Weill Cornell Medicine

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Year-Long Global Health Opportunities and Fellowships

Fully-funded:.

  • VECD Fogarty Global Health Fellowships The WCMC Center for Global Health recently received NIH Fogarty funding as a consortium with Vanderbilt (V), Emory (E), Cornell (C), and Duke (D) to train medical students and post-doctoral fellows in global health research. Support is provided for one year (stipend, travel, supplies) to conduct mentored clinical research at one of the Center for Global Health international sites (Haiti; Tanzania; Brazil). There will be 1-3 slots per year at Weill-Cornell and the application process is competitive. The start date of the one-year training will be in July. Interested WCMC students should contact  Dr. Dan Fitzgerald  and  Lindsey Reif . (Note: The Fogarty Global Health Fellowship Program has replaced the Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows Program.)
  • Doris Duke Charitable Foundation: Clinical Research Fellowship for Medical Students The Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship (CRF) provides support for one year of full-time clinical research training. The main goal of the program is to encourage medical students to pursue careers in clinical research. Interested medical students must be willing to take a year out from school and conduct fellowship research and training at one of 12 hosting medical schools. Six of the 12 participating schools offer international fellowship opportunities.
  • BOTUSA Project - Research Fellowship for Senior Medical Students (6+ Month Elective) The BOTUSA Project is a collaborative effort between the Botswana Ministry of Health, the  U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention\Division of Tuberculosis Elimination   (CDC\DTBE), and the Global AIDS Program (GAP). The principal goal of the BOTUSA Project is to expand our knowledge of the relationship between epidemic tuberculosis (TB) and epidemic HIV disease in a resource-poor country setting so that this information can be used to develop prevention strategies for the local and global control of TB. BOTUSA staff work closely with counterparts in the Botswana National TB Programme and AIDS Control Programme. BOTUSA has a medical student fellowship to provide third or fourth-year medical students the opportunity to participate in CDC research in Botswana, as well as gain experience with clinical medicine and culture in a developing country.
  • Each year, eight competitively selected medical students from around the country spend 10-12 months at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. At CDC they gain an in-depth understanding of applied epidemiology, the role of epidemiology in medicine and health, and the role of physicians in the public health system. With the guidance of experienced CDC epidemiologists, they perform epidemiologic analyses and research, design public health interventions and assist in field investigations. Possible areas of concentration include birth defects, injury prevention, chronic disease, infectious disease, environmental health, reproductive health and minority health.
  • CDC Foundation - O.C. Hubert Fellowship in International Health The year-long fellowship provides third- and fourth-year medical and veterinary students with valuable public health experience in an international setting. The main focus of the fellowship is a 6- to 12-week field assignment. Fellows are mentored by experienced CDC staff and learn through hands-on experience while working on a public health project in a developing country. Projects vary each year, and applicants may indicate a preference for up to five field assignments. The CDC-Hubert Global Health Fellowship is endowed by the O.C. Hubert Charitable Trust.
  • Global Health Corps GHC provides opportunities for young professionals from diverse backgrounds to work on the frontlines of the fight for global health equity in year-long paid positions. During their fellowship year, fellows make a significant and measurable contribution to the partner organization and the target population. GHC partners with organizations that range from small grassroots organizations to large global institutions. Fellow candidates apply for specific positions with one of the partner organizations for which they have relevant skills and experience, and are selected jointly by GHC and the partner organization. In the 2013-2014 fellow class, GHC had 52 American fellows serving in Burundi, Malawi, Rwanda, Uganda, Zambia and the US.
  • biomedical research training for medical, dental, and veterinary students enrolled in schools in the U.S. The fellowship research may be conducted at any academic or nonprofit institution in the United States, except the National Institutes of Health. Research may be conducted abroad if the fellow's mentor is affiliated with a U.S. institution.
  • Year-Off Training Program for Graduate or Medical Students in Clinical and Translational Science The Year-off  Training  Program for Graduate and Medical Students provides opportunities for students who are enrolled in graduate or medical degree programs to engage in biomedical research at the Rockefeller Center for Clinical and Translational Science. Those selected for the program come to the Center with the understanding that they will return to their degree-granting institution and program within one year. In an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research, trainees work under the supervision of some of the leading clinical and translational scientists in the world. The trainee can select from among the 75 different laboratories on the Rockefeller campus. In addition, trainees participate in the didactic programs and lectures developed for Clinical Scholars.

Volunteer/Partially Funded:

  • American Medical Women's Association (AMWA) Overseas Assistance Grant AMWA provides small grants, up to $1,500,  for assistance with transportation costs (airfare, train fare, etc.) connected with pursuing medical studies in an off-campus setting where the medically neglected will benefit. The Grants are awarded to national AMWA members completing their second, third or fourth year of an accredited U.S. medical or osteopathic medical school or a resident who will be spending a minimum of six weeks and no longer than one year in a sponsored program which will serve the needs of the medically underserved.
  • International Society of Travel Medicine  The ISTM Research  Award program provides moderate grants (between USD 5,000 and USD 10,000) each year through a peer-review process implemented by the ISTM Research and Grants Committee. These grants are designed to stimulate travel medicine research by supporting comprehensive research projects or, for larger projects, providing support for pilot studies to enable researchers to collect data/test hypotheses so that they can then apply to other agencies for more substantive research grants.
  • Remote Area Medical The Remote Area Medical (RAM) Volunteer Corps is a non-profit, volunteer, airborne relief corps dedicated to serving mankind by providing free health care, dental care, eye care, veterinary services, and technical and educational assistance to people in remote areas of the United States and the world. Volunteer doctors, nurses, pilots, veterinarians and support workers participate in expeditions (at their own expense) in some of the world's most exciting places. Medical supplies, medicines, facilities and vehicles are donated. To volunteer as a student, you must have school sponsorship and supervision in the form of a licensed practitioner. RAM aims at development rather than dependence so volunteers are typically involved in education and organization as much as direct health care service.
  • Volunteer Missionary Movement The Volunteer Missionary Movement (VMM)  was founded in 1969 by Edwina Gateley, an English laywoman, in response to a need for lay people to become more deeply involved in the mission life of the Church. After spending three years in Uganda, where she opened a very successful school for young girls and worked as a teacher, she returned to England and began to recruit and train volunteer missionaries to work in education, healthcare and pastoral projects in eastern Africa. As VMM became more widely known, it was able to send volunteers to communities in need throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Transportation, housing, and food can be covered by the organization.
  • Unite for Sight Global Impact Corps Unite For Sight supports eye clinics in  Ghana, India and Honduras by investing human and financial resources in their social ventures to eliminate patient barriers to eye care. Unite For Sight applies best practices in eye care, public health, volunteerism, and social entrepreneurship to achieve our goal of high-quality eye care for all. Global Impact Fellows are volunteers that range from undergraduate students to medical students, public health students and professionals, nurses, educators, opticians, optometrists and ophthalmologists. They receive all necessary training from Unite For Sight so that they are able to assist the local doctors with global health delivery. Global Impact Fellows participating with Unite For Sight abroad have the option to also design and pursue a global health research study.

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Weill Cornell Medicine Office of International Medical Student Education 1300 York Avenue (C-118) New York, NY 10065 Phone: (646) 962-8058 [email protected]

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A summer research fellow pipetting samples into a tray

Patient-oriented research fellowship at Mayo Clinic

Summer research fellowship.

The Summer Research Fellowship was created to address the need for clinical investigators from diverse backgrounds. The health needs of U.S. minority populations have been studied inadequately, due in part to the shortage of clinical investigators belonging to underrepresented groups.

Although the number of clinicians belonging to underrepresented groups has increased, there has not been a corresponding increase in clinical investigators. Students often believe the choice between clinical medicine and research is an "either/or" decision. This unfortunate misperception is not true for patient-oriented clinical research.

Training in patient-oriented research

Patient-oriented research is the study of research questions that have direct clinical application. Many questions fall at the interface between basic and applied research, within the area of clinical research studies.

The Summer Research Fellowship was created through grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and Mayo Clinic. This comprehensive training program, which lasts eight weeks, prepares underrepresented students for careers in clinical care and patient-oriented research.

The goal of this NHLBI research education program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research workforce in the mission areas of importance to NHLBI. These NHLBI mission areas are biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences research and training to address cardiovascular, lung, and blood diseases as well as sleep disorders.

As a student at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minnesota, you will be matched with Mayo investigators based on your professional interests and will spend eight weeks conducting research. You will experience dynamic basic or clinical research while working with nationally and internationally recognized scientists and clinicians.

Students usually participate in the program in the summer between their first and second years of medical school.

In addition to your research projects, you will attend seminars and presentations that introduce clinical research methods and the Mayo Clinic  Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS) .

Eligibility

You are eligible for the Summer Research Fellowship if you:

  • Are U.S. citizens or permanent resident enrolled in a U.S. medical school that is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education
  • Have completed one year of medical school
  • Are a current medical student in good academic standing
  • Can commit to a minimum appointment of eight weeks
  • Black/African-American
  • Hispanic or Latino
  • American Indian or Alaska Native
  • Native Hawaiian or U.S. Pacific Islander
  • People with life-altering disabilities
  • Other racial and ethnic groups considered to be underrepresented in medicine and biomedical research

Financial support

The Summer Research Fellowship award is $7,000 for eight weeks, plus flights to and from Rochester, Minnesota. From this stipend, students are responsible for their own housing, meals, and personal travel.

  • See a list of Summer Research Fellowship mentors

How to apply

Online applications are available on Sept. 1 preceding the summer of appointment. Applications are reviewed in early February and offers to interview are sent. Appointments are made in late February to early March or until spots are filled. Early application is recommended.

Application instructions

Complete the following steps to apply:

  • Select - Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Select - Summer Research Fellowship (SRF)
  • Complete each section of the application and submit
  • Upload each required item in the Supplemental Items section
  • Complete the Recommendation Request section

Additional required items

  • Answers to prompt questions
  • Personal statement
  • Letter of good standing/medical school verification
  • AMCAS documents
  • Three letters of recommendation are required and must be completed in the Recommendation Request section. Each recommender will receive an email with a link to complete a rating form and upload a letter
  • Unofficial or official college transcripts may be uploaded in the Supplemental Items area for application purposes

We're here to help

Send a message to our admissions team by submitting the form below. We can't wait to hear from you!

Program dates: June 3 - July 26, 2024 Application deadline: Sept. 1, 2023 - Feb. 1, 2024

Luis Lujan, Ph.D. Program Manager-Diversity Grants Office for Education Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science 200 First St. SW Rochester, MN 55905 Phone: 507-266-2912 Email:  [email protected]

Related links

  • Research at Mayo Clinic
  • Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS)

Sloan Research Fellowships

2024 fellows, 2024 sloan research fellows.

Congratulations to the Sloan Research Fellows of 2024. The following 126 early-career scholars represent the most promising scientific researchers working today. Their achievements and potential place them among the next generation of scientific leaders in the U.S. and Canada. Winners receive $75,000, which may be spent over a two-year term on any expense supportive of their research.

Kwabena Bediako, University of California, Berkeley

Juan-Pablo Correa-Baena, Georgia Institute of Technology

Yael David, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Lisa Fredin, Lehigh University

Stephen D. Fried, Johns Hopkins University

Kandis Leslie Gilliard-AbdulAziz, University of California, Riverside

Stavroula K. Hatzios, Yale University

Abigail Knight, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Chong Liu, The University of Chicago

Zhenfei Liu, Wayne State University

Jonathan Z. Long, Stanford University

Jarad A. Mason, Harvard University

Lea Nienhaus, Florida State University

Rodrigo Noriega, University of Utah

Zachariah A. Page, The University of Texas at Austin

Shahar Sukenik, University of California, Merced

Alexandra Velian, University of Washington

Vojtech Vlcek, University of California, Santa Barbara

Wenjing Wang, University of Michigan

Xiao Wang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Sidney M. Wilkerson-Hill, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Xin Yan, Texas A&M University

Yang Yang, University of California, Santa Barbara

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Jacob D. Andreas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Nathan Beckmann, Carnegie Mellon University

Adam M. Belay, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Aaron Bernstein, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Katherine (Katie) L. Bouman, California Institute of Technology

Simon Shaolei Du, University of Washington

Daniel Genkin, Georgia Institute of Technology

Nika Haghtalab, University of California, Berkeley

Nan Jiang, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Chi Jin, Princeton University

Rene F. Kizilcec, Cornell University

Aleksandra Korolova, Princeton University

Courtney Y. Paquette, McGill University

Priyanka Raina, Stanford University

Arvind Satyanarayan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Adriana Schulz, University of Washington

Yakun Sophia Shao, University of California, Berkeley

Justine Sherry, Carnegie Mellon University

Virginia Smith, Carnegie Mellon University

Li-Yang Tan, Stanford University

Diyi Yang, Stanford University

Xiangyao Yu, University of Wisconsin, Madison

EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE

Roxanne Beltran, University of California, Santa Cruz

Natalie Cohen, University of Georgia

Travis A. Courtney, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez

Orencio Duran Vinent, Texas A&M University

Kaitlyn Gaynor, University of British Columbia

Ching-Yao Lai, Stanford University

Marianna Linz, Harvard University

Dipti Nayak, University of California, Berkeley

Sunyoung Park, The University of Chicago

Penny Wieser, University of California, Berkeley

Zoë B Cullen, Harvard University

Eduardo Dávila, Yale University

Ellora A. Derenoncourt, Princeton University

Laura Doval, Columbia University

Maryam Farboodi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Kilian Huber, The University of Chicago

Ryota Iijima, Yale University

Ludwig Straub, Harvard University

MATHEMATICS

Alex Blumenthal, Georgia Institute of Technology

Theodore D. Drivas, Stony Brook University

Zhou Fan, Yale University

Elena Giorgi, Columbia University

Benjamin D. Grimmer, Johns Hopkins University

Matthew Harrison-Trainor, University of Illinois at Chicago

Jiaoyang Huang, University of Pennsylvania

Yuehaw Khoo, The University of Chicago

Daniel Lacker, Columbia University

Boris Leonidovich Hanin, Princeton University

Michael Lindsey, University of California, Berkeley

Daniel Litt, University of Toronto

Jinyoung Park, New York University

Sarah Peluse, University of Michigan

Samuel Punshon-Smith, Tulane University

Aaditya Ramdas, Carnegie Mellon University

Ananth Shankar, Northwestern University

Junliang Shen, Yale University

Antoine Song, California Institute of Technology

Melanie Weber, Harvard University

Ian M. Zemke, Princeton University

NEUROSCIENCE

Vineet Augustine, University of California, San Diego

Wilma A. Bainbridge, The University of Chicago

SueYeon Chung, New York University

Anne Draelos, University of Michigan

Meng-meng Fu, University of California, Berkeley

Stephanie Gantz, University of Iowa

Theanne N. Griffith, University of California, Davis

Vijay Mohan K Namboodiri, University of California, San Francisco

Justus M. Kebschull, Johns Hopkins University

Preeya Khanna, University of California, Berkeley

Jacqueline M. Kimmey, University of California, Santa Cruz

Jonathan Lynch, Johns Hopkins University

Zachariah M. Reagh, Washington University in St. Louis

Monique L. Smith, University of California, San Diego

Gaia Tavoni, Washington University in St. Louis

Maryam Vaziri-Pashkam, University of Delaware

Meg Younger, Boston University

Kate D. Alexander, University of Arizona

Soonwon Choi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Martin Claassen, University of Pennsylvania

Susan E. Clark, Stanford University

Chuanfei Dong, Boston University

Chunhui Du, Georgia Institute of Technology

Ke Fang, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Maya Fishbach, University of Toronto

Anna Y. Q. Ho, Cornell University

Chao-Ming Jian, Cornell University

Chenhao Jin, University of California, Santa Barbara

Daniel Lecoanet, Northwestern University

Zhen Liu, University of Minnesota

Xiao Luo, University of California, Santa Barbara

Lee McCuller, California Institute of Technology

Karan K. Mehta, Cornell University

Abdoulaye Ndao, University of California, San Diego

Lina Necib, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Hadi Nia, Boston University

Geoff Penington, University of California, Berkeley

Alexander Philippov, University of Maryland, College Park

Vikram Ravi, California Institute of Technology

Andrew Vanderburg, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Suyang Xu, Harvard University

Yahui Zhang, Johns Hopkins University

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Program Helps Medical, Dental, Veterinary Students Enter the Pathway to Biomedical Research Careers

2023-2024 MRSP Application Period: October 1, 2022 - January 6, 2023

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The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medical Research Scholars Program (MRSP) is a comprehensive, year long research enrichment program designed to attract the most creative, research-oriented medical, dental, and veterinary students to the intramural campus of the NIH in Bethesda, MD.

Student scholars engage in a mentored basic, clinical, or translational research project on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, or nearby NIH facilities that matches their research interests and career goals.

NIMHD is proud to participate with other NIH Institutes and Centers in the MRSP. Our goal is to introduce the MRSP to medical, dental, and veterinary students from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and encourage them to consider biomedical research as a career.

MRSP Eligibility Requirements for the NIH

In order to be eligible to apply for a Medical Research Scholars Program at the NIH, you must meet the following requirements :

  • This program is intended for medical, dental, osteopathic, and veterinary students attending accredited institutions location in the U.S., U.S. Commonwealth territories, or Canada. Candidates must currently be enrolled in a medical school accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, a dental school that is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, an osteopathic school that is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association, or a veterinary medical college that is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association, Council on Education.
  • Candidates currently enrolled in PhD or MD/PhD programs are not eligible to apply.
  • The Medical Research Scholars Program is designed for students who have completed their clinical rotations, i.e., third-year, but does not exclude students with strong research interests from applying prior to having completed their clinical rotations.
  • Candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.
  • Fourth-year students qualify to apply and participate in the Medical Research Scholars Program. However, they must not participate in the National Residency Match Program and must defer graduation.

For more information, visit Medical Research Scholars Program

NIMHD Featured Scholar Bio

Jamie Ko

Jamie Ko (2021-2022 MRSP Scholar) is a fourth-year medical student at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is completing a yearlong research fellowship through the NIH’s Medical Research Scholars Program under the mentorship of Dr. Anna M. Nápoles, Scientific Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and Dr. Paula Strassle, staff scientist in NIMHD's Division of Intramural Research.

As a first-generation college graduate and child of immigrants from China, she became intimately aware of how social factors affected the health of under-resourced communities. Throughout Ms. Ko’s academic studies, she developed a passion for exploring and addressing health inequities.

As an undergraduate student at Yale, she integrated her interests in health sciences with public health, resulting in a double major in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology, as well as sociology with a health concentration. To further her understanding of health inequities, she completed a master's degree in public health in chronic disease epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health.

During medical school, she continued to pursue her interest in health disparities, merging her epidemiology skill set with health policy and patient advocacy. She served as a co-president and delegate of the UCLA American Medical Association and California Medical Association chapters, a committee member on the American Medical Association’s Council on Global Public Health, and Research Director of the Los Angeles Human Rights Initiative.

Ms. Ko plans to apply to a general surgery residency and pursue a career in academic surgery devoted to providing equitable surgical care for patients. Currently, her research focuses on surgical and COVID-19 health disparities. During her free time, she enjoys playing the violin, singing in choirs, running, and reading.

Previous NIMHD Scholars

  • 2020-2021 MRSP Scholar
  • 2019-2020 MRSP Scholar
  • 2018-2019 MRSP Scholar
  • 2017-2018 MRSP Scholars

Page updated October 31, 2022

Program Contact

Dr. Anna María Nápoles NIMHD [email protected] -->

More Information

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Meet Current and Alumni Scholars

NIH announces 2019-2020 Medical Research Scholars Program Class

NIH announces 2018-2019 Medical Research Scholars Program Class

NIH announces 2017-2018 Medical Research Scholars Program Class

MSRP Inquiries [email protected]

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Programs in research, global health medical student research fellowship.

This fellowship offers up to two medical students a year funding and support to dedicate one year to global health research.

Fellowship Overview

The Global Health Medical Student Research Fellowship is a joint effort by The Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH) and the Stanford MedScholars Program. In response to increasing interest in global health among incoming and current medical students, this fellowship provides an opportunity for medical students with a genuine interest in global health to gain foundational experience in global health research. This fellowship will offer up to two medical students a year funding and support to dedicate one year to global health research. It will include an on-campus element as well as an extended period of time at a global field site conducting research.

Candidates will apply with a project idea and a faculty mentor, and if accepted, will work with Dr. Michele Barry, Senior Associate Dean for Global Health and Director of the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health, and Dr. Steve Luby, Associate Dean for Global Health and Director of Research at CIGH, during their fellowship for additional guidance.

Meet our current fellows

medical research fellowship usa

Vongai Mlambo

Research fellow.

medical research fellowship usa

Vongai Christine Mlambo, a 4th year medical student, will research “Cost Effectiveness of Cardiac Surgery for Rheumatic Heart Disease” in Rwanda.

“The reason I wanted to become a physician is to expand healthcare infrastructure for non-communicable diseases in Southern Africa,” she says. “I cannot wait to research how this can be done successfully for the treatment of rheumatic heart disease, with local communities in Rwanda driving the agenda. To learn from and work alongside cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons on the ground will be an honor and the takeaways, invaluable.”

Mentor: Yihan Lin

medical research fellowship usa

Lillie Reed

medical research fellowship usa

Reed, a medical student in the 5th year of her 6-year training, has planned a research project titled “Examining Venezuelan Refugee Experiences to Promote Maternal & Child Health” alongside Save the Children Colombia in Bogotá, Colombia. The project will explore gender-based violence, mental health, and health issues facing mothers and children. She said she is particularly excited to have time to immerse herself in extended global health research.

“As someone who has worked in global health in the past, I know it takes a long time to establish connections and do meaningful, community-driven global health work,” she said. “I was also drawn to the intentionality of the fellowship and the longer-term commitment.”

Who is eligible?

  • Stanford medical students who have completed MS1 and are eligible to apply for at least 3 full time research quarters of MedScholars
  • Demonstrated interest in global health
  • Prior research experience preferred but not required
  • Prior international work or educational experience preferred

Application Process

Applications are now open! The deadline has been extended to Jan. 21, 2024.

  • Students must submit applications for both the Global Health Medical Student Research Fellowship and MedScholars.
  •  Applications are now open for the 2024-25 Global Health Medical Student Research Fellowship. The application deadline is January 21, 2024.
  • Applications should consist of a resume/CV and essay (no more than one page) describing your interest in conducting international research as a medical student, and an essay about a time you demonstrated flexibility in the face of an unexpected professional or educational setback. You will also be asked about your prior research and international education experience and for a description of the research project, including a note about the faculty mentor you’ve identified for the project. See Faculty Mentors and Research Sites section below for information about identifying a mentor and site . The application must be accompanied by a letter of support from the faculty mentor for the project, and a second letter of reference from a Stanford faculty member. The letters must be uploaded to the application form directly by the faculty.
  • Applications will be reviewed, and potential candidates will be interviewed. Final decisions will be communicated in February.
  • Since every student’s situation is different, we recommend that you meet with Financial Aid, the Registrar, and your advising dean prior to applying to discuss how this fellowship would fit with their schedule.

Additional application to Med Scholars required If you are selected for the Global Health Medical Student Research Fellowship, MedScholars applications must be submitted by the July deadline. For additional information regarding the MedScholars application, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/medscholars.html

Faculty Mentors and Research Projects

Students must identify a faculty mentor and a research project prior to applying for the fellowship.

  • Ideally, students already have a pre-existing relationship with a professor who is conducting global health research. If you already have a faculty mentor, discuss this opportunity with them.
  • If you are not already connected to a faculty member who is engaged in global health work, you can start your search by visiting the Stanford Global Health Research & Activity Map . Search by region or clinical/academic focus area. Once you find a potential mentor, you can email them directly or contact Yosefa at CIGH to request an introduction.
  • If you are reaching out to a faculty you do not already have a relationship with, include your CV and your interests and how they align with theirs and include a link to this webpage with information about the Global Health Medical Student Research Fellowship.
  • Research activities depend on your interests and the time constraint of three quarters.

Sites where Fellows propose to conduct research must be pre-approved by the Director of Research for CIGH, Dr. Steve Luby, and the Senior Associate Dean for Global Health, Dr. Michele Barry during the application process. All research protocols will need to obtain IRB approval by Stanford.

The fellowship spans one year (4 quarters) as follows:

  • Summer Quarter: Fellows must submit MedScholars application by the July deadline. The Fellowship is contingent upon the MedScholars application being accepted.
  • Autumn Quarter: Fellowship begins. Fellows will spend this quarter on campus preparing for their global field research. Fellows will enroll in classes related to epidemiology and global health research and they will set up the research project and engage with the faculty mentor and Dr. Luby and Dr. Barry.
  • Winter, Spring, and Summer Quarters: Fellows must spend up to three full-time quarters implementing their global health project.

Completion Requirements

Submit a report:

  • Use manuscript format (hypothesis, methods, results, citations) with an emphasis on results
  • If the research has not been fully completed and a full manuscript is not possible, then a progress report is acceptable as long as the advisor confirms that substantial work has been completed
  • If the work is being published, a paper can be submitted in place of the report as long as the student made significant contributions to the paper

Give an oral presentation of the results of the project: Submit an abstract to present research findings at the Stanford Global Health Research Convening or the Stanford Medical Student Research Symposium , or at a regional, national, or an international academic conference

Submit an evaluation of the experience

The report and oral presentation information must be provided to the MedScholars program within 6 months after the end of the fellowship, along with a mentor letter of summary. https://med.stanford.edu/medscholars/completion.html

If approved, students will receive a stipend in the autumn and MedScholars support winter, spring, and summer quarter of the fellowship year. The stipend for autumn quarter will be at the MedScholars rate for the corresponding academic year.

Travel-related expenses will be covered by the fellowship program.

Questions about the fellowship can be directed to Yosefa Gilon, Associate Director for Global Health Education, at [email protected] .

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  • Published: 19 February 2024

The All of Us Research Program is an opportunity to enhance the diversity of US biomedical research

  • Diana W. Bianchi 1 ,
  • Patricia Flatley Brennan 2   nAff29 ,
  • Michael F. Chiang   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-8172-7636 3 ,
  • Lindsey A. Criswell   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-0761-7543 4 ,
  • Rena N. D’Souza 5 ,
  • Gary H. Gibbons 6 ,
  • James K. Gilman 7 ,
  • Joshua A. Gordon   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-5488-8266 8 ,
  • Eric D. Green 9 ,
  • Susan Gregurick 10 ,
  • Richard J. Hodes 11 ,
  • Peter H. Kilmarx   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0001-6464-3345 12 ,
  • George F. Koob 13 ,
  • Walter J. Koroshetz 14 ,
  • Helene M. Langevin 15 ,
  • Jon R. Lorsch 16 ,
  • Jeanne M. Marrazzo 17 ,
  • Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable 18 ,
  • W. Kimryn Rathmell 19 ,
  • Griffin P. Rodgers 20 ,
  • Joni L. Rutter   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-6502-2361 21 ,
  • Jane M. Simoni 22 ,
  • Bruce J. Tromberg 23 ,
  • Debara L. Tucci 24 ,
  • Nora D. Volkow   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0001-6668-0908 25 ,
  • Rick Woychik 26 ,
  • Shannon N. Zenk 27 ,
  • Elyse Kozlowski 28 ,
  • Rachele S. Peterson 28 ,
  • Geoffrey S. Ginsburg   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0003-4739-9808 28 &
  • Joshua C. Denny 28  

Nature Medicine volume  30 ,  pages 330–333 ( 2024 ) Cite this article

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  • Genetic databases
  • Personalized medicine

The All of Us Research Program has prioritized the enrollment of people from backgrounds that are historically under-represented in medical research to bring precision medicine to the full diversity of the US population and to improve health outcomes for all.

You have full access to this article via your institution.

Several countries with national health systems have established large, longitudinal cohorts to advance population and precision health, each with unique features and populations, including the UK Biobank 1 and several more. The USA is different from those countries: not only does it lack a national health system for its citizens, but it ranks 43rd in the world for life expectancy 2 . Important longitudinal population-specific studies of health in the USA are ongoing, such as the Million Veteran Program. Many of these studies have under-representation of diverse populations 3 .

The lack of diversity in genomics research, with more than 90% of studies from populations of European ancestry 4 , has led to many challenges in equity, including non-transportability of polygenic risk scores to different populations 5 and incorrect assignment of genomic variant pathogenicity 6 .

A platform for research

Launched in 2018, the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) All of Us Research Program has enrolled over 700,000 people and is deliberately focused on advancing health equity by inclusively engaging and enrolling a diverse population 7 . All of Us aims to include populations historically under-represented in biomedical research. Currently, 80% of All of Us participants are under-represented in biomedical research by race, ethnicity, age, geography, sexual and gender identity, income, education, access to healthcare, and/or disability.

Nearly 7,000 researchers across a variety of training levels and representing more than 530 institutions (including more than 85 Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Hispanic-serving institutions) have signed up to analyze the available data repository on more than 400,000 participants. The data include survey responses, electronic health records (EHRs), genome sequences, and Fitbit records, accessed via the cloud-based Researcher Workbench. The Workbench contains three tiers of data access (Public, Registered and Controlled), with genomic data available in the Controlled Tier to registered researchers who have signed a data-use agreement. More than 245,000 whole-genome sequences and data from more than 312,000 genomic variant arrays are available for analysis via the Controlled Tier. In the 245,000 genome sequences available thus far, there is genetic variation at more than a billion loci. More than 200 articles using these data have been published in peer-reviewed journals since the first data release in 2020.

More data from diverse US-based populations, such as data from environmental exposures and geospatial data, are needed to drive the identification of meaningful and valid risk factors, early-detection tools and prevention strategies, and precision medicine applications that reach everyone. Lack of inclusion of diverse populations in research can have profound negative consequences to human health, which leads to a narrow understanding of the underlying biology of diseases, impedes the development of new treatments and limits the effectiveness and applicability of treatment and prevention strategies for all populations. As directors of NIH institutes, centers and offices, we encourage researchers to contribute to and leverage the All of Us Research Program as a key resource to aid in this endeavor.

Unifying the NIH

The NIH has long supported cohort science, beginning with the Framingham Heart Study in 1948. Many of these studies have been specific to individual disease domains or conditions, such as cardiovascular disease or aging, or have been tailored to certain populations. The discovery of intervenable risk factors for cardiovascular disease from the Framingham Heart Study has contributed to a reduction of >60% in cardiovascular disease since the 1950s 8 .

Previous joint research initiatives across the NIH have resulted in many contributions to multi-disciplinary science, including the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative 9 . There is still an urgent need to ensure that research resources are applicable and valid across the entire population. All of Us aims to unite the entirety of the NIH toward creating a multimodal, comprehensive assessment of human health that is reflective of the USA.

All of Us is disease agnostic and so is applicable to the many research interests of the NIH. To better understand the landscape of health conditions reflected in data from the program, we compared the prevalence of top health conditions in the US population, as estimated in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019 (ref. 10 ), with that of current All of Us participants who have a matching diagnosis in their EHR data, and a subset of those who identified as belonging to minority racial or ethnic groups under-represented in biomedical research. Figure 1 shows the relative prevalence of each health condition in these three populations, projected to values in 1 million participants for ease of comparison, including the prevalence in under-represented populations by race and ethnicity. All of Us generally mimics the prevalence of common diseases in the general population. There is higher relative prevalence of substance use disorders, diabetes, and maternal and neonatal disorders among under-represented racial and ethnic groups. This provides evidence of potential health disparities for some diseases represented in All of Us.

figure 1

National prevalence of each disease is estimated by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. Using the International Classification of Disease 9 (ICD-9) and the International Classification of Disease 10 (ICD-10) codes from the GBD2019 Study, mapped to Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI) Common Data Model condition concepts, prevalence was estimated from participants who have provided access to their EHR records in All of Us, including the subset cohort identified as being underrepresented minority racial and ethnic groups in biomedical research. All estimates were adjusted to project predicted prevalence among 1 million participants.

There are several key strategic areas in which NIH institutes, centers and offices can partner with and augment All of Us to address barriers to research for which no other adequate resources exist (Table 1 ).

A milestone in the symbiotic relationship between All of Us and the broader set of NIH institutes, centers and offices is the launch of ancillary studies, which add new data and technologies in alignment with the scientific strategy of the program. This framework leverages existing relationships with NIH institutes, centers and offices to build proactive collaborations that will inform strategies for expansion to other partners, including industry and international collaborators. Any data generated via these studies will be returned for broad researcher use, which creates a robust feedback loop to enhance baseline data collection.

The largest ancillary study thus far, Nutrition for Precision Health, aims to understand individual responses to different diets and develop models to provide insight into personalized nutrition. Supported by the NIH Common Fund and managed by a trans-NIH collaborative working group that involves 18 institutes and centers, the study is also a key component of the NIH Nutrition Research strategic plan. Future ancillary studies will enable the addition of new data types to expand the depth of data available to researchers, including environmental, geospatial, exposomics (the study of all exposures experienced during a lifetime), imaging and others.

Synergies to address deficiencies

We have identified nine key areas of synergy between NIH institutes, centers and offices and All of Us that address common and unique deficiencies in the current clinical, epidemiological and genomics research landscape (Box 1 ).

The nine themes in Box 1 are already present among the more than 7,700 studies ongoing in the All of Us Researcher Workbench. Several studies are investigating ways to optimize existing algorithms and develop new models to predict clinical outcomes by leveraging the population diversity represented in All of Us data. This includes a new model trained with multi-site, multi-EHR All of Us data predicting the need for surgery among people with glaucoma, which outperformed a previous model from a less-diverse, single-site dataset 11 . This work highlights the need to include robust diversity in artificial intelligence and machine learning models for disease prediction to ensure equitable utility across populations.

Other studies have investigated disparities in under-represented groups across All of Us data for cardiovascular disease 12 and cancer 13 , among other conditions. Researchers are beginning to use All of Us data to test validation of polygenic risk scores in diverse populations 14 , as well as the pathogenicity of rare genomic variants 15 . All of Us will empower the translation of research findings to clinical outcomes.

Box 1 Nine areas of synergy with All of Us

Enhancing the diversity of genomic data across all conditions.

Building an open foundation for artificial intelligence and machine learning across human health and diverse populations, EHR vendors, and healthcare systems.

Establishing models and technologies for disease prediction, surveillance and screening approaches across the lifespan.

Leveraging linkage among biospecimens, EHRs, digital health platforms, imaging, and other participant-provided data streams to prospectively identify disease biomarkers prior to diagnosis.

Linking domains of behavioral, emotional and cognitive traits and their impact on various aspects of medical illness, treatment adherence and cognitive changes, including extension to children and adolescents.

Equitably defining risk factors (such as actionable genetic variants and genetic predisposition across race and ethnicity) to improve care guidelines and outcomes for the leading health conditions in the USA across diverse populations, including health disparities.

Delineating complex traits associated with differential responses to the exposome.

Investigating diseases of childhood that have largely been underexplored in biomedical research, but often represent a foundation for future health.

Creating a longitudinal sampling of environmental, geospatial, social determinants, and other data to capture the effect of all experiences of an individual across their lifespan.

Data missingness

Achieving the promise and potential of All of Us is not without challenges. Data missingness, harmonizing EHRs across vendors and environments, and continuing to engage and enroll a diverse population are just some of the areas in which the program is actively seeking solutions. We are working to make the Researcher Workbench easier and more accessible to diverse researchers, including the development of standardized phenotype definitions and the introduction of new tools. More research is needed into understanding enrollment biases and evaluating the generalizability of results, including analytical approaches to address missing data from surveys and EHRs. The program also continuously monitors survey completion rates across populations and has introduced new methods to reduce gaps in completion, such as computer-assisted telephone interviews and other specialized interventions. The program promotes open science through sharable workspaces in the Researcher Workbench. Methods and tools created to overcome these limitations are freely available for use by other researchers.

Ensuring equitable participant access to All of Us is an ongoing process, and All of Us is continuing to identify and address operational constraints identified as barriers to enrollment. Inherent in its mission and core values is the ability to acquire informed consent from the full complement of participants. The consent process was designed to enable fully self-navigated consent by the maximal number of eligible participants and ensure an inclusive experience for all regardless of race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability status, income, education or access to care. However, many participants may still desire or require additional support to complete the consent process. Assisted and facilitated consent are presently permitted, and consent by proxy, in which an enrollment relies on a legally authorized representative, is an initiative in the planning stages in partnership with the American Association on Health and Disability to provide input on the operationalization of participation by proxy, including subject matter expert consultation, a landscape analysis, and a report anticipated in 2024.

All of Us was intentionally designed as a resource that addresses diversity and inclusion at all levels: diversity in participant demographics; diversity in data types; and diversity in researchers. It aims to be a world-accessible scientific resource that provides the data, tools, and cloud-based analysis infrastructure needed to enable biomedical research to support the missions of all NIH institutes, centers and offices, extending across the biomedical research community and enhancing the work of researchers at all career levels.

We represent the NIH institutes, centers and offices and All of Us, and we invite researchers to join us in expanding the All of Us platform to all disease domains, diverse populations, common and rare genomic variants, social and commercial determinants of health, and other modalities to ensure the advancement of precision health, medicine and equity for everyone.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank the participants of the All of Us Research Program for their trust, time and contributions.

Author information

Patricia Flatley Brennan

Present address: , Easton, MD, USA

Authors and Affiliations

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Diana W. Bianchi

National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Michael F. Chiang

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Lindsey A. Criswell

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Rena N. D’Souza

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Gary H. Gibbons

Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

James K. Gilman

National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Joshua A. Gordon

National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Eric D. Green

Office of Data Science Strategy, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Susan Gregurick

National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Richard J. Hodes

Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Peter H. Kilmarx

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

George F. Koob

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Walter J. Koroshetz

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Helene M. Langevin

National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Jon R. Lorsch

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Jeanne M. Marrazzo

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable

National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

W. Kimryn Rathmell

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Griffin P. Rodgers

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Joni L. Rutter

Offices of the Director and Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Jane M. Simoni

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Bruce J. Tromberg

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Debara L. Tucci

National Institute of Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Nora D. Volkow

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Durham, NC, USA

Rick Woychik

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Shannon N. Zenk

All of Us Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Elyse Kozlowski, Rachele S. Peterson, Geoffrey S. Ginsburg & Joshua C. Denny

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Bianchi, D.W., Brennan, P.F., Chiang, M.F. et al. The All of Us Research Program is an opportunity to enhance the diversity of US biomedical research. Nat Med 30 , 330–333 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-023-02744-3

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Many international medical graduates (IMGs) are keen on seeking U.S. experience with the goal of strengthening their qualifications and candidacy for U.S. graduate medical education. A program that has been uniquely designed to support this objective is the Medical Research Fellowship Program (MRFP), which is offered through the Office of International Medicine Programs (IMP) at the George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS). The MRFP provides IMGs with the opportunity to enhance their research and clinical skills and gain experience in the U.S. medical system before applying for residency.

Under the guidance of a GW physician who serves as their faculty mentor, research fellows contribute to ongoing research projects with the goal of obtaining publications and letters to the editor. They are also integrated into the clinical department through weekly clinical observation. In addition, research fellows participate in professional development workshops and seminars which guide them through the process of applying to U.S. residency programs.

Since introducing this program in 2012, IMP has hosted research fellows from a number of countries including Bangladesh, Dominican Republic, Egypt, India, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Furthermore, research fellows have been paired with physicians in several specialties over the years including cardiology, emergency medicine, endocrinology, internal medicine, neurology, pathology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and radiology.

The MRFP was recently updated to allow research fellows to participate for a three-month and six-month period, in addition to the year-long duration which has been offered in the past.

Jigar Patel, MBBS, is a recent alum from India who completed the year-long program in September 2021. Patel began his search to obtain U.S. medical experience during the COVID-19 pandemic and during that time was struggling to find suitable options – until he came across MRFP.

Patel was initially apprehensive about joining the program with almost no research experience. “A lot of people that I worked with in this program had some kind of research background, but my position was a little different because I didn’t have research experience.” Fast forward to today and Patel has now published more than 19 articles and correspondences in various journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine , the American Journal of Emergency Medicine , and THE LANCET .

Patel worked with Juan Reyes, MD, assistant professor of medicine, as his faculty mentor, and was able to build strong connections within the clinical department throughout his time during the program. “It was really a unique opportunity to work alongside residents and interns.”

From enhancing his research skills to strengthening his public speaking at weekly critical appraisal sessions led by the MRFP Program Director, Ali Pourmand, MD, MPH, professor of emergency medicine, Patel believes the MRFP did much more than just expose him to the U.S. medical system. “MRFP has granted me tremendous research skills and motivation to continue to pursue scholarly activities in the future, which is very important to note, because even if I was able to match into residency programs without this experience, my motivation to pursue scholarly activities would not be there.”

In the coming years, IMP anticipates that this program will continue to attract increasing numbers of IMGs, such as Patel, who are interested in seeking U.S. medical experience. A contributing factor in this interest is the recent transition of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores to Pass/Fail, which will impact IMGs applying to U.S. residency programs.

IMGs who are interested in applying for the MRFP can learn more about the program on our website . IMP is currently accepting applications on a rolling basis.

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International Research Fellowship

Contact Information

medical research fellowship usa

Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery and Surgical Critical Care (TESSCC)

165 Cambridge Street, Suite 810 Boston , MA   02114

Email: [email protected]

Explore This Fellowship

The approved applicant will hold a Massachusetts General Hospital and a Harvard Medical School (HMS) appointment as a research fellow. Applications from non-U.S. candidates are encouraged. The program involves clinical and laboratory research activities, allowing the fellow to participate in single- and multi-center studies as well as multiple clinical research projects related to retrospective, prospective and randomized controlled studies. The fellow will also participate in basic science research at the Trauma Research Laboratory and the animal operating rooms. The precise balance between clinical and laboratory research will be decided on a case-by-case basis according to the fellow’s preference and the divisional needs.

The research fellow will be assigned to one faculty member of the division and become actively involved in clinical and laboratory research. The research fellow will attend all educational programs of the division and participate in an observational capacity in clinical activities. At the end of the fellowship, the fellow is expected to have rich knowledge in trauma, emergency surgery and surgical critical care research as well as have completed multiple studies, which can be presented at major surgical meetings and published in major surgical journals.

Note:  Direct contact with patients is not allowed within this program.

Requirements

Individuals interested in applying for a research fellow position must meet the following criteria:

  • Fluent in English, both spoken and written
  • Medical degree (MD equivalent)
  • Minimum two-year commitment

Although United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores are not an absolute prerequisite for admission to the Research Fellowship Program, applicants who have taken their USMLE's are preferred. 

The research program of the division is funded by multiple federal agencies and industry. Financial support is possible through grants, but limited, and therefore cannot be promised. Evidence of external institutional financial support is highly desirable. Decisions about financial support are made on a case-by-case basis, depending on availability of funds, nature of research and performance of the fellow.

The fellow is expected to be familiar with study design and methodology as well as simple statistical analysis (univariate analysis, t-test, chi-square).

How to Apply

To apply for a research fellow position, interested individuals should submit:

  • Application Form , including current photo
  • Letter of intent (one page) describing the applicant's goals and expectations from the research fellowship. The statement should clarify whether the candidate requests full, partial or no financial support, and clearly state the intent (or lack of intent) to pursue residency in the U.S. upon the completion of the program
  • A   curriculum vitae  that is detailed and chronologically organized
  • Two (2) letters of recommendation from professors or directors at the applicant's institution (from the past 12 months)

This material should be properly ordered and compiled into one (1) PDF and emailed to [email protected] . The applicant will be notified via e-mail within five (5) business days upon receipt of the requested documentation.

Important Dates

Start dates are normally in/around July. The selection committee—chaired by George Velmahos, MD, PhD, Division Chief and John Hwabejire, MBBS, MPH, Director of Trauma Research—will review all applications and select fellows based on need and funding availability (usually, two to four fellows are selected each year). Zoom interviews will be arranged during the selection process. Important dates in the application and selection process are approximate:

  • Deadline for applications: October 14, 2024
  • Selection Committee meeting: November 18, 2024
  • Notifications to applicants: December 30, 2024

Appointment Process

If accepted, the fellow will receive a research fellow appointment package, which should be promptly completed and returned. Delays on receiving a completed appointment package may compromise the appointment. Please note that the appointment and visa process can take three to four months.

Among other forms, the package includes:

  • Application for initial appointment to professional staff of Mass General and HMS
  • Doctoral degree diploma, translated to English and notarized
  • Letter verifying source and level of any external institutional financial support
  • Visa application

Note: As part of the appointment process, candidates are required to pass a Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) background check.

Selection Committee

These are the members of the selection committee for the International Research Fellowship program.

medical research fellowship usa

John Hwabejire, MBBS, MPH

  • Director, Trauma Research
  • Trauma and Acute Care Surgeon

medical research fellowship usa

George Velmahos, MD, PhD

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  • John F. Burke Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School

Teaching Generations of Health Care Professionals

Mass General is the largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. We train future healthcare professionals in innovative therapies.

Contact the International Research Fellowship team for more information.

Our programs support biomedical research, develop future leaders, and build inclusive learning environments. Explore opportunities that offer the resources, flexibility, and network for breakthrough science.

Supporting early career scientists as they launch careers in academic science, and equipping them to recruit, mentor, and inspire future generations. Fellows join a cohort of peers and receive funding up to $1.5 million.

Supporting outstanding early career faculty committed to advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in science. Scholars are HHMI employees, and each is appointed for up to two, five-year terms, receiving up to $8.6 million over 10 years, including salary, research budget, and equipment.

Equipping undergraduate science educators nationwide with course-based research projects to scale student access to high-impact educational experiences. Participating faculty receive year-round scientific support and collaborate to advance science and education.

Preparing science leaders through paired awards to graduate students and their thesis advisers who, together, are committed to advancing equity and inclusion in science. Fellowship provides up to three years of funding, professional development, and community.

Equipping established scientists to push their research fields into new areas of inquiry. Investigators are HHMI employees, and each receives roughly $9 million in direct support over a renewable seven-year term.

Working with research universities to identify barriers to inclusion and build inclusive learning environments through a multi-institution learning community. A subset of the community receives $2.5 million over five years to implement institution- and student-centered programs. 

Bringing together a community of accomplished scientists committed to engaging undergraduates and advancing inclusive science education.

Convening a community of 57 colleges and universities and HHMI in designing, implementing, and sustaining institutional change for improving inclusion. 

Building institutional capacity for inclusion so students from all backgrounds can thrive in science. Each institution participates in a learning cluster that shares $8-9 million over six years to test their ideas. 

ELIGIBILITY CONSIDERATIONS

HHMI selects researchers and grantees to support through competitions that have specific objectives and eligibility criteria; thus, HHMI does not encourage and rarely funds unsolicited grant proposals. Most HHMI grants competitions have a formal invitation and review process. Information about eligibility requirements and how to apply for specific programs can be found on each program’s page.

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One year national, international and global health research fellowship opportunities.

One-year Funded Research Fellowships [FB1] are available and can provide a more extensive research experience. Many of these one-year funded research training programs are available through national and international sponsors and through our Alumni Association as listed below. These prestigious year-off research opportunities are pursued by some students between their second and third or third and fourth years of school. Appropriate communication and planning with the College of Medicine and the Medical Student Research Team is required. Starting early is essential as the due dates for applications of submission to SUNY Downstate One-Year Alumni Fellowship or to the many other opportunities listed below vary significantly (e.g., from August to April the year before.

One-year National and International Research Training

The suny downstate alumni association one year fellowship.

The Alumni Association of SUNY-Downstate Medical College offers funds to support one or more medical students who are planning a year of full-time research during the academic year. Student applicants must have completed at least one year of matriculation by July 1. Priority is given to projects that are planned to occur at SUNY-Downstate or an affiliate, but all applications will be carefully reviewed.

SUNY Downstate Medical Center & Mount Sinai Medical Center - Medical Student Dermatology Clinical Research Fellowship

A paid 1-year fellowship that focuses on non-invasive imaging with reflectance confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography in addition to clinical trials. Fellows will see study patients as well as clinical trial patients.

2020-2021 Dermatology Research Fellowship for Medical Students | Student Doctor Network

American Heart Association Predoctoral Fellowship

To help students initiate careers as scientists, physician-scientists or other clinician-scientists, or related careers aimed at improving global cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and brain health.

AHA Predoctoral Fellowship - Professional Heart Daily | American Heart Association

Howard Hughes Medical Institute at an Academic or Non-Profit Research Institution

Encourage development of future medical-scientists by providing a year of full-time, mentored laboratory research training to medical students with interest in and commitment to biomedical research.

Medical Research Fellows Program | HHMI.org

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Year Long Medical Research Fellows Program at Janelia or K-RITH (Durban, South Africa)

HHMI international opportunity

Janelia Research Campus

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program

MRSP is a year-long residential research immersion program for medical, dental and veterinary students seeking careers as clinician-scientists.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Medical Student Research Training Supplement

NIDDK is to conduct and support medical research and research training and to disseminate science-based information on diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutritional disorders, and obesity; and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases, to improve people’s health and quality of life.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Fellowships in Environmental Medicine for Medical Students

A one-year research fellowship for medical students to train at NIEHS. The trainees will work full time in a research group for one year, beginning in late summer/early fall. 

Research to Prevent Blindness Medical Student Fellowship

The RPB Medical Student Fellowship (MSF) encourages gifted medical school students to consider careers in eye research and allows them to take one year off from their studies to participate in a research project at an RPB-supported department of ophthalmology.

RPB Medical Student Eye Research Fellowship | ProFellow

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Fellowship Program

The Sarnoff Fellowship Program offers research opportunities for outstanding medical students to explore medical careers in cardiovascular research.

Sarnoff Foundation: Welcome (sarnoffendowment.org)

HVTN Research and Mentorship Program (RAMP) Scholar Program (for African American and Hispanic students)

The HIV Vaccine Trials Network, in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health is investing in the next generation of HIV prevention researchers by providing African American and Latinx medical students with opportunities for independent research with structured mentoring, funding, training, and professional development activities.

CDC Experience in Applied Epidemiology

CDC has many diverse fellowship, internship, training, and volunteer opportunities for students. Many opportunities provide invaluable experience and potentially offer clear cut paths to exciting careers with CDC.

One-year global health research training

Global health program for fellows and scholars (replaces fogarty-ellison).

Program supports U.S. university consortia to provide collaborative, mentored global health research training opportunities in low- and middle-income countries. Medical students from the U.S. or from low- and middle-income countries apply through the consortia below for placement at an low- and middle-income countries institution for 12 months.

Apply through one of 5 centers:

  • University of California, Berkeley - Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship
  • GloCal Health Fellowship | UC Global Health Institute (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • University of Washington
  • Vanderbilt University

Fulbright-Fogarty Fellows and Scholars in Public Health

Fogarty is partnered with the Fulbright Program (i.e., flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government) and promotes the expansion of research in public health and clinical research in resource-limited settings for students.

Doris Duke International Clinical Research Fellowship (ICRF)

ICRF program provides fellowships for U.S.-based medical students to take a year out from school to conduct mentored clinical research in developing countries. The program was designed to support this blending of skills by giving medical students an outstanding clinical research experience in global health while they are in the midst of developing their medical proficiency.

Programs for Medical Students, Residents and Fellows (duke.edu)

Doris Duke Fellowships

Apply from here International Clinical Research Fellowship | Encourage and Develop Clinical Research Careers | Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (ddcf.org) ) through one of 6 centers:

  • Duke University School of Medicine and Duke Global Health Institute
  • Harvard Medical School
  • University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine
  • University of Minnesota Medical School
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine
  • Yale University School of Medicine

USA to Australia Fellowship Program from the ProFellow American Australian Association (AAA)

The AAA awards Fellowships each year for US scholars undertaking advanced research or study in Australia.

USA to Australia Fellowship Program | ProFellow

Luce Scholars Program

This nationally competitive fellowship program provides stipends, language training, and individualized professional placement in Asia, unique among American-Asian exchanges in that it is intended for young leaders who have had limited experience of Asia and who might not otherwise have an opportunity in the normal course of their careers to come to know Asia. Applications are made through 75 undergraduate colleges (listed here )

Luce Scholars | The Henry Luce Foundation (hluce.org)

South American Program in HIV Prevention Research (SAPHIR)

The SAPHIR training program of HIV prevention research in Latin America is for pre-physician researchers from the U.S. Each trainee is paired with mentors to focus on a specific area of research while receiving educational overview of HIV prevention (didactic program).

National Institute of Health (NIH) Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program

An accelerated, individualized research training program for science students committed to biomedical research careers. Students perform research with courses students choose to take in relationship to their own interests.

Fulbright-Fogarty Awards in Public Health

Fellowships   in Public Health are offered in partnership between the Fulbright Program and the Fogarty International Center of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. These awards were established to promote the expansion of research in public health and clinical research in resource-limited settings.

Otolaryngology Medical Student Research Fellowship Program

medical research fellowship usa

Connecting clinical and research expertise

Mayo Clinic's Otolaryngology Medical Student Research Fellowship program gives you the opportunity to immerse yourself in the research side of clinical practice.

medical research fellowship usa

Mentored research training

Mayo Clinic faculty members with research expertise in otolaryngology and related fields mentor fellows in the program.

medical research fellowship usa

Diverse research opportunities within a focused field

Otolaryngology research fellows can pursue basic science, translational or clinical research via retrospective studies, clinical trials, laboratory research, biomedical engineering and more.

medical research fellowship usa

Research infrastructure to support success

Fellows benefit from multidisciplinary collaborations and are supported by procedural and skills laboratories, major research center partners, other Mayo Clinic departments and divisions, and the Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 's Research Committee.

The Mayo Clinic Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery offers a research fellowship to medical school students and recent graduates that provides an opportunity for participants to work within our research program to advance patient care.

As a research fellow, you will be given an opportunity to immerse yourself in the research side of clinical practice and gain invaluable experience and training for your future career.

In the program, you will develop a research plan, meet with departmental statisticians to create a statistical plan and have a fellowship timeline. You'll also give presentations to the department's Research Committee , which helps fellows meet research goals and gain experience presenting. In addition, fellows assist with ongoing projects, database management and data acquisition.

The number of publications and projects each fellow can participate in is directly related to the individual's motivation and efficiency. The department encourages fellows to take leadership roles and earn first authorship in their primary projects.

Availability

The Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery offers two full-time, paid fellowship positions, including:

  • Relocation stipend
  • Funding to attend and present at national conferences

These two positions are offered to candidates from groups that are underrepresented in medicine — such as Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander — or who demonstrate a significant financially or educationally disadvantaged background.

The department can offer up to two additional unrestricted positions for applicants who have commensurate independent funding, such as from a home institution or grant, for periods of time up to one academic year with a rolling application process.

Program components

The program runs for 12 calendar months beginning in June or July of the program year.

The fellowship includes a week-long, intensive research bootcamp covering topics such as:

  • Statistics 101
  • Health care disparities
  • How to choose a mentor

In addition, fellows can complete a one-month clinical research "Sub-I" to gain experience and exposure in the operating room and clinical setting.

Fellows attend all general didactic sessions as well as research-specific didactics — for example, craniofacial conference, otology journal club and the like. Fellows have opportunities to present their work at departmental Research Grand Rounds and at the year-end Resident Research Day.

Each fellow is paired with a primary faculty mentor and primary resident mentor and meets weekly with the faculty research mentor.

Outreach and engagement

Outreach opportunities for fellows include:

  • Mentoring undergraduate research students in the department's summer research program
  • Mentoring high school students through the Mayo Clinic Health Career Collaborative, which partners with Rochester STEM Academy
  • Participating in the department's community outreach clinic, which serves a predominantly Hispanic and Latino patient population

Although currently awaiting political stabilization, the department hopes to offer an opportunity to participate in virtual clinical rounds with colleagues in Ethiopia.

The Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery strives to engage fellows in the departmental community and the larger Mayo Clinic and Rochester communities. Learn more about the department's diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives .

Before the end of the program, department faculty members provide feedback on residency application materials such as CVs and personal statements. Fellows participate in mock interviews with faculty members to prepare for successful residency applications. Additionally, a Mayo Clinic photographer will provide each fellow with professional headshots.

Research fellows

medical research fellowship usa

Gabriela Calcano

Medical school: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Primary mentor: Kathryn (Katie) M. Van Abel, M.D.

  • Publications

medical research fellowship usa

Gabriel Hernandez-Herrera

Medical school: University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine

medical research fellowship usa

Felicia O. Olawuni

Medical school: Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

medical research fellowship usa

George B. Sankar

Medical school: Morehouse School of Medicine

Previous research fellows

  • Ghazal S. Daher, M.D.
  • Cynthia Chweya, M.D.
  • Joseph el Badaoui, M.D.

Department Research

The Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery offers robust research opportunities with dedicated mentors, statistical support, supportive clinical research coordinators and access to a wide variety of resources.

Residency Program

Learn more about the Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery Residency faculty and specific areas of study and research.

More about research at Mayo Clinic

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Medical Research Scholars Program

Press Release : NIH Announces 2023-2024 Medical Research Scholars Program Class

The Medical Research Scholars Program is a year long research immersion program for future clinician-scientists that advances health by inspiring careers in biomedical research. By engaging students in basic, clinical, or translational research investigations, offering a curriculum rich in didactics and professional development, and featuring a robust mentorship and advising program, MRSP prepares its Scholars to become tomorrow's leaders in medicine and biomedical research.

Portrait of Manuel Cintron

Eligibility

The 10-12 month program is designed for students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, have a strong interest in conducting basic, translational, clinical or epidemiological research and are currently enrolled in their 2nd, 3rd, or 4th year at an accredited medical, dental, or veterinary program .

Dental and veterinary students: due to the integrated nature of the third and fourth (clinical) years, participation in the MRSP is recommended after you have completed your second or fourth year in school.

Acknowledgement Statement

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medical Research Scholars Program is a public-private partnership supported jointly by the NIH and contributions to the Foundation for NIH, alumni of student research programs, and other individual supporters via contributions to the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.

NOTE: PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader .

This page last updated on 11/21/2023

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Innovation in Eye Care, Research & Education

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Research Fellowships

Research fellows and research staff.

A broad number of openings are available for postdoctoral research fellows, research staff, visiting scholars, and clinical research coordinators across different programs in the Department of Ophthalmology. Please contact faculty in your area of interest or expertise, or look for posted staff research positions  here .

Fellowships

Currently accepting applications

  • Ophthalmic Innovation Program

Not currently accepting applications

  • Adaptive optic imaging research
  • Cornea research
  • Glaucoma research
  • Neuro-Ophthalmology research
  • Retinal biology and diabetic retinopathy research

Top 10 largest NIH grants funding research in 2023

Andrea Zeek Feb 20, 2024

Liana Apostolova works with a LEADS study participant.

Liana Apostolova, MD, MS, works with a LEADS study participant. The top 5 largest NIH grants to the IU School of Medicine in 2023 included funding for Alzheimer's disease research.

During federal fiscal year 2023, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators received over $243 million in National Institutes of Health research funding — bringing the school’s national NIH funding ranking to No. 13 among all public medical schools and No. 29 among all schools in the United States, according to the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research .

Blue Ridge is a nonprofit organization that annually ranks U.S. medical schools by NIH grants awarded each federal fiscal year. The NIH is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world, and the 2023 federal fiscal year was Oct. 1, 2022, to Sept. 30, 2023.

Across the 27 centers and institutes that make up the NIH, the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) were the largest sources of NIH grant funding to IU School of Medicine researchers in 2023 — with nearly $71.8 million from the NIA, over $30.8 million from the NHLBI and nearly $25.5 million from the NIDDK.

The IU School of Medicine was also among the U.S. medical schools receiving the largest amounts of funding from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the NIA and the NIDDK — ranking No. 3 in NIAAA funding among all medical schools in the country, No. 6 in NIA funding and No. 20 in NIDDK funding.

Read on for a list of the school’s largest NIH grant awards of 2023.

1. Early Onset AD Consortium – the LEADS Study

  • Amount: $13.9 million
  • Principal Investigator: Liana G. Apostolova, MD, MS

2. National Centralized Repository for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (NCRAD)

  • Amount: $10.3 million
  • Principal Investigator: Tatiana Foroud, PhD

3. IU/JAX/PITT MODEL-AD Center

  • Amount: $9.8 million
  • Principal Investigator: Bruce T. Lamb, PhD

4. IU School of Medicine Alzheimer’s Disease Drug Discovery Center (TREAT-AD)

  • Amount: $7.3 million
  • Principal Investigator: Alan Palkowitz, PhD

5. National Centralized Repository for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (NCRAD)

  • Amount: $6 million

6. Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI)

  • Amount: $5.5 million
  • Principal Investigator: Sharon M. Moe, MD

7. Structure of amyloid fibrils in human neurodegenerative diseases and aging

  • Amount: $3.9 million
  • Principal Investigator: Ruben Vidal, PhD

8. East Africa International Epidemiology Database to evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) Regional Consortium

  • Amount: $3.4 million
  • Principal Investigator: Kara K. Wools-Kaloustian, MD

9. The Indiana University-Ohio State University Maternal and Pediatric Precision in Therapeutics Data, Model, Knowledge, and Research Coordination Center

  • Principal Investigator: Sara K. Quinney

10. Multimodal Fetal and Placental Imagine and Biomarkers of Clinical Outcomes in Opioid Use Disorder

  • Amount: $3.1 million
  • Principal Investigator: Rupa Radhakrishnan, MD, MS

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Andrea Zeek

Assistant Director of Research Communications

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Applying to Medical Research Programs

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Division of Cardiology section navigation

Cardiovascular research fellowship, emory's cardiology research fellowship program.

An important aspect of the Division of Cardiology's research program is training the next generation of clinician-scientists. Cardiology fellows have the opportunity to work with some of the nation's top investigators, benefiting from their experience and diverse expertise. Close, day-to-day interactions between fellows and their respective mentors provide guidance not only with their research projects, but also training in manuscript and grant writing, data analysis, oral presentations, and research project planning. In addition to cardiology fellows, we have a large number of graduate students and postdoctoral research fellows representing a diverse array of disciplines who come to Emory for advanced research training in cardiovascular research. The resulting cross-disciplinary research teams coupled with state-of-the-art facilities provide a very unique training environment to prepare fellows for careers in academic medicine.

Division of Cardiology Research

The Division of Cardiology has renowned investigators involved in basic science, clinical, and translational research. Explore the division's many research areas.

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COMMENTS

  1. Medical Research Fellowship Program

    The Medical Research Fellowship Program (MRFP) at the George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) provides international medical graduates with the opportunity to enhance their research and clinical skills, preparing them to be strong candidates when applying for U.S. residency programs in the United States.

  2. Year-Long Global Health Opportunities and Fellowships

    The year-long fellowship provides third- and fourth-year medical and veterinary students with valuable public health experience in an international setting. The main focus of the fellowship is a 6- to 12-week field assignment.

  3. Research and Training Opportunities

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medical Research Scholars Program (MRSP) is a comprehensive, year-long research enrichment program designed to attract the most creative, research-oriented medical, dental, and veterinary students to the intramural campus of the NIH in Bethesda, MD. NIH Summer Internship Program in Biomedical Research

  4. Residencies and Fellowships Research

    4,270 Research personnel 787 Physicians involved in research 271 Scientific faculty (career scientists) Research by the numbers: Facilities 22 Core research laboratories 393,328 sq. ft. Research laboratory space 1,002,899 sq. ft. Total research space Research by the numbers: Studies and publications 2,727

  5. Summer Research Fellowship

    The Summer Research Fellowship was created through grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and Mayo Clinic. This comprehensive training program, which lasts eight weeks, prepares underrepresented students for careers in clinical care and patient-oriented research.

  6. Fellowships

    Find a Fellowship. Programs listed are ACGME Accredited or Equivalent. ... The Office of Graduate Medical Education; ... The Impact of Wearable Technologies on Health Research. January 17, 2024. A CRISPR Future. January 10, 2024. Beyond the Renaissance: Nobel Laureates and Their Creative Pursuits. December 19, 2023. What's in a Brain?

  7. 2024 Fellows

    2024 Sloan Research Fellows. Congratulations to the Sloan Research Fellows of 2024. The following 126 early-career scholars represent the most promising scientific researchers working today. Their achievements and potential place them among the next generation of scientific leaders in the U.S. and Canada.

  8. NIH Medical Research Scholars Program

    Jamie Ko (2021-2022 MRSP Scholar) is a fourth-year medical student at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is completing a yearlong research fellowship through the NIH's Medical Research Scholars Program under the mentorship of Dr. Anna M. Nápoles, Scientific Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and Dr. Paula Strassle, staff ...

  9. Global Health Medical Student Research Fellowship

    The Global Health Medical Student Research Fellowship is a joint effort by The Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH) and the Stanford MedScholars Program. In response to increasing interest in global health among incoming and current medical students, this fellowship provides an opportunity for medical students with a genuine interest ...

  10. The All of Us Research Program is an opportunity to enhance the

    Launched in 2018, the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) All of Us Research Program has enrolled over 700,000 people and is deliberately focused on advancing health equity by inclusively ...

  11. Medical Student Research Fellowship

    Medical Student Research Fellowship Research Fellowship and Selective This is an opportunity for UC Davis School of Medicine students to enhance their medical training through direct participation in basic science, clinical investigation, or health care delivery research.

  12. International Medical Grads Seek U.S. Experience through GW's Medical

    The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences' Office of International Medicine Programs offers the Medical Research Fellowship Program, for international medical graduates looking to strengthening their qualifications and candidacy for U.S. graduate medical education. The program is uniquely designed to support research and clinical skills and offer experience in ...

  13. Fellowship Programs

    Feb 14, 2024 · 6 MIN READ Medical Justice in Advocacy Fellowship The Center for Health Equity (CHE) has partnered with Morehouse School of Medicine's Satcher Health Leadership Institute (SHLI) to create and launch the Medical Justice in Advocacy Fellowship. AMA Center for Health Equity Share Copy Add Bookmark Membership Moves Medicine™

  14. UC Davis neuroscientist named 2024 Sloan Research Fellow

    (SACRAMENTO) Theanne Griffith, an assistant professor in the UC Davis Department of Physiology and Membrane Biology, has been awarded a prestigious 2024 Sloan Research Fellowship in neuroscience from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.. The two-year, $75,000 fellowships honor exceptional U.S. and Canadian researchers whose creativity, innovation, and research accomplishments make them stand out as ...

  15. One-year Fellowships < MD Program

    Approximately 15-25 students per year receive competitive one-year medical student research fellowships funded by internal and external sources. All stipends are paid directly to the student and are considered taxable income. Students in their third year of medical school are eligible to apply. On this page

  16. medical research fellowships

    medical research fellowships. medical research fellowships. HMS Students Receive HHMI Fellowships. May 4, 2018. Six are first-time recipients, one is a second-year fellow. Growth Opportunities. October 28, 2021. Programs nurture the next generation of leaders in medicine, science.

  17. International Research Fellowship

    165 Cambridge Street, Suite 810 Boston, MA 02114 Email: [email protected] Overview The approved applicant will hold a Massachusetts General Hospital and a Harvard Medical School (HMS) appointment as a research fellow. Applications from non-U.S. candidates are encouraged.

  18. UC Davis medical school ranked among the nation's best for NIH research

    (SACRAMENTO) The UC Davis School of Medicine is among the nation's leading medical schools in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, according to the latest Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research ranking. The medical school broke its record of NIH funding with a total of more than $209 million, placing it 33 rd nationally. "Research is foundational to our mission of delivering ...

  19. Individual Fellowships

    Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award Individual Predoctoral Fellowship to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (Parent F31 - Diversity) To provide predoctoral individuals with supervised research training in specified health and health-related areas leading toward the research doctoral degree (e.g., PhD).

  20. 53 Medical Research Fellowships for Professionals, Scholars and

    The Consortium offers Research Fellowships, nine-month Dissertation Fellowships, NEH Postdoctoral Fellowships, and Fellowships-in-Residence for scholars in the history of science, technology or medicine who would like to use the collections at two or more institutions in the Consortium.

  21. Apply to a Program

    Supporting outstanding early career faculty committed to advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in science. Scholars are HHMI employees, and each is appointed for up to two, five-year terms, receiving up to $8.6 million over 10 years, including salary, research budget, and equipment. Application deadline (3:00 p.m. ET)

  22. One Year Research Fellowships

    The RPB Medical Student Fellowship (MSF) encourages gifted medical school students to consider careers in eye research and allows them to take one year off from their studies to participate in a research project at an RPB-supported department of ophthalmology.

  23. Overview

    The Mayo Clinic Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery offers a research fellowship to medical school students and recent graduates that provides an opportunity for participants to work within our research program to advance patient care. As a research fellow, you will be given an opportunity to immerse yourself in the research ...

  24. Medical Research Scholars Program

    The 10-12 month program is designed for students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, have a strong interest in conducting basic, translational, clinical or epidemiological research and are currently enrolled in their 2nd, 3rd, or 4th year at an accredited medical, dental, or veterinary program.

  25. Research Fellowships

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  26. MSK 2024 Medical Student Summer Research Fellowship

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  27. Top 10 largest NIH grants funding research in 2023

    Blue Ridge is a nonprofit organization that annually ranks U.S. medical schools by NIH grants awarded each federal fiscal year. The NIH is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world, and the 2023 federal fiscal year was Oct. 1, 2022, to Sept. 30, 2023.

  28. Applying to Medical Research Programs

    Learn about the process of applying to medical research programs. ... Training in a Residency or Fellowship. ... Connect With Us. Contact Us; View all Social Media; Association of American Medical Colleges. 655 K Street, NW, Suite 100 Washington, DC, 20001-2399 202-828-0400.

  29. Cardiovascular Research Fellowship

    Emory's Cardiology Research Fellowship Program. An important aspect of the Division of Cardiology's research program is training the next generation of clinician-scientists. Cardiology fellows have the opportunity to work with some of the nation's top investigators, benefiting from their experience and diverse expertise.