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john wick chapter 2 movie review

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Have you ever walked out of a film so struck by awe and wonder your skin is abuzz? Has a film ever left you so joyful and drunk on adrenaline that it made you more hopeful about the world? Has a lead performance in an action film ever had such balletic grace it made you marvel at the possibilities of the human body itself? This is exactly how I felt watching “John Wick: Chapter Two,” the sequel to the surprising 2014 action hit.

“John Wick: Chapter Two” is a more audacious film, bolder and more violent than its predecessor. It’s also surprisingly hilarious, wringing humor from physical pratfalls and dry wit in unexpected moments. In many ways, it’s the platonic ideal of an action film: operatic yet colored with fine-tuned details, blisteringly visceral yet tinged with pathos. For all its great craft, the movie is ultimately a showcase for Keanu Reeves , who returns as the titular assassin, proving his greatness as an actor and action star. Yes, that’s right, I said greatness. No qualifiers necessary. “John Wick: Chapter Two” is truly wondrous, but it wouldn’t work without Reeves, who has a sincere love of this genre.

Wick is not good at retiring. It’s easy to believe, as commented on by others in the film, that he’s addicted to the vengeance he dishes out with such panache. After all, what else does he have to live for? The sequel picks up shortly after the end of the first film; Wick is still reeling from the death of his wife, Helen ( Bridget Moynahan ), failing to adjust to a new life even with his adorable, unnamed pitbull steadfastly by his side. (For those wondering, the dog remains safe.) He has little time to relax when he finds Santino D’Antonio ( Riccardo Scamarcio ) on his doorstep, asking him to make good on the blood oath he made years prior that allowed him to retire from his deadly profession. At first, Wick balks. One devastating house explosion later, he sees no other choice. But accepting Santino’s offer does not bring Wick the peace he desires so intensely. Soon, he finds himself facing threats from all sides, including Santino’s mute enforcer Ares ( Ruby Rose ) and Cassian (Common), a bodyguard of the woman Wick is forced to kill.

“John Wick: Chapter Two” is never as singularly focused as its stellar opening, which is pretty much the best Batman sequence that never was. Wick has already avenged his dog and now wants to recover the car stolen in the previous film. This gives us a fun Peter Stormare cameo as Abram Tarasov, the brother of the Russian gangster Wick killed the last time around. The opening juxtaposes Wick fluidly moving in and out of shadow killing all manner of men who stand in his path. All the while, Abram listens to the ricocheting bullets and belabored screams of his henchmen growing almost cartoonishly overwrought with dread. The scene works by leaning into Wick’s mythic nature even more heavily than the first film and establishes the sequel’s excellent comedic stylings.

After the opening, the film wastes no time plunging us deeper into the mythology of Wick’s labyrinthine world of assassins, blood oaths and arcane rules. The budding franchise has some of the best world-building currently in film, besting comic properties and reboots that have decades of material from which to draw. There are many delectable details introduced like an old-fashioned steno pool of tattooed darlings that handle the release of hits and other nasty work needing to be done. Some of the most fun moments are just watching Wick prepare. He’s a man of extremely refined taste, whether he’s getting a new suit tailored or conversing with The Sommelier ( Peter Serafinowicz ) about weaponry with the metaphors of fine dining. Cinema was created so Keanu Reeves could wear a fine black suit and slice through people with the same grace as Fred Astaire . But in expanding Wick’s world the film often lacks the sharp focus that made the original so entrancing. But even though it isn’t a perfect sequel, the imperfections are charming, lending the story the ability to venture down fun avenues.

“John Wick: Chapter Two” is a character actor’s paradise. It’s so obvious that returning cast members and new faces are having fun that you can’t help but smile: Ian McShane returns to make a meal out of every scene he’s in as Winston, the owner of New York City’s Continental hotel; Lance Reddick and John Leguizamo are also a pleasure, giving completely different energy to the film; Ruby Rose might just have a great career soon as an action star. With not a single line of dialogue, she has a commanding presence, proving me wrong about her skills demonstrated in a previous season of “Orange is the New Black.” Common proves to also be a great foil for Reeves, nailing the silent but deadly assassin mode with panache. Franco Nero ’s brief appearance as the manager of the Continental hotel in Rome is especially great. Come on. It’s Franco Nero talking to John Wick. What else could you ask for?

But it’s Laurence Fishburne as the Bowery King that may just be my favorite addition to this fascinating world. “ The Matrix ” co-stars understandably have great rapport. They riff off each other in the way only actors with deeply shared history can. Fishburne’s presence is commanding, with a tinge of eccentricity. His booming laughter happens to be one of the most powerful aspects of the film’s impressive arsenal. At one point, his laugh acts as a transition between scenes going longer than expected in response to Wick’s questionable request. He only appears briefly but he makes quite an impact.

Of course, the reason to truly cherish “John Wick: Chapter Two” is the action. Director Chad Stahelski and cinematographer Dan Laustsen make every frame a sumptuous visual feast. They take advantage of the outsized world they’ve created, forming a color palette unique to the action film landscape that gives “John Wick: Chapter Two” a painterly quality. They also know how good-looking and physically expressive their leading man is. Often Reeves is the only thing on-screen, his face and body cast in shades of turquoise, jade, and neon pink.

There is an artistry and detail to even minor scenes of characters trading barbs that express the sheer mythic and grand nature of the story. The sound design highlighting the crunch of bones, splatter of blood, and the various repercussions of these increasingly intense battles is also quite artful. Fight scenes are never over-edited, opting for continuous wide shots, making it evident how much Reeves trained. The violence is never one-note, running the gamut from darkly humorous to oddly poetic. And it is always very, very bloody. This film is far more brutal than the first. Assassins are sliced at the groin, stabbed in the thigh, and shot in all manner of body parts with the camera never flinching, forcing us to bear witness. Bonus: we get to see Wick’s pencil trick. It’s even more gruesome than I imagined.

But the action isn’t just intense and gorgeously crafted. In “John Wick: Chapter Two” physicality is identity. Screenwriter Derek Kolstad smartly doesn’t over-explain the history between characters—the way they fight speaks for them. When Ares gets her showdown with Wick, she’s scrappy and unhinged, like a starved lioness released onto an unsuspecting public. Cassian is more openly brutal and forceful. He’s more simplistic than Wick in his fighting choices but nearly as deadly. Their fight scenes often begin with long pauses and intense stares before giving way to outright mayhem. Then, of course, there is Reeves. No action star quite understands how physicality can communicate story like he does. His dialogue may be spare. But his body tells an entire story all its own, even in subdued moments. A glare or half-hearted smile communicates more history than many actors do with a monologue. Where Ares is energetic and Cassius is brutal, Reeves makes Wick elegant in his violence.

Interestingly, Wick often does a sort of flip, locking an opponent between his legs. It’s a move that is typically the domain of female action stars, reminding me of Black Widow’s signature move in films like “Captain America: Winter Soldier.” This demonstrates how Reeves uniquely blends typically feminine and masculine traits with aplomb. During the film’s most memorable fight scenes, Reeves seems like he’s creating dance crafted with punches and gun-fu. He effectively marries the cool grace of Fred Astaire with the sex appeal of Gene Kelly . No modern action star is so brutal and beautiful an equal measure.

But Reeves goes beyond being a talented physical performer in action scenes. The film highlights the thematic preoccupation that snakes through his entire career: loneliness. Reeves has always been best when playing men isolated due to equal parts choice and pathology. Wick’s struggle to find peace and his place in the world is surprisingly moving. Here is a man without any home in the world—emotional or tangible. Amid the high body count and clever design, “John Wick: Chapter Two” is a moving portrait of how loneliness warps the best of us. It ends with room for a third chapter, which I am definitely hoping for, since “John Wick: Chapter Two” demonstrates what film as an art form is all about: it awes and delights, challenges and provokes. It also proves that Keanu Reeves is the greatest modern action star and film is better for his return.

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Film credits.

John Wick: Chapter Two movie poster

John Wick: Chapter Two (2017)

Rated R for strong violence throughout, some language and brief nudity.

Keanu Reeves as John Wick

Bridget Moynahan as Helen Wick

Ruby Rose as Ares

Ian McShane as Winston

Laurence Fishburne as The Bowler King

John Leguizamo as Aurelio

Lance Reddick as Charon

Thomas Sadoski as Jimmy

  • Chad Stahelski

Writer (based on characters created by)

  • Derek Kolstad

Cinematographer

  • Dan Laustsen
  • Evan Schiff
  • Tyler Bates
  • Joel J. Richard

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John Wick: Chapter 2 Reviews

john wick chapter 2 movie review

Despite offering wonderfully staged action that takes stunts to a new level, it lacks the emotional heart of the debut film.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | May 12, 2023

john wick chapter 2 movie review

This sequel builds the world of the highly organized and codified High Table that John Wick had left, but now is forced to re-enter. The film answers the question: Is there honor among thieves? It's bloody, but no dog dies.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/5 | Apr 2, 2023

john wick chapter 2 movie review

…if the element of surprise has gone, there’s plenty for genre fans to soak up in Chapter 2, not least Reeves’ impeccable, graceful presence as the world’s best assassin…

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Mar 20, 2023

john wick chapter 2 movie review

John Wick 2 is everything everyone would want out of John Wick's sequel. [Full review in Spanish]

Full Review | Original Score: 8/10 | Mar 3, 2023

john wick chapter 2 movie review

There is a beautiful rhythm to the violence, and the film never loses its self-awareness or tongue-in-cheek wit.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Aug 22, 2022

john wick chapter 2 movie review

John Wick: Chapter 2 does exactly what good sequel should: it replicates aspects of the original while also expanding its mythology through a measure of novelty and one-upmanship.

Full Review | Original Score: 3/4 | Apr 5, 2022

john wick chapter 2 movie review

The Raid movies make the John Wick films look like outtakes from Driving Miss Daisy by comparison.

Full Review | Original Score: 2/4 | Aug 17, 2021

As ever, it's the action that dazzles. Stahelski choreographs the killing sprees with gruesome elegance and the flick contains genuinely tense and unpredictable moments.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Apr 29, 2021

john wick chapter 2 movie review

Hits all the right notes. It's a tad too long but fans of the original will be reminded of why they fell in love with John Wick in the first place.

Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5 | Mar 4, 2021

john wick chapter 2 movie review

The violence has become a shade more graphic, though it's also gained a self-awareness that lends to superior humor.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/10 | Dec 5, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

If you aren't excited for a third chapter when the credits start to roll, check your pulse; you might have died from shock.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Sep 24, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

A decent film for those seeking nothing more than escapist action devoid of CGI.

Full Review | Original Score: 2.0/4.0 | Sep 12, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

The elegance of this action packed sequel is marvelled and celebrated in its brutal 'gun-fu' violence. While it struggles to reach the heights of its surprisingly entertaining predecessor, John Wick: Chapter 2 certainly raises the bar for action films.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Aug 26, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

There's betrayal, murder, and when John Wick finds out he has a price on his head, he goes revenging and kills...well, everyone. Sound perfect, right?

Full Review | Original Score: A | Jul 2, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

John Wick: Chapter 2 does what any good sequel should: It ups the action, ups the stakes and keeps the story moving in a forward direction.

Full Review | Jul 1, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

As phlegmatic assassin John Wick, Reeve's svelte and photogenic demeanour is paraded with grace and pride. Director Chad Stahelski loves his leading man, understands his appeal and shoots him accordingly as a killer on a catwalk.

Full Review | Jun 20, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

The creative team blows open the doors to this secret world and allows viewers inside this dark world where Wick (the appropriately understated Keanu Reeves) made his home... And boy, do they make it fun again.

Full Review | May 1, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

John Wick: Chapter 2 isn't just a great action movie. It's one of the best action movies ever made, and it stands alongside other classics like The Raid, Mad Max: Fury Road and Hard Boiled.

Full Review | Feb 19, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

[Keanu] Reeves's Zen-like cool serves him well here. He's like an athlete resorting to muscle memory, lethal and lightning quick as he automatically falls into what he's done best.

Full Review | Jan 14, 2020

john wick chapter 2 movie review

Stahelski's kinetic direction keeps things moving, even if there are way too many shots to the head.

Full Review | Original Score: 3.75/5 | Dec 7, 2019

John Wick: Chapter 2 Review

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Mike Rougeau Avatar

John Wick: Chapter 2 expands on the original’s lore while not giving away too many underworld secrets. Common and Ruby Rose bring their A-games as foils to Reeves’ Wick, who has somehow become an icon of action hero purity after just two films. Dragged down only slightly by a lack of resolution and less of the original’s aura of hushed mystery, John Wick: Chapter 2 nonetheless delivers everything most fans could want.

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John Wick: Chapter Two

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Non-virtual Keanu Reeves in John Wick: Chapter 2.

John Wick: Chapter 2 review – a bigger, bloodier, broodier sequel

Well-executed follow-up ramps up the shootouts, leaving monosyllabic Keanu Reeves never more than 9mm from a bloody gun battle

John Wick , Keanu Reeves’ first hit in almost a decade, arrived in 2014 as a brisk, limber counterblast to the excesses of the Marvel and Fast & Furious universes, configured by ex-stuntman Chad Stahelski towards non-virtual, live-on-location fisticuffs. The sequel succumbs to Hollywood inflation, cranking up the budget, volume and running time, and pitching Reeves ’s reluctant assassin into new forms of carnage every 15 minutes. Climaxing with a gallery shootout that underlines the films’ aspirations to pop art, that carnage can feel video-gamey, yet it remains imaginatively designed and executed: Stahelski is among the few action directors whose big guns still pointedly demand reloading.

The impact, however, gets muffled by extra layers of the nerdy (under)world-building through which the first movie cut such a stylish dash. Business with metaphysical ledgers and gold coins carries the none-too-thrilling whiff of accountancy; one belated cast addition returns us to the Matrix movies’ tortuous footnotes. Any franchise employing Peter Serafinowicz as its Q-via-Alfred figure surely retains some sense of humour about the nonsense it’s peddling, and Chapter 2 will pass a Friday or Saturday night as mindlessly as its predecessor. Yet if the third instalment – excitingly trailed here – runs much beyond two hours, stern objections should be lodged with the ombudsman.

  • Keanu Reeves
  • Action and adventure films

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  • Lions Gate Films

Summary Legendary hitman John Wick is forced to back out of retirement by a former associate plotting to seize control of a shadowy international assassins’ guild. Bound by a blood oath to help him, John travels to Rome where he squares off against some of the world’s deadliest killers.

Directed By : Chad Stahelski

Written By : Derek Kolstad

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Film Review: ‘John Wick: Chapter 2’

As in 2014's surprise hit, this elegantly choreographed action sequel elevates its brutal confrontations to a dazzling form of modern dance.

By Peter Debruge

Peter Debruge

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John Wick: Chapter 2

“John Wick” wasn’t designed for a sequel. It began with someone killing John Wick’s dog, and ended with the vengeance-bent uber-assassin stealing a new best friend from an animal shelter, after dropping 76 (or more) dead bodies along the way. The movie, which launched the directorial career of Keanu Reeves ’ stunt double in “The Matrix,” Chad Stahelski , succeeded not on the strength of its story, but on the elegance of its action, and while it reaches at times to justify its own existence, “ John Wick: Chapter 2 ” boasts a reunion with “Matrix” co-star Laurence Fishburne and two major improvements on the original: First, no animals were harmed in the making of the film. And secondly, the human body count is significantly higher.

The John Wick movies accomplish what Hong Kong action flicks did a quarter-century ago, seducing bloodthirsty (predominately male) audiences into appreciating an exquisitely choreographed modern ballet. If you doubt that Stahelski sees his own job in these terms, look no further than how he lights each scene: Even neon demon Nicolas Winding Refn must be taking notes at the way Stahelski and his crew place bright-fuchsia fluorescent tubes in a New York subway, poltergeist-blue spotlights beneath the arches of ancient Roman catacombs, and nightclub-worthy accents throughout an elaborate hall of mirrors art exhibit.

In the opening scene, a Russian crime tsar (Peter Stormare) reminds us of Wick’s ruthless boogeyman reputation, and after Wick retrieves his stolen 1969 Mustang and knocks off another dozen or so of his men, he brokers a truce that puts the vendetta of the first movie to rest. Rules matter to the criminals in Wick’s world, and even he is bound by them, lest he find himself outside the protection of the Continental — a secret network of assassins dreamed up by screenwriter Derek Kolstad for the original.

Wick’s debt drags him into the middle of a power play for a seat at the High Table, a council of international super-criminals in which Italian playboy Santino D’Antonio (the impeccably dressed Riccardo Scamarcio) wants the spot held by his sister Gianna (Claudia Gerini), and orders Wick to eliminate her. It’s a job that Wick describes as “impossible,” but actually proves to be remarkably easy (she actually does the deed for him) — until he tries to escape, only to be cornered by both Gianna’s bodyguard (Common) and D’Antonio’s henchmen.

Perhaps the Continental ought to consider a third rule: Contract holders can’t snuff the assassins they engage, or vice versa. No sooner the task been competed than D’Antonio issues an open contract on Wick, which goes out wide to every assassin in the world (none of whom keep their cell phones on silent), making for an amusing montage as Stahelski reveals just how far the Continental’s network extends. With the exception of one returning character, a look-the-other-way local cop played by Thomas Sadoski, every speaking role is held by someone related in one way or another to this vast underground organization, though some — like the Orthodox Jewish banker who watches over his safety deposit box, or the “sommelier” who deals guns as if they were fine wines — wouldn’t dream of turning a weapon on Wick.

Ironically, the John Wick introduced at the outset of this movie sincerely believes he’s done with violence. Except we’re dealing with Keanu Reeves here, and though he’s acrobatic enough to meet the physical demands of the role, the actor has never in his career managed to convey complex emotion: In this case, Reeves’ version of extreme reluctance looks more like mild constipation, never more pronounced than in the scene where he makes a decision to violate the Continental’s most important rule, knowing full well it will leave him “excommunicado” (a silly word rendered menacing by hotel manager Ian McShane). That said, it might be even more amusing if he’d gotten himself kicked out for overstepping one of the hotel’s unwritten restrictions — specifically, its no-dogs policy.

Reviewed at Rodeo Screening Room, Beverly Hills, Feb. 2, 2017. MPAA Rating: R. Running time: 122 MIN.

  • Production: A Lionsgate release of a Summit Entertainment presentation of a Thunder Road Pictures production, in association with 87eleven Prods. Producers: Basil Iwanyk, Erica Lee. Executive producers: Jeff Waxman, Robert Bernacchi, David Leitch, Kevin Frakes, Vishal Rungta. Co-producer: Holly Rymon.
  • Crew: Director: Chad Stahelski. Screenplay: Derek Kolstad, based on characters created by Derek Kolstad. Camera (color): Dan Laustsen. Editor: Evan Schiff. Music: Tyler Bates, Joel J. Richard.
  • With: Keanu Reeves, Common, Laurence Fishburne, Riccardo Scamarcio, Ruby Rose, Lance Reddick, Peter Stormare, Bridget Moynahan, Franco Nero, John Leguizamo, Ian McShane.

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‘John Wick: Chapter 2’ Review: Keanu Reeves Is Back in Delirious, Mayhem-Filled Sequel

By Peter Travers

Peter Travers

Remember how the original John Wick snuck up and wowed us in 2014? Now he’s back and better than ever. John Wick: Chapter 2 is the real deal in action-movie fireworks – it’s pure cinema, an adrenaline rocket of image and sound that explodes on contact.

Wait, say the skeptics, isn’t it just Keanu Reeves , as the titular character, shooting, stabbing, kicking and punching bad guys when he’s not using assorted vehicles to go Mad Max on his enemies? Well, yes, it’s that too. And yet this sequel – with the star at his absolute best as the so-called Boogeyman who once killed three men with a pencil – crashes beyond the borders of typical B-movie nihilism. Chapter 2 finds something excitingly existential in this tale of a loner looking to take a stand in a world gone batshit crazy. Deliriously fast and funny, this wild thing is set in perpetual motion by director Chad Stahelski with a choreographic skill to rival La La Land, if that Oscar-bound musical had a body count.

The plot is cleverly engineered by screenwriter Derek Kolstad to go full throttle. Last time, Wick tried to retire from the assassin business and settle down with the missus. Then she died, a bummer made worse when Russian thugs steal Wick’s prize 1969 Mustang and kill his puppy, a gift from his late wife. What’s a dude to do? Go on a rampage, of course. Chapter Two picks up with Wick settling in again at his sleekly modern Long Island home, this time with a new pup. But the past pulls him back in, this time via the lethal Italian gangster Santino D’Antonio (Riccardo Scamarcio). Santino wants Wick to fly to Rome and execute his sister, Gianna (Claudia Gerini), so he can take her place at the “High Table,” a secret gathering spot for the criminal elite. Wick makes his frowny face. But mobster has his marker and in the hitman biz, you don’t welsh on a marker.

The code of honor among scum is one of the movie’s wittiest conceits, along with the concept of underworld syndicates hiding in plain sight. It’s house policy at the Continental, a chic Manhattan hotel for hitmen and women run with elegant dispatch by Winston (a delicious Ian McShane). There is to be no violence on the premises, ever; you break the rule at your peril. Otherwise, all bets are off in Rome where Wick tangles with Cassian (a stellar Common), Gianna’s security honcho, and Ares (Ruby Rose), the mute head of Santino’s goon squad.

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A “gun-fu” battle at the ancient Baths of Caracalla, is spectacular; ditto a shootout at a hall of mirrors that echoes Orson Welles’s The Lady From Shanghai. And it’s jaw-dropping when Wick and Cassian go at it back in New York, where Santino has put out a global contract on our one-man army, bringing every killer out of the shadows. For help, Wick turns reluctantly to an old enemy, the Bowery King (Laurence Fishburne) – yup, Neo and Morpheus reunite. It’s a setup for Wick’s climactic duel at the World Trade Center subway hub.

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To call these thunderous sequences thrilling is to understate the case. Reeves trained for weeks in judo and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, and it shows. Stahelski, who started as Reeves’ stunt double on the Matrix films, has a keen eye for how action defines character. Working with the gifted cinematographer Dan Laustsen ( Crimson Peak ), whose neon lighting is perversely seductive, the director fills every inch of his dazzling widescreen compositions. No hollow digital dazzle, green-screen trickery or caffeinated editing, just long takes of actors moving with artful precision and grace. Reeves, a throwback to the great Hong Kong action stars, is poetry in bruising motion. He’s a cowboy. He’s a samurai. He’s rock and roll. What are you waiting for? And when do we get Chapter 3 ?

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Here's what critics are saying about John Wick: Chapter 2

Several reviewers found the action sequel a welcome return to form

Christian Holub is a writer covering comics and other geeky pop culture. He's still mad about 'Firefly' getting canceled.

john wick chapter 2 movie review

Yeah, he’s thinking he’s back. A few years after Keanu Reeves re-asserted himself as an action star with 2014’s high-octane revenge thriller John Wick , he’s back for a second round. As far as most critics are concerned, Reeves (and the returning duo of director Chad Stahelski and screenwriter Derek Kolstad) stuck the landing with John Wick: Chapter 2 , expanding on both the first film’s mythology and its body count. Sure seems like we have a new franchise on our hands.

EW’s Chris Nashawaty gave the film a B+, celebrating both the high and low: Reeves’ performance as “a haunted (and largely speechless) ronin living by the 21st-century code of the samurai” and the accompanying “tire-squealing car chases, countless point-blank kills, and scenic bone-crunching brawls in Rome’s ancient catacombs.”

Read more of Nashawaty’s thoughts, as well as a selection of other reviews, below.

Chris Nashawaty ( Entertainment Weekly ) “The biggest compliment I can think to pay John Wick: Chapter 2 is that I lost track of the body count within the first 15 minutes. If that sounds like high praise to you, too, then you will absolutely dig Keanu Reeves’ gratuitously crunchy ode to choreographed ultraviolence via the bullet, the bare knuckle, and the everyday No. 2 pencil.”

Justin Lowe ( The Hollywood Reporter ) “Reeves is back in fine form, confirming how indispensable he is to the franchise with his lithe physicality, no-nonsense demeanor and impressive skillset, as he again performs many of his own driving and martial arts stunts. Returning screenwriter Derek Kolstad reaffirms the appealing ingenuity of his highly memorable lead character, whose clear motivations for underworld score-settling are both relatable and rootable. Once again, Reeves does not disappoint, fully inhabiting Wick by channeling his rage over life’s injustices into an intensely focused performance.”

Scott Mendelson ( Forbes ) “Summit and Lionsgate’s John Wick: Chapter 2 gives us exactly what it promises and exactly what we want, for (mostly) better or for worse. It’s a little light on actual story and takes awhile to get on its feet, but it successfully expands the mythology and dives headfirst into the criminal underworld which existed on the fringes of the first film. You might have to turn off your moral compass this time around, at least more so than last time, but the picture does eventually become a glorious ballet of horrifically violent gun battles and fight scenes, all staged for maximum clarity and creativity.”

Eric Kohn ( IndieWire ) “Much about John Wick: Chapter 2 looks and sounds like the previous installment, from John’s moody exchanges with Winston (Ian McShane), head of the hitman network The Continental, to his cryptic interactions with The Continental’s mysterious concierge (Lance Reddick). But this movie has a more expansive playing field, veering from one elaborate sequence to the next with a noticeable uptick in confidence. As exaggerated action cinema goes, it never quite gets to the level of Kill Bill Volume 2 , but by avoiding plot distractions in favor of exuberant style, it’s more consistently satisfying than The Raid 2 . Stahelski excels at delivering a strain of violent fight movie in which each element contributes (over and over again, sometimes too repetitively and elsewhere just repetitively enough) to a symphony of mayhem.”

Peter Debruge ( Variety ) “The John Wick movies accomplish what Hong Kong action flicks did a quarter-century ago, seducing bloodthirsty (predominately male) audiences into appreciating an exquisitely choreographed modern ballet. If you doubt that Stahelski sees his own job in these terms, look no further than how he lights each scene: Even neon demon Nicolas Winding Refn must be taking notes at the way Stahelski and his crew place bright-fuchsia fluorescent tubes in a New York subway, poltergeist-blue spotlights beneath the arches of ancient Roman catacombs, and nightclub-worthy accents throughout an elaborate hall of mirrors art exhibit.”

Robert Abele ( The Wrap ) “The second hour of Chapter 2 — save a mildly amusing Matrix reunion with a theatrical Laurence Fishburne as the subterranean leader of a cadre of hobo killers — is primarily an exhilarating gauntlet of martial arts/gun-fu assault, climaxing in a museum showdown inside a Welles-ian hall of mirrors. But these are the musical numbers we’ve been waiting for, mapped out in long, economically filmed takes of ferocious close-quarters fighting and firing that Reeves performs with a soulfully mean élan you could trace back to Lee Marvin’s heyday. The filmmakers know when to lace in genre-tweaking humor, too, as when Reeves and Common are on different levels of a crowded public concourse, nonchalantly poking guns out of their coats and squeezing off shots at each other that nobody else notices.”

Chris Hewitt ( Empire ) “And when the brutality (there are more headshots here than on a casting director’s desk) threatens to overwhelm, Stahelski leavens the tone with traces of sly humor. You’ll smile at Laurence Fishburne’s knowing cameo, making this a Matrix reunion. You’ll laugh at a sequence where Wick and one rival take sly silenced potshots at each other in a crowded public area, like kids playing cops and robbers with their fingers. And striding through it all like a coutured colossus is Reeves. Keanu famously means “cool breeze over the mountains” in Hawaiian. Here it should stand for “cool beard shoots you in the face”. Wick is a man of few words but many bullets — it’s a role that fits the taciturn Reeves like a glove.”

Screen Rant

John wick: chapter 2 review, john wick: chapter 2 delivers plenty more of what fans want, while fleshing out the property's mythology and lore in fascinating ways..

Shortly after retired hitman John Wick (Keanu Reeves) extracted revenge on Iosef and Viggo Tarasov, leaving many dead bodies in his wake, Wick is ready to truly settle down and live the rest of his days in peace with a new dog by his side. Unfortunately for John, his second attempt at stepping away from his past is short-lived when he is visited by an old acquaintance, Santino D'Antonio (Riccardo Scamarcio). Prior to John's first retirement, he made a blood oath with Santino to come to his aid when asked. Wick is bound by the rules of the criminal underworld to come back once more and fulfill his promise.

Reluctantly agreeing to his mission, John heads to Rome to take care of the assignment - leaving his pit bull safe and sound in the Continental Hotel back in New York. Arriving in Italy, John quickly learns that if he's successful in carrying out Santino's wishes, the consequences are far greater than he ever could have imagined. Slowly but surely, John is pulled back into the world he tried to leave behind, and now he finds himself in a fight for his life.

Keanu Reeves as John Wick in John Wick Chapter 2

John Wick: Chapter 2 is the sequel to the surprise 2014 sleeper hit  John Wick , which impressed many viewers with its "gun-fu" action sequences and sense of world-building reminiscent of comic book universes. Though the first film was a relatively straightforward action film, several saw the potential for a great franchise due to these various elements, and hoped the followup could deliver on that promise. Fortunately,  John Wick: Chapter 2 delivers plenty more of what fans want, while fleshing out the property's mythology and lore in fascinating ways.

Chad Stahelski, who co-directed the first installment with David Leitch, is at the helm solo here, and it's safe to say he's as important to  John Wick 's success as Reeves is. He obviously greatly excels at constructing the various set pieces, very much upping the ante from  Chapter 2 's predecessor. All of them feature top-notch stunts and camera work, fulling engrossing the audience in the action without relying on quick cuts or shaky cam to simulate intensity. Stahelski also finds an assortment of visually-stunning locations to place his hero, helping the film feel grander and broader in scope while still maintaining the series' now trademark style.

Keanu Reeves and Common in John Wick Chapter 2

John Wick writer Derek Kolstad also returns to pen the screenplay, and he is ultimately successful in crafting another entertaining adventure. He strikes the tricky balance of fleshing out the  John Wick universe without bogging the proceedings down in an overabundance of backstory and minute details. The way  Chapter 2 expands the world is quite interesting as more layers are peeled back to explore. Admittedly, some of the choices made may stretch believability for some viewers, but those small faults are never enough to derail the movie. Additionally, the story is a bit slower-paced this time around and takes some time before it gets going, as John's motivations are established. That said, when the action kicks in,  Chapter Two is a non-stop thrill ride that's wholly exciting. The sequel doesn't have as strong an emotional hook as the first movie, but the stakes are still high enough to keep viewers invested and never lose interest.

It goes without saying that Reeves remains one of this generation's standout action stars, fully committing himself to the role of John Wick. He's able to convincingly sell just about everything the character does or says, and some of his kills here take things to the next level. Much like the original film, Reeves is able to blend gritty toughness with some moments of levity, sprinkling a periodic chuckle throughout the running time. Ian McShane also shines reprising Winston, manager of the Continental. The veteran actor lends a gravitas that another thespian may not have possessed in the role, giving the franchise an intimidating and stern presence that leaves audiences on the tips of their toes. It's hard to picture these movies without him, a credit to what McShane has done with a seemingly minor character.

Laurence Fishburne in John Wick 2

Unfortunately, the rest of the supporting cast is largely hit or miss. Common and Ruby Rose appear as two of John's rival hitmen trying to track him down, and while they both handle their action scenes nicely, neither really leaves their mark on their characters. Stahelski tries something different with Rose's Ares, but it ultimately comes off as a more visually interesting way to convey typical henchmen dialogue than anything else. On the flip side, Laurence Fishburne is fun in his small part as the Bowery King. His back-and-forth with Reeves isn't  quite the  Matrix reunion some were hoping for, but Fishburne makes the most of what he has to work with and gleefully plays the role with theatricality. Scamarcio is suitable as Santino, but there likewise isn't a whole lot for him to do. This is Reeves' show through and through, and he's able to carry the film to great effect.

In the end,  John Wick: Chapter 2 is precisely what fans of the first movie wanted when the sequel was announced. Many of the new concepts introduced to the assassin world feel organic, and the breathtaking action will leave viewers wanting more. Though some may wonder what else Stahelski and company can do with the core premise,  Chapter 2 presents a number of intriguing possibilities for future installments, and it will be interesting to see where they decide to take it. In the meantime, action junkies are sure to get a kick out of  Chapter 2 , and it is definitely worth the price of admission in the theater.

John Wick: Chapter 2 is now playing in U.S. theaters. It runs 122 minutes and is rated R for strong violence throughout, some language, and brief nudity.

Let us know what you thought of the film in the comments!

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John Wick: Chapter 2 Is a Beautiful Descent Into Hell

Portrait of David Edelstein

After a campy opening action sequence that must have been ordered up by a studio boob looking for something more “lite,” Chad Stahelski’s shoot-’em-up, hack-’em-up John Wick: Chapter 2 settles into one of the bleakest bloodbaths you’ll see outside an actual war movie. It’s both crazy-violent and funereal, too grim for guiltless kicks, but in its way, quite beautiful. The carnage is abstract, ritualized, like something out of Kabuki theater, where even the most senseless brutality has firm rules of order.

The first John Wick had its champions (I wasn’t among them), but next to its sequel it seems cartoonishly thin. It began, you’ll recall, with the eponymous ex-super-assassin (Keanu Reeves) mourning his wife, who has just died from natural causes. Wick is relit after a psychotic bully — the son of a Slavic kingpin — steals his vintage automobile and kills the puppy that had been his wife’s last (posthumous) gift. Action-movie premises don’t come much more elemental.

John Wick: Chapter 2 is built on something comparatively complicated. To resign from a club that does not let its members go lightly, Wick apparently gave his “marker” (a fancy coin) to a sleek Italian hood named Santino D’Antonio (Riccardo Scamarcio). As the movie proper begins, Santino shows up at John’s secluded modernist house in the New York suburbs. (Wick is daring the gods by moving into a place with so many floor-to-ceiling windows: People who live in glass houses shouldn’t fire CA-415 assault rifles.) He wants John to murder his mob-boss sister. (Santino’s mob-boss sister, not John’s: John doesn’t appear to have any family except his new dog and his wife in flashbacks.) Wick abhors the task, but to refuse would mean death. To accept would likely mean death, too, but Wick would at least have righteousness on his side. Keanu is most excellent when he’s righteous.

The movie instantly improves when Wick strides into the tony Continental Hotel, which caters to the most violent people on Earth but where violence is verboten. It’s presided over by a charmingly fatalistic Ian McShane as Winston, a man who has seen and done many brutal things but whose sense of decorum is matchless. (He calls John “Jonathan,” which threw me since the diminutive of Jonathan is “Jon.” Perhaps John Wick was originally Jonathan Wickstein.) Lance Reddick with an Afro-Caribbean accent plays the elaborately formal desk clerk, Charon, who welcomes “Mr. Wick” with what seems like a glimmer of actual affection — a passing nod from one River Styx pure soul to another. In the hotel’s Rome branch (run by Franco Nero as “Julius”), Wick acquires his elegant bulletproof wardrobe and yummy array of weapons, the latter from the great Peter Serafinowicz as “the Sommelier.” Then he heads for Rome to meet his prey — and his destiny.

What follows has little logic and less credibility, but that’s a minor quibble. The ancient Catacombs are a mythic setting for a battle between a demigod and a wave of phantoms — near-anonymous figures that rush from the blue mist and are promptly sent back into it, pinwheeling gore. The body count of John Wick: Chapter 2 is stratospheric, but the assailants aren’t weightless and interchangeable, as in a video game. Stahelski is a former stunt double, and he choreographs the action in breathtaking long takes, as if to create a Rite of Spring for gore-hounds, each kill more convulsive than the last, each attacker a nastier gag sprung by sonofabitch gods. And Stahelski tops himself in the final battle sequence, in which practically every Manhattan denizen — homeless or high-toned — turns out to be an assassin in search of the $7 million dollar bounty on Wick’s head. The third act begins astride the fountain at Lincoln Center, continues into the new Calatrava PATH station’s pretentious white subterranean passageways, and reaches its climax in a geographically absurd and graphically mesmerizing odyssey through the subway system, dead-ending in a museum hall of mirrors in which the mirrors also spin to spit out even more bad tidings. It’s such a tour de force that when the voice of Santino starts taunting the mirrored Wick about his dual nature, you don’t laugh at the movie, you laugh with it.

For a movie so visual (how many shades of blue can you count?), John Wick: Chapter 2 has quite a clever script. Derek Kolstad anchors that abstract action with good, spiky passages of dialogue. Winston’s lines are loaded with portent. Santino’s grinning deaf-mute sidekick Ares (Ruby Rose) conveys pleasantries in sign language that seem positively diabolical. (She fights superbly, too.) Reeves’s old Matrix mentor Laurence Fishburne has a juicy scene as the wily “Bowery King,” the Lord of the Bums. Some of the best exchanges are between rival warriors John and Cassian (Common), the latter a thoroughly decent fellow compelled by protocol to kill the man who killed his “ward” — and also compelled to sip a drink with him civilly in the confines of the Continental.

It’s worth asking if John Wick: Chapter 2 finally transcends its dreck-y genre. Maybe just — but it’s still dreck-adjacent. I’d be a hypocrite, though, if I moralized about the evils of spending two hours watching dudes get royally wasted when many times I wake up at 3 or 4 in the morning and turn on the TV in search of something violent, no matter how shitty, no matter if it stars Steven Seagal or Sylvester Stallone. (I save Ozu and Bresson for early evenings.) John Wick: Chapter 2 is the apotheosis of a 3 a.m. cable wallow. And loving it doesn’t corrupt you. Near the end, there’s a shoot-out in a fancy art museum where the white walls are splattered with blood. But the paintings remain untouched. The movie says that even in hell, there’s such a thing as decorum.

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Den of Geek

John Wick 2 review

Keanu Reeves returns in the eagerly-awaited John Wick 2. It makes us want John Wick 3, please.

john wick chapter 2 movie review

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“He did warn you.”

After his rampage in the first film, assassin extraordinaire John Wick is no longer viewed as retired, causing long buried ties to resurface. Forced to take on a task in Europe, Wick soon finds himself with another personal beef to resolve. Violence ensues.

Some of the questions I had going into John Wick Chapter 2 weren’t answered positively. The first film has such a simple, primal story to frame all of that brilliant inventive action. Could a sequel find something similarly urgent without treading the same ground?

It’s no lazy rework, but the story isn’t as good. It’s not linear enough to allow it to build momentum as easily, and it’s only in the last 40 minutes that it really feels urgent. The airy second quarter in particular feels like a segment of a story that’s less significant than the first film. John Wick got it so right, quickly establishing the character and his motivation, and it was always going to be a struggle to match that in John Wick Chapter 2 .

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If I had to pinpoint the major problem, though, it would be with my line of questioning, because the story issues prove to be a minor hindrance in the return of Keanu Reeves’ action hero. John Wick Chapter 2 , while falling a little short of the original, is a terrific and massively satisfying action film.

Writer Derek Kolstad and director Chad Stahelski, both returning from the first John Wick , pack each action sequence with a wealth of originality. It’s never contrived, but there’s always a new fight move, an interesting location, a weird looking character and some horrifying and surprising way that their face is being destroyed. This is detail oriented action cinema, where there’s so much to take in that the film demands repeat viewings. The fights in this film are exceptional.

John Wick Chapter 2 is always visually engaging. In the world of John Wick, no one ever walks past anything boring. The use of colour is eye catching and and lively. It’s a film to be seen with the image bright and the sound turned up loud (the punishing sound design deserves to be heard at the sort of volume where you question whether you might be damaging your ears).

The villains all look interesting. There are so many of them that there isn’t enough screen time in the world to fill them all in. But you can visibly distinguish each one, and each look suggests a bit of character. It is so effective in making the world real. Be it Peter Stormare’s delightfully sleazy, cigar chomping mobster or Riccardo Scamarcio’s Santino, an immaculately dressed greasy cherub.

We’ve all seen sequels and prequels so enamoured by the details of their predecessor that they shrink the world they take place in. Here, the nods to John Wick are mixed in with additions that grow the legend of the character and enrich the world. They’re able to retain the air of mystery around John Wick, which is desperately important to making the character work.

John Wick Chapter 2 is unpredictable. Not in an immediately obvious sense; we all know that hyper-skilled face shooter Wick will end up committing haunting acts of violence against countless opponents. Rather, the unknown is in the build. We don’t when he’s going to stop and talk, we don’t know when the jokes are coming and we don’t know when he’s going to fight and if it’s doing to be a punch up, shoot-out or knife fight. It cannily uses misdirection, too, building scenes around our action movie expectations before subverting them by having Wick do something at odds with what we’ve braced ourselves for. All of this serves to make the film tenser. An added sense of paranoia later in the film heightens the atmosphere further.

It’s funny, too. It makes you laugh like a decent horror movie can. Those are tension relief laughs and they are incredibly satisfying. They come from character moments from the wonderful supporting cast or from action movie tough guy lines, delivered knowingly by Reeves from writer Derek Kolstad’s self-aware script.

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Keanu Reeves is, again, wonderful as John Wick. Reeves is able to sell cooler than cool Wick, a physically and emotionally vulnerable action hero who can commit jaw dropping acts of violence while still seeming entirely sympathetic and likeable. It’s important that we acknowledge the physical performance Reeves puts in, too; we can see that Reeves is taking part in many of these elaborately choreographed fights and he’s brilliant in them. While the cast are uniformly great, Ian McShane demands mention, putting in a performance rich in swagger.

Keanu Reeves’ John Wick is so elegant and stylish that nothing short of the slickest of shoot ‘em up would suffice. That perfect match of character to film makes John Wick Chapter 2 a triumph of genre filmmaking, a visually stunning action sequel that will have you wincing yourself stupid. If this is how sequels to John Wick are going to turn out, roll on Chapter 3.

John Wick Chapter 2 is in UK cinemas from Friday.

Matt Edwards

Matt Edwards

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Review: ‘John Wick: Chapter 2,’ a Roman Holiday With Shots Not Sparks

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By Jeannette Catsoulis

  • Feb. 9, 2017

They just couldn’t leave it alone. The original “John Wick,” about an über assassin who’s reluctantly drawn out of retirement, was a near perfect synergy of simple premise and intricate movement — an action movie that danced. But the lightness and winking quality that softened the slaughter are less evident in “John Wick: Chapter 2,” an altogether more solemn affair weighed down by the philosophy that more is always more.

That means almost doubling the body count as John (Keanu Reeves, still superstoic and hyper-pliable) is once again yanked out of seclusion, this time to fulfill a debt to an Italian mobster by killing the mobster’s sister (Claudia Gerini). The plot matters only inasmuch as it allows the returning director, Chad Stahelski, to stage his spectacular fight sequences in various stunning Roman locations, where they unfold with an almost erotic brutality. In this movie, the camera contemplates weaponry with more lip-licking awe than is ever afforded Ms. Gerini’s curves.

John might remind you of James Bond, but he has no interest in the honeys. Carnage is his release, and the camera plays along, gazing up at his aspirational buttocks as he slides a knife from his back pocket, and circling his twisting torso with rapt attention. A brilliantly stylized foreplay sequence is constructed around assassin-related paraphernalia, and both Ian McShane and Laurence Fishburne — as the respective heads of separate killing squads — remind us of madams, pimping death across continents.

Some of this world-building is fun, and almost all of it is dazzling, but the emotional sterility of John’s life will burden a franchise. At some point, he’ll have to care about more than his dog.

Rated R. Sadly, not for sex. Running time: 2 hours 2 minutes.

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John wick: chapter 2, common sense media reviewers.

john wick chapter 2 movie review

Assassin action sequel is thrilling but very bloody.

John Wick: Chapter 2 Poster Image

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this movie.

Even among thieves and murderers, a code of honor

John Wick is a deadly killer, but he struggles wit

Absolute carnage: The movie is a mill of gory, blo

A woman is briefly shown completely naked, but it'

"S--t," "hell," "damn," and "f--k."

Products/brands shown/mentioned include Victoria's

Social drinking by adults.

Parents need to know that, like the original John Wick , John Wick: Chapter 2 is an action-packed, very violent thriller about an assassin played by Keanu Reeves. Name a brutal act -- stabbing, point-blank shooting, bloody suicide via wrist-slashing -- and you'll likely find it here; the…

Positive Messages

Even among thieves and murderers, a code of honor exists. Also, a promise is a promise.

Positive Role Models

John Wick is a deadly killer, but he struggles with the line of work he finds himself stuck in and is desperate to leave it all.

Violence & Scariness

Absolute carnage: The movie is a mill of gory, bloody mayhem. People are shot point blank. A person slashes their own wrists; the resulting blood turns bath water into a crimson well. Vehicles ram their way through the streets and run people over; people are stabbed, one in the chest, his death a lingering scene. Many deaths.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Violence & Scariness in your kid's entertainment guide.

Sex, Romance & Nudity

A woman is briefly shown completely naked, but it's filmed from afar.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Sex, Romance & Nudity in your kid's entertainment guide.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Language in your kid's entertainment guide.

Products & Purchases

Products/brands shown/mentioned include Victoria's Secret, Nokia, Applebee's, American Eagle Outfitters, Mustang, and more.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Drinking, Drugs & Smoking in your kid's entertainment guide.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that, like the original John Wick , John Wick: Chapter 2 is an action-packed, very violent thriller about an assassin played by Keanu Reeves . Name a brutal act -- stabbing, point-blank shooting, bloody suicide via wrist-slashing -- and you'll likely find it here; the movie is nonstop gory mayhem. There's also some nudity (a full-frontal female shot, but it's filmed from afar, so it's hard to see details) and plenty of swearing (including "s--t," "f--k," and more), as well as some social drinking. And there are moments of wit and levity to provide much-needed breathers in what's otherwise a sea of brutality. To stay in the loop on more movies like this, you can sign up for weekly Family Movie Night emails .

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john wick chapter 2 movie review

Community Reviews

  • Parents say (19)
  • Kids say (73)

Based on 19 parent reviews

Amazing movie 13+

What's the story.

John Wick ( Keanu Reeves ) left the life of an assassin to get married and settle down. But his decision comes back to haunt him in JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 2, when Santino D'Antonio (Riccardo Scamarcio), the man to whom Wick owes his exit -- and who reminds him of a blood oath Wick gave as "payment" -- comes back to collect. It's an offer he can't refuse, but the assignment is horrific: Wick must kill Santino's sister, Gianna ( Claudia Gerini ), who now owns a seat at the High Table, a collection of the world's top criminal operators, which she inherited from her and Santino's father. Her death ignites a chain of events that will leave Wick the target of everyone's wrath, especially Santino, who's as cold-blooded as a man like him gets. ( Laurence Fishburne and Ian McShane co-star.)

Is It Any Good?

If there's a plot in this fun-but-too-gory follow-up to John Wick , it's not there to serve the narrative. Instead, it exists as a bar on which to hang all the bloodshed that the film unfurls in its ferocious, vicious glory -- which appears to be the point of this entire enterprise. Not more than five minutes (okay, maybe 10 in one spot) pass in between fights, confrontations, and face-offs.

Perhaps because they're a welcome break from the nonstop violence, the witty, sometimes weirdly funny moments that thread through the film (and the series -- the first John Wick was similar) are all the more appealing. For instance, there's a sequence in which a "sommelier" describes guns as if they were Chardonnays and Chiantis. And Reeves' brand of tight-lipped spy soldier is perfect for the franchise: He's brawny and conflicted, tough and empathetic, and very well-versed in the ways of weaponry.

Talk to Your Kids About ...

Families can talk about the violence in John Wick: Chapter 2 . Do you think it's all necessary to the story? What's the impact of media violence on kids?

Is John Wick a hero or a villain? How can you tell? Is it OK to sympathize with characters who do bad things?

What motivates John Wick? Do you understand where he's coming from? Does he have any acceptable excuses for violence?

Movie Details

  • In theaters : February 10, 2017
  • On DVD or streaming : June 13, 2017
  • Cast : Keanu Reeves , Thomas Sadoski , Ruby Rose
  • Director : Chad Stahelski
  • Inclusion Information : Asian actors, Polynesian/Pacific Islander actors
  • Studio : Summit Entertainment
  • Genre : Action/Adventure
  • Run time : 122 minutes
  • MPAA rating : R
  • MPAA explanation : strong violence throughout, some language and brief nudity
  • Last updated : January 16, 2024

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John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Review

Audience thrills intensify.

Phil Brown

John Wick: Chapter 2

Brutalist Review Style (Version 2)

A few years ago the world was stunned when a low budget Keanu Reeves action movie turned out to be friggin’ awesome. John Wick seemingly came out of nowhere, but thanks to a delightfully tongue-in-cheek script and some of the finest fight scenes to come out of Hollywood in years, the flick instantly developed a cult. Co-directed by longtime stunt veterans Chad Stahelski and David Leitch, John Wick mixed the minimalist cool of a classic Walter Hill romp with the neon macho perfectionism of vintage Michael Mann, and the gun-fu ballet of old-timey John Woo in a movie almost too bad-ass for words. Even better, the flick made money while pleasing all the vintage action nuts, so now we’ve all been treated to John Wick: Chapter 2 , and thank god it doesn’t disappoint.

The movie kicks off with a little silent movie comedy to remind everyone about origins of the action stunt work we love so dearly, and also as a cheeky checkpoint to ensure none of what follows is taken seriously. From there director Chad Stahelski (David Leitch didn’t join in the fun this time as he had another action movie to direct, plus Deadpool 2 to prepare) stages a goddamn delightfully ridonkulous action scene in which John Wick (Reeves) uses vehicles like weapons to complement his guns, knives, along with his deadly fists and feet. From there the plot kicks in. No dead dogs this time. Instead, an old frenemy from Wick’s past (Riccardo Scamarcio) pops up to demand Wick to a job to pay off a debt. When John politely refuses, a rocket launcher is used to enforce the arrangement. Then Wick returns to Ian McShane’s Continental Hotel to make arrangement for a trip to Rome to fulfil his debt with a murder that obviously leads to dozens of more murders and an endless stream of stylised shootouts. Did you expect anything less?

For a film by a pair of first-time directors, it was unbelievable how much confidence and style went into the original John Wick. Stahelski n’ Leitch might have been building their own oddball action universe, but they did it on the back of a mountain of influences that combined into something fresh yet familiar. John Wick: Chapter 2 dives right back into that world and ramps things up, but not too much. Much of the humour from John Wick comes from all of the unspoken rules and bonds of this strange secret world of international assassins where everyone seems aware of a mythology the filmmakers never bother to explain. That’s continued here as the assassin network grows international with a Rome chapter and suggestions of similar places all over the world. Thankfully the script never explains while expanding the lore. We see more but never have to suffer through exposition. That would delay all the punch-punch, bang-bang .

John Wick: Chapter 2 (Movie) Review 1

Instead the movie rockets from one set piece to the next. If there aren’t fists or bullets flying, then Reeves is chatting up some sort of cult character actor in terse one-liners in an increasingly lavish setting. The whole movie whizzes by with a certain deadpan comedy. It’s all treated seriously, despite being ridiculous and the actors are clearly winking along having fun. The cast is crazy this time with everyone from Ruby Rose and Common to Warriors ’ legend David Patrick Kelly, straight-faced comedian Peter Serafinowicz, and even Reeves’ old Matrix sparring partner Laurence Fishbourne popping up to steal scenes. The casting all feels self-conscious, often serving as a punchline. When Reeves arrives in Rome to set up his grand assassination, the movie starts to take on the feel of an old Italian Eurotrash action thriller, and then the legendary Franco Nero (aka the original Django ) pops up as the Italian equivalent of Ian McShane’s malevolent crimelord to hammer home the reference. Sometimes you laugh just from seeing an actor’s face, then the one-liners and slapstick violence pile on to get the real laughs.

And good lord is the action ever fantastic. Emboldened by the success of the first flick and gifted with a larger budget, Chad Stahelski arguably tops the finale of John Wick in the first scene and then goes about topping himself every 10 minutes or so. Sure, there are some clunkers (a machine gun shootout in the catacombs of Rome goes on a little too long), but for the most part, the action scenes just keep getting bigger and better. It’s always physical, it’s always brutal, and there’s always a certain level or irony and slapstick employed to make it fun. By the climax, Stahelski starts cutting together several fight scenes at once and going public with his ludicrous fisticuffs amongst a sea of extras. It’s all a big glorious bloody ballet guaranteed to put a smile on any action movie lover’s swollen face. Keanu Reeves once again holds it all together with an impressive physical commitment, and a less-is-more approach to acting that confirms his star power and ass-kickery.

John Wick: Chapter 2 (Movie) Review 2

John Wick: Chapter 2 is thankfully one of those rare sequels that is undeniably an equal. It takes everything that worked about the first movie, serves up more, amps up what you love, and never slows down long enough for you to consider how absurd it all is. The only thing that prevents Chapter 2 from topping Chapter 1 is a little bit of over-ambition. There was a tight elegance to the last round of dumb-dumb John Wick fun that this sequel can’t match due to sprawling ambition and an embracement of the absurd. It’s not quite as satisfying, especially when it wraps up with a cliffhanger setting up Chapter 3 . On the plus side, dumb action movies don’t need to be tightly plotted, and it’s hard not to walk out of the theatre excited for the potential of a bigger, stupider, funnier, and even more insane threequel. Somehow Keanu Reeves has found himself a third franchise worth following. God bless you, sir. That’s an achievement that I must stand back and admire with a stunned, “Whoa.”

Final Thoughts

Phil Brown

Phil Brown is a film critic, comedy writer, and filmmaker who can be found haunting theaters and video stores throughout Toronto.

This post may contain affiliate links. If you use these links to buy something, CGMagazine may earn a commission. However, please know this does not impact our reviews or opinions in any way. See our ethics statement.

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‘John Wick: Chapter 2’ movie review by Justin Chang

Justin chang reviews ‘john wick: chapter 2’ directed by chad stahelski, starring keanu reeves, common, laurence fishburne, ruby rose. video by jason h. neubert..

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John Wick Chapter 2 Review: Everything You Want and More

Director Chad Stahelski and Keanu Reeves are back for John Wick: Chapter 2, the rare sequel that doesn't skip a beat and matches its predecessor.

It is no secret that Hollywood is a little sequel and franchise happy at the moment. Most studios are leaving no stone unturned in the search for their next franchise, and many are trying desperately to cobble together some kind of cinematic universe in order to really try and cash in. John Wick: Chapter 2 is the latest entry in what looks to be a budding and extremely promising franchise, but prior to 2014, nobody would have suspected a Keanu Reeves action flick to be such a hit. That is where we are, and perhaps not since Die Hard have we come across an action series so deserving of a continued storyline. John Wick: Chapter 2 is everything audiences loved about the first John Wick , but it never feels stale or recycled. It's damn near perfect.

Lionsgate 's John Wick: Chapter 2 once again follows legendary hitman John Wick ( Keanu Reeves ) as he tries to put his life together and stay out of the killing game. Unfortunately for him, a figure from his past comes knocking and is attempting to collect on an old debt, which brings John Wick right back into the world he is desperately wanting to leave behind. Now, whether he likes it or not, he's back in the business of killing and business is very, very good.

John Wick was not a movie that smelled like a franchise. Lionsgate barely even promoted it ahead of its release back in 2014. But once audiences got a taste, they wanted more. They needed more. Lionsgate was kind enough to give it to us. Luckily, they were smart enough to bring back director Chad Stahelski for John Wick 2 , who co-directed the first entry with David Leitch . No disrespect to Mr. Leitch , but Chad Stahelski didn't seem to miss a beat flying solo. The action in John Wick and John Wick: Chapter 2 is almost jarring, given its unrelenting intensity, and it is undeniably well executed. It is probably hard for anyone who watched the first movie to imagine things improving any, but it is certainly arguable that somehow, Chad Stahelski kicked it up a notch. His many years of experience working as a stunt coordinator and performer really show.

Movie sequels are a tricky thing. They are sort of like a band's second album. Do you give the audience more of the same? Or do you try and reinvent the wheel? John Wick: Chapter 2 is, and I say this in the best possible way, a lot more of the same. There are tons and tons of bullets, bodies and great lines to go around. Sure, there are little differences and a new story, or a continuation of the story, rather. It is more than enough to make it feel as though we aren't watching the same movie over again. John Wick: Chapter 2 does not fall into the same trap that movies like Taken 2 do. A lot of that has to do with the decision to surround all of this chaos with intrigue. Things like the Continental Hotel and this odd set of conduct that these hit men (and women) must follow are truly fascinating. Every character, even the guy who makes the suits, is someone you want to know more about, but the filmmakers cleverly leave you wanting more in that way. Those elements of the move are caked in nuance. There is a mystery to it. An intrigue. It provides a balance that few action movies ever achieve. It is brilliant and even after two full movies with a higher body count than anyone can fathom, the audience is somehow left wanting more. It defies logic.

Prior to John Wick , it had been awhile since Keanu Reeves had really broken out in a role that made him feel like the bonafide movie star he is. At times, it is easy to write him off as a one dimensional guy, but it is clear after watching John Wick: Chapter 2 that this franchise simply wouldn't be the same without him. He brings an odd charisma to the role that you can't quite put your finger on. He is so clearly dedicated that it is impossible not to admire. Sure, he still has that classic "Keanu" line delivery, but that is part of the charm. It really works. He is John Wick .

There are several returning cast members that deliver the goods in John Wick: Chapter 2 , such as John Leguizamo and Lance Riddick , but once again, it is Ian McShane who steals every scene he is in. Something about this guy who we all know is a complete badass just hanging out and managing this bizarre hotel for hit men is so endlessly fascinating. Much like in the first John Wick , we learn a lot about Winston but at the same time, we have a lot more questions than we have answers, which is way more awesome than it is frustrating. The new additions to the cast are all welcome and fit into this world perfectly. Ruby Rose is actually the stand out, even though she doesn't actually have any dialogue in the movie. Common is also great for his part and he seems like a guy who probably doesn't get enough credit for being a pretty damn good actor when he shows up in a movie. The little Matrix reunion we get with Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne is also great, but best save that for when you see the movie. Everything and everyone in this movie syncs up like a very well-oiled machine.

With John Wick: Chapter 2 it is incredibly simple. If you liked the first John Wick , you should be absolutely delighted with this sequel. If you haven't seen John Wick , this movie could oddly stand on its own pretty well, but you will definitely get more out of John Wick: Chapter 2 if you have seen the first movie. Also, there is a new dog , and let's just say things pan out a little better on that front than they did last time. Truly, John Wick: Chapter 2 may not be a perfect movie when examined under the most intense forms of scrutiny that exist in the world of film criticism, but it is probably a perfect sequel and that is a rare thing in the world of action movies.

John Wick spin-off Ballerina starring Ana de Armas delayed by a year

Ana de Armas won't go full John Wick until 2025

Keanu Reeves as John Wick in John Wick: Chapter 4

Ballerina, the long-awaited John Wick spin-off starring Ana de Armas, has been delayed to 2025.

The film was initially slated for a June 7, 2024 and is now set to hit theaters on June 6, 2025 (H/T Deadline ). De Armas stars as a young female assassin who seeks revenge against the people who killed her family, though no other plot details have been revealed other than that the events of movie take place between John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum and John Wick: Chapter 4 .

Len Wisemen (Live Free or Die Hard) directs from a screenplay by John Wick franchise writers Shay Hatten and Michael Finch, and Saltburn director Emerald Fennell. De Armas reportedly hired Fennell to "punch up" the script. Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne will reprise their roles, alongside a posthumous performance from the late Lance Reddick. The film also features series newcomers Donnie Yen, Hiroyuki Sanada, and Rina Sawayama.

"Ian has a little bit more to do, and John Wick is an extended cameo. He shot for about a week. Lance shot for a day," confirmed producer Erica Lee .

In an interview with Deadline , Lionsgate boss Joe Drake said the studio is "not ready to say goodbye to Keanu Reeves’ world-class hitman." A spin-off prequel series, The Continental, aired last year on Peacock with Mel Gibson and Colin Woodell as the leads. Another John Wick installment is highly likely, as director Chad Stahleski has reportedly signed a new deal with Lionsgate.

For more, check out our round-up of the most exciting upcoming movies in 2024 and beyond, or, skip straight to the good stuff with our list of confirmed movie release dates .

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Lauren Milici

Lauren Milici is a Senior Entertainment Writer for GamesRadar+ currently based in the Midwest. She previously reported on breaking news for The Independent's Indy100 and created TV and film listicles for Ranker. Her work has been published in Fandom, Nerdist, Paste Magazine, Vulture, PopSugar, Fangoria, and more.

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‘john wick’ spinoff ‘ballerina’ delayed a year to film additional action scenes.

The film will get more action sequences, with 'Wick' mastermind Chad Stahelski working with 'Ballerina' director Len Wiseman.

By Aaron Couch , Ryan Gajewski February 21, 2024 4:35pm

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Ballerina is departing 2024, with the John Wick spinoff now opening June 6, 2025. In a twinned move, The Crow will fly into Ballerina ‘s previous date of June 7, 2024.

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Ballerina  stars Ana de Armas star as an assassin trained in the traditions of the Ruska Roma. The film also stars Anjelica Huston, Gabriel Byrne, the late Lance Reddick, Catalina Sandino Moreno, Norman Reedus, with Ian McShane and Wick lead Keanu Reeves also among the cast.

Rupert Sanders directs The Crow from a script by Zach Baylin and Will Schneider, rebooting the film franchise that launched with the 1994 feature starring the late Brandon Lee, who died during production. The movie is based on the 1989 comic book series of the same name and stars Bill Skarsgård as the title character alongside a cast that also includes FKA Twigs and Danny Huston.

In addition to Ballerina and The Crow’ s release dates, Lionsgate set a new Guy Ritchie film for Jan. 17, 2025. It stars Henry Cavill and Eiza González, who will appear in Ritchie’s upcoming Lionsgate feature The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare , bowing April 19 of this year. Jake Gyllenhaal also stars.

Ballerina shot its initial work beginning in late 2022. It is part of a growing Wick franchise, which Stahelski oversees with Basil Iwanyk and Erica Lee at Thunder Road. The series is known for its inventive action and for Reeves’ ever expanding array of death defying stunts and fight choreography. The fourth installment, John Wick: Chapter 4 , stands as its highest grossing with $440 million globally.

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John Wick's Delayed Spinoff Movie Gets Honest Explanation From Ian McShane

  • Ian McShane reveals Ballerina 's delays are to protect the franchise by adding new action sequences with the help of original director Chad Stahelski.
  • Ballerina was recently moved from June 2024 to June 2025 due to additional production.
  • Lionsgate's focus on perfecting Ballerina is vital for the future of the expanding John Wick franchise.

John Wick star Ian McShane offers a blunt explanation about the reason for the Ballerina spinoff movie’s recent delay. Set to star Ana de Armas as the titular dancer and assassin, the movie is not only set in the world established by Keanu Reeves’ John Wick movies, but will also feature several key characters, including McShane’s Winston Scott, owner of the New York Continental Hotel. Originally slated to be released in June this year, the Ballerina release date was recently pushed back to 2025 to allow for new action sequences to be added.

In addition to de Armas and McShane, Ballerina also stars Anjelica Huston, Gabriel Byrne, Lance Reddick, Catalina Sandino Moreno, Norman Reedus, and Keanu Reeves.

During a recent appearance on the British chat show The One Show (via Twitter user Adam Kahn ), McShane explained that the movie is not undertaking reshoots, but is instead filming whole new sequences to be inserted into the final movie with the original John Wick director Chad Stahelski.

The actor suggested that the film’s delays are due to the need to “ protect the franchise” and improve the final product. McShane also revealed that he has not seen the recent prequel show The Continental , as neither he nor Reeves were consulted about it. Check out his comments below:

It's not reshoots, it’s new shoots. They’re shooting for Ballerina , which is the spinoff with Ana de Armas of the John Wick franchise. You know, it’s like they’ve got to protect the franchise. And obviously I did it, when was it? We did it about a year ago, we did the movie Ballerina and they’ve looked at it, and Chad’s [Stahelski] come in, the guy who directed all the John Wick movies, and they want to make it better. Because they have to protect it. Because Keanu’s in it as well, and it takes place between John Wick 3 and John Wick 4. Why would I see [ The Continental] ? They never asked anybody about it, they just went and did it. Yeah, they just went and did it without asking me and Keanu about it. We both went, “I don’t know, you never asked us about it.”

Why It's Important They Get Ballerina Right

Ballerina has big shoes to fill.

With 2014’s original John Wick filmed with a modest budget of $20 million, few could have predicted that it would go on to spawn a hit franchise, with each successive sequel serving to topple the box office takings of its predecessors. Credited with reinstating Reeves to his much-deserved status as an action icon, Lionsgate’s plans for the future of the John Wick franchise extend well beyond 2025’s Ballerina and a possible John Wick 5.

Yet while the release of every John Wick movie has proven itself incrementally more successful at the box office than the last, if Lionsgate is to successfully expand the franchise beyond the core film, it is imperative they take the time they need to get Ballerina and its action sequences right . With the previous spinoff show, The Continental , only succeeding in generating mixed reviews and many suggesting its own action scenes fell short of the movies that inspired it, the decision to delay this new spinoff makes perfect sense.

Moreover, with Stahelski soon to find his attention divided between both the John Wick franchise and the new Highlander reboot starring Henry Cavill , further refining Len Wiseman’s Ballerina to a point where it could successfully sustain its own sequels would allow the franchise’s original director some much-needed room. Hopefully, the decision to push Ballerina back a whole year gives the project the time it needs to deliver a product worthy of the franchise that spawned it.

Source: The One Show (via Twitter user Adam Kahn )

Ballerina  is a spinoff movie set in the universe of  John Wick . Ana de Armas will play the titular role, a character who appeared in  John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum  as a child ballerina who was being trained to become an assassin eventually. In  Ballerina , the story follows de Armas' character, who wants revenge on those who murdered her family. 

Director Len Wiseman

Release Date June 7, 2024

Studio(s) 87Eleven Productions, Thunder Road Films, Summit Entertainment

Distributor(s) Lionsgate

Writers Emerald Fennell, Shay Hatten

Cast Anjelica Huston, Lance Reddick, Ian McShane, Catalina Sandino Moreno, Norman Reedus, Keanu Reeves, Gabriel Byrne, Ana De Armas

Rating Not Yet Rated

Genres Thriller, Action

Franchise(s) John Wick

Sequel(s) John Wick: Chapter 4

prequel(s) John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum, John Wick: Chapter 2, John Wick

John Wick's Delayed Spinoff Movie Gets Honest Explanation From Ian McShane

IMAGES

  1. John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Movie Review

    john wick chapter 2 movie review

  2. John Wick Chapter 2 Movie Review

    john wick chapter 2 movie review

  3. John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Movie Review

    john wick chapter 2 movie review

  4. Movie Review: “John Wick: Chapter 2”

    john wick chapter 2 movie review

  5. John Wick: Chapter 2

    john wick chapter 2 movie review

  6. John Wick: Chapter 2

    john wick chapter 2 movie review

VIDEO

  1. John Wick: Chapter 4

  2. John Wick: Chapter 4

  3. John Wick: Chapter 4 Movie Review

  4. John Wick: Chapter 3 in Minutes

  5. John Wick: Chapter 4

  6. John Wick: Chapter 4 Lengthy Runtime Revealed

COMMENTS

  1. John Wick: Chapter Two movie review (2017)

    "John Wick: Chapter Two" is truly wondrous, but it wouldn't work without Reeves, who has a sincere love of this genre. Advertisement Wick is not good at retiring. It's easy to believe, as commented on by others in the film, that he's addicted to the vengeance he dishes out with such panache. After all, what else does he have to live for?

  2. John Wick: Chapter 2

    Tomatometer 285 Reviews 85% Audience Score 50,000+ Ratings What to know Critics Consensus John Wick: Chapter 2 does what a sequel should -- which in this case means doubling down on the...

  3. John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017)

    99+ Photos Action Crime Thriller After returning to the criminal underworld to repay a debt, John Wick discovers that a large bounty has been put on his life. Director Chad Stahelski Writer Derek Kolstad Stars Keanu Reeves Riccardo Scamarcio Ian McShane See production info at IMDbPro STREAMING RENT/BUY from $3.79 Add to Watchlist

  4. John Wick: Chapter 2

    John Wick: Chapter 2 does exactly what good sequel should: it replicates aspects of the original while also expanding its mythology through a measure of novelty and one-upmanship. Full...

  5. John Wick: Chapter 2 Review

    John Wick: Chapter 2 loses a little of that magic by demonstrating just how far its tendrils spread. Director Chad Stahelski, one half of the team that directed the original, perfectly...

  6. John Wick: Chapter 2 review

    Mike McCahill Thu 16 Feb 2017 17.45 EST John Wick, Keanu Reeves' first hit in almost a decade, arrived in 2014 as a brisk, limber counterblast to the excesses of the Marvel and Fast & Furious...

  7. 'John Wick: Chapter 2' Review

    The success of John Wick: Chapter 2 will go a long way toward demonstrating whether the franchise can distinguish itself from the competition in that rarefied realm, although it appears to...

  8. John Wick: Chapter 2

    Bound by a blood oath to help him, John travels to Rome where he squares off against some of the world's deadliest killers. Action. Crime. Thriller. Directed By: Chad Stahelski. Written By: Derek Kolstad. John Wick: Chapter 2. Metascore Generally Favorable Based on 43 Critic Reviews. 75.

  9. 'John Wick: Chapter 2' Review

    Feb 6, 2017 9:00am PT Film Review: 'John Wick: Chapter 2' As in 2014's surprise hit, this elegantly choreographed action sequel elevates its brutal confrontations to a dazzling form of...

  10. Peter Travers: 'John Wick: Chapter 2' Movie Review

    John Wick: Chapter 2 is the real deal in action-movie fireworks - it's pure cinema, an adrenaline rocket of image and sound that explodes on contact. Wait, say the skeptics, isn't it just...

  11. John Wick: Chapter 2 review: "Stunning fights, relentless action and a

    When John Wick arrived in 2014, it took everyone by surprise. Delivering a rabbit punch to the action genre's solar plexus, this sharp mix of gun-fu fight choreography and New York noir offered

  12. John Wick: Chapter 2 reviews: What critics are saying

    Here's what critics are saying about. John Wick: Chapter 2. Yeah, he's thinking he's back. A few years after Keanu Reeves re-asserted himself as an action star with 2014's high-octane ...

  13. John Wick: Chapter 2 Review

    John Wick: Chapter 2 is the sequel to the surprise 2014 sleeper hit John Wick, which impressed many viewers with its "gun-fu" action sequences and sense of world-building reminiscent of comic book universes.

  14. Movie Review: John Wick 2 Is Even Better Than the Original

    By David Edelstein Keanu Reeves in John Wick: Chapter 2. Photo: Lionsgate After a campy opening action sequence that must have been ordered up by a studio boob looking for something more...

  15. John Wick: Chapter 2 Review

    Taking a little from Walter Hill's classic The Warriors, and a bit more from the early work of John Woo, John Wick: Chapter 2 is as close to pure cinema as an action movie can come. John Wick ...

  16. John Wick 2 review

    Reviews John Wick 2 review Keanu Reeves returns in the eagerly-awaited John Wick 2. It makes us want John Wick 3, please. By Matt Edwards | February 17, 2017 | | 0 "He did warn you."...

  17. Review: 'John Wick: Chapter 2,' a Roman Holiday With Shots Not Sparks

    12 John Wick: Chapter 2 Directed by Chad Stahelski Action, Crime, Thriller R 2h 2m By Jeannette Catsoulis Feb. 9, 2017 They just couldn't leave it alone. The original "John Wick," about...

  18. John Wick: Chapter 2 Movie Review

    Parents Say: age 14+ 19 reviews Any Iffy Content? Read more Watch Our Video Review Watch now A Lot or a Little? What you will—and won't—find in this movie. Positive Messages Even among thieves and murderers, a code of honor Positive Role Models John Wick is a deadly killer, but he struggles wit Violence & Scariness

  19. John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) Review

    Even better, the flick made money while pleasing all the vintage action nuts, so now we've all been treated to John Wick: Chapter 2, and thank god it doesn't disappoint. The movie kicks off ...

  20. John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017)

    8/10 It's just a great action film danielmanson 28 November 2020 I mean. This literally is what is says on the tin. It's jam packed with action and I love it. The plot is easy to understand and the action shots are brilliant. So much bloodshed, guns, fighting, killing and more guns. Did I mention guns? It's just a nice, easy and fun watch.

  21. 'John Wick: Chapter 2' movie review by Justin Chang

    Justin Chang reviews 'John Wick: Chapter 2' Directed by Chad Stahelski, Starring Keanu Reeves, Common, Laurence Fishburne, Ruby Rose.

  22. John Wick Chapter 2 Review: Everything You Want and More

    John Wick: Chapter 2 does not fall into the same trap that movies like Taken 2 do. A lot of that has to do with the decision to surround all of this chaos with intrigue.

  23. John Wick: Chapter 2

    1.92M subscribers Subscribe 774K views 6 years ago John Wick is BACK leaving a trail of bodies in bloody glory! But does the sequel hold up to the original? Here's my review for "John Wick:...

  24. John Wick spin-off Ballerina starring Ana de Armas ...

    Ballerina, the long-awaited John Wick spin-off starring Ana de Armas, has been delayed to 2025. The film was initially slated for a June 7, 2024 and is now set to hit theaters on June 6, 2025 (H/T ...

  25. 'John Wick' Spinoff 'Ballerina' Delayed a Year

    Ballerina is departing 2024, with the John Wick spinoff now opening June 6, 2025. In a twinned move, The Crow will fly into Ballerina's previous date of June 7, 2024. The year-long delay for ...

  26. John Wick's Delayed Spinoff Movie Gets Honest Explanation From ...

    John Wick star Ian McShane offers a blunt explanation about the reason for the Ballerina spinoff movie's recent delay. Set to star Ana de Armas as the titular dancer and assassin, the movie is ...

  27. Jedd Jong on Instagram: "John Wick: Chapter 4 is virtuosic filmmaking

    31 likes, 2 comments - jedithemovieguy on March 21, 2023: "John Wick: Chapter 4 is virtuosic filmmaking. The action sequences are brilliant, as one expects..." Jedd Jong on Instagram: "John Wick: Chapter 4 is virtuosic filmmaking.