Informative Essay — Purpose, Structure, and Examples

Daniel Bal

What is informative writing?

Informative writing educates the reader about a certain topic. An informative essay may explain new information, describe a process, or clarify a concept. The provided information is objective, meaning the writing focuses on presentation of fact and should not contain personal opinion or bias.

Informative writing includes description, process, cause and effect, comparison, and problems and possible solutions:

Describes a person, place, thing, or event using descriptive language that appeals to readers’ senses

Explains the process to do something or how something was created

Discusses the relationship between two things, determining how one ( cause ) leads to the other ( effect ); the effect needs to be based on fact and not an assumption

Identifies the similarities and differences between two things; does not indicate that one is better than the other

Details a problem and presents various possible solutions ; the writer does not suggest one solution is more effective than the others

What is informative writing?

Purpose of informative writing

The purpose of an informative essay depends upon the writer’s motivation, but may be to share new information, describe a process, clarify a concept, explain why or how, or detail a topic’s intricacies.

Informative essays may introduce readers to new information .

Summarizing a scientific/technological study

Outlining the various aspects of a religion

Providing information on a historical period

Describe a process or give step-by-step details of a procedure.

How to write an informational essay

How to construct an argument

How to apply for a job

Clarify a concept and offer details about complex ideas.

Purpose of informative essays

Explain why or how something works the way that it does.

Describe how the stock market impacts the economy

Illustrate why there are high and low tides

Detail how the heart functions

Offer information on the smaller aspects or intricacies of a larger topic.

Identify the importance of the individual bones in the body

Outlining the Dust Bowl in the context of the Great Depression

Explaining how bees impact the environment

How to write an informative essay

Regardless of the type of information, the informative essay structure typically consists of an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Introduction

Background information

Explanation of evidence

Restated thesis

Review of main ideas

Closing statement

Informative essay structure

Informative essay introduction

When composing the introductory paragraph(s) of an informative paper, include a hook, introduce the topic, provide background information, and develop a good thesis statement.

If the hook or introduction creates interest in the first paragraph, it will draw the readers’ attention and make them more receptive to the essay writer's ideas. Some of the most common techniques to accomplish this include the following:

Emphasize the topic’s importance by explaining the current interest in the topic or by indicating that the subject is influential.

Use pertinent statistics to give the paper an air of authority.

A surprising statement can be shocking; sometimes it is disgusting; sometimes it is joyful; sometimes it is surprising because of who said it.

An interesting incident or anecdote can act as a teaser to lure the reader into the remainder of the essay. Be sure that the device is appropriate for the informative essay topic and focus on what is to follow.

Informative essay hooks

Directly introduce the topic of the essay.

Provide the reader with the background information necessary to understand the topic. Don’t repeat this information in the body of the essay; it should help the reader understand what follows.

Identify the overall purpose of the essay with the thesis (purpose statement). Writers can also include their support directly in the thesis, which outlines the structure of the essay for the reader.

Informative essay body paragraphs

Each body paragraph should contain a topic sentence, evidence, explanation of evidence, and a transition sentence.

Informative essay body paragraphs

A good topic sentence should identify what information the reader should expect in the paragraph and how it connects to the main purpose identified in the thesis.

Provide evidence that details the main point of the paragraph. This includes paraphrasing, summarizing, and directly quoting facts, statistics, and statements.

Explain how the evidence connects to the main purpose of the essay.

Place transitions at the end of each body paragraph, except the last. There is no need to transition from the last support to the conclusion. A transition should accomplish three goals:

Tell the reader where you were (current support)

Tell the reader where you are going (next support)

Relate the paper’s purpose

Informative essay conclusion

Incorporate a rephrased thesis, summary, and closing statement into the conclusion of an informative essay.

Rephrase the purpose of the essay. Do not just repeat the purpose statement from the thesis.

Summarize the main idea found in each body paragraph by rephrasing each topic sentence.

End with a clincher or closing statement that helps readers answer the question “so what?” What should the reader take away from the information provided in the essay? Why should they care about the topic?

Informative essay example

The following example illustrates a good informative essay format:

Informative essay format

information of an essay

Writing an Informative Essay

Informative essays engage readers with new, interesting, and often surprising facts and details about a subject. Informative essays are educational; readers expect to learn something new from them. In fact, much of the reading and writing done in college and the workplace is informative. From textbooks to reports to tutorials like this one, informative writing imparts important and useful information about a topic.

This tutorial refers to the sample informative outline and final essay written by fictional student Paige Turner.

Reasons to Write Informatively

Your purpose for writing and the audience for whom you are writing will impact the depth and breadth of information you provide, but all informative writing aims to present a subject without opinions or bias. Some common reasons to write informatively are to

  • report findings that an audience would find interesting,
  • present facts that an audience would find useful, and
  • communicate information about a person, place, event, issue, or change that would improve an audience’s understanding.

Characteristics of Informative Essays

Informative essays present factual information and do not attempt to sway readers’ opinions about it. Other types of academic and workplace writing do try to influence readers’ opinions:

  • Expository essays aim to expose a truth about an issue in order to influence how readers view the issue.
  • Persuasive essays aim to influence readers’ opinions, so they will adopt a particular position or take a certain course of action.

Expository and persuasive essays make “arguments.” The only argument an informative essay makes is that something exists, did exist, is happening, or has happened, and the point of the essay is not to convince readers of this but to tell them about it.

  • Informative essays seek to enlighten and educate readers, so they can make their own educated opinions and decisions about what to think and how to act.

Strategies for Writing Informatively

Informative essays provide useful information such as facts, examples, and evidence from research in order to help readers understand a topic or see it more clearly. While informative writing does not aim to appeal emotionally to readers in order to change their opinions or behaviors, informative writing should still be engaging to read. Factual information is not necessarily dry or boring. Sometimes facts can be more alarming than fiction!

Writers use various strategies to engage and educate readers. Some strategies include

  • introducing the topic with an alarming fact or arresting image;
  • asserting what is true or so about the subject in a clear thesis statement;
  • organizing the paragraphs logically by grouping related information;
  • unifying each paragraph with a topic sentence and controlling idea;
  • developing cohesive paragraphs with transition sentences;
  • using precise language and terminology appropriate for the topic, purpose, and audience; and
  • concluding with a final idea or example that captures the essay’s purpose and leaves a lasting impression.

Five Steps for Getting Started

1. Brainstorm and choose a topic.

  • Sample topic : The opioid epidemic in the United States.
  • The opiod epidemic or even opiod addiction would would be considered too broad for a single essay, so the next steps aim to narrow this topic down.

2. Next, write a question about the topic that you would like to answer through research.

  • Sample question : What major events caused the opioid crisis in the United States?
  • This question aims to narrow the topic down to causes of the epidemic in the US.

3. Now go to the Purdue Global Library to find the answers to your research question.

As you begin reading and collecting sources, write down the themes that emerge as common answers. Later, in step four, use the most common answers (or the ones you are most interested in writing and discussing) to construct a thesis statement.

  • Sample answers: aggressive marketing, loopholes in prescription drug provider programs, and economic downturn.

4. Next, provide purpose to your paper by creating a thesis statement.

The thesis attempts to frame your research question. The sample thesis below incorporates three of the more common answers for the research question from step two: What caused the opioid crisis in the United States?

  • Thesis Statement : Aggressive marketing, loopholes in prescription drug provider programs, and economic downturn contributed to the current opioid crisis in the United States.
  • Writing Tip : For additional help with thesis statements, please visit our Writing a Thesis Statement article. For help with writing in 3rd person, see our article on Formal Vs. Informal Writing .

5. Now follow each numbered step in the “Suggested Outline Format and Sample” below.

Sample answers have been provided for “I. Introduction” and “II. First Cause.” A complete sample outline can be seen here. A complete sample informative essay can be seen here.

Suggested Outline Format and Sample

I. INTRODUCTION

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the main topic: Sample topic sentence : There is a current prescription pain medication addiction and abuse epidemic possibly caused by an excessive over prescription of these medications.

B. Now provide a couple sentences with evidence to support the main topic: Sample sentence one with evidence to support the main topic : According to Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), in testimony before the 115th Congress, “In 2016, over 11 million Americans misused prescription opioids … and 2.1 million had an opioid use disorder due to prescription opioids” (Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017, p. 2).

C. Sample sentence two with evidence to support the main topic : Volkow indicated “more than 300,000 Americans have died of an opioid overdose” since 2013 (Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017, p.2).

D. Sample sentence three with evidence to support the main topic : According to Perez-Pena (2017), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported more than 25,000 people in the United States died in 2015 from overdosing on opioids Fentanyl, Oxycodone, and Hydrocodone.

E. Toward the end of the introduction, include your thesis statement written in the 3rd-person point-of-view: Sample thesis statement : Potential solutions to the growing opioid epidemic may be illuminated by examining how opioid addiction is triggered through aggressive pharmaceutical marketing, how opioid addiction manifests among prescribed patients, and how economic downturns play a role in the increase of opioid addiction.

F. Write down the library sources you can use in this introductory paragraph to help support the main topic.

  • Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017
  • Perez-Pena, 2017
  • Writing Tip : For more help writing an introduction, please refer to this article on introductions and conclusions .

II. FIRST CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the first cause of the opioid epidemic: Sample topic sentence that introduces the first cause : One issue that helped contribute to the opioid epidemic is aggressive marketing by pharmaceutical manufacturers.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the first cause: Sample sentence one with evidence that supports the first cause : Perez-Pena (2017) concluded that while the healthcare industry was attempting to effectively and efficiently treat patients with chronic pain, pharmaceutical companies were providing funding to prominent doctors, medical societies, and patient advocacy groups in order to win support for a particular drug’s adoption and usage.

C. Sample sentence two with evidence to support the first cause : In fact, pharmaceutical companies continue to spend millions on promotional activities and materials that deny or trivialize any risks of opioid use while at the same time overstating each drug’s benefit (Perez-Pina, 2017).

D. Next, add more information or provide concluding or transitional sentences that foreshadows the upcoming second cause: Sample concluding and transitional sentence that foreshadow the second cause : Although aggressive marketing by pharmaceutical companies played a large role in opioid addiction, patients are to blame too, as many take advantage of holes in the healthcare provider system in order to remedy their addiction.

E. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the first cause:

  • Writing Tip : For more assistance working with sources, please visit the Using Sources page here.

III. SECOND CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the second cause.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the second cause.

C. Next, add more information or provide concluding or transitional sentences that foreshadows the upcoming third cause.

D. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the second cause:

  • Writing Tip : Listen to Writing Powerful Sentences for information and features of effective writing.

IV. THIRD CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the third cause.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the third cause.

C. Next, add more information or provide a concluding sentence or two.

D. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the third cause:

V. CONCLUSION: Summary of key points and evidence discussed.

  • Writing Tip : For more help writing a conclusion, refer to this podcast on endings .
  • Writing Tip : Have a question? Leave a comment below or Purdue Global students, click here to access the Purdue Global Writing Center tutoring platform and available staff.
  • Writing Tip : Ready to have someone look at your paper? Purdue Global students, click here to submit your assignment for feedback through our video paper review service.

See a Sample Informative Essay Outline here .

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dang bro i got an A

Having faith with all this mentioned, that i will pass my english class at a college. Thank you for posting.

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How to Write an Informative Essay

Last Updated: February 14, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Megan Morgan, PhD . Megan Morgan is a Graduate Program Academic Advisor in the School of Public & International Affairs at the University of Georgia. She earned her PhD in English from the University of Georgia in 2015. There are 12 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 241,773 times.

An informative essay educates the reader about a topic. You'll need to know a good deal about your subject and convey information in a clear, organized fashion. If it seems overwhelming at first, remember to take it step by step. Working methodically can help you write a successful paper, and you may even enjoy the process!

Selecting and Researching Your Topic

Step 1 Understand your assignment.

  • Be sure you know how your teacher wants you to cite your sources so you can keep track of what you research. Some schools provide reference software like EndNote or RefWorks, which can make collecting and keeping track of research sources easier.
  • Be aware of any formatting requirements. The essay prompt will often tell you things such as whether the essay needs to be handwritten or typed, and what font type and size to use. If it doesn't stipulate, the safe choice is a standard, readable 12-pt font such as Times New Roman or Arial. Avoid using "cute" or "quirky" fonts in an academic paper unless given specific permission to do so.
  • Know the due date! Get started early so that you have plenty of time to complete the essay.

Step 2 Choose a topic.

  • The topic should not be too broad or too narrow. See Write an Essay for more information. There should be enough information about the topic to write about, but not so much that you can't present clear, concise information. For example, writing on "the history of animal shelters" is probably much too broad, while "the history of Sunny Days Animal Shelter in X County" is probably too narrow. A happy medium might be "the history of breed-specific animal shelters in America."
  • The topic should be appropriate and interesting to your audience. Think in advance about who might be reading your essay. Obviously, if this is for school, your teacher is your primary audience, but you should always have a target audience in mind. What will they want to know? What do they probably not know already that your essay will provide?
  • Ideally, the topic should be one that interests you. This will make the writing process that much easier, and you can pass your enthusiasm on to your reader.

Step 3 Conduct good research.

  • For best results, try to find online sources from reputable organizations, government agencies, and universities. Google Scholar can be a good place to start.

Step 4 Take notes as you research.

  • For your informative essay, you will need an introduction, at least three main points, and a conclusion. You may want to make these sections and write notes down under the section where you expect it to go.

Step 5 Keep track of your sources.

  • Make an ideas map. Put your topic in a circle at the center of a piece of paper, then write down the most important pieces of information or ideas related to it in circles surrounding the topic. Make lines connecting each idea to the topic. Next, add details around each idea, circling them and making lines to show connections. There may be lines connecting ideas to each other, as well, or between supporting details.
  • Make a list. If you prefer the linear format of a list, write down your topic at the top and then below it any ideas you have. Under the ideas, add extra details that support them. Don't worry about putting them in specific order - that comes next.
  • Free write. Free writing can help you generate ideas, even if it usually doesn't provide polished prose you'll use in your final draft. Set a short time limit, such as 15 minutes, and then write whatever comes to mind about your topic. Don't stop to edit or change spelling, and keep writing even if you aren't sure you have anything to say. The important thing is to write for all 15 minutes.

Making an Outline

Step 1 Plan an introduction with a hook.

  • Don't worry about getting your thesis just right at this point - that comes later. If you don't feel ready to write the thesis out, jot down some notes in the introductory part of your outline. At the very least, you need some idea of what you want to say in your essay.
  • While it may seem odd to summarize your essay before you've begun, writing your thesis at the beginning of your outline will help you organize your ideas and select the most important details that you want to present.

Step 2 Use one major supporting detail per paragraph in the body of your essay.

  • The number of details you use depends on the paper length: if you're writing a five-paragraph essay, then you have three paragraphs for the body, so you'll need three main ideas.
  • Make sure you choose the most important details, and that they are all distinct from one another.
  • Details used to support your thesis are also called "evidence."

Step 3 Add in supporting details for each paragraph in the body.

  • Make sure you have enough supporting details for each paragraph. If you don't have enough to say about the paragraph's main topic, consider changing the topic or combining it with another paragraph. Alternatively, you can research a bit more to find additional supporting details for the paragraph.

Step 4 Restate your thesis in your conclusion.

Writing Your Essay

Step 1 Write a rough draft.

  • Do not worry about spelling errors or mistakes. Remember that this is just a rough draft, not your final copy. Just focus on writing it down, and later you can fix mistakes.
  • Write your rough draft by hand or type it - whichever is easier for you.

Step 2 Give each paragraph a topic sentence.

  • For example, a topic/transition sentence might look like this: "While some factories allow union labor, others, such as those in X, argue that unionizing harms the workplace." This sentence gives a clear direction for the paragraph (some factories argue against unionizing) and links it to the paragraph before it (which was probably about pro-union factories).
  • Remember: each paragraph needs unity (a single central idea), clear relation to the thesis , coherence (logical relationship of ideas within the paragraph), and development (ideas are clearly explained and supported). [11] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source

Step 3 Structure your essay in parts.

  • Make sure you're clear about what the idea of each paragraph is. To keep yourself on track, refer to your outline as you write.

Step 4 Edit your rough draft.

  • Have you told the reader everything you need to about your topic?
  • Do you have a clear thesis statement, expressed in two to three sentences?
  • Do all your paragraphs relate to the thesis?
  • Does each paragraph have one main idea, supported by accurate, objective details?
  • Does your conclusion summarize your thoughts on the topic without adding new information or opinions?
  • How does the paper flow? Are there clear, logical transitions between paragraphs?
  • Have you used clear, concise prose and avoided flowery language?
  • Did the reader learn something new from the essay? Is it presented in an interesting way?
  • Have you cited sources as instructed by your teacher?

Step 5 Write your final draft.

  • As you write your final draft, keep track of coherence in particular. Rough drafts often have all of their ideas jumbled up without a clear, logical progression. A key difference between a rough draft and a final draft is that the final draft should offer its information in a smooth, clear, easy-to-read fashion that builds on previous points as it goes along. Keeping an eye out to make sure you've followed the C-E-E- formula will help you.

Step 6 Finalize your language.

  • Also keep an eye out for word echoes, or words that show up many times within the space of a few sentences or paragraphs. If you use the word discusses multiple times in the same paragraph, it will make your writing seem clunky and unpolished.

Step 7 Proofread your final draft.

  • Sometimes our eyes "fix" mistakes for us as we read, so it's hard to catch mistakes reading silently. Reading aloud helps you find mistakes your eye might not.

Community Q&A

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Write an Essay

  • ↑ http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/understanding-assignments/
  • ↑ https://library.carleton.ca/guides/help/choosing-essay-topic
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/subject_specific_writing/writing_in_literature/writing_in_literature_detailed_discussion/conducting_research.html
  • ↑ https://advice.writing.utoronto.ca/researching/notes-from-research/
  • ↑ https://libguides.rio.edu/c.php?g=620382&p=4320145
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/brainstorming/
  • ↑ https://examples.yourdictionary.com/20-compelling-hook-examples-for-essays.html
  • ↑ https://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-informative-essays.html
  • ↑ https://wts.indiana.edu/writing-guides/paragraphs-and-topic-sentences.html
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/paragraphs/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/revising-drafts/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/editing-and-proofreading/

About This Article

Megan Morgan, PhD

To write an informative essay, start with an introduction that presents a thesis statement articulating your argument in 2-3 concise sentences. For the body of the essay, focus on one main idea per paragraph and start each paragraph with a topic sentence that establishes that main idea. Then, follow the topic sentence with cited evidence and explanatory detail. Finish up with a conclusion that summarizes your main points and restates your thesis. Don't forget to proofread carefully before turning in your essay! For helpful tips on researching and using good sources, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Informative Essay

Barbara P

Informative Essay - Writing Tips, Examples and Topics

Published on: Nov 17, 2019

Last updated on: Nov 17, 2023

Informative Essay

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The Ultimate Handbook for Informative Essay Topics

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Do you find writing informative essays a bit tricky? You're not alone—many students feel the same way.

It can be tough to figure out how to start and organize your essay.

But don't worry! This blog is here to help. We'll guide you step by step on how to write great informative essays. By the end, you'll feel confident and ready to tackle your assignments with ease! 

Let's get started!

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What is an Informative Essay?

An informative essay is a type of academic writing where you objectively share facts, statistics and about a specific topic. It's like being a helpful guide, presenting information without adding your own opinions. It's an organized way of communicating to ensure clarity in academic discussions.

Why Write an Informative Essay?

Writing an informative essay is all about sharing knowledge. It helps explain complex ideas, teach important concepts, or describe detailed processes. 

Whether you're a student meeting academic needs or a facts enthusiast, this essay style provides a clear structure for easy understanding.

Types of Informative Essay 

According to the functions that an informative essay performs, it can be divided into several types. If you are a high school or a college student, understanding each informative essay type is essential to score well.

Expository Essays

Expository essays aim to explain a process or concept with clarity and precision. 

They provide a detailed, step-by-step breakdown, ensuring the reader gains a comprehensive understanding of the subject. The focus is on presenting information logically to make complex ideas more accessible.

Descriptive Essays

Descriptive essays strive to create a vivid and sensory-rich experience for the reader. 

By incorporating detailed descriptions and appealing to the senses, these essays go beyond mere facts. They immerse the audience in the subject, fostering a deeper connection and understanding through the power of vivid language.

Compare and Contrast Essays

In compare and contrast essays , the writer explores the similarities and differences between two subjects. 

This type of essay facilitates a nuanced understanding of relationships and distinctions, providing valuable insights into the characteristics that bind or differentiate the chosen subjects.

Cause and Effect Essays

Cause and effect essays delve into the reasons behind a particular event or phenomenon, examining the factors that lead to its occurrence. 

Simultaneously, these essays explore the consequences or outcomes that result from these causal factors. 

This type of informative essay is valuable for comprehending the interconnected nature of events and understanding their broader implications.

How to Start an Informative Essay?

Here are some steps that will help you to start writing an essay. 

Choose a Topic

Selecting an engaging and relevant topic is the foundational step in starting your informative essay. 

Consider your interests, the preferences of your audience, and the requirements of the assignment. Choose a subject that not only captivates your curiosity but also has enough credible information available for thorough exploration.

Conduct Research

Once you've chosen your topic, delve into research to gather credible and reliable information. Utilize reputable sources such as academic journals, books, and reputable websites. 

Take comprehensive notes, making sure to distinguish between various perspectives and collecting relevant data that will contribute to a well-informed and compelling essay.

Create an Outline

Organize your thoughts and research findings by creating a structured outline. Divide your essay into sections, including an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. 

Establish a logical flow by arranging your main points and supporting details in a cohesive manner. The outline serves as a roadmap for your writing, ensuring that your informative essay unfolds in a clear and organized fashion.

Here is the basic structure of an informative essay outline:

 Have a look at this in-depth guide on how to outline informative essays effectively!

How to Write an Informative Essay?

Now that you have your basic information organized in an outline, you can get started on the writing process. Here’s what you need to include:

Introduction

The first section of the essay is the introduction . Here you will present the essay’s purpose and attempt to grab the reader’s attention towards the content. An informative essay introduction includes the following information:

  • A hook statement to excite the audience
  • The background context of the chosen topic
  • The main thesis statement

Writing an introduction that tells your reader what to expect is essential for your informative essay’s effectiveness. 

Body Paragraphs

An informative essay body contains all the details on the topic. Each body paragraph starts with a topic sentence which indicates what the paragraph is going to be about. In addition, it includes supporting information and evidence on the thesis statement. 

This section has several paragraphs that together form informative content for the audience. All the body paragraphs contain a single point or claim and an explanation that describes a topic. 

How To End An Informative Essay

After the body paragraphs, you close your essay by writing your conclusion. Here’s how you can end informative essay:

All the body paragraphs lead the audience towards the end of the essay. The conclusion is the last section of the essay in which the closing statements are presented. It gives closure to the whole discussion. 

The concluding paragraph of an informative essay should contain the following information:

  • Restated thesis statement 
  • Summary of the major points

The purpose of writing a conclusion is to highlight the essay’s significance and where this information can be applied. 

Editing and Proofreading 

After finishing your essay's conclusion, take the time to read through and make improvements. Check it a few times to catch any mistakes and make sure it follows the rules of writing. Look out for:

  • Punctuation
  • Sentence structure

Fix all the errors to make your essay more interesting. Lastly, confirm that you've  used the right format for an informative essay. This ensures your essay is well-presented and engaging.

Informative Essay Examples

When drafting an academic assignment for the first time, students need examples to understand the correct procedure and structure. 

Here is a short informative essay example:

Check out more essay examples: 

Informative Essay Sample

Informative Essay on Bullying

Informative Essay on Poverty

Informative Essay Format

Thesis Statement for Informative Essay

Informative Essay Introduction Examples

Informative Essay Topics

Choosing an effective informative essay topic is crucial for creating a compelling piece of writing. 

An ideal topic should not only captivate your interest but also resonate with your audience. The subject matter should hold contemporary significance or contribute to a better understanding of various aspects of life. 

Here are some good informative essay topics for you:

  • The Impact of Climate Change on Global Weather Patterns
  • The Evolution and Importance of Renewable Energy Sources
  • The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Modern Healthcare
  • Understanding the Effects of Social Media on Mental Health
  • Exploring Sustainable Practices for a Greener Lifestyle
  • The History and Significance of Space Exploration
  • The Benefits and Risks of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) in Agriculture
  • The Influence of Cultural Diversity on Global Business Practices
  • The Rise of E-commerce and Its Effects on Traditional Retail
  • The Importance of Financial Literacy for Young Adults

Can’t pick a topic? Check out more interesting and creative informative essay topics !

Informative Essay Writing Tips

Here are some essential tips to enhance your essay writing:

  • Clearly articulate why you are writing the essay.
  • Tailor your content to the knowledge level and interests of your readers.
  • Conduct in-depth research consulting credible sources of information to make the content authentic.
  • The thesis statement of the essay should be concise, direct, and readable. 
  • Use examples and facts to support your claims.
  • Maintain an unbiased and factual tone throughout your essay.
  • Do not share extra information in the introduction paragraph. 
  • Create an outline to make the essay’s content structured
  • The length of the conclusion should not exceed the length of the introduction. 

To sum up, you now have all the steps and valuable tips laid out, you can get started on your informative essay!

It's as simple as crafting an interesting introduction, organizing ideas in paragraphs, and wrapping it up with a strong conclusion. 

However, if you find yourself struggling or needing extra help, our professional essay writing service is here for you. Our skilled writers are ready to assist, making sure your essay stands out for being clear, thorough, and impactful.

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How to Write an Informative Essay: Everything You Need to Know

information of an essay

Did you know that informative essays are not limited to academic settings? While they are commonly assigned in schools and universities, informative essays also have practical applications in various professional fields. Industries such as journalism, marketing, and public relations often utilize this type of writing to communicate complex ideas, educate the public, and promote products or services. This demonstrates the versatile nature of informative essays and their ability to convey valuable information beyond the classroom setting.

So, if you are looking to write an informative essay, congratulations! You have chosen a genre that is not only interesting but also quite challenging. To ensure the success of your essay, according to our essay writer , you must invest time and effort into thoughtful planning, thorough research, and effective organization. It's key to maintain a balanced tone, provide clear and concise information, and incorporate your own analysis to make your essay stand out.

Short Description

Throughout this comprehensive guide, we will explore the definition and purpose of informative essays, highlighting the reasons why you should embrace the art of crafting one. Furthermore, we will provide valuable insights on how to commence and organize your own informative essay format effectively. Without further ado, let us embark on this enriching journey!

What is an Informative Essay: Unraveling the Essence

Informative writing aims to educate readers about a specific topic by presenting accurate and objective information. Whether used in academic settings or published in magazines and online platforms, informative essay examples cover a wide range of subjects and require thorough research and credible sources. This type of essay follows a structured format and considers the intended audience to ensure clarity and engagement. Here are some important facts from our admission essay writing service you should know about this kind of paper:

What is an Informative Essay

  • They are designed to educate or inform readers about a particular topic.
  • The emphasis is on presenting accurate, objective facts and information.
  • They can cover various subjects, from science and technology to literature, history, and culture.
  • They are commonly used in academic settings but can also be found in magazines, newspapers, and online publications.
  • The essays rely on verifiable facts and require extensive research and credible sources.
  • Personal opinions and biases should be avoided to maintain credibility.
  • The essay structure includes an introduction with background information and a clear thesis statement, a body presenting main points and supporting evidence, and a conclusion summarizing the information.
  • The language and tone should be appropriate for the target audience.
  • The level of detail should be adjusted based on the audience's knowledge of the topic.

Reasons to Write an Informative Essay

Writing an informative essay, whether in an IEEE format or any other style, offers an opportunity to share expertise, educate others, and shed light on lesser-known topics. Whether driven by passion, a desire to showcase expertise or a quest for spreading awareness, there are compelling reasons to embark on this writing journey:

  • Share knowledge : Understanding how to write an informative essay allows you to impart knowledge about a specific field or subject. As an expert in psychology, for instance, you could enlighten readers about theories of personality or the impact of stress on mental health. By sharing your expertise, you contribute to increased understanding and awareness of significant issues.
  • Demonstrate expertise : If you are a professional in a particular field like medicine or law, writing this kind of paper provides a platform to showcase your expertise. By articulating your knowledge and skills, you can establish credibility not only within your field but also among the general public.
  • Unveil the unknown : It can be an effective means to present information that is not widely known or understood. For instance, you might delve into a lesser-known historical event or a scientific discovery that has yet to receive widespread attention. By unveiling such knowledge to your readers, you contribute to raising awareness and fostering understanding of significant topics.

How to Start an Informative Essay: Effective Strategies

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the thought of how to write an informative essay? Don't worry; you're not alone! Many students struggle with getting started on their writing assignments. You can either order essay or, with a few helpful tips, you can tackle this task with confidence and ease.

Start an Informative Essay

  • Choose an engaging topic : Select a topic that genuinely interests you, as it will make the writing process more enjoyable and engaging. Additionally, choose a topic you have some knowledge about to write with authority and credibility.
  • Conduct thorough research : Invest time in researching your chosen topic to gather the necessary information for a compelling and essay. Use reputable sources and take detailed notes to ensure accuracy.
  • Determine the purpose of your essay : Clarify the purpose of your essay. Are you explaining a complex concept, analyzing a problem, or comparing and contrasting ideas? Knowing the purpose will help you stay focused and organized throughout the writing process.
  • Create an outline : Use an outline to organize your thoughts and information. Include an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. This structure of an informative essay will provide a clear framework for your paper and make the writing process smoother.

Informative Essay Outline

Many students overlook the importance of creating an outline, yet it serves as a valuable tool for directing research and organizing the structure and flow of an essay. By investing a little more time in crafting an outline, you can significantly reduce the time spent on the actual writing process. To assist you, here is a sample informational essay format from our term paper writing services that can serve as a helpful guide:

I. Introduction

A. Hook or attention-grabbing statement

B. Background information on the topic

C. Informative essay thesis statement that states the main focus of the essay

II. Body Paragraphs

A. Main Idea 1

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 1

2. Explanation or analysis of the supporting evidence

3. Transition sentence to the next paragraph

B. Main Idea 2

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 2

C. Main Idea 3

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 3

III. Conclusion

A. Restate the thesis statement

B. Summarize the main points discussed in the body paragraphs

C. Closing thoughts or final remarks to leave a lasting impression

IV. Optional: Additional Sections

A. Counter Arguments and refutations (if necessary)

B. Further research or recommendations for further reading

C. Personal reflections or real-life examples (if applicable)

Informative Essay Structure

Now that you have an outline and know how to start an essay , it's important to understand how to structure your essay with further elaboration:

  • Introduction : When it comes to writing an informative essay, the first step is to choose a topic that is interesting and relevant to your audience. You should also do some research to gather information and facts that will support your thesis statement. Once you have a clear understanding of your topic, you can start writing your introduction. Your informative essay introduction should provide some background information about your topic and end with a thesis statement that summarizes the main points of your essay.
  • Body Paragraphs : Each body paragraph should focus on a main point and provide evidence to support it. Use examples, statistics, and quotes to strengthen your argument. For example, if you are writing an essay about the benefits of exercise, your first body paragraph could focus on the physical benefits of exercise, such as weight loss, increased muscle mass, and improved cardiovascular health. You could provide evidence from scientific studies or expert opinions to support your argument.
  • Conclusion : Summarize the main points of your essay and provide a concluding thought. Avoid introducing new information in your conclusion. For example, if you are writing about the benefits of exercise, your conclusion should summarize the physical, mental, and social benefits of exercise and encourage your reader to start an exercise routine for a healthier and happier life.

Informative Essay Topics

When writing an informative essay, topic selection is a task more challenging than it may initially appear. Since the objective of such an essay is to provide information about a subject, almost any topic can serve as a suitable choice. However, it is crucial to avoid hastily diving into the first topic that comes to mind. Instead, dedicate time to brainstorming multiple options and conducting preliminary research on each of them. To narrow down a good topic, consider the following guidelines:

How to Choose informative essay topics

  • Avoid excessive breadth : Ensure that the topic is not too broad to allow for a comprehensive explanation within the essay.
  • Steer clear of excessive specificity : Similarly, avoid selecting a topic that lacks substantial information, as it may hinder your ability to present a well-supported essay.
  • Appeal to the audience : Choose a topic that is interesting and relevant to your target audience, as this will captivate their attention and enhance the overall quality of your essay.
  • Personal interest : Opt for a topic that personally intrigues you. When you find the subject matter fascinating, it becomes easier to engage in the research and writing process.
  • Significance of the topic : Ensure that your chosen topic addresses something important, as this will contribute to the overall value and relevance of your essay.

Take sufficient time to generate a strong topic. If you encounter difficulties, consider reviewing some examples to understand the type of information you need to find. Additionally, you can refer to a list of topics for inspiration.

10 History Topics

  • Recounting a Cherished Era: Reflections on a Favorite Period in History.
  • Unveiling the Origins of the English Language: Tracing its Linguistic Development.
  • Unraveling Your Family Tree: An In-depth Analysis of Ancestral Lineage.
  • Echoes of the Ancient Egyptians: Exploring the Auditory Landscape of a Bygone Civilization.
  • Timekeeping Techniques of Ancient Civilizations: Examining Methods and Instruments.
  • Shifting Perspectives: Three Formerly Acceptable Norms Now Regarded as Iniquitous.
  • Tracing the Fascinating History of a European Royal Family.
  • Pre-European Africa: A Glimpse into the Continent's Precolonial Era.
  • The Significance of the Silk Trade Route: Examining its Historical, Economic, and Cultural Impacts.
  • Connecting the Dots: How the Last Mass Extinction Event Paved the Way for Mammalian Dominance.

10 Business Topics

  • Examining the Detrimental Environmental Effects of Global Supply Chains: Three Key Reasons.
  • Unlocking Social Media Marketing Success: Effective Strategies for Maximum Impact.
  • Navigating Entrepreneurship: Identifying the Major Challenges of Starting a Small Business.
  • The Ripple Effect: Exploring the Influence of Government Policy Changes on Business Decision-Making.
  • Expanding Horizons: A Guide to Introducing a Product to a New Market.
  • The Rising Value of Data and Information: Exploring their Transformation into Commodities.
  • Unveiling the Long-Term Implications of Cryptocurrency: Examining its Lasting Impact.
  • The Advantages of Bartering: Assessing the Benefits of the Ancient Trading System.
  • Diverse Regulations: Understanding the Variances in Child Labor Laws Among Countries.
  • Spotting Business Opportunities: Key Strategies for Identifying and Capitalizing on Potential Ventures.

10 Social Topics

  • Addressing the Social Stigma of Mental Disorders: Steps Towards Promoting Understanding and Acceptance.
  • Unveiling the Evolution of Media Censorship: A Historical Perspective.
  • The Impact of Geographic Location on Life Opportunities: Exploring the Connection.
  • The Significance of Jane Goodall: Contributions to Conservation and Primatology.
  • The Phenomenon of Snap Judgments: Understanding the Quickness to Judge Others.
  • Gaining Insights into Humanity through Animal Observation: Lessons from Non-Human Behavior.
  • Unraveling the Effects of the Pandemic on the World's Wealthiest Individuals.
  • Making an Impact: Effective Approaches to Donating for Charitable Causes.
  • Combating Bullying in Schools: Promoting Effective Strategies and Interventions.
  • The Influence of Social Media on Loneliness: Examining the Connection and Implications.

10 Political Topics

  • The French Revolution: Paving the Way for Contemporary Democracy.
  • Exploring the Factors Behind the Increased Political Polarization Worldwide.
  • Understanding China's Rapid Expansion: Key Drivers and Implications.
  • Weighing the Pros and Cons of Different Political Systems.
  • Bridging the Divide: Initiating Conversations with Individuals from Differing Perspectives.
  • Navigating the Path to the Presidency: Steps Towards Becoming the Leader of the United States.
  • Assessing the Ramifications of Another World War on Global Dynamics.
  • Contrasting Liberalism and Conservatism: Key Differentiating Factors.
  • The Ripple Effect: How Elections in a Neighboring Country Impact Your Nation.
  • Portrait of a Political Luminary: Examining the Life and Contributions of an Influential Leader.

10 Education Topics

  • Exploring the Advantages and Disadvantages of Standardized Testing.
  • Enhancing Memory: Strategies to Improve Cognitive Recall.
  • Unveiling the Advantages of Mentor Programs for Personal and Professional Development.
  • The Transformative Power of Higher Education: How Universities Enhance Lives.
  • Empowering Student Choice: The Importance of Allowing Students to Select Their Subjects.
  • Contrasting Educational Systems: A Comparative Analysis of Schooling Approaches Worldwide.
  • Conquering the Toughest Tests: A Look at the Most Challenging Examinations Globally.
  • Bridging the Gap: The Role of Education in Reducing Social Inequality.
  • Crafting an Academic Essay: Guidelines and Tips for Effective Writing.
  • The Vital Role of Restful Sleep in Exam Preparation and Performance.

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Informative Essay Examples

Essay examples are invaluable resources that demonstrate the skill of translating theoretical concepts into practical applications with effectiveness and engagement. By examining the below well-crafted essays, you gain insights into how to write an informative essay with proper structure, organization, and presentation techniques!

Meanwhile, you can also explore essay writing apps that enable you to work on your upcoming assignments anytime and anywhere, providing convenience and flexibility to enhance your writing process.

EssayPro is the best custom essay writing service on the web, as we always hire qualified paper writers to create high-level content for very fair prices.

Final Remarks

Congratulations! You are now equipped with the knowledge to craft an outstanding paper. This comprehensive guide has provided essential insights, including understanding the essence of informative essay writing, selecting an engaging topic, constructing a well-structured outline, and step-by-step instructions for composing each paragraph. Additionally, valuable tips and general advice have been shared to enhance your writing journey. By following the guidance provided, you are bound to embark on a fulfilling, informative writing experience, allowing you to share compelling information about a subject close to your heart.

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How to Write an Informative Essay: Outlines and Examples

How to Write an Informative Essay: Outlines and Examples

Imagine Erica, a college student majoring in history. She has been assigned an informative essay as part of her homework, encouraging her to gather information on a historical subject and write an essay that provides facts and analysis on the topic. Erica is eager to start working on her essay but is unsure about the proper format and structure.

Writing an informative essay can seem daunting at first, but with the right framework, it becomes a manageable task. One useful tool for organizing your thoughts and ideas is an outline. An outline’s main purpose is to provide a structure for your essay and serves as a guide to keep you on track. It helps you divide your essay into sections and indicates the major points you want to cover.

The body paragraphs contain the bulk of the information in your essay. Each paragraph should focus on a single idea or topic related to the subject. Use factual information and evidence to support your claims, and provide analysis and argumentation to strengthen your points.

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When writing an informative essay, remember to conduct thorough research and use credible sources. The information you present should be accurate and backed by evidence. Avoid subjective opinions and personal bias. Instead, focus on presenting objective facts and analysis.

As Erica sits at her desk in the library, she gathers books and articles on her chosen historical subject. She takes notes, marks important lines, and makes use of quotation and analysis. Erica understands the peculiarities of informative writing and the importance of providing factual and useful information to her readers.

Once Erica has gathered all the necessary information, she starts drafting her essay. She goes beyond simply presenting facts and tries to make her essay engaging by using examples, anecdotes, and real-life examples. Erica understands the importance of connecting her topic to the larger society and culture, making her essay relevant and relatable.

As Erica works on her rough draft, she keeps in mind that her essay is not a single entity but part of a larger conversation. Her goal is to contribute useful and informative insights to the existing body of knowledge on her topic. Erica knows that she must go through multiple drafts, seeking feedback and making revisions along the way.

Writing an informative essay is worth the effort. It provides an opportunity to learn more about a subject and share that knowledge with others. With proper research, organization, and presentation, an informative essay can be a powerful tool for educating and inspiring others.

As Erica submits her final essay on the historical subject she chose, she feels a sense of accomplishment. She knows that her research and writing have gone beyond the classroom and have the potential to make a real impact. Erica understands the power of information and how it can shape our understanding of the world.

Whether you are writing an informative essay for a class assignment or for personal satisfaction, remember the importance of presenting accurate and reliable information. Be thorough in your research, and use proper citation when necessary. Your essay has the potential to educate, enlighten, and inspire others. So go ahead and dive into the world of informational writing, and make a difference one essay at a time.

What is an Informative Essay?

Understanding the purpose.

The purpose of an informative essay is to present information and educate the reader. This type of essay is not meant to express personal opinions or create an argument. Instead, it relies on providing relevant and reliable information about a specific topic.

Informative essays can cover a wide range of subjects, including science, history, technology, literature, and more. The writer typically conducts thorough research and analysis to gather factual information about the topic. This requires using reliable sources such as books, articles, and statistics, as well as conducting interviews or surveys if necessary.

The Structure of an Informative Essay

Body Paragraphs: The body paragraphs of an informative essay contain the main points and supporting evidence. Each paragraph focuses on a specific aspect related to the topic and provides detailed information or examples to support the ideas presented.

Brainstorming and Research

Before writing an informative essay, it is essential to brainstorm ideas and conduct thorough research. This will help the writer gather the necessary information and ensure the essay is well-rounded and informative.

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During the brainstorming process, writers should consider the target audience and what kind of information they would find useful. They can also use various brainstorming techniques, such as mind mapping or listing, to generate ideas and organize their thoughts.

Research is a crucial step in writing an informative essay. It involves gathering reliable sources and conducting in-depth analysis to ensure the information presented is accurate and up-to-date. Writers can use resources such as books, scholarly articles, reputable websites, and statistics to support their claims and provide evidence for their arguments.

Creating a Strong Thesis Statement

A strong thesis statement is a crucial part of an informative essay. It provides a clear and concise summary of the main point or argument that will be explored in the essay. The thesis statement should be specific, focused, and capable of generating interest in the topic.

For example, if the essay is about water pollution, a strong thesis statement could be: “Water pollution is a significant environmental issue that is caused by various pollutants entering our water sources, leading to detrimental effects on both human health and the ecosystem.”

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The thesis statement sets the tone for the entire essay and helps guide the writer through the composition process.

An informative essay is a valuable tool that provides factual information and educates readers on a particular topic. By following the proper step-by-step structure and conducting thorough research, writers can create informative essays that are comprehensive, well-written, and a-worthy. Whether it’s about unemployment statistics, educational resources on the internet, or solutions to waterborne problems on campus, an informative essay helps people gain a deeper understanding of the world around them.

Choosing a Topic

When choosing a topic, consider the following:

Choose a topic that is relevant to the subject you are writing about. It should be something that is currently being discussed or that has an impact on society. This will make your essay more interesting and provide the reader with valuable information.

Choose a topic that you are genuinely interested in. This will make the research and writing process much easier and more enjoyable. When you are passionate about a topic, your enthusiasm will shine through in your writing, making it more engaging for your audience.

Choose a topic that you have some knowledge or expertise in. This will make it easier for you to gather information, organize your thoughts, and present them in a clear and concise manner. Drawing from your own knowledge and experiences will also create a more authentic and credible essay.

Open-pit Mining and Environmental Pollution

As an example, if you are studying environmental science, you may choose to write about the environmental impact of open-pit mining and the pollutants it creates. You can start your essay with an attention-grabbing quote or statistic about the topic to create a strong impact from the beginning.

By choosing a topic that you are passionate about and have knowledge of, you can better engage your audience and ensure that your essay flows smoothly from one point to another. With proper research, drafting, and editing, your informative essay on open-pit mining and environmental pollution can become an informative and thought-provoking piece of academic writing.

Creating an Outline

To create an outline, start by identifying the major sections or arguments that you want to include in your essay. For example, if your essay is about environmental pollution, you might have sections on the causes of pollution, the effects of pollution, and possible solutions.

Within each section, you can name the specific points you want to make and provide examples or explanations to support your arguments. For instance, under the section on causes of pollution, you might include examples such as industrial emissions, excessive use of cars, and technological advancements.

To gather ideas and examples for your outline, you can refer to books, articles, and other writings on the topic. Online databases and reference sources can also be helpful resources. Remember to cite your sources properly when using information from others.

When creating your outline, it is essential to have a clear thesis statement that states your main argument or position. This statement will serve as the gateway to the rest of your essay, so it should be clearly stated at the beginning. For example, you could state, “The rapid urbanization and industrial development have caused significant environmental pollution.”

Your outline should include specific details and examples to support each point and subpoint. This will help the reader understand your arguments and see the evidence that you have gathered to support them. For example, under the section on effects of pollution, you might provide examples of how pollution impacts human health, wildlife, and the overall ecosystem.

It is also important to include any opposing viewpoints or counterarguments in your outline. This demonstrates that you have considered different perspectives and strengthens your argumentation. For example, you might include a section on alternative beliefs about the causes of pollution and explain why you disagree with those beliefs.

While creating your outline, keep in mind the purpose of your informative essay. Is it to educate, persuade, or encourage action? This will help you determine the tone and style of your writing and make sure that your essay effectively communicates your intended message to the reader.

Finally, don’t forget to review and revise your outline once you finish creating it. Make sure that the sections and subpoints are logically organized and flow smoothly from one to the next. Check for any gaps or missing information and make necessary adjustments.

Creating an outline is an important step in the informative essay writing process. It helps you organize your thoughts, gather relevant information, and present your ideas in a logical and coherent manner. By following these tips and using the outline as a guide, writers can create informative essays that are thorough, well-structured, and impactful.

Examples of Informative Essays

1. choosing a major in college.

One of the common issues that students face is choosing a major in college. This example of an informative essay analyzes the factors that students should consider when making this important decision. It includes guidelines on researching different majors, touring college campuses, and accessing reliable information to help you make an informed choice.

2. The Impact of Open-Pit Mining on the Environment

In this essay, the writer presents a thorough analysis of the environmental impact of open-pit mining. The essay includes evidence based on scientific research and studies, as well as the major issues surrounding this controversial practice. By providing reliable data and information, the essay aims to inform readers about the potential consequences of open-pit mining on the environment.

3. The Influence of Religion on Society

Religion plays a significant role in shaping society and individual beliefs. This informative essay explores the influence of religion on different aspects of life, including culture, politics, and morality. It presents various examples and discusses the positive and negative impacts religion can have on a community.

4. The Advantages and Disadvantages of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are a topic of much debate and controversy. This informative essay provides a comprehensive overview of the advantages and disadvantages of GMOs in the agricultural industry. It discusses the potential benefits of increased crop yield and resistance to pests, as well as the concerns regarding the long-term effects on human health and the environment.

5. The Role of Business Ethics in Modern Organizations

Ethics is a crucial aspect of conducting business in a responsible and sustainable manner. This essay examines the role of business ethics in modern organizations and highlights the importance of ethical decision-making. It includes examples of companies that have faced ethical dilemmas and discusses the consequences of unethical behavior in the business world.

These examples of informative essays cover a variety of subjects and demonstrate different approaches to presenting information. Whether you are writing an expository essay for an academic assignment or simply want to gain knowledge on a subject, these samples can serve as a starting point to help you draft a well-structured and informative piece of writing.

What is an informative essay?

An informative essay is a type of essay that provides factual and objective information on a specific topic. It aims to educate the reader about a particular subject and does not include the writer’s personal opinion.

How do I choose a topic for an informative essay?

When selecting a topic for an informative essay, consider something that you are knowledgeable about and have a genuine interest in. It should also be relevant and of interest to your target audience. Additionally, make sure the topic is specific enough to be covered within the word limit of your essay.

What should be included in the introduction of an informative essay?

The introduction of an informative essay should grab the reader’s attention and provide background information on the topic. It should also include a clear thesis statement that highlights the main points that will be discussed in the essay.

How can I organize my ideas in an informative essay?

There are several ways to organize your ideas in an informative essay. You can use a chronological order, where you present information in a step-by-step manner. Alternatively, you can use a logical order, where you group related information together. Another option is to use a cause and effect structure, where you explain the causes and effects of a particular phenomenon.

An informative essay is a type of academic writing that aims to educate the reader on a specific topic. It provides detailed information, facts, and analysis to present a balanced and objective view.

What is the structure of an informative essay?

An informative essay typically consists of an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. The introduction provides background information and introduces the thesis statement. The body paragraphs present the main points and supporting evidence. The conclusion summarizes the main ideas and restates the thesis.

Alex Koliada, PhD

By Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD, is a well-known doctor. He is famous for studying aging, genetics, and other medical conditions. He works at the Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics. His scientific research has been published in the most reputable international magazines. Alex holds a BA in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Southern California , and a TEFL certification from The Boston Language Institute.

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Guest Essay

I’m the Mayor of Dearborn, Mich., and My City Feels Betrayed

A woman points and shouts into a megaphone. Other people hold Palestinian flags and signs that read “Abandon Biden.”

By Abdullah H. Hammoud

Mr. Hammoud is the mayor of Dearborn, Mich., and a Democrat.

“Dearborn doesn’t sleep,” I recently told an out-of-state visitor to my hometown.

It was a reference to the celebratory time of Ramadan, when our city breaks bread together for iftar at sunset and suhoor, before sunrise, each day. For a month, Dearborn is bustling around the clock: Business districts buzz during the day, and residents and visitors flock to break the fast together every night, gathering over hot, heaping plates filled with some of the best food in the country, surrounded by neighbors of all backgrounds.

I have always spoken these words with warmth and pride for my community, but after 130 days of genocide in Gaza, the phrase has taken on new meaning.

Dearborn does not sleep. We have not slept. Our entire city is haunted by the images, videos and stories streaming out of Gaza. Life seems heavily veiled in a haze of shared grief, fear, helplessness and even guilt as we try to understand how our tax dollars could be used by those we elected to slaughter our relatives overseas.

We don’t have to imagine the violence and injustice being carried out against the Palestinian people. Many of us lived it, and still bear the scars of life under occupation and apartheid.

Since the Nakba of 1948, many Palestinians have been forcibly displaced by the state of Israel. My neighbors still have the documents they had to carry between Israeli military checkpoints, to prove they could walk the streets of their own ancestral villages. My aunts, uncles and elders recall life under Israeli occupation and wrestling with the decision to flee the only home they ever knew. I have seen grief gut a constituent whose family pulled both his grandmothers from the rubble of their shared apartment building after it was leveled by Israeli missiles. Even before the horrific events of Oct. 7, last year was the deadliest year in nearly two decades for Palestinians in the West Bank.

Now, friends pray for the safe return of family members still in the West Bank. A shop owner from Sheikh Jarrah, a Palestinian neighborhood in Jerusalem that has come under threat from radical Zionist settlers, wonders what will happen to Al Aqsa Mosque. His family has cared for it for generations.

At a Dearborn City Council meeting in November, a resident testified that his family has buried at least 80 relatives in Gaza since Israel began its bombing campaign in October. Eighty relatives. Eighty innocent lives.

What compounds the constant fear and mourning is a visceral sense of betrayal. In the past three federal elections, Arab American voters in Michigan have become a crucial and dependable voting bloc for the Democratic Party, and we were part of the wave that delivered for Joe Biden four years ago. But this fact seems long forgotten by our candidate as he calls for our votes once more while at the same time selling the very bombs that Benjamin Netanyahu’s military is dropping on our family and friends.

Until just a few months ago, I firmly believed that Joe Biden was one of the most consequential and transformative presidents that our nation had seen since Franklin Delano Roosevelt. His administration managed to put in place groundbreaking domestic policies in the last three years that his predecessors couldn’t manage even in two terms. But no amount of landmark legislation can outweigh the more than 100,000 people killed, wounded or missing in Gaza. The scales of justice will not allow it.

President Biden is proving many of our worst fears about our government true: that regardless of how loud your voice may be, how many calls to government officials you may make, how many peaceful protests you organize and attend, nothing will change.

My greatest fear is that Mr. Biden will not be remembered as the president who saved American democracy in 2020 but rather as the president who sacrificed it for Benjamin Netanyahu in 2024.

Dearborn is not alone in calling for a permanent cease-fire in Gaza. A poll conducted last fall found that 66 percent of Americans and a whopping 80 percent of Democrats want a cease-fire. However, the president and our elected representatives in Congress seem content to ignore the will of the American people.

This betrayal feels uniquely un- American. When conflict shoved them out of their homes, many of Dearborn’s parents fled to Michigan in pursuit of the American dream and the promise that their voices would be heard and valued. Today, we instill in our children the American aspiration of standing on the side of justice for all people, everywhere.

Two years ago, when Americans across the country rallied to offer support and aid to Ukraine in the face of Russian aggression, so did we. There are still blue and yellow flags fading against the facades of homes and businesses across my city. But when Dearborn residents flew the Palestinian flag this past fall, they were met with threats .

Too often, it feels as if our president and members of Congress have turned their backs on us. In many ways, the Democratic Party has turned its back on us, too.

This month, I agreed to meet with senior policy officials from the Biden administration on the condition that they be open to withdrawing their support for the right-wing Israeli government now bombarding Gaza. A delegation visited me in Dearborn on Feb. 8, fully aware of these terms.

I firmly believe that there is always time to do the right thing. But as I imparted to the officials I met with, words are not enough. The only way to ensure the safe return of all hostages and prisoners is through an immediate cease-fire. The only way to ensure that unrestricted humanitarian aid enters Gaza is through an immediate cease-fire. The only way to establish a just and legitimate Palestinian state is through an immediate cease-fire.

With every day that passes, every minute that the president fails to do the right thing, the belief that I and so many others have invested in him dwindles. With every American-made bomb that Israel’s right-wing government drops on Gaza, a stark numbness coats everything, restricting any space for belief to grow.

Four days after our meeting in Dearborn, the United States government watched as Israel, which had corralled innocent Palestinian civilians into Rafah, one of the last safe havens in Gaza, besieged the city overnight, killing dozens in what experts believe could amount to an egregious war crime.

I, like many of my fellow Americans, cannot in good conscience support the continuation of a genocide. This has weighed heavy on my heart, particularly as the presidential primary election in Michigan has drawn near.

It is for that reason that I will be checking the box for “uncommitted” on my presidential primary ballot next Tuesday. In doing so, I am choosing hope.

The hope that Mr. Biden will listen. The hope that he and those in Democratic leadership will choose the salvation of our democracy over aiding and abetting Mr. Netanyahu’s war crimes. The hope that our families in Gaza will have food in their bellies, clean water to drink, access to health care and the internet and above all else, a just state in which they have the right to determine their own future.

The hope that, one day soon, Dearborn will be able to sleep again.

In my sleepless nights, I have often questioned what kind of America my daughters will grow up in: one that makes excuses for the killing of innocent men, women and children or one that chooses to reclaim hope. What still lies between betrayal and hope is the power of accountability. It is my prayer — as a father, the son of immigrants and as a public servant in the greatest city in the greatest nation in the world — that my fellow Michiganders will harness this power and lend their voice to this hope by holding the president accountable.

Abdullah H. Hammoud ( @AHammoudMI ) became the mayor of Dearborn, Mich., in 2021.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips . And here’s our email: [email protected] .

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  • How to conclude an essay | Interactive example

How to Conclude an Essay | Interactive Example

Published on January 24, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on July 23, 2023.

The conclusion is the final paragraph of your essay . A strong conclusion aims to:

  • Tie together the essay’s main points
  • Show why your argument matters
  • Leave the reader with a strong impression

Your conclusion should give a sense of closure and completion to your argument, but also show what new questions or possibilities it has opened up.

This conclusion is taken from our annotated essay example , which discusses the history of the Braille system. Hover over each part to see why it’s effective.

Braille paved the way for dramatic cultural changes in the way blind people were treated and the opportunities available to them. Louis Braille’s innovation was to reimagine existing reading systems from a blind perspective, and the success of this invention required sighted teachers to adapt to their students’ reality instead of the other way around. In this sense, Braille helped drive broader social changes in the status of blindness. New accessibility tools provide practical advantages to those who need them, but they can also change the perspectives and attitudes of those who do not.

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Table of contents

Step 1: return to your thesis, step 2: review your main points, step 3: show why it matters, what shouldn’t go in the conclusion, more examples of essay conclusions, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about writing an essay conclusion.

To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument.

Don’t just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction.

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Next, remind the reader of the main points that you used to support your argument.

Avoid simply summarizing each paragraph or repeating each point in order; try to bring your points together in a way that makes the connections between them clear. The conclusion is your final chance to show how all the paragraphs of your essay add up to a coherent whole.

To wrap up your conclusion, zoom out to a broader view of the topic and consider the implications of your argument. For example:

  • Does it contribute a new understanding of your topic?
  • Does it raise new questions for future study?
  • Does it lead to practical suggestions or predictions?
  • Can it be applied to different contexts?
  • Can it be connected to a broader debate or theme?

Whatever your essay is about, the conclusion should aim to emphasize the significance of your argument, whether that’s within your academic subject or in the wider world.

Try to end with a strong, decisive sentence, leaving the reader with a lingering sense of interest in your topic.

The easiest way to improve your conclusion is to eliminate these common mistakes.

Don’t include new evidence

Any evidence or analysis that is essential to supporting your thesis statement should appear in the main body of the essay.

The conclusion might include minor pieces of new information—for example, a sentence or two discussing broader implications, or a quotation that nicely summarizes your central point. But it shouldn’t introduce any major new sources or ideas that need further explanation to understand.

Don’t use “concluding phrases”

Avoid using obvious stock phrases to tell the reader what you’re doing:

  • “In conclusion…”
  • “To sum up…”

These phrases aren’t forbidden, but they can make your writing sound weak. By returning to your main argument, it will quickly become clear that you are concluding the essay—you shouldn’t have to spell it out.

Don’t undermine your argument

Avoid using apologetic phrases that sound uncertain or confused:

  • “This is just one approach among many.”
  • “There are good arguments on both sides of this issue.”
  • “There is no clear answer to this problem.”

Even if your essay has explored different points of view, your own position should be clear. There may be many possible approaches to the topic, but you want to leave the reader convinced that yours is the best one!

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  • Argumentative
  • Literary analysis

This conclusion is taken from an argumentative essay about the internet’s impact on education. It acknowledges the opposing arguments while taking a clear, decisive position.

The internet has had a major positive impact on the world of education; occasional pitfalls aside, its value is evident in numerous applications. The future of teaching lies in the possibilities the internet opens up for communication, research, and interactivity. As the popularity of distance learning shows, students value the flexibility and accessibility offered by digital education, and educators should fully embrace these advantages. The internet’s dangers, real and imaginary, have been documented exhaustively by skeptics, but the internet is here to stay; it is time to focus seriously on its potential for good.

This conclusion is taken from a short expository essay that explains the invention of the printing press and its effects on European society. It focuses on giving a clear, concise overview of what was covered in the essay.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

This conclusion is taken from a literary analysis essay about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein . It summarizes what the essay’s analysis achieved and emphasizes its originality.

By tracing the depiction of Frankenstein through the novel’s three volumes, I have demonstrated how the narrative structure shifts our perception of the character. While the Frankenstein of the first volume is depicted as having innocent intentions, the second and third volumes—first in the creature’s accusatory voice, and then in his own voice—increasingly undermine him, causing him to appear alternately ridiculous and vindictive. Far from the one-dimensional villain he is often taken to be, the character of Frankenstein is compelling because of the dynamic narrative frame in which he is placed. In this frame, Frankenstein’s narrative self-presentation responds to the images of him we see from others’ perspectives. This conclusion sheds new light on the novel, foregrounding Shelley’s unique layering of narrative perspectives and its importance for the depiction of character.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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Your essay’s conclusion should contain:

  • A rephrased version of your overall thesis
  • A brief review of the key points you made in the main body
  • An indication of why your argument matters

The conclusion may also reflect on the broader implications of your argument, showing how your ideas could applied to other contexts or debates.

For a stronger conclusion paragraph, avoid including:

  • Important evidence or analysis that wasn’t mentioned in the main body
  • Generic concluding phrases (e.g. “In conclusion…”)
  • Weak statements that undermine your argument (e.g. “There are good points on both sides of this issue.”)

Your conclusion should leave the reader with a strong, decisive impression of your work.

The conclusion paragraph of an essay is usually shorter than the introduction . As a rule, it shouldn’t take up more than 10–15% of the text.

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