Application Letter Vs. Cover Letter

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Cover Letter Analysis

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There are subtle differences between application letters and cover letters. However, the terms cover and application are sometimes used interchangeably. An application letter is often intended to stand on its own, whereas a cover letter generally can't be the applicant's only document submitted to express interest in a job opening.

Cover Letter Versus Application Letter Introductions

Cover letters typically contain a brief introduction. The introduction in a cover letter consists of three to four sentences about the job seeker's work experiences, education, accomplishments and the type of organizations he feels are best suited for his qualifications. On the other hand, an application letter might contain a more extensive introduction simply because this letter serves a purpose that's similar to the resume.

Dear (Hiring Executive),

Please accept my enclosed application for the position of executive assistant to your Vice President of Operations. I'm pleased to say that my qualifications match your job requirements perfectly. In my current role with Genex Engineering, I handle all of the same duties and much more as executive assistant to the president and CEO for the past four years. My experience, education (bachelor's degree), strong communication skills and ability to manage complex tasks and solve problems makes me an ideal candidate for your position.

Cover Letter Versus Application Letter Work History

An application letter generally contains a brief description of the job seeker's work history or professional experience. An application letter often can substitute for a resume and, therefore, requires that the job seeker include specific information about her work history and professional competencies. A cover letter shouldn't contain too much information about the job seeker's work history because it's merely an introduction to the resume. It's acceptable for a cover letter to reference the job seeker's work history in a sentence or two about her current or previous employer; however, it shouldn't contain details about any professional experience.

Example of Cover Letter Work History:

Prior to working at Genex Engineering, I was executive secretary to the COO at Boomer Industrial Hose Inc. and started my career as a receptionist/ secretary for the Sales Manager at Geny Oil Corp. 10 years ago in Texas.

No need to add more to your work history in a cover letter as it is thoroughly covered in the accompanying resume.

Example of Application Letter Work History:

At Genex Engineering, I handle all of the duties required of your position and much more as executive assistant to the president and CEO for the past four years. In addition to providing secretarial and administrative support to the president, I train other secretaries to support other high-level executives and regularly speak at conventions and manage trade shows. My responsibilities also include creating presentations and proposals, arranging travel for all the executives, generating reports and taking responsibility for confidential company documents. I spearheaded modifications in IT that generated increased profitability for Genex and implemented a variety of upgrades in our accounting procedures dramatically cutting costs in that department.

After describing your duties in your present position, you would then briefly describe your duties in your two previous junior-intermediate level jobs at Boomer and Geny Oil.

Cover Letter Versus Application Letter Content

A cover letter is a teaser. Its intent is to capture the reader's attention enough to make the recruiter or hiring manager want to review the resume. The cover letter should contain just enough information that it doesn't give away everything about the applicant. An application letter, on the other hand, is a more comprehensive document. It describes the applicant's educational background, certifications and licenses, and in some cases, salary history for job postings that require it.

When to Use an Application Letter

When an employer specifically requires a cover letter and resume, that's what the job seeker should submit. It's relatively rare that an employer will accept an application letter in lieu of a cover letter and resume. The two approaches are different and employers use application letters infrequently when compared to how they use cover letters and resumes. An application letter is more appropriate for unsolicited interest, or when there isn't a job posting. For example, an application letter could be mailed to several employers that aren't advertising specific jobs vacancies as a way to provide a more extensive introduction to prospective employers.

Uses of Cover Letters and Application Letters

A cover letter is almost always used to express interest in employment. An application letter can be used for employment purposes; however, it can also be used for applying for a place in an academic program or an internship program. Employers don't always require a cover letter, but it's always a good idea to use a cover letter. On the other hand, an application letter might be the only requirement sought by schools or employers – with an application letter, it may not always be necessary to include a resume.

Ruth Mayhew has been writing since the mid-1980s, and she has been an HR subject matter expert since 1995. Her work appears in "The Multi-Generational Workforce in the Health Care Industry," and she has been cited in numerous publications, including journals and textbooks that focus on human resources management practices. She holds a Master of Arts in sociology from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Ruth resides in the nation's capital, Washington, D.C.

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Resume VS Cover Letter in 2024 [Detailed Guide & Examples!]

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Navigating the job market in 2024 can be tricky, with every detail in your job application making a huge difference. 

In such a situation, you might find yourself wondering about the roles of resumes and cover letters and how each can help your job hunt. 

While a resume showcases your skills and experiences, a cover letter adds a personal touch, explaining why you're the perfect fit. But blending these two effectively isn't always straightforward.

But worry not! 

This guide will show you how to create a spotless application by telling you all about resumes vs cover letters, including:

  • Resume Vs Cover Letter: 3 Key Differences 

Resume Vs Cover Letter: 3 Key Similarities

  • What to Include in Your Resume and Cover Letter
  • Resume and Cover Letter Examples

Let’s dive in!  

Resume Vs Cover Letter: 3 Key Differences

When you're on the hunt for a new job, understanding the difference between a resume and a cover letter is crucial. 

They might seem like they serve the same purpose at first glance, but they're actually quite different in terms of format, tone, and purpose. 

Let's break down these key differences to help you leverage each one effectively in your job application: 

#1. Format 

The main difference between a resume and a cover letter is how they’re formatted. A resume’s format is structured, almost like a database of your professional life. It's a concise, bullet-pointed list showcasing your work experience, skills, and educational background. 

The idea is to make it easy for the employer to scan through your qualifications quickly. Think of it as a highlight reel of your career, with each point clear and to the point.

On the other hand, a cover letter has a more narrative style. It's your chance to tell a story about your professional journey. Here, you're not just listing your achievements and skills; you're explaining them. 

You can dive into details about key experiences, how you tackled challenges, and why you're a great fit for the role. While your resume is factual and to the point, your cover letter allows your personality and enthusiasm to shine through.

What you include in a cover letter is also different from a resume. In your cover letter , you're linking your skills and experiences directly to what the job requires, using examples and anecdotes. Meanwhile, your resume serves as a straightforward record of your professional path and competencies.

resume formats

The tone is where you see the difference between a resume and a cover letter. 

A resume is all about being professional and straightforward. You're sticking to the facts: your past job titles , the skills you've mastered, and your educational background. It's like a formal report about you, so there's not much room for personal flair or storytelling.

In contrast, your cover letter is where you can be a bit more relaxed and personal. 

This doesn't mean you should be overly casual, but it's definitely the place to add a bit of your personality. You can write in the first person, share your enthusiasm for the job, and talk about why you're excited about the opportunity. It's like having a conversation with the hiring manager, telling them why you'd be a great fit for the job.

So, while your resume is the straight-to-the-point , no-nonsense part of your application, your cover letter is where you get to be more expressive. 

#3. Purpose

When it comes to the purpose of a resume and a cover letter, it's all about showing different sides of your professional story. 

Your resume is the backbone of your job application; it's essential. It gives a clear, concise rundown of your professional journey. Basically, it's your way of saying, "Here's what I've done and what I'm good at." You can apply for a job with just a resume, but it's just a part of the whole picture.

The cover letter is what fills that picture. It complements your resume by filling in the gaps and adding context to your experiences. This is your space to explain why you're interested in the job and how your background makes you a great fit. It's like adding color to a black-and-white photo. 

By writing a cover letter , you're showing hiring managers that you're not just tossing your resume into every job opening you see. You're taking the time to present a complete, well-thought-out application.

So, while your resume is key, including a cover letter can be a game-changer. It shows you're a dedicated job seeker who understands the value of presenting a full picture. Hiring managers often look for this effort as it demonstrates you’re serious about the role. In a stack of many resumes, a well-crafted cover letter can be the thing that makes you stand out .

If navigating the world of job applications can be tricky, it helps to know that both resumes and cover letters also share some common ground.

While they have their differences, they also have key similarities like length, the need to be tailored to the job, and using matching templates. 

Understanding these similarities can help you create a cohesive and compelling job application package:

#1. Length 

First up, let's talk about length. Both your resume and cover letter should be pretty brief . 

The recommended resume length is usually one page long . You can have a two-page resume , but that's only if you have tons of experience and are applying for an executive position. 

As a rule of thumb, though, your resume should be all about being concise and to the point. You want to make sure every word counts, especially since hiring managers don't spend a lot of time on each resume.

Your cover letter should also be short and sweet. Aim for about three to four paragraphs , and don’t go over one page. You're not writing your autobiography here; you're giving a snapshot of why you're the right fit for the job. It's your chance to highlight the most important parts of your resume and add a bit of personality, but remember, brevity is key.

So, whether it's your resume or cover letter, keep it tight. You want to give just enough to spark interest and make them say, "Let's call this person for an interview."

#2. Tailoring it to the Job

Now, let's talk about tailoring these documents to the job. 

This is super important for both your resume and cover letter. You can't just send the same version to every job opening; it needs to feel like it was made just for that specific role. For your resume, this means highlighting the experience and skills that are most relevant to the job you're applying for. You've got to show them that what you've done lines up with what they need.

Your cover letter needs this custom touch, too. It's your chance to draw a clear line between your skills and experiences and the job's requirements. Here, you're telling them, "Hey, see these things on my resume? This is how they make me a great fit for your job." It's about making the connection between you and the role crystal clear.

So, whether it's tweaking your resume to highlight certain experiences or writing a cover letter that speaks directly to the job ad, tailoring each document is key. It shows that you're not just looking for any job; you're interested in this job.

Looking for a new job? Be sure to read the ultimate guide to the job hunt for help along the way!

#3. Matching Templates 

Lastly, there's the visual aspect – using matching templates for your resume and cover letter. When these two pieces of your application match, it gives everything a cohesive and professional look. 

Think of it like wearing a matching outfit to an interview; it just looks more put together. Using the same design, colors, and font style in both documents creates a strong, unified brand for you as a professional. It's a subtle touch, but it can make your application stand out.

Having a matching set also shows attention to detail. It tells the hiring manager that you've put thought and effort into your application. It's not just about the content; it's also about presenting it in a way that's pleasing to the eye and easy to read.

If you're not a design whiz, don't worry. There are tools out there that can help.

matching resume and cover letter

For example, Novorésumé offers matching templates for resumes and cover letters. This makes it super easy to create a professional and stylish-looking application package. 

With a few clicks, you can have a resume and cover letter that look like they were made to go together, because, well, they were!

What to Include in Your Resume

Your resume is your professional story on a page. It's crucial to include the right information to showcase your skills and experiences effectively. Here's a breakdown of what to include:

  • Contact Information : Start with the basics - your name, phone number, email, and LinkedIn profile. Make sure your email sounds professional and not like something you came up with in high school (e.g.: [email protected]). 
  • Resume Summary or Objective : This is a brief statement at the top of your resume. It should highlight your career achievements and aspirations. Tailor it to reflect how you're a great fit for the specific job you're applying for.
  • Professional Experience: List your past jobs in reverse chronological order. Include your title, the company name, dates of employment, and a brief description of your responsibilities and achievements in each role.
  • Skills (Hard and Soft): Highlight both your technical skills (like programming languages or marketing tools) and soft skills (like communication or problem-solving ). Tailor these to match the job description.
  • Education : Include your most recent and relevant educational experiences. List the degree, the institution, and the year of graduation. You can also mention academic honors or extracurricular activities if they're relevant (I.e.: if you’re a recent graduate or entry-level professional).
  • Optional Sections : If you have leftover space on your resume, you can include optional sections such as any languages you speak, any volunteer work you’ve done, your certifications or personal projects, as well as your hobbies and interests .

Are you wondering if you should write a CV or resume ? Read our article to find out what the differences are!

What to Include in Your Cover Letter

A cover letter is your chance to make a personal connection with the employer. It complements your resume by bringing your experiences to life. Here’s what you should include:

  • Contact Information: Just like your resume, start with your name, phone number, and email. No need for your address, but including your LinkedIn profile could be a nice touch.
  • Addressing the Hiring Manager: It's important to address your cover letter to the right person. If you can, find out the name of the hiring manager and address them directly (like "Dear Ms. Smith"). This personal touch shows you've put in the extra effort and makes your letter feel more tailored and respectful.
  • Introduction: Grab their attention. Start with a concise introduction about who you are and why you're interested in the role. A compelling opener can make a big difference.
  • Why You’re Interested in the Role: Explain what drew you to the job. Be specific about why the company or the role excites you. This shows you've done your homework.
  • Your Relevant Experience and Skills: Here's where you match your skills to the job description. Use specific examples from your past to show how you've used these skills effectively to show the hiring manager why they should hire you.
  • Conclusion and Call to Action : Wrap it up by reiterating your interest and thank the reader for their time. A proactive closing, like mentioning your eagerness to discuss your application in an interview, leaves a strong final impression.

cover letter structure

13 Resume Examples

Are you wondering what a great resume looks like? Here are 13 resumes for different professions to inspire you:

#1. Business Analyst Resume Example

Business Analyst Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business analyst resume here.

#2. Digital Marketing Resume Example

Digital Marketing Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a digital marketing resume here.

#3. Software Engineer Resume Example

Software Engineer Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a software engineer resume here.

#4. Construction Project Manager Resume Example

Construction Project Manager Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a construction project manager resume here.

#5. Customer Service Resume Example

Customer Service Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a customer service resume here.

#6. High School Resume Example

High School Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a high school resume here.

#7. Student Resume Example

Student Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a student resume here.

#8. Server Resume Example

Server Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a server resume here.

#9. Actor Resume Example

Actor Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing an actor resume here.

#10. Web Developer Resume Example

Web Developer Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a web developer resume here.

#11. Engineering Resume Example

Engineering Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineering resume here.

#12. Computer Science Resume Example

Computer Science Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing a computer science resume here.

#13. Architect Resume Example 

Architect Resume Example

Check out our full guide to writing an architect resume here.

13 Cover Letter Examples

And here are some cover letter examples to take your application from great to perfect:

#1. Customer Service Cover Letter

Customer Service Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a customer service cover letter here.

#2. Marketing Executive Cover Letter

Marketing Executive Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a marketing executive cover letter here.

#3. Medical Assistant Cover Letter

Medical Assistant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a medical assistant cover letter here.

#4. Consultant Cover Letter

Consultant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a consultant cover letter here.

#5. College Student Cover Letter

College Student Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a college student cover letter here.

#6. Retail Cover Letter

Retail Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a retail cover letter here.

#7. Team Leader Cover Letter

Team Leader Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a team leader cover letter here.

#8. Actor Cover Letter

Actor Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an actor cover letter here.

#9. Digital Marketing Cover Letter

Digital Marketing Cover Letter

#10. Executive Assistant Cover Letter

Executive Assistant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an executive assistant cover letter here.

#11. Finance Cover Letter

Finance Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a finance cover letter here.

#12. Graphic Designer Cover Letter

Graphic Designer Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a graphic designer cover letter here.

#13. IT Cover Letter

IT Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an IT cover letter here.

Key Takeaways 

And that’s a wrap on everything you need to know about cover letters and resumes. 

Before you go and perfect your application based on what you just read, here’s a rundown of the main points we covered in this article:

  • Resumes and cover letters differ in the way you format them, the tone you use when writing them, and the purpose they serve. 
  • On the other hand, they also have similarities. For example, they’re typically the same length and need to be tailored to the job you’re applying for. 
  • On your resume, make sure to include your contact information, resume summary, work experience, education, skills, and other optional sections. 
  • Meanwhile, in your cover letter, you should first include a header with both your and the hiring manager’s contact information. Then you should address the hiring manager, write a captivating introduction, talk about your achievements and skills, and wrap up with a call to action and a professional signature line. 

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  • Resume and Cover Letter
  • Resume vs Cover Letter: How...

Resume vs Cover Letter: How They're Different

8 min read · Updated on January 25, 2024

Ronda Suder

Knowing how a resume and cover letter work together can increase your chances of standing out

A resume and cover letter are essential job marketing tools that allow you to grab the attention of prospective employers and make a solid first impression. Where a resume provides an objective and concise overview of your work history, knowledge, skills, and overall qualifications, a cover letter formally introduces you to the employer and summarizes your work experiences related to your resume. It also discusses why you're interested in the position and why you're a suitable candidate. 

These two complementary documents are similar in a few ways and very different in others. In this post, we'll cover the following to provide clarity around cover letters vs resumes:

Cover letter vs resume: what are the similarities?

Cover letter vs resume: what are the differences?

What can a cover letter convey that a resume can't?

What's the difference between a cover letter, a resume, and an application letter? 

Cover letter vs resume: what are the similarities? 

As noted, a cover letter and resume are both career marketing tools, provided to prospective employers, that give the opportunity to make a strong first impression. Here are a few additional similarities between the two:

Both are meant to sell your skills and experience to entice employers to bring you in for an interview

The heading and contact information provided in a cover letter should match what's provided in a resume

When both a cover letter and resume are submitted as part of a job application, they're submitted together

Each document should use a similar style in terms of colors, font type , and font size to provide a cohesive package

Both documents should be tailored to each job you apply to

Both your cover letter and resume should include keywords from the job description.

These few points are where the similarities between a cover letter and a resume end. 

When considering a cover letter vs resume, there are five significant differences between them. They are

Layout and structure

Tonality , tense and orientation.

A resume is a requirement and necessity for virtually all job applications. A cover letter, on the other hand, is highly recommended but isn't necessarily required unless the job application specifically requests the inclusion of a cover letter. It's also possible to come across some job postings that specifically ask you not to include a cover letter. If you come across such an instance, even if you're tempted, don't include it unless you want to risk immediately going into the “no” pile. 

Unless specifically asked not to, in most instances it's in your best interest to include a cover letter with your resume. It shows you care about the position and can help to make your application stand out from the competition. 

The purpose of a resume is to provide the employer with a concise overview of your relevant work history, skills, and other qualifications. It focuses on your past and how it applies to your potential to succeed in a new job. 

Your cover letter should focus only on the job you're applying to - it serves as an introduction to you and your resume. With your cover letter, you have the opportunity to showcase a bit of your personality, further summarize your resume, and emphasize why you're interested in, and the right fit for, the job. 

In a nutshell, a resume shows the employer how your experience fits the role and a cover letter tells them why it does. 

Another main difference between a cover letter vs resume is the layout and structure of each. A resume typically uses bullet points without paragraphs or large chunks of text. There are also standard resume formats to choose from. A cover letter is written in paragraph form, with a layout similar to any professional business letter you might write.

Resume layout and structure

A resume uses one of three resume formats - reverse chronological, functional, or hybrid - with specific sections that are required within each format. The most commonly used is the chronological format, which includes the following sections:

Contact Information

Resume Headline

Resume Summary

Core Competencies

Work Experience 

Additional optional sections sometimes included on a resume are IT Skills, Volunteer Experience, Special Projects, Certifications, Training, Awards, Publications, and Hobbies & Interests. 

For more tips on how to write an effective resume with several resume examples to review, refer to “ How to Make a Resume: Beginner's Writing Guide with Examples .”

Cover letter layout and structure

A cover letter ranges from 300 to 500 words and should be written using the same format as any professional business letter. The key sections of a cover letter include:

The header with the date, the employer's address, and your contact information

A salutation directed to a specific individual when possible

An introduction paragraph where you introduce yourself, share why you're interested, and emphasize why you're an ideal candidate

The body paragraphs - the most crucial section of your cover letter - where you summarize your qualifications and how they make you an ideal candidate to meet the job requirements and demands, in one to two paragraphs

A conclusion paragraph , where you'll conclude with appreciation and a call to action

The closing , with a professional closing salutation and your name

For more detailed information on how to write a cover letter with a cover letter example, refer to “ How to Write a Cover Letter (With Example) .” 

Your cover letter, unlike your resume, addresses the employer directly and with a tone that's more personable than a resume. The exact tone you go with for your cover letter should reflect the industry and organization to which you're applying, though it's still good to showcase some personality. When doing so, ensure you still keep it professional and don't be too personal to the point that it distracts from the letter's overall goal and ability to leave a positive impression. 

The tone of a resume is straightforward and objective. It offers the reader specific details about your past work history, key qualifications, and skills. 

A resume is mostly past-oriented, meaning that it focuses largely on your past work history and experiences. Much of a resume is written in the past tense, as well. 

A cover letter is written primarily in the present tense. The focus of a cover letter is more on the present and future, including mentioning current and future objectives. 

What can a cover letter explain that a resume cannot?

As noted, where a resume shows how you're a good fit for the job, a cover letter can discuss why you're a good fit. Also, a cover letter can explain details about your resume that you might not have had space for on the resume. For example, if you listed a work experience bullet point with a great accomplishment, yet you weren't able to highlight the challenges you overcame for that significant achievement, that might be something to include in the cover letter if it adds value and is relevant. 

Cover letter vs resume vs application letter

In addition to a cover letter and resume being part of your arsenal of career marketing tools, you might also be wondering where an application letter fits in - especially since some confuse an application letter with a cover letter. 

What is the difference between a resume and an application letter?

As mentioned, a resume is a document required for job applications and provides a succinct overview of your work history and credentials. An application letter provides a detailed overview of your work history and credentials in a letter format and is typically not used in conjunction with a resume.

What is the difference between a cover letter and an application letter?

Though a cover letter and application letter share similar features, they're different in content and purpose. A cover letter complements a resume and provides an introduction to yourself and an overview as to why your qualifications make you a good fit for the job. It's sent with the resume as part of the application process. 

An application letter is more detailed and dives deeper into an applicant's work history and qualifications. It's common to send an application letter to an employer of interest, even if they don't have any job openings at the time. In other words, it's sent outside of the application process and often expresses interest in working for the organization. 

The structure is similar to a cover letter, because they're both professional business letters. However, since the intent of a cover letter and application letter differs, the content focus is different between the two. 

Cover letter vs resume: yes, you need both (with rare exceptions)

Now you know the similarities and differences between a cover letter vs resume and the purpose of each. You also know that, in most instances, it's best to submit a cover letter with your resume when applying for jobs. Including both helps you to set yourself apart from others in a tough job market and make a positive first impression on hiring teams! 

Wondering if your resume and cover letter complement each other the way they should? Our team of TopResume experts can help you to ensure that both showcase the correct elements to help you land the interviews you desire. You can even submit your resume for a free review   to get started!

Recommended reading: 

How to List Certifications on a Resume (with Examples)

How to Start a Cover Letter that Grabs Attention

How to Include Relevant Coursework on a Resume (with Examples)

Related Articles:

Do Hiring Managers Actually Read Cover Letters?

How to Create a Resume With No Education

Why You Lose When You Lie on Your Resume: Learning From Mina Chang

See how your resume stacks up.

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COMMENTS

  1. Application Letter vs. Cover Letter: Definitions and Differences

    While a cover letter contains similar information to an application letter, a cover letter provides brief details about your experience, skills and goals. It talks about a specific job opening that you have an interest in pursuing. Having a solid cover letter may help a hiring manager notice your resume.

  2. Application letter vs. cover letter: pros and cons, tips for job

    2) Job application letter for academic programs. When there is a requirement to describe depth of academic experience, a longer-form letter is sometimes employed in academic circles instead of a resume. Here, the letter of application vs cover letter argument is won in favor of academic rigor.

  3. Cover Letter vs. Application Letter [Differences, Pros & Cons, and

    5. Cover Letter vs. Application Letter - Closing paragraph. How to write a cover letter vs a job application's closing paragraph is similar. You will need to include the following information: Restate your interest in the role/program. Include a call to action inviting the hiring manager to reach out to you.

  4. What is a Cover Letter? Definition & Examples

    An application cover letter is the most common type of cover letter and is used to apply to an open job position - think of it as the default cover letter. Your application cover letter should briefly outline your professional experience and skills, and make a compelling argument for why you're the ideal person for a job. You can also use ...

  5. Application Letter Vs. Cover Letter

    A cover letter is almost always used to express interest in employment. An application letter can be used for employment purposes; however, it can also be used for applying for a place in an academic program or an internship program. Employers don't always require a cover letter, but it's always a good idea to use a cover letter.

  6. Cover Letter vs. Application Letter [Differences, Pros & Cons, and

    difference between a cover letter and an application letter resources, Resume/CV/Cover letter formats, templates, examples, and writing guides, interview tips, job search resources and salary survey, company interviews - CakeResume provides professional difference between a cover letter and an application letter resources for you.

  7. The Purpose of a Cover Letter

    A cover letter is a document that typically forms a key part of a successful job application, and candidates use it to introduce themselves to an employer. This introductory letter should influence a hiring manager to learn more about the applicant through their other documents. Key components in the cover letter include a statement of interest ...

  8. How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

    start your cover letter. with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter's header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text. Here, you want to include all the essential contact information, including: Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top. Job Title.

  9. Resume VS Cover Letter in 2024 [Detailed Guide & Examples!]

    Resume Vs Cover Letter: 3 Key Similarities. If navigating the world of job applications can be tricky, it helps to know that both resumes and cover letters also share some common ground. While they have their differences, they also have key similarities like length, the need to be tailored to the job, and using matching templates.

  10. Resume vs Cover Letter: How They're Different

    A resume is mostly past-oriented, meaning that it focuses largely on your past work history and experiences. Much of a resume is written in the past tense, as well. A cover letter is written primarily in the present tense. The focus of a cover letter is more on the present and future, including mentioning current and future objectives.

  11. Cover Letter Do's and Don'ts: 10 Expert Writing Tips

    Here's what to include in a cover letter to make your application stand out: Your name and contact information. The hiring manager's name and contact info. A salutation. Your relevant achievements. A mention of something you know about the company. Why you are the best candidate for the position. An impressive ending.

  12. cover letter vs. an application letter Resources & Tutorials

    cover letter vs. an application letter resources, Resume/CV/Cover letter formats, templates, examples, and writing guides, interview tips, job search resources and salary survey, company interviews - CakeResume provides professional cover letter vs. an application letter resources for you.

  13. Cover Letter vs. Resume: How Are They Different?

    The difference between a cover letter and a resume. There are four key differences between a cover letter and a resume: 1. Importance. Resumes are a requirement when you apply for work. On the other hand, cover letters are often necessary, but optional when a company specifically says to not include one.

  14. Cover Letter Versus Email: Which Is Better?

    That's me. My attached resume and cover letter outline my qualifications for the role. Thank you very much for your consideration. I hope to hear from you soon! Keep it brief if you go this route. Those on the receiving end won't appreciate having to plow through a super long email and all your attachments.

  15. How to write the perfect cover letter (With examples)

    To start your cover letter, introduce yourself. This means including your full name, your specific interest in the position and the reasons you've chosen to apply. If you got a referral to the job from another party, ensure to mention this in the first paragraph. 2. Mention your skills and qualifications.

  16. How to Write a Cover Letter When You're Changing Careers (Sample + Tips

    Let's review four key pieces of information you can weave into your career change cover letter. 1. Clarify your career change context. Explaining why you're interested in changing careers and how the role you're applying to fits within your larger career aspirations can preemptively contextualize your story.