wording as in direct speech
  • The mother told her son, “Don’t be so loud.” → The mother told her son   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t
  • The policeman told us, “Please keep moving.” → The policeman told us   . to + same wording as in direct speech ( please can be left off)
  • She told me, “Don’t worry.” → She told me   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t
  • The zookeeper told the children, “Don’t feed the animals.” → The zookeeper told the children   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t

How good is your English?

Find out with Lingolia’s free grammar test

Take the test!

Maybe later

  • Grammar Lessons
  • Grammar Exercises
  • Grammar Quizzes
  • Mixed Tests
  • PDF Worksheets
  • Beginners Lessons
  • Easy Worksheets
  • Beginners Tests
  • Reading Exercises
  • Drag & Drop Grammar
  • English For Kids
  • Kids Word Games
  • Picture Vocabulary
  • Reading Tests
  • Short Dialogues
  • Short Sentences
  • Closest in Meaning
  • Irrelevant Sentence
  • ESL Paragraphs
  • GRE Reading
  • Text Completion
  • GRE Equivalence
  • SAT Sentence
  • Essay Writing
  • Vocabulary Exercises
  • Study Skills Tips
  • Drag & Drop Vocab

Reported Speech WH-Questions

Reported Speech Yes/No Questions Video

GrammarBank YouTube Video Exercises

reported speech con did

Conditionals and Reported Speech

reported speech con did

Have you started learning conditionals ? You probably fear you’ll make a lot of mistakes with all those complicated rules, right? And to make things even more complicated, there’s the reported speech. How can you report conditional sentences?

There are numerous English language schools and programs in California that can help you with all the doubts you may have. But to truly master the conditionals and other aspects of the English language, you should rely on as many reliable resources as possible. So, keep reading this article as we explain how if-clauses are changed in reported speech. 

Contact us online and get a quote today or call us via WhatsApp!

reported speech con did

Can we use "if" in reported speech?

“If” is a conjunction we use in indirect speech when we report yes/no questions. 

Direct speech: Do you want to go to the cinema?

Indirect speech: He asked if I wanted to go to the cinema.

Also, if we want to report a conditional sentence, we’ll keep “if” in the reported speech too.

Direct speech: If it doesn’t rain, I’ll go for a walk.

Indirect speech: She said that if it didn’t rain, she’d go for a walk.

How do you change the if-clause in reported speech?

To see what tense and modal changes occur, let’s examine each type of conditional sentence separately. 

Zero conditional in reported speech

The tense shift will occur only in instances when the condition is no longer valid. Otherwise, the tenses remain the same.

Mom: If dad gets angry, he always reads a newspaper in the living room and ignores everybody else.

Mom said that if dad gets angry, he always reads a newspaper in the living room and ignores everybody else. (Dad still does this.)

Mom said that if dad got angry, he always read a newspaper in the living room and ignored everybody else. (Dad doesn’t do this anymore. Mom just described his past habit.)

First conditional in reported speech

If we need to report a first conditional sentence, the following changes might take place.

Luke: If we hurry up, we’ll catch the bus .

Luke said that if we hurry up, we’ll catch the bus. (This information is still relevant. Luke and his interlocutor still have time to catch the bus.)

Luke said that if we hurried up, we’d catch the bus. (These reported words aren’t relevant anymore. The bus has already left. Note the tense and modal shift: the present simple becomes the past simple , and will becomes would .)

Second conditional in reported speech

The above tense and modal shifting rules apply to the second conditional too. If the condition is still relevant, no changes occur. However, if it’s outdated, the past simple becomes the past perfect , and would becomes would + have + past participle. 

Sofia: If I had more money, I would buy a new car. 

Sofia said that if she had more money, she would buy a new car. (Sofia still doesn’t have money, and consequently, she can’t buy a new car.)

Sofia said that if she had had more money, she would have bought a new car. (The speaker remembers Sofia’s words and wishes from the past. Maybe Sofia doesn’t have any money issues now.)

Third conditional in reported speech

When reporting third conditionals, there is no change in the verb form:

Tania: If I had seen him, I would have told him about the accident.

Tania said that if she had seen him, she would have told him about the accident .

Where to find the most reliable English language schools and programs in California?

Are you fed up with practicing English by yourself? Do you want to find a California-based school with a program specially tailored to satisfy your learning needs? The College of English Language is there for you. Our teachers boast many years of teaching experience under their belt, and successful teaching methods up their sleeves, and you'll soon notice a huge difference in your daily communication in English .

Visit us in one of our three locations in San Diego, Santa Monica , and Pacific Beach, and enjoy learning English in state-of-the-art classrooms with top teachers. We are waiting for you!

Snopes

Rumor Claims Sneaker Con Crowd Booed Trump and Chanted 'Let's Go Biden.' Here Are the Facts

O n Feb. 17, 2024, former U.S. President Donald Trump made a brief appearance at a sneaker  convention  at the Philadelphia Convention Center in Pennsylvania.

In front of an enthusiastic crowd at Sneaker Con, Trump carried up to a lectern a pair of shiny gold high tops with an American flag detail on the back. The newly announced, Trump-inspired shoes were named "Never Surrender High-Tops" and cost $399, according to  The Associated Press , which also noted that his convention-hall appearance to "hawk" the shoes came just one day after a New York judge announced a $355 million ruling against him in his civil fraud trial.

Two of the rumors that came out of Trump's appearance were that the crowd booed him and that they joined together to chant "Let's Go Biden!" While the rumor of the booing requires some further explanation, the claim about the chant was false. Some members of the crowd yelled the familiar Trump rally chant of "F--- Joe Biden!" — not "Let's Go Biden!" — as a way of showing support for the former president.

Instead of applying a single fact-check rating to collectively rate two different claims — one that appears to be surrounded by misleading posts that are short on evidence and another that's false — we have instead laid out all of the facts in the story below.

Examples of the 'Trump Booed' Claim

Following Trump's appearance at the convention hall, the progressive network Meidas Touch posted  ( archived ) on YouTube, "Trump Gets MERCILESSLY BOOED at Philadelphia 'Sneaker Con.'" As of this writing, the video had been viewed more than 1.2 million times.

Popular TikTok user @harryjsisson said in a video  ( archived ) with nearly 800,000 views that Trump had been "badly booed."

MSNBC also highlighted the Sneaker Con booing in a TikTok video , both in the video's caption and at the end of the clip.

On X, user  @Mr_Webcast ( archived ) claimed that Trump was "relentlessly booed" and said he left the stage "after 60 seconds of a planned 45 minute speech." Meanwhile, user @TristanSnell ( archived ) posted, "Trump booed offstage at SneakerCon, quits in a huff after 1 minute — of a planned 60 minute speech."

But rumors about whether a politician was booed at a gathering often appear to be promoted by people who fail to gather a wealth of data before coming to their own partisan-influenced and validation-seeking conclusions.

These popular posts and videos claimed that Trump had been "mercilessly," "badly" and "relentlessly" booed. These are all subjective terms, and it is a stretch to use such language to describe what was apparently a brief few seconds of booing where the target of the boos was unclear. Several people could be heard shouting from the crowd — some positively and others unclear — and it's possible that one or more people were being booed while they were trying to heckle the former president.

To be clear, it was false to say that Trump left the stage after 60 seconds. Trump spoke to the crowd for just over five minutes. He was present in the convention-hall room for just over 14 minutes. Further, we found no evidence that he had planned to give a 45- or 60-minute speech, as some users claimed.

Was Trump Booed at Sneaker Con?

Right-Side Broadcasting Network on YouTube provided a live video of Trump's remarks at Sneaker Con. At the 1:30:05 mark in the YouTube video , just as some feedback noises could be heard coming from the sound system in the room, Trump said to the attendees, "Hello everybody. So, thank you very much. And we have a few young ladies that are up here crying. Look at you with the Trump 2024. Thank you, darling."

One woman near the front of the crowd responded positively to Trump in a high-pitched voice. Trump responded, "I love you too. Wow. Lot of emotion. There's a lot of emotion in this room."

It was at this point that a few seconds of apparent booing could be heard from what seemed to be a small number of people in the crowd. That was followed by the audio system again producing feedback, which seemed similar to the sounds of booing.

Again, due to a lack of evidence, it's unclear whether the brief sounds of some apparent booing were intended for Trump or were directed toward one or more attendees who were shouting at the former president, as one user on X also wondered  ( archived ). (This user did not provide evidence that it was not Trump who was being booed.)

Fact: Crowd Chanted 'We Want Trump' Before Arrival

Snopes searched for other video clips from Sneaker Con to gather more understanding of whether the crowd was supportive of Trump's appearance. After all, such an understanding would drive at the heart of what users were claiming in their posts: that Trump was not welcome at the convention.

The videos Snopes reviewed appeared to show that the crowd was largely supportive of — not opposed to — the former president's appearance.

At least two videos showed what appeared to be many of the attendees chanting "We Want Trump!" before his arrival. The users who posted about booing did not share these clips with their followers.

Fact: Crowd Chanted 'USA!' After Trump's Speech

After Trump was finished making his brief comments — which included him urging young people to vote in the November election — he was met with a raucous chant of "USA!" Like the "We Want Trump!" chant, the chant of "USA!" was not shared by the users who posted about the boos.

Other videos   displayed  supportive convention attendees greeting Trump after his speech, where he signed some of their shoes. Some photos published to the Getty Images website showed members of the crowd with "Make America Great Again" hats and at least one shirt with the words "Joe Biden Sucks."

Further, Snopes found videos from positive-minded TikTok users who were at the convention and  posted more details about the Trump-inspired shoes.

The Crowd Did Not Chant 'Let's Go Biden!'

As for the claim about the "Let's Go Biden!" chant, one of the most popular posts on X that promoted the false rumor read, "Omg I f---ing loooove this. Trump is booed as the crowd chants 'let's go Biden.' These young folks are too smart to fall for his s---."

However, again, there's no evidence that the crowd chanted in support of Biden. The crowd chanted "F--- Joe Biden!" and one of the attendees seen chanting in this video clip was one of many people in the crowd who were holding up signs that read "Sneakerheads Love Trump."

For further reading, Snopes previously reported about the origins of the anti-Biden phrase "Let's Go Brandon!"

@americafirst617. "WE WANT TRUMP CHANT BREAKS OUT AT SNEAKER CON IN PHILLY!" TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.tiktok.com/@americafirst617/video/7336685144285416750 .

@Axel. "Trump Is out at Sneaker Con Signing People's Shoes." TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.tiktok.com/@Axel./video/7336698735902182698 .

@beaver_punch. "Don't Believe the Media He Wasn't Boo'ed at Sneaker Con in Philly." TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.tiktok.com/@beaver_punch/video/7336953809274506539 .

@jaysse_lopez. "Donald Trump Sneaker Unboxing!" TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.tiktok.com/@jaysse_lopez/video/7336717060447210794 .

Lauer, Claudia, and Jill Colvin. "Trump Hawks $399 Branded Shoes at 'Sneaker Con,' a Day after a $355 Million Ruling against Him." The Associated Press , 17 Feb. 2024, https://apnews.com/article/trump-sneakers-sneaker-con-philadelphia-4de093eda6f8d1c68baf8fe8095f777b .

"LIVE REPLAY: PRESIDENT TRUMP GIVES SPEECH AT SNEAKER CON IN PHILADELPHIA – 2/17/24." YouTube , Right Side Broadcasting Network, 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUt57tv-DRk .

@MSNBC. "Donald Trump announced his new line of sneakers yesterday — to a booing crowd at Sneaker Con yesterday." TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024,  https://www.tiktok.com/@msnbc/video/7337052394179546410 .

"Sneaker Con Philadelphia - February 17, 2024." Sneaker Con , https://sneakercon.com/event/sneaker-con-philadelphia-february-17-2024/ .

@soleloco. "First Look at Trumps First Shoe." TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.tiktok.com/@soleloco/video/7336685032209255722 .

---. "Trump Pulled up to Sneaker Con." TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.tiktok.com/@soleloco/video/7336749488222113067 .

Somodevilla, Chip. "Republican Presidential Candidate and Former President Donald Trump..." Getty Images , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/republican-presidential-candidate-and-former-president-news-photo/2018512012 .

---. "Supporters and Attendees Listen to Republican Presidential Candidate..." Getty Images , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/supporters-and-attendees-listen-to-republican-presidential-news-photo/2018531692 .

Snopes Staff. "'Let's Go Brandon': A Collection of Stories." Snopes , 2 Nov. 2021, https://www.snopes.com//collections/lets-go-brandon/ .

@swaggyomar. "Omfg." TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024, https://www.tiktok.com/@swaggyomar/video/7336684450727660842 .

@ttbanned1980. TikTok , 17 Feb. 2024,  https://www.tiktok.com/@ttbanned1980/video/7336696699798228270 .

Rumors claimed that Trump was booed and received a let's go Biden chant when he made an appearance at Sneaker Con in Philadelphia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

  • B1-B2 grammar

Reported speech: questions

Reported speech: questions

Do you know how to report a question that somebody asked? Test what you know with interactive exercises and read the explanation to help you.

Look at these examples to see how we can tell someone what another person asked.

direct speech: 'Do you work from home?' he said. indirect speech: He asked me if I worked from home. direct speech: 'Who did you see?' she asked. indirect speech: She asked me who I'd seen. direct speech: 'Could you write that down for me?' she asked. indirect speech: She asked me to write it down.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Grammar B1-B2: Reported speech 2: 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

A reported question is when we tell someone what another person asked. To do this, we can use direct speech or indirect speech.

direct speech: 'Do you like working in sales?' he asked. indirect speech: He asked me if I liked working in sales.

In indirect speech, we change the question structure (e.g. Do you like ) to a statement structure (e.g. I like ).

We also often make changes to the tenses and other words in the same way as for reported statements (e.g. have done → had done , today → that day ). You can learn about these changes on the Reported speech 1 – statements page.

Yes / no questions

In yes / no questions, we use if or whether to report the question. If is more common.

'Are you going to the Helsinki conference?' He asked me if I was going to the Helsinki conference. 'Have you finished the project yet?' She asked us whether we'd finished the project yet.

Questions with a question word

In what , where , why , who , when or how questions, we use the question word to report the question.

'What time does the train leave?' He asked me what time the train left. 'Where did he go?' She asked where he went.

Reporting verbs

The most common reporting verb for questions is ask , but we can also use verbs like enquire , want to know or wonder .

'Did you bring your passports?' She wanted to know if they'd brought their passports. 'When could you get this done by?' He wondered when we could get it done by.

Offers, requests and suggestions

If the question is making an offer, request or suggestion, we can use a specific verb pattern instead, for example offer + infinitive, ask + infinitive or suggest + ing.

'Would you like me to help you?' He offered to help me. 'Can you hold this for me, please?' She asked me to hold it. 'Why don't we check with Joel?' She suggested checking with Joel.

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Grammar B1-B2: Reported speech 2: 2

Language level

She offered me to encourage studying English. She asked us if we could give her a hand.

  • Log in or register to post comments

He said, "I wished she had gone."

How to change this sentence into indirect speech?

Hello bhutuljee,

'He said that he wished she had gone.'

Best wishes, Kirk LearnEnglish team

He said, "I wish she went."

How to change the above sentence into indirect speech?

Hi bhutuljee,

It would be: "He said that he wished she had gone."

LearnEnglish team

He said , "She wished John would succeed."

This is the third sentence you've asked us to transform in this way. While we try to offer as much help as we can, we are not a service for giving answers to questions which may be from tests or homework so we do limit these kinds of answers. Perhaps having read the information on the page above you can try to transform the sentence yourself and we will tell you if you have done it correctly or not.

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, I hope my comment finds you well and fine. 1- reported question of "where did he go?"

Isn't it: She asked where he had gone?

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/grammar/b1-b2-grammar/reported-…

2- how can I report poilte questions with( can I, May I) For example: She asked me" Can I borrow some money?"

Your reply will be highly appreciated.

Hello alrufai,

1) The version of the sentence you suggest is also correct. In informal situations, we often don't change the past simple into the past perfect, but in formal situations we do so more often.

2) 'can', 'may' and 'might' all become 'could' in reported questions like these: 'She asked if she could borrow some money.'

I wonder if there are any occasions we can't use "Why" for reported speech? I'm not sure for this one. Thank you

Online courses

Footer:Live classes

Group and one-to-one classes with expert teachers.

Footer:Self-study

Learn English in your own time, at your own pace.

Footer:Personalised Tutor

One-to-one sessions focused on a personal plan.

Footer:IELTS preparation

Get the score you need with private and group classes.  

  • Election 2024
  • Entertainment
  • Newsletters
  • Photography
  • Press Releases
  • Israel-Hamas War
  • Russia-Ukraine War
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Asia Pacific
  • AP Top 25 College Football Poll
  • Movie reviews
  • Book reviews
  • Financial Markets
  • Business Highlights
  • Financial wellness
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Social Media

Trump hawks $399 branded shoes at ‘Sneaker Con,’ a day after a $355 million ruling against him

Former President Donald Trump unveiled a new line of shoes at Sneaker Con. The gold lame high tops with an American flag detail on the back are being sold as “The Never Surrender High-Tops” for $399.

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump holds gold Trump sneakers at Sneaker Con Philadelphia, an event popular among sneaker collectors, in Philadelphia, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump holds gold Trump sneakers at Sneaker Con Philadelphia, an event popular among sneaker collectors, in Philadelphia, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

  • Copy Link copied

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump attends Sneaker Con Philadelphia, an event popular among sneaker collectors, in Philadelphia, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024. Trump announced a line of shoes bearing his name. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump looks at gold Trump sneakers at Sneaker Con Philadelphia, an event popular among sneaker collectors, in Philadelphia, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump gestures to the crowd at Sneaker Con Philadelphia, an event popular among sneaker collectors, in Philadelphia, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Supporter Donna Bernhard of Adamstown, Pa., points at Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump at Sneaker Con Philadelphia, an event popular among sneaker collectors, in Philadelphia, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024. Trump brought her up on stage. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump hugs supporter Donna Bernhard of Adamstown, Pa., as he attends Sneaker Con Philadelphia, an event popular among sneaker collectors, and announces a gold Trump sneaker, in Philadelphia, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2024. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — As he closes in on the Republican presidential nomination, former President Donald Trump made a highly unusual stop Saturday, hawking new Trump-branded sneakers at “Sneaker Con,” a gathering that bills itself as the “The Greatest Sneaker Show on Earth.”

Trump was met with loud boos as well as cheers at the Philadelphia Convention Center as he introduced what he called the first official Trump footwear.

The shoes, shiny gold high tops with an American flag detail on the back, are being sold as “Never Surrender High-Tops” for $399 on a new website that also sells other Trump-branded shoes and “Victory47” cologne and perfume for $99 a bottle. He’d be the 47th president if elected again.

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump speaks at his Mar-a-Lago estate, Friday, Feb. 16, 2024, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

The website says it has no connection to Trump’s campaign, though Trump campaign officials promoted the appearance in online posts.

The unannounced launch came a day after a judge in New York ordered Trump and his company to pay a whopping $355 million in penalties , finding that the former president lied about his wealth for years, scheming to dupe banks, insurers and others by inflating his wealth on financial statements.

That penalty came after Trump was ordered to pay an additional $83.3 million to the writer E. Jean Carroll for damaging her reputation after she accused him of sexual assault. With interest payments, Trump’s legal debts might now exceed a half-billion dollars — an amount it is unclear he can afford to pay.

Trump’s appearance was met with clashing boos from his detractors and chants of “USA!” from supporters who arrived at the sneaker event decked out in Trump gear. The dueling chants made it difficult, at times, to hear Trump speak.

Some had been given signs that read “SNEAKERHEADS LOVE TRUMP.”

“There’s a lot of emotion in this room,” Trump said of the reaction, after holding up and showing off a pair of gold shoes, then placing one on each side of his podium.

“This is something that I’ve been talking about for 12 years, 13 years. And I think it’s going to be a big success,” he said.

As he spoke, the smell of weed occasionally wafted through the room.

Some of those who attended said they were unaware Trump would be there, and continued to shop as a crowd gathered around the stage. Many in the audience said they were not from the city and instead hailed from nearby states and Washington, D.C.

The attendees skewed younger and more diverse than Trump’s usual rally crowds. Trump’s campaign is hoping he will be able to win over more young and minority voters, particularly young Black men, in a likely rematch against President Joe Biden in November.

This isn’t the first money-making venture Trump has announced since launching his third campaign for the White House in 2022. Trump last year reported making between $100,000 and $1 million from a series of digital trading cards that portrayed him, through photo editing, in a series of cartoon-like images, including as an astronaut, a cowboy and a superhero. He has also released books featuring photos of his time in office and letters written to him through the years.

Before he ran for office, Trump hawked everything from steaks to vodka to a venture he called “Trump University.”

The new sneaker website says it is run by CIC Ventures LLC, a company that Trump reported owning in his 2023 financial disclosure. The website states the new venture “is not political and has nothing to do with any political campaign.”

Still, it describes the sneakers as a limited-edition, numbered “true collector’s item” that is “Bold, gold, and tough, just like President Trump.”

“The Never Surrender sneakers are your rally cry in shoe form,” the description reads. “Lace-up and step out ready to conquer.”

A Trump spokesman did not respond to questions about the event, including whether Trump was paid to attend.

Among those in the crowd were Jonathen Santiago, 21, and Danea Mitchell, 20, Trump supporters who drove from Monroe County in the northeastern part of the state for the sneaker event. They said they were excited to see the former president and praised how he interacted with the crowd. They also had kind words for the sneakers.

“The red bottoms were a really nice touch,” Mitchell said.

She shrugged when asked about Trump’s legal troubles. “I think it’ll be an interesting four years if he’s found guilty, but I have no doubt he’ll be president,” she said.

Also in attendance was a group of “cheer moms” from New Jersey who said they were in town for a cheerleading event and decided to stop by for a chance to see Trump.

Karla Burke, 48, said she heard some people booing and making noise, but that most people around her had been supporters. “At the front was a different vibe,” she said.

As for Friday’s penalty in Trump’s civil fraud trial, Burke said it doesn’t change her support. “I think it was unfair,” she said. “They’re just going after him so he’s not the Republican candidate.”

Biden-Harris 2024 Communications Director Michael Tyler slammed the appearance, saying: “Donald Trump showing up to hawk bootleg Off-Whites is the closest he’ll get to any Air Force Ones ever again for the rest of his life.”

Trump flew from Philadelphia to Michigan, where he held a rally in the suburbs of Detroit and railed against Friday’s judgment , which he has vowed to appeal. Both Pennsylvania and Michigan are expected to be critical battleground states.

Colvin reported from New York.

reported speech con did

Trump met with boos and chants while selling sneakers in Philadelphia

The former president went back on the trail after a major legal setback.

The day after a New York judge fined him $355 million in the wake of a lengthy fraud trial, which he plans to appeal, former President Donald Trump spent his Saturday in two battleground states, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

First stop: Sneaker Con in Philadelphia.

"Sneakerheads, you're sneakerheads, right? Does everybody in the room consider themselves a sneakerhead?" Trump said in a short speech to an unusual crowd that was divided between chanting for and booing at him.

The event was supposed to be part of an unveiling of the latest Trump merchandise: gold "Never Surrender" high-top sneakers selling for $399, which are already listed as sold-out online, and "Victory47" fragrances for $99. (Also available: "Red Wave" and $199 "POTUS 45" shoes.)

Trump himself took the stage holding a pair of the high-top sneakers.

But his five-minute remarks, in a heavily Democratic city, were sometimes barely able to be heard as members of the diverse, young crowd were consistently screaming and chanting throughout.

While many booed and chanted at him, others attempted to drown them out with anti-Joe Biden and USA chants.

"This a slightly different audience than I'm used to, but I love this audience," Trump said, struggling to get through his speech.

He attempted to divert the attention by acknowledging his supporters in the crowd, even bringing one of them, a woman, up to the stage where she talked about how much she loves Trump because she said he is a Christian family man.

"They're after him for no reason. Go out and vote for Trump," she said to boos and some cheers.

Trump even acknowledged he wasn't necessarily in friendly territory -- "Right after this, I go to Michigan ... I'll be talking about a slightly different subject than sneakers. But you know what? It's all part of Americana," he said.

That didn't stop him from making his pitch in Philadelphia.

PHOTO: Former President Donald Trump holds gold Trump sneakers at Sneaker Con Philadelphia in Philadelphia, PA, Feb. 17, 2024.

"What's the most important thing: to go out and vote, right? We have to go out and vote. We got to get young people out to vote," he said.

Later, in Michigan, an angry Trump came out swinging, railing against all the prosecutors investigating him. He faces 91 criminal charges, all of which he denies.

He told the fired-up crowd that if he wins the swing state, which will likely be a key battleground, then he will win the entire election.

However, he also misstated the upcoming Republican primary date and gave the wrong year for when he won Michigan -- gaffes that critics like primary rival Nikki Haley have seized on to argue that he is "diminished."

Trump has attacked President Joe Biden for similar slips but defended his own mental acuity. "I feel my mind is stronger now than it was 25 years ago," he said in January.

The former president returned to the campaign trail this weekend in the wake of perhaps his biggest legal setback to date, when the judgment came down at the end of a yearslong civil fraud lawsuit in New York.

With a 92-page order issued late Friday, Judge Arthur Engoron dealt Trump a legal and financial blow that could permanently damage the business empire that propelled him to the presidency.

In addition to the nine-figure penalty, Engoron temporarily stripped Trump and his sons of the ability to lead their own businesses or apply for financing.

Trump's lawyers plan to appeal the ruling, vowing that higher courts will reverse Engoron's ruling.

ABC News' Peter Charalambous contributed to this report.

Top Stories

reported speech con did

AT&T outage caused by software update, company says

  • Feb 22, 7:56 PM

reported speech con did

Texas woman mistaken as intruder and shot by police speaks for the 1st time

  • Feb 15, 5:26 PM

reported speech con did

Moms for Liberty co-founder faces backlash amid sex scandal

  • Feb 22, 11:59 AM

reported speech con did

Judge denies Trump's request to delay enforcement of $355M fraud case penalties

  • Feb 22, 2:44 PM

reported speech con did

Private lander makes first US moon landing in more than 50 years

  • Feb 22, 12:44 PM

ABC News Live

24/7 coverage of breaking news and live events

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

gold high-top with american flag decoration at top

Sneakerheads on Trump’s ‘Never Surrender’ gold shoe: ‘Tacky and very, very dumb’

The ex-president debuted the high-tops just after he was ordered to pay $355m in court

T rump Steaks, Trump University, Trump Vodka – and now, Trump Sneakers. The former president is no stranger to frenzied licensing and intense self-promotion, and the grift continued this weekend, even after a judge ordered him to pay more than $350m in his civil trial ruling.

His next move? Debuting the $399 “Never-Surrender High-Top Sneaker”, branded as “the official” Trump shoe. The 2024 contender stopped at Sneaker Con Philadelphia, a traveling event for sneakerheads, to reveal the shoe on Saturday. Only 1,000 pairs were available to buy, to make this a super limited-edition run; “at least 10” of these shoes will be “randomly autographed” by Trump.

The high-tops were produced under a licensing agreement with a company called 45Footwear. Each one comes with a “custom charm” blazed with an illustration of Trump clad in a tight red superhero jumpsuit, muscles bulging out from underneath.

During Trump’s Sneaker Con speech, the Republican presidential frontrunner said “the most important thing” was “to get young people out to vote”. In 2020, Pennsylvania’s youngest voters, aged 18-29, overwhelmingly voted for Joe Biden, with Trump winning only 35% of the demographic.

According to the Pennsylvania Star-Capital, the Sneaker Con president, Alan Vinogradov, donated $743 to Trump’s re-election campaign last year, along with $827 to his affiliated Trump Save America Pac.

But that didn’t make Trump a popular – or welcome – Sneaker Con guest. Attendees loudly booed during his speech, and many spoke out against his appearance on social media. “Sneaker con should be ashamed for uploading this,” wrote one follower. “No sneaker there, just a con,” another chimed in.

trump speaking behind sneaker

Sneaker Con did not respond to a request for comment, though the event did release an online statement in response to the backlash. “Sneaker Con’s mission is to support and promote sneaker culture through our worldwide live events and digital platforms. We are thankful and appreciative of the sneaker community, and recognize individuals who generate awareness and authentic sneaker related engagement towards our community. #sneakercon,” it read.

Hikmet Sugoer, a German sneakerhead and founder of Solebox, a boutique with locations in six European cities, told the Guardian he was “shocked and disappointed” to see Trump at the event.

“At first I thought it was an April Fool’s joke,” Sugoer said. “Sneakers unite a diverse community around our shared passion, and sneakers should connect us, rather than divide. This move exploited us for selfish reasons.”

Berty Mandagie, a commercial photographer and sneaker enthusiast from Seattle, feels the same way. “Trump has nothing to do with sneakers and sneaker culture consists of people of color who would not feel safe around someone like Trump and his followers,” Mandagie said. “The fact that Sneaker Con turned out to be a Trump rally instead of a sneaker convention is wildly upsetting.”

And what to make of the shoe design? “I think they’re tacky,” Mandagie said. “They look spray-painted with a cheap gold color. The font of the ‘T’ is so basic. It looks like a knockoff shoe produced by Temu.”

Zeke Hannula, a San Francisco-based sneakerhead and content creator, calls the stunt “very, very dumb”.

after newsletter promotion

“He just took the worst parts of sneaker culture and fed into it,” Hannula said. “I think someone on the Trump team just saw how you can release a small amount of sneakers and get notoriety for the insane resale prices, and I hate that. This all seems so cheap and ugly, but that’s very on-brand for Trump.”

Not everyone agrees with Hannula. Some people really like the shoes – and are willing to pay above asking price for their own pair. A luxury watch dealer named Roman Sharf bid $9,000 during an auction at Sneaker Con to secure a pair of his own, which he plans to give to his children.

A video posted to X shows Sharf after winning the sneakers, saying: “Of course I have something to say – Trump 2024!” (Sharf later backtracked in an Instagram post , writing that he “wasn’t trying to make a political statement” by buying the shoes.)

Man paid $9,000 for Donald Trump’s new signature shoes 👀 pic.twitter.com/uWGwnjei5J — Daily Loud (@DailyLoud) February 19, 2024

On Tuesday, GQ reported that a Biden staffer had called the sneakers “bootleg Off-Whites,” referring to the hype-y streetwear line founded by the late designer Virgil Abloh. Continuing with the sassy sneaker references, the staffer added that the high-tops “are the closest [Trump will] ever get to an Air Force One ever again in his life”. (Cringe pandering to the youth vote is a bipartisan sport.)

“It’s like Trump took the most generic sneaker you could possibly think of and then put the ugliest possible materials and color way on it,” Hannula added. “It looks like a cut-and-paste job, not like something that’s been created and copyrighted – though I wouldn’t be surprised if he ripped off a copyrighted design, actually.”

  • Donald Trump

Most viewed

reported speech con did

  • Shop to Support Independent Journalism
  • We Have Issues
  • Investigations
  • Ethics Policy
  • Ad-Free Login

Trump 'booed off the stage' while promoting his golden sneakers: reports

David McAfee

David McAfee

Senior editor, david joined raw story in 2023 after nearly a decade of writing about the legal industry for bloomberg law. he is also a co-founder and a commissioning editor at hypatia press, a publisher that specializes in philosophical works that challenge religion or spirituality..

Trump 'booed off the stage' while promoting his golden sneakers: reports

Donald Trump on Saturday was reportedly booed off stage while promoting his new golden sneakers at "Sneaker Con," an event in Philadelphia.

The former president was ridiculed mercilessly by political experts and internet users for the controversial fundraising attempt, with President Joe Biden's campaign joking that the sneakers are the closest Trump will ever come to "Air Force Ones." Some MAGA influencers, however, were excited to buy a pair of the limited items to support the ex-president.

But later in the speech, there was a moment of consistent booing that at least appears to be aimed at the former president.

ALSO READ: How Speaker Mike Johnson’s dream of bipartisan decency died in his hands

"A lot of emotion. There's a lot of emotion in this room. Thank you," he says over the loud boos. "The nice thing is... we have lines... I want to thank Chase and I want to thank Allen. But we have lines going all around the block." He then continued speaking over them.

Social media users were quick to mock the ex-president's awkward moment.

"HA!! Trump got booed off the stage at Sneakercon in Philadelphia, PA today. His handlers did not vet this well," @Laurieluvsmolly wrote.

"Lol Fraud trump is booed heartily in #Philly . I've never been prouder," user Brian Lane added.

Baldy Banks wrote, "Orange Jesus was booed off stage in Philly this afternoon. This might’ve been the shortest appearance ever for him."

Ernest Owens, an award-winning journalist, added, "Okay, Philly. Y'all representing correctly. Trump getting booed is the correct response."

Another user compared the move to a past mistake of the Trump team.

"Trump getting booed at a sneaker convention lands very close to the four seasons total landscaping conference in vibes," @girldrawsghosts wrote on Saturday.

Watch the video below or click the link.

Stories Chosen For You

Should trump be allowed to run for office, 'insultingly stupid': legal experts spurn trump's bid to ditch classified documents case.

Donald Trump on Thursday filed several motions seeking to throw out the criminal case he faces for allegedly keeping classified documents from the White House from authorities, but legal experts were quick to shut down the court filing.

The former president argued in part that he was immune from the case due to presidential immunity, not referencing the fact that he wasn't president at the time of the alleged misdeeds. Trump's former attorney and "fixer" Michael Cohen said the bid to dismiss the action was all about trial delay and fundraising.

ALSO READ: How Donald Trump is spreading a dangerous mental illness to his supporters

Legal experts were quick to rail against the filings online.

Regarding the motion seeking to dismiss the counts based on presidential immunity, national security attorney Bradley P. Moss said, the motion "is insultingly stupid."

"Trump is arguing he designated all these highly classified records as PERSONAL records, and that he therefore had the right to keep them," Moss said. "Even if that was a plausible argument, this is a motion to dismiss: he can’t introduce news facts."

Former federal prosecutor Joyce Vance also had a problem with that particular filing.

"The arguments are no more meritorious than the ones the court of appeals in DC already rejected," Vance wrote Thursday.

On the motion to dismiss for unconstitutional "vagueness," the security expert Moss said, "I also won’t waste my time with this one. Trump did the standard 'the espionage act provision is unconstitutionally vague' argument every EspAct defendant tries. It will fail. Just like the rest."

Secrets and Laws, an account that purports to be run by a former CIA lawyer, chimed in:

"If Trump really designated all the classified docs he took as 'personal records,' why did he return 184 of them to NARA & another 38 to DOJ in response to the subpoena? And then hide the rest from DOJ & his own attorney? And then attempt to destroy the evidence of all that?"

Trump's new bid to ditch documents case is about fundraising and delay: Michael Cohen

Trump's paper dumping to raise more dollars.

That's according to the 45th president's former personal attorney and fixer Michael Cohen.

"So of course his lawyers are filing this late motion," he said of his former boss during an appearance on CNN's "News Night" with Abby Phillip. "The purpose of this one we all know is to delay, delay, delay."

"So when he loses he can go back to his supporters and say 'We need more money for the lawyers so that way they can file appeals on that as well!' It's all a delay game."

Cohen was opining about former President Donald Trump's latest effort to compel Judge Cannon to nix several classified docs counts on presidential immunity grounds in his criminal obstruction case, citing his absolution based on the Presidential Records Act to keep the records.

"In addition to President Trump’s constitutional authority and DOJ’s established practices prior to this case, presidential discretion to designate records as personal under the PRA adds additional ambiguity for the reasons set forth in President Trump’s motion to dismiss based on the PRA," attorneys for the former president wrote in one of the Thursday filings.

Trump and some of his staffers at Mar-a-Lago have been indicted for unlawfully hoarding classified documents at the Palm Beach country club, and dodging authorities' efforts to retrieve them.

Trump has maintained his innocence and claimed he had every right to keep those documents some of which contained nuclear and national defense response strategies.

But Cohen's convinced that the president is consistently digging in dry sand when it comes to playing the immunity card.

"Every attempt regarding presidential immunity has failed," he said. "And rightfully so.

"First of all, the issue is not that he took them when he was the president of the United States — the issue is, is that they had lied. They had filed documents claiming that they had returned everything, and clearly they did not, and he continues refusing to return the documents."

"That's part of that document case."

Watch below or click here.

Mike Lindell wants to count ballots like he says he makes pillows — by hand

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — Fresh off being ordered to pony up $5 million over peddling election conspiracies, pillow maker Mike Lindell is pushing election conspiracies at this year’s annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC).

Lindell — contrary to all evidence — continues pushing election conspiracies, even as many Republicans gathered at this convention center just outside of the nation’s capital have rejected former President Donald Trump’s losing 2020 strategy and are now encouraging early voting, including by mail.

The MyPillow guy dismisses members of his party — from local officials to those at the Republican National Committee (RNC) — encouraging vote-by-mail in 2024.

“They're completely insane. That's an insane thought there,” Lindell told Raw Story . “They can’t. They're wrong, they're wrong and they're wrong.”

That’s becoming an increasingly lonely position within the GOP, though Trump seems to be one of the few Republicans left in Lindell’s corner after he recently promised to end vote-by-mail if he wins this November.

“Mail-in voting is totally corrupt,” Trump told a Michigan crowd earlier this month. “Get that through your head. It has to be.”

On Wednesday, a federal judge in Minneapolis ruled Lindell has 30 days to pay $5 million to software developer Robert Zeidman.

Zeidman beat Lindell’s so-called “ Prove Mike Wrong ” challenge with a 15-page paper debunking his 2020 conspiracies by proving – first in arbitration and now in a federal court – they’re based on misrepresentations and incomplete data sets.

Lindell plans to appeal. He says the key issue in 2024 is the need to unplug all voting machines in America and go completely wireless.

“You have to go to paper ballots — hand counted — and we will get there,” Lindell said.

Lindell can hardly think about anything else.

“Mike, why aren’t you running for public office?” an older CPAC attendee asked Lindell in-between questions from reporters.

“Because I'm too busy trying to get rid of these electronic voting machines and save the country,” Lindell re[lied. “That's my focus. Nothing else matters.”

Veteran political journalist Ben Jacobs also tried to get Lindell on a different subject at CPAC, to no avail.

“Mike, just a slightly different point,” Jacobs asked. “What do you make of Liz Truss being here?”

“What’s that?”

“Liz Truss, the former prime minister?”

“The former prime minister of the U.K., Liz Truss?”

“What about it?”

“She’s here.”

“I didn’t know,” Lindell replied. “You’re telling me this stuff. I’m focused on machines, guys.”

Lindell also rebuffed questions about MyPillow and its operations.

“Are you changing your behavior and the way you do business using apps and phones and machines?” another reporter asked.

“What now?”

“That's the dumbest question ever heard,” Lindell said. “It's just like this, some things are better done manually, like making my pillows. I make my pillows manually. Every single one of them. You can't have a machine weigh the patented filling and do that right.”

Raw Story stayed on topic.

“Do you trust encrypted apps on your phone? Do you think there’s no way to safeguard…?” Raw Story asked.

“Of course, there's no way to safeguard. Are you kidding?” Lindell said. “Come on, give me a break. Everything –- you cannot use computers in our elections.”

The made-for-TV businessman says the pillows and sheets he peddles are different from elections.

“I have a huge business. If we get hacked, or businesses get hacked … let's say it's a breach, a cyber breach … insurance covers it. It's all about money and life goes on. It's all about money,” Lindell said. “But when elections get hacked, you lose your country. Everything's based on election, not selections. We have to have elections.”

reported speech con did

‘Leave the drama to them:’ Mother of Lauren Boebert’s grandson speaks out

Trump supporters hope they can create enough chaos to fulfill this one fantasy.

Copyright © 2024 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | Manage Preferences | Debug Logs For corrections contact [email protected] , for support contact [email protected] .

reported speech con did

  • Pre-Markets
  • U.S. Markets
  • Cryptocurrency
  • Futures & Commodities
  • Funds & ETFs
  • Health & Science
  • Real Estate
  • Transportation
  • Industrials

Small Business

Personal Finance

  • Financial Advisors
  • Options Action
  • Buffett Archive
  • Trader Talk
  • Cybersecurity
  • Social Media
  • CNBC Disruptor 50
  • White House
  • Equity and Opportunity
  • Business Day Shows
  • Entertainment Shows
  • Full Episodes
  • Latest Video
  • CEO Interviews
  • CNBC Documentaries
  • CNBC Podcasts
  • Digital Originals
  • Live TV Schedule
  • Trust Portfolio
  • Trade Alerts
  • Meeting Videos
  • Homestretch
  • Jim's Columns
  • Stock Screener
  • Market Forecast
  • Options Investing
  • Chart Investing

Credit Cards

Credit Monitoring

Help for Low Credit Scores

All Credit Cards

Find the Credit Card for You

Best Credit Cards

Best Rewards Credit Cards

Best Travel Credit Cards

Best 0% APR Credit Cards

Best Balance Transfer Credit Cards

Best Cash Back Credit Cards

Best Credit Card Welcome Bonuses

Best Credit Cards to Build Credit

Find the Best Personal Loan for You

Best Personal Loans

Best Debt Consolidation Loans

Best Loans to Refinance Credit Card Debt

Best Loans with Fast Funding

Best Small Personal Loans

Best Large Personal Loans

Best Personal Loans to Apply Online

Best Student Loan Refinance

All Banking

Find the Savings Account for You

Best High Yield Savings Accounts

Best Big Bank Savings Accounts

Best Big Bank Checking Accounts

Best No Fee Checking Accounts

No Overdraft Fee Checking Accounts

Best Checking Account Bonuses

Best Money Market Accounts

Best Credit Unions

All Mortgages

Best Mortgages

Best Mortgages for Small Down Payment

Best Mortgages for No Down Payment

Best Mortgages with No Origination Fee

Best Mortgages for Average Credit Score

Adjustable Rate Mortgages

Affording a Mortgage

All Insurance

Best Life Insurance

Best Homeowners Insurance

Best Renters Insurance

Best Car Insurance

Travel Insurance

All Credit Monitoring

Best Credit Monitoring Services

Best Identity Theft Protection

How to Boost Your Credit Score

Credit Repair Services

All Personal Finance

Best Budgeting Apps

Best Expense Tracker Apps

Best Money Transfer Apps

Best Resale Apps and Sites

Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) Apps

Best Debt Relief

All Small Business

Best Small Business Savings Accounts

Best Small Business Checking Accounts

Best Credit Cards for Small Business

Best Small Business Loans

Best Tax Software for Small Business

Filing For Free

Best Tax Software

Best Tax Software for Small Businesses

Tax Refunds

Tax Brackets

Tax By State

Tax Payment Plans

All Help for Low Credit Scores

Best Credit Cards for Bad Credit

Best Personal Loans for Bad Credit

Best Debt Consolidation Loans for Bad Credit

Personal Loans if You Don't Have Credit

Best Credit Cards for Building Credit

Personal Loans for 580 Credit Score or Lower

Personal Loans for 670 Credit Score or Lower

Best Mortgages for Bad Credit

Best Hardship Loans

All Investing

Best IRA Accounts

Best Roth IRA Accounts

Best Investing Apps

Best Free Stock Trading Platforms

Best Robo-Advisors

Index Funds

Mutual Funds

Trump ordered to pay $454 million in fines and interest in NY business fraud case

thumbnail

  • Donald Trump has been ordered to pay about $454 million in total penalties after a judge found that Trump, his company and others fraudulently inflated assets to boost his net worth and get financial perks.
  • That includes about $355 million in disgorgement and more than $98 million in prejudgment interest at a 9% annual rate.
  • Manhattan Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron also barred Trump for three years from serving as an officer or director of any New York corporation, or applying for loans from any New York chartered or registered financial institution.
  • "Their complete lack of contrition and remorse borders on pathological," Engoron wrote in a scathing ruling.

A New York judge on Friday ordered Donald Trump to pay about $454 million in total penalties as part of his ruling in the former president's civil business fraud trial.

The staggering figure includes about $355 million in disgorgement, a term for returning ill-gotten gains, plus more than $98 million in prejudgment interest that will accrue every day until it is paid, according to a spokesperson for the attorney general's office.

Manhattan Supreme Court Judge Arthur Engoron also barred Trump from running a business in New York for three years.

The former president also faces a three-year ban on applying for loans from financial institutions registered with the state.

"New York means business in combating business fraud," Engoron wrote in the 92-page ruling.

The judge delivered the final decision from the trial, which was held without a jury.

"We've employed tens of thousands of people in New York, and we pay taxes like few other people have ever paid in New York," Trump said in remarks at his Mar-a-Lago resort after the ruling. "They don't care about that. It's a state that's going bust because everybody's leaving."

His attorney Chris Kise said in a statement earlier Friday that Trump "will of course appeal."

The former president "remains confident the Appellate Division will ultimately correct the innumerable and catastrophic errors made by a trial court untethered to the law or to reality," Kise said.

The appeals process could take several years to resolve.

The explosive trial stemmed from New York Attorney General Letitia James' lawsuit accusing Trump, his two adult sons, his company and top executives of fraudulently inflating Trump's assets to boost his stated net worth and obtain various financial perks.

"There simply cannot be different rules for different people," James said in a statement celebrating the ruling Friday afternoon.

"Everyday Americans cannot lie to a bank to get a mortgage to buy a home, and if they did, our government would throw the book at them," James said.

James had asked Engoron to ban Trump for life from New York's real estate industry, and for $370 million in disgorgement.

Instead, Engoron fined Trump $354,868,768 in disgorgement. He also ordered Trump to pay a total of $98.6 million in prejudgment interest, which will accrue at an annual rate of 9%.

The grand total, including disgorgement and interest, for all defendants in the case: just under $464 million.

Of that sum, Eric Trump and Donald Trump Jr., who took over the Trump Organization after their father became president in 2017, have been ordered to pay more than $4 million each.

Eric and Donald Jr. also face two-year bans from serving as officers or directors of any New York corporation or legal entity.

Co-defendants Allen Weisselberg, the Trump Organization's former chief financial officer, and the company's comptroller, Jeffrey McConney, are permanently banned from controlling the finances of a New York business, Engoron ruled.

But the judge vacated his own prior directive to cancel the defendants' business certificates, meaning he is no longer pursuing what some legal experts described as a "corporate death penalty" for the Trump Organization.

The decision is only the latest court-ordered punishment imposed on Trump, who is running for president while dealing with numerous criminal and civil lawsuits. Last month, a jury in a separate civil case in New York federal court ordered Trump to pay $83.3 million for defaming writer E. Jean Carroll when he responded to her claim that he had raped her in the mid-1990s.

Trump is the clear front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination, setting up a likely rematch with President Joe Biden , who beat him in 2020.

Lawyers for Trump and the other defendants quickly blasted Friday's ruling, accusing the judge and the prosecutor of political bias and warning that the outcome will drive business away from New York.

"Countless hours of testimony proved that there was no wrongdoing, no crime, and no victim," Trump attorney Alina Habba said in a statement.

But Engoron wrote in his ruling that the statute used in the case does not require that a victim lose money.

"It is undisputed that defendants have made all required payments on time; the next group of lenders to receive bogus statements might not be so lucky," he wrote.

"Defendants submitted blatantly false financial data" as they sought to borrow more money at better loan rates, "resulting in fraudulent financial statements," Engoron wrote.

He also pointed to the Trump team's legal defenses, saying they proved the company and its officers would keep operating the same way they always had unless he forced them to change.

"When confronted at trial with the statements, defendants' fact and expert witnesses simply denied reality," the judge wrote.

Their "refusal to admit error" led the judge to conclude "that they will engage in it going forward unless judicially restrained."

"Indeed, Donald Trump testified that, even today, he does not believe the Trump Organization needed to make any changes based on the facts that came out during this trial," Engoron wrote.

"Their complete lack of contrition and remorse borders on pathological."

Read more on this Trump fraud trial

  • Trump lashes out at financial monitor in business fraud case after she reports errors
  • Trump storms out of fraud trial after judge clashes with his attorneys, fines him $10,000 for violating gag order
  • New York AG pushing for lifetime Trump ban cites Martin Shkreli ruling

Trump has frequently raged against his many legal battles as "witch hunts," claiming they are part of a Biden administration-backed conspiracy to tank his political ambitions.

He vociferously denied all wrongdoing in the New York fraud case, blaring his claims of total innocence on social media, at the courthouse and even on the witness stand.

Trump claimed to be worth far more than what was reported on his financial statements, while asserting that a disclaimer on the records protected him from liability for any inaccuracies.

But Trump and the other defendants were found liable for fraud by Engoron before the trial even began.

In a bombshell pretrial ruling, Engoron granted summary judgment on James' main cause of action — that the defendants committed fraud in violation of New York law.

Engoron found that Trump's statements of financial condition between 2014 and 2021 overvalued his assets between $812 million and $2.2 billion.

The ruling razed Trump's defense claims, accusing him and his co-defendants of trying to convince the court to "not believe its own eyes."

The trial was conducted to determine the amount to be paid in penalties and resolve other claims of wrongdoing from James' lawsuit.

The trial also doubled as a soapbox for Trump to air his grievances about his perceived political foes, including those sitting feet away from him in court.

On the witness stand, Trump railed against Engoron and James while defending the values that were reported on his statements of financial condition. Trump also tore into another key witness, his former fixer and personal lawyer Michael Cohen, who testified that Trump had directed him to falsely manipulate his net worth.

Trump's venting brought consequences. On the second day of the trial, Engoron imposed a narrow gag order after Trump repeatedly targeted the judge's principal law clerk, Allison Greenfield, who sat in court.

Trump violated the gag order twice within four weeks, catching fines totaling $15,000.

Don't miss these stories from CNBC PRO:

  • Three stocks that could replace Tesla in the 'Magnificent 7'
  • Morgan Stanley hikes Nvidia price target ahead of earnings: 'AI demand continues to surge'
  • Vanguard launches two new ETFs to hit this sweet spot of tax-free fixed income
  • Berkshire Hathaway topped $600,000 a share last week, aiming at $1 trillion market value

comscore

IMAGES

  1. Reported Speech: A Complete Grammar Guide ~ ENJOY THE JOURNEY

    reported speech con did

  2. REPORTED SPEECH: Qué es y cómo usarlo?

    reported speech con did

  3. Reported Speech: A Complete Grammar Guide ~ ENJOY THE JOURNEY

    reported speech con did

  4. How to Use Reported Speech in English

    reported speech con did

  5. REPORTED SPEECH: Qué es y cómo usarlo?

    reported speech con did

  6. Reported Speech: Useful Rules & Examples

    reported speech con did

VIDEO

  1. Reported speech part 1 الاستاذ بهاء شنك

  2. Reported speech 1

  3. Reported speech

  4. Reported speech

  5. Reported speech presentation By Anojan

  6. Reported Speech Part 6

COMMENTS

  1. Reported speech

    Level: intermediate Reporting and summarising When we want to report what people say, we don't usually try to report their exact words. We usually give a summary, for example: Direct speech (exact words): Mary: Oh dear. We've been walking for hours! I'm exhausted. I don't think I can go any further. I really need to stop for a rest.

  2. Reported Speech

    The reporting clause here is William said. Meanwhile, the reported clause is the 2nd clause, which is I need your help. What are the 4 Types of Reported Speech? Aside from direct and indirect, reported speech can also be divided into four.

  3. Reported Speech

    Here's how it works: We use a 'reporting verb' like 'say' or 'tell'. ( Click here for more about using 'say' and 'tell' .) If this verb is in the present tense, it's easy. We just put 'she says' and then the sentence: Direct speech: I like ice cream. Reported speech: She says (that) she likes ice cream.

  4. Reported Speech: Important Grammar Rules and Examples • 7ESL

    We do it almost every day, in conversation and in writing. The problem is, sometimes there can be some confusion around the topic. So today we'll take a look at reported speech: what it is, how to use it, and we'll give some interactive exercises of reported speech too, so you can see how it looks in everyday conversations or writing.

  5. Reported Speech: Rules, Examples, Exceptions

    For reported requests, we use "asked (someone) to do something": "Please make a copy of this report." (direct speech) She asked me to make a copy of the report. (reported speech) For reported orders, we use "told (someone) to do something:". "Go to the bank." (direct speech)

  6. What is Reported Speech and How to Use It? with Examples

    1. Change the pronouns and adverbs of time and place: In reported speech, you need to change the pronouns, adverbs of time and place to reflect the new speaker or point of view. Here's an example: Direct speech: "I'm going to the store now," she said. Reported speech: She said she was going to the store then.

  7. He Said, She Said: Mastering Reported Speech in English (Both ...

    Direct speech: "I don't want to enter the water, ever," she says. "If everyone's going in the ocean, I'm like, no.". Here, the speech is reported as though it's in the present tense ("she says") instead of in the past ("she said"). In writing of all kinds, direct reported speech is often split into two or more parts, as ...

  8. How to use Reported Speech

    Grammar We use reported speech when we want to repeat what someone had previously said. Let's look at the difference between direct speech and reported speech: Direct Tomie said = ' I am tired.' Reported Speech = 'Tomie said (that) she was tired.' In reported speech we need to use the past tense form of the verb.

  9. Reported speech: reporting verbs

    Grammar test 1 Grammar explanation When we tell someone what another person said, we often use the verbs say, tell or ask. These are called 'reporting verbs'. However, we can also use other reporting verbs. Many reporting verbs can be followed by another verb in either an infinitive or an -ing form. Reporting verb + infinitive

  10. Reported Speech Tenses Chart: How to convert tenses

    Reported speech tenses will change from that of the direct speech in most cases. This is known as backshifting in reported speech, with the basic rule that a tense is shifted back to its past tense form. This is because we are usually talking about something in the past. You can also watch a video of this lesson:

  11. Reported Speech: Definition, Rules, Usage with Examples, Tips

    Jan 10, 2024 10 minute read Reported Speech: Reported Speech or also known as indirect speech, is typically used to convey what has been said by someone at a particular point of time. However, owing to the nuances of the systems involved, English grammar may be a complicated language to learn and understand.

  12. Indirect speech

    Questions in indirect speech. We use the normal order of words in reported questions, i.e. the subject comes before the verb, and it is not necessary to use do or did. Imperatives in indirect speech. When we report an order or instruction, we use the form ask or tell someone to do something. Pronoun changes in indirect speech

  13. Reported speech: indirect speech

    from English Grammar Today Indirect speech focuses more on the content of what someone said rather than their exact words. In indirect speech, the structure of the reported clause depends on whether the speaker is reporting a statement, a question or a command. Indirect speech: reporting statements

  14. Unit 7

    Unit 7 - Exercise 1 - Reported speech. Rewrite the direct speech as reported speech to complete the sentences. Use contractions where possible.

  15. Reported Speech

    Reported speech is the form in which one can convey a message said by oneself or someone else, mostly in the past. It can also be said to be the third person view of what someone has said. In this form of speech, you need not use quotation marks as you are not quoting the exact words spoken by the speaker, but just conveying the message.

  16. Reported Speech

    Reported speech is used when someone says a sentence, like, "I'm going to the movie tonight". Later, we want to tell a 3rd person what the first person is doing. It works like this: We use a reporting verb i.e 'say' or 'tell'. In the present tense, just put in 'he says. Direct Speech: I like burgers.

  17. Reported speech

    Reported speech 1. Reported speech 2. Reported requests and orders. Reported speech exercise. Reported questions - worksheet. Indirect speech - worksheet. Worksheets pdf - print. Grammar worksheets - handouts.

  18. Reported Speech

    Rewrite the demands/requests in indirect speech. The passenger requested the taxi driver, "Stop the car.". → The passenger requested the taxi driver . to + same wording as in direct speech. The mother told her son, "Don't be so loud.". → The mother told her son . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don't.

  19. Reported Speech WH-Questions

    Reported Speech Examples -. More Complex Sentences. Reported Speech Imperatives Exercise -. Reported Mixed Exercise. Convert the direct WH-Questions to indirect speech statements (reported speech). My new neighbor asked me: 1. "How are you?". .

  20. grammaticality

    You can also use would unchanged: "I would like to swim.". → "You Bi said she would like to swim.". Here, you can analyse would as conditional—if You Bi went swimming, she would like it. Would is also (morphologically) the past form of will, so it doesn't need to change tense for reported speech. Share.

  21. Conditionals and Reported Speech

    Second conditional in reported speech. The above tense and modal shifting rules apply to the second conditional too. If the condition is still relevant, no changes occur. However, if it's outdated, the past simple becomes the past perfect, and would becomes would + have + past participle. Sofia: If I had more money, I would buy a new car.

  22. Rumor Claims Sneaker Con Crowd Booed Trump and Chanted 'Let's Go Biden

    Here Are the Facts. Story by Jordan Liles • 14m. Rumors claimed that Trump was booed and received a let's go Biden chant when he made an appearance at Sneaker Con in Philadelphia. Chip ...

  23. Reported speech: questions

    Grammar test 1 Read the explanation to learn more. Grammar explanation A reported question is when we tell someone what another person asked. To do this, we can use direct speech or indirect speech. direct speech: 'Do you like working in sales?' he asked. indirect speech: He asked me if I liked working in sales.

  24. Trump hawks $399 branded shoes at 'Sneaker Con'

    Trump hawks $399 branded shoes at 'Sneaker Con,' a day after a $355 million ruling against him. Former President Donald Trump unveiled a new line of shoes at Sneaker Con. The gold lame high tops with an American flag detail on the back are being sold as "The Never Surrender High-Tops" for $399. Photos. 11.

  25. Trump met with boos and chants while selling sneakers in Philadelphia

    Trump was met with boos and cheers at Sneaker Con one day after a New York judge fined him $355 million in the wake of a lengthy fraud trial ... Trump said in a short speech to an unusual crowd ...

  26. Sneakerheads on Trump's 'Never Surrender' gold shoe: 'Tacky and very

    During Trump's Sneaker Con speech, the Republican presidential frontrunner said "the most important thing" was "to get young people out to vote". ... GQ reported that a Biden staffer had ...

  27. Donald Trump Booed Onstage While Promoting New $399 Sneakers

    The former president attended Sneaker Con to launch custom, Trump-branded sneakers a day after he was ordered to pay $355 million in penalties. ... a company that Trump reported owning in his 2023 ...

  28. Trump 'booed off the stage' while promoting his golden sneakers

    Tom Boggioni. February 19, 2024. Donald Trump's weekend visit to Sneaker Con in Philadelphia, where he promoted a Trump-branded line of athletic shoes, was greeted with a great of deal of ...

  29. Trump fraud trial: Judge Engoron fines ex-president $454 million

    A New York judge on Friday ordered Donald Trump to pay about $454 million in total penalties as part of his ruling in the former president's civil business fraud trial. The staggering figure ...