Movie Reviews

Tv/streaming, collections, great movies, chaz's journal, contributors, the conjuring.

conjuring movie review in english

Now streaming on:

From " Saw " to " Insidious ," indie horror filmmaker James Wan's films have always been confrontational in their guileless grand-standing. So it's not surprising that watching "The Conjuring" is like getting a tour of a haunted house attraction from someone that pushes, and pulls you through every room.

There's nothing really scary about Wan's latest because there's nothing particularly mysterious, or inviting about its proceedings. The film's relentlessly lame expository dialogue and tedious parade of jump scares are overwhelming in the worst way possible. Only one in five scares hit home because, while Wan sometimes proves that he can reel viewers in, he usually prefers to strong-arm his audience into submission. Then again, the film's scenario, scripted by Carey and Chad Hayes (the 2005 " House of Wax " remake), is so thunderously stupid that you probably wouldn't want to wander around Wan's film-shaped carnival ride if you could.

"The Conjuring" is as toothless as it is because it's two different kinds of boring. The film's plot is explained exhaustively whenever loud noises aren't blaring, and random objects aren't teasingly leaping out at you from the corner of your eye. In fact, the Hayes' brothers are so anxious to explain their "Amityville Horror"-knockoff's convoluted backstory that they dump information in viewers' laps three different ways before the film's opening credits.

First, there's a dramatization of the 1968 Annabelle Higgins case, a real-life "haunting" that apparently involved a creepy doll, and two dimwitted nubile nurses. Next, Ed and Lorraine Warren ( Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga ) explain to a rapt collegiate audience that they're demonologists who specialize in exorcisms. It's never explicitly explained in the film, but in real life, the Warrens "investigated" the Amityville Horror hoax. Finally, a ream of text assaults your eyeballs with even more useless information. This movie is set in the early '70s, is "based on the true story," and follows the most serious exorcism case in the Warrens' history. And if you don't believe the filmmakers, too bad, braaaahm, here's the movie's title in huge, bigger-than-Kubrick yellow font; don't choke on it.

That kind of incessant throat-clearing continues after we're introduced to the Perrons, a family with five young daughters who just moved into a big house on the edge of a small Massachusetts town. We learn something new about the Perrons and the Warrens in every other scene because they never stop describing themselves to each other. The girls are rambunctious, and miss their old home: "Well, first cute boy she meets, she'll forget about Jersey."

The Perrons' house needs cleaning up: "Whoa! That's gonna take a lot of elbow grease!" The Warrens are God-fearing, and happily married: "You said that God brought us together for a reason." And while there are three stages to a haunting ("Infestation, Oppression, Possession"), the Perrons' new house isn't haunted—they are ("It's like stepping on gum: sometimes you take it with you").

Don't let the Hayes' diarrhetic explanations put you off: you can ignore much of what's being said and understand "The Conjuring" just fine. But a key reason that the film's barrage of jump scares is as dissatisfying as it is is because the Hayes' scenario is distressingly light on intelligent characterizations, memorable dialogue, logic. One might argue that there wouldn't be much of a movie if characters didn't make stupid decisions. But it takes a special kind of rocket scientist to enter a room after seeing a ghost with slit wrists whisper (loudly), "Look what she made me do," then disappear around a corner.

This is a movie where two characters, after experiencing a major traumatic event, express affection for each other by saying, "You did good," and, "No, you did." Hokey period details, like Wilson's Elvis-like flip haircut and sideburns, or Farmiga's Liberace-style collar ruffles, are meant to lull viewers into complacency. But that kind of bait-and-switch tactic is just annoying in a horror film whose monsters are only as scary as they are fitfully unnerving.

The fact that so many pseudo-spooky scenes in "The Conjuring" involve jump scares is telling. Wan and the Hayes want their film to be judged as a theme park attraction. But they fail to deliver bargain-basement cheap thrills. Even if you ignored the parts of "The Conjuring" that require more than shock-deep emotional involvement, the film's scares are too monotonous and schematic to be really scary. Wan and the Hayes only plumbed their ids so much, and consequently only have to offer a creepy doll, a screaming old crone, and dead kids in period dress. These things aren't that much scarier when they're flying into your face. There's nothing holding "The Conjuring" together beyond its creators' desperate need to needle you.

Simon Abrams

Simon Abrams

Simon Abrams is a native New Yorker and freelance film critic whose work has been featured in  The New York Times ,  Vanity Fair ,  The Village Voice,  and elsewhere.

Now playing

conjuring movie review in english

Unsung Hero

Christy lemire.

conjuring movie review in english

Nothing Can't Be Undone by a HotPot

conjuring movie review in english

Monica Castillo

conjuring movie review in english

Turtles All the Way Down

Peyton robinson.

conjuring movie review in english

The Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare

Glenn kenny.

conjuring movie review in english

Girls State

Film credits.

The Conjuring movie poster

The Conjuring (2013)

112 minutes

Patrick Wilson as Ed Warren

Vera Farmiga as Lorraine Warren

Ron Livingston as Roger Perron

Lili Taylor as Carolyn Perron

Mackenzie Foy as Cindy

Joey King as Christine Perron

Hayley McFarland as Nancy

Shanley Caswell as Andrea Perron

Sterling Jerins as Judy Warren

  • Carey Hayes
  • Peter Safran

Latest blog posts

conjuring movie review in english

Meanwhile in France...Cannes to Be Specific

conjuring movie review in english

Heeramandi: The Diamond Bazaar Wastes Its Lavish Potential

conjuring movie review in english

​Nocturnal Suburban Teen Angst Fantasia: Jane Schoenbrun on I Saw the TV Glow

conjuring movie review in english

A Preview of the 2024 Cannes Film Festival

  • Cast & crew
  • User reviews

The Conjuring

The Conjuring (2013)

Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren work to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their farmhouse. Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren work to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their farmhouse. Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren work to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their farmhouse.

  • Carey W. Hayes
  • Patrick Wilson
  • Vera Farmiga
  • Ron Livingston
  • 1.3K User reviews
  • 582 Critic reviews
  • 68 Metascore
  • 15 wins & 22 nominations

Trailer #3

  • Lorraine Warren

Ron Livingston

  • Roger Perron

Lili Taylor

  • Carolyn Perron

Shanley Caswell

  • Judy Warren

Morganna Bridgers

  • Female Student
  • All cast & crew
  • Production, box office & more at IMDbPro

More like this

The Conjuring 2

Did you know

  • Trivia The real Perron family visited the set of the film.
  • Goofs (at around 1h 30 mins) In the exorcism scene where Carolyn is thrown against a wall whilst strapped in her chair, as Carolyn falls to the floor you can see that it is in fact a stunt man as his wig falls off.

Lorraine Warren : Do you remember the thing you said on our wedding night?

Ed Warren : Can we do it again?

Lorraine Warren : No! The other thing, that God brought us together for a reason.

  • Crazy credits When the names "Shannon Kook", "John Brotherton", "Sterling Jerins" appear in the end credits, a white cross on the grave turns upside down.
  • Connections Featured in Showreel: We've Got Keanu Reeves (2013)
  • Soundtracks Time of the Season Written by Rod Argent Performed by The Zombies Courtesy of Marquis Enterprises, Ltd. By arrangement with Ace Music Services, LLC

User reviews 1.3K

  • hitchcockthelegend
  • Jun 16, 2014
  • Did Lorraine Warren ever comment on the accuracy (or inaccuracy) The Conjuring?
  • What killed Sadie the dog?
  • What is 'The Conjuring' about?
  • July 19, 2013 (United States)
  • United States
  • Official Facebook
  • Official site
  • The Warren Files
  • North Carolina, USA
  • New Line Cinema
  • The Safran Company
  • Evergreen Media Group
  • See more company credits at IMDbPro
  • $20,000,000 (estimated)
  • $137,446,368
  • $41,855,326
  • Jul 21, 2013
  • $320,415,166

Technical specs

  • Runtime 1 hour 52 minutes
  • Dolby Digital

Related news

Contribute to this page.

  • IMDb Answers: Help fill gaps in our data
  • Learn more about contributing

More to explore

Production art

Recently viewed

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

The Conjuring – review

The craft – if not the art – of a great horror flick skitters around Saw creator James Wan's new popcorn-spiller. Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga play Ed and Lorraine Warren, the real-life paranormal investigators who in the early 1970s helped the Perron family (led here by Ron Livingston and Lili Taylor) rid their Rhode Island pad of a demon, before clearing up at Amityville. The beast roves the house, as bashful about its hell-raising as Wan is about reeling off genre tropes: slamming doors, stopping clocks and smashing family photos.

The Conjuring was a huge hit in the US, perhaps because it plays to sceptics and believers alike; there's never any question that what we're seeing might be absurd or imaginary. The Warrens – religious folk concerned for their victims' souls (their church attendance is patchy) – are presented as dedicated professionals, rather than kooks, weirdos or (whisper it) hucksters. But the 70s setting, paired with the cheapish visual effects, helps the thing scramble along like a fleshed-out episode of Scooby Doo. Wan's shocks are predictable but – yikes! – are they scary.

  • Horror films

Comments (…)

Most viewed.

an image, when javascript is unavailable

Film Review: ‘The Conjuring’

A sensationally entertaining old-school freakout and one of the smartest, most viscerally effective thrillers in recent memory.

By Justin Chang

Justin Chang

  • Film Review: ‘A Hologram for the King’ 8 years ago
  • Cannes: A Look at the Official Selection, by the Numbers 8 years ago
  • Film Review: ‘Captain America: Civil War’ 8 years ago

The Conjuring Review

The mere sound of two hands clapping will have audiences begging for mercy in “ The Conjuring ,” a sensationally entertaining old-school freakout and one of the smartest, most viscerally effective thrillers in recent memory. Dramatizing a little-known account from the 1970s case files of paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren, director James Wan ‘s sixth and best feature is pull-out-the-stops horror filmmaking of a very sophisticated order, treating the story’s spiritual overtones with the utmost sincerity even as it playfully mines all manner of apparent cliches — creaky doors, cobwebbed cellars, toys you’d have to be just plain stupid to play with — for every last shiver of pleasure. What’s a moviegoer to do but join with the demons and applaud?

Having moved the New Line production up from February to a July 19 release date on the basis of through-the-roof test-screening reactions, Warner Bros. would appear to have an estimable mid-summer hit on its hands. That the MPAA opted to give the picture an R rating, claiming it was simply too scary for a PG-13 despite having met the basic content qualifications, should do little to hinder its tremendous word-of-mouth potential in theatrical and ancillary play.

While it owes an obvious debt to the likes of “The Exorcist,” “Poltergeist” and “ The Amityville Horror ” (itself inspired by the Warrens’ most famous case), this exuberantly creepy supernatural shocker is in many ways the film Wan has been working toward his whole career; it not only incorporates elements from his 2007 demon-doll thriller “Dead Silence” and his 2010 haunted-house saga “Insidious,” which felt like a warm-up exercise by comparison, but also taps into the sly, self-aware vein of humor that has long been one of Wan’s trademarks. And coming from the director who helped push indie horror toward ever more dubious torture-porn extremes with “Saw” 10 years ago, “The Conjuring” feels all the more remarkable for being a relatively gore-free piece of mainstream craftsmanship, the work of a B-movie maestro in full command of his studio-given resources.

Popular on Variety

A prologue quickly establishes the picture’s weird combo of straight-faced religiosity and genre-savvy irreverence as it introduces Ed Warren (Patrick Wilson) and his clairvoyant wife, Lorraine ( Vera Farmiga ), who have devoted their lives to studying, warding off and sometimes directly battling the forces of evil. Together these Connecticut-based demonologists project a down-to-earth folksiness that belies the seriousness of their convictions and the hair-raising intensity of their spiritual warfare. Their understanding of the occult world is so rigorous and methodical (they debunk several misconceptions early on) as to inspire immediate confidence in the scripting smarts of brothers Chad and Carey W. Hayes (who also collaborated on 2007’s less effective Bible-thumping thriller “The Reaping”).

The story was inspired by an alleged case of demonic possession so horrifying that the Warrens kept it under wraps for years, despite having been quite open about their work in their numerous books, lectures and TV appearances. It’s 1970 when Carolyn and Roger Perron ( Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston) and their five daughters move into their dream home in Harrisville, R.I., only to swiftly realize they are not the sole inhabitants of this secluded lakeside farmhouse. The demonic manifestations seem fairly routine at first: doors opening and slamming of their own accord, an obligatory spot of animal cruelty, the girls feeling a strange presence tugging at them in their sleep, and dark bruises appearing on Carolyn’s legs and back. Yet it takes almost no time for “The Conjuring” to immerse the viewer in its spell, as it teases seemingly minor jolts into frissons of terror, and turns a simple game of hide-and-seek into a tour de force of sustained excitement.

Impressively, the film achieves its most startling effects through motion, not stasis. Wan’s command of horror technique isn’t just virtuosic; it’s borderline rhapsodic, playing the audience like Hitchcock’s proverbial piano (a literal example of which is shown collecting dust in the Perrons’ extremely frightening cellar). Cinematographer John R. Leonetti’s widescreen compositions are forever in flux: The handheld camera pursues the characters from room to room in long, patient tracking shots, shifting from one uneasy perspective to the next and prowling every inch of the house’s cavernous, ramshackle interiors (brilliantly conceived by production designer Julie Berghoff).

In terms of what he does and doesn’t show, Wan strikes an ideal balance between the power of suggestion and the satisfaction of a good, in-your-face scare, and he and editor Kirk Morri expertly modulate the film’s dramatic rhythms, allowing the audience an occasional breather between setpieces without losing the momentum. Crucially, the sense of danger only accelerates when Ed and Lorraine temporarily move in with the Perrons and seek out answers, delving into the house’s chilling history of witchcraft, possession, suicide and satanic ritual murder. Along with an investigative assistant (Shannon Kook) and a skeptical but helpful cop (John Brotherton), they even set up film cameras hoping to catch some glimpse of the apparitions at work, like something out of an analog prequel to the “Paranormal Activity” franchise.

Ultimately the sort of relentless, expertly tricked-out scarefest that leaves one feeling happily drained rather than deeply, permanently unsettled, the film nonetheless heightens its impact by playing the material utterly straight where it counts. The two lead actresses rep the major casting coups here, both maxing out their scream-queen potential without skimping on dramatic heft: Taylor gamely submits to all kinds of physical and emotional extremes as the loving wife and mother on whom the house exacts its most frightening toll, while Farmiga movingly conveys Lorraine’s astounding courage as well as the enormous sacrifices her sixth sense requires. She and Wilson (also in “Insidious”) achieve a rock-solid rapport as two eccentric but authoritative individuals who selflessly and unapologetically view their marriage as a force for good in the world.

Loosely approximating the mildly funky fashions and longish haircuts of the period, the film reinforces its ’70s orientation with stylized homemovie footage and the occasional use of a paranoid zoom lens. “Insidious” composer Joseph Bishara supplies another deranged symphony of screeching strings, working in nerve-shredding counterpoint to the film’s inventive soundscape of bumps, creaks, whispers and pauses.

Reviewed at Los Angeles Film Festival (Special Screenings), June 21, 2013. (Also in Edinburgh Film Festival — Night Moves.) MPAA Rating: R. Running time: 111 MIN.

  • Production: A Warner Bros. release of a New Line Cinema presentation of a Safran Co./Evergreen Media Group production. Produced by Tony DeRosa-Grund, Peter Safran, Rob Cowan. Executive producers, Walter Hamada, Dave Neustadter.
  • Crew: Directed by James Wan. Screenplay, Chad Hayes, Carey W. Hayes. Camera (Technicolor, widescreen), John R. Leonetti; editor, Kirk Morri; music, Joseph Bishara; production designer, Julie Berghoff; art director, Geoffrey S. Grimsman; set decorator, Sophie Neudorfer; costume designer, Kristin M. Burke; sound (Dolby Digital/Datasat/SDDS), Carl Rudisill; sound designer/supervising sound editor, Joe Dzuban; re-recording mixers, Steve Maslow, Gregg Landaker; special makeup effects, Fractured FX; special effects supervisor, David Beavis; visual effects supervisor, Ray McIntyre Jr.; visual effects, Pixel Magic; stunt coordinators, Joel Kramer, Norbert Phillips; assistant director, Albert Cho; casting, Anne McCarthy, Kellie Gesell.
  • With: Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Ron Livingston, Lili Taylor, Joey King, Shanley Caswell, Haley McFarland, Mackenzie Foy, Kyla Deaver, Sterling Jerins, Marion Guyot, Steve Coulter, Shannon Kook, John Brotherton.

More From Our Brands

Reese witherspoon, will ferrell star in new wedding disaster movie, a bathroom vanity that looks like a turntable, disney upfront features a kelce hire, nfl chatter and a knicks nix, the best loofahs and body scrubbers, according to dermatologists, the voice semi-finals results-show recap: it’s four to the door as season 25’s final five are revealed, verify it's you, please log in.

Quantcast

Screen Rant

'the conjuring' review.

4

Your changes have been saved

Email Is sent

Please verify your email address.

You’ve reached your account maximum for followed topics.

Anne Hathaway’s New Rom-Com Success Is Great News For Disney's Upcoming Sequel To Her 23-Year-Old Movie

Sydney sweeney's remake of '60s sci-fi cult classic in talks with edgar wright to direct, fast & furious’ $85 million flop proves how difficult it is to continue without vin diesel's dominic toretto, the conjuring is a very satisfying horror movie outing, but when it's done - beyond the trauma of a freaky moviegoing experience - there is little to ponder or reflect upon..

The Conjuring   transports us into the world of Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga), the famous real-life couple who for decades studied, combated and documented supernatural occurrences. Teased by the promise that this is the Warren's most frightening case of all, The Conjuring  follows the plight of the Perron family - Carolyn (Lili Taylor), her husband Roger (Ron Livingston) and their five daughters - who move into a remote farmhouse, only to discover it is inhabited by a fearsome demonic presence.

Ed and Lorraine agree to help the Perrons exorcise their home, but the case quickly proves to be more dangerous than they could've ever imagined. With Lorraine (a talented physic) vulnerable to the dark forces haunting the Perrons, and a ghostly adversary that's as cunning as she is evil, the Warrens soon find that they have become the hunted, instead of the hunters.

The Conjuring  comes our way courtesy of horror director James Wan ( Saw , Insidious ) and twin brother horror/thriller writing duo Chad and Carey Hayes ( The Reaping ,  House of Wax ). While the script has  the usual "passable" quality of the Hayes brothers' B-movie signature, it is Wan's uncanny ability to create simple, creative and very effective scare sequences that elevates this movie above just about every other ghost story horror flick of the last few years. In short: this is the scariest movie of 2013 (so far).

It's a small miracle that the movie achieves the nonstop, hair-raising tension that it does. Wan is used to making the utmost out of a micro-budget ( Saw  and Insidious  both had budgets averaging out at about $1.3 million) and  The Conjuring  is the best application of his low-budget formula to date. Instead of CGI creatures and fancy visual effects used in so many other films today,  The Conjuring  takes things back to the '70s/'80s era of horror movies, using simple filmmaking techniques like camera angles, keen concepts and fantastic sequencing to create a truly terrifying horror experience that is mostly free of  blood and/or gore, making its frightful nature an even more impressive achievement.

Admittedly, the film is built on pretty familiar horror movie tropes - but again, it's the way these familiar moments (bumps in the night, something lurking in the shadows or behind a door) are staged that makes them more impressive and effective than so many other films. It's all about the craftsmanship, and James Wan, working at the top of his game, truly knows how to scare us. Practical makeup and visual effects help to sell the  scary show in a tactile and real way (a welcome respite from the barrage of CGI monsters and VFX seen in so many horror movies these days) rather than nagging the mind with the distracting notion of non-reality that often comes with digital effects work.

Aiding in the creation of a convincingly frightening world are a cast of talented performers who help sell the scares with grounded and believable performances. Wilson and Wan (who worked together on Insidious  and its upcoming sequel ) are comfortable enough with one another to allow Ed to be a charming enough straight-faced leading man, while Farmiga ( Up In the Air , Bates Motel ) once again demonstrates why she is such solid and reliable actress, making Lorraine a fascinating and very human character, despite the fantastical nature of her "powers" and the supernatural world she inhabits.

The same dynamic works for Roger and Carolyn Perron: Livingston ( Office Space ) is a sympathetic, straight-faced male protagonist, while Taylor ( Hemlock Grove ) uses her talents in a wide range of emoting to create the believable and well-rounded character needed to pul off the film's climatic third act.

The child actors are also skilled at selling the idea of real fear and emotion, thanks to talented youngsters like Mackenzie Foy ( Breaking Dawn ), Hayley McFarland ( Lie to Me ), Joey King ( Dark Knight Rises ), Kyla Deaver and Shanley Caswell ( Vegas ) - who all work well together selling the chemistry and bond of tight-knit sisters. Even bit characters played by Shannon Kook ( Degrassi: The Next Generation ) and John Brotherton ( One Life to Live ) get standout moments and are likable enough to relate to, and because we actually care about all of the people involved in this battle against evil, it's easy to be invested in each moment and sequence in which their lives (or souls) are put in danger. On a character level, there are no weak links or throwaways.

No film is without nitpicks, however, and the only reason  The Conjuring  isn't (necessarily) worthy of five-star classic status is due to the fact that the Hayes brothers' script - while blessedly tight and efficient at a lean 112 minutes - still manages to dangle a few threads (mostly concerning the Warrens' personal life) that are not really necessary and distract from the main narrative. Of course, now that a  Conjuring  sequel has been approved, those dangling threads could conceivably be tied into future films exploring the Warrens' long career; but in this standalone film, they feel extraneous.

One further nitpick: although this film is excellent, its simple, self-contained and anecdotal nature doesn't necessarily give it the same ability to hang around in mind like, say,  The Shining , a film whose deep levels and themes stay with you long after the credits roll.  The Conjuring  is a very satisfying horror movie outing, but when it's done - beyond the trauma of a freaky moviegoing experience - there is little to ponder or reflect upon. Of course, the intention is to tell an anecdotal story - and for better or worse, the filmmakers do just that.

If you are a horror movie fan, go see  The Conjuring . Even if you're the type who is too tough and rugged to be scared by a movie (or if you have that "seen it all" attitude of a hardcore horror connoisseur), you'll have to at least give it up to Wan and Co. for bringing things back to a bygone era of filmmaking and proving that progress and technological advances will never be suitable replacements for good old-fashioned creativity and know-how. That statement alone is worthy of applause by the time the credits roll - that is, if you aren't too busy trying to calm your rattled nerves.

Check out the trailer for  The Conjuring  if you're still on the fence:

[poll id="643"]

The Conjuring   is now in theaters. It is 112 minutes long and is Rated-R for sequences of disturbing violence and terror (translation: it's too scary).

Our Rating:

  • Movie Reviews
  • 4.5 star movies

Cookie banner

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy . Please also read our Privacy Notice and Terms of Use , which became effective December 20, 2019.

By choosing I Accept , you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies.

  • Entertainment
  • Movie Review

'The Conjuring' review: the return of true horror

The director of 'insidious' and 'saw' ups the ante in his latest ghost story.

By Bryan Bishop on July 18, 2013 09:01 am 72 Comments

conjuring movie review in english

In 2004 director James Wan helped launch an entire subgenre of horror with Saw . Dubbed “torture porn” — a derisive label used by cultural critics that confused catharsis with titillation — it became the gory norm for years, with the Saw franchise creaking out sequel after sequel. Starting with 2010’s Insidious , however, Wan himself has been exploring different, more nuanced ground: bringing the classic ghost story back in terrifying fashion.

His latest effort is The Conjuring , based on a case from Ed and Lorraine Warren — the real-life ghost hunters behind The Amityville Horror investigation. While the “true story” premise adds an additional layer of allure, the film goes far beyond that sort of one-note trickery, providing Wan the opportunity to take the techniques he’s learned in his previous outings and turn them up to 11. It’s a movie that doesn’t quite leap into the pantheon of genre classics it’s riffing on, but it proves James Wan is able to do one thing better than almost any filmmaker working today: scare the hell out of you.

It's the early 1970s, and Roger and Carolyn Perron (Ron Livingston and Lili Taylor) are moving into an old Rhode Island farmhouse along with their five daughters. Right off the bat things seem a little off: the family dog refuses to enter the home, and the Perrons discover a cobwebbed basement behind a false wall in the closet. At night things only get worse. Clocks mysteriously stop, strange knocking echoes down the halls, and one of the Perron’s daughters starts sleepwalking — with a particular fixation on the creepy wardrobe they found abandoned in the home.

Carolyn eventually contacts renowned demonologist Ed Warren (a chilly Patrick Wilson) and his clairvoyant wife Lorraine (Vera Farmiga), begging them to investigate. And once the Warrens arrive, they realize there’s something very, very wrong.

It’s all standard-issue setup, but it’s clear Wan knows that just as much as the audience. The film is littered with references to genre classics — Poltergeist , The Changeling , Robert Wise’s The Haunting — but they’re never foregrounded. They’re passing nods; a filmmaker acknowledging what excites him, and letting the audience know he’s a fan, too. Instead, Wan uses the familiar plot as a canvas for his own bravura performance in genre filmmaking.

From his cinematographer (longtime collaborator John Leonetti) to his editor and sound designer, Wan uses every creative ally and cinematic tool at his disposal to maximize tension. The look of the film and its affinity for slow zooms places it squarely in a lived-in, realistic 1971. Clever composition misdirects the eye like an expert magician, setting up scares from the most unexpected places.

The film has its share of classic jumps, but in a refreshing departure few actually rely on the cheap gag of music stings (one particularly unsettling jump scare uses nothing but framing alone). In fact, during the first half of the film Wan is content to let long passages play with almost no sound or score. The longer he holds on to the silence, the more the audience squirms, knowing that something is coming. It makes every creak of the house a shriek; every groan a demonic howl.

The Conjuring is the kind of movie that knows exactly when it has you — and then decides to push you even further. It gets inside your head. So much so that I was instinctively sinking down in my chair in the theater. Enough that the empty back seat in my car had me rattled on the drive home. That may sound extreme, but if you like horror movies and being scared these are very good things.

Despite its effectiveness, the film does fall short of some of the greats it’s so clearly inspired by. Part of it is simply the way the film resolves. When you get into the realm of the supernatural, it’s hard to wrap things up in a way that feels both dramatically satisfying and realistic — even within the expanded boundaries of a supernatural world. The Exorcist arguably did it best, but the reason that film was able to pull it off was because it spent half its running time focusing on Father Karras; the film was about his journey, not Regan MacNeil’s.

Screenwriters Chad and Carey Hayes try to do something similar in The Conjuring . The horrible haunting happens to the Perron family, but the emotional spine of the movie belongs to the Warrens. Unfortunately, that aspect of the film fails to click the way it needs to. Wilson’s Ed comes off strangely detached, never blending into the period landscape, and when the film requires Ed and Lorraine’s relationship to bring things home it can’t quite follow through.

Ron Livingston and Lili Taylor, on the other hand, both shine. Livingston expertly draws Roger as a straightforward man who suddenly finds himself in a world that’s anything but, while Taylor keeps Carolyn grounded and real — no matter how crazy her circumstances get.

Of course, in a world of found-footage retreads, not besting some of the best horror films of all time is hardly a crime. Leaving slashers behind for the murky uncertainties of the supernatural, Wan has found a way to expand his talents while driving yet another modern genre shift — and he’s still got a sequel to Insidious coming this September. It’s all the more notable given that so many of his torture porn brethren have since stalled out or otherwise failed to deliver on the promise of their early films. James Wan has made one of the scariest movies of 2013 — the only question is, will he top himself with Insidious: Chapter 2 ?

conjuring movie review in english

Common Sense Media

Movie & TV reviews for parents

  • For Parents
  • For Educators
  • Our Work and Impact

Or browse by category:

  • Get the app
  • Movie Reviews
  • Best Movie Lists
  • Best Movies on Netflix, Disney+, and More

Common Sense Selections for Movies

conjuring movie review in english

50 Modern Movies All Kids Should Watch Before They're 12

conjuring movie review in english

  • Best TV Lists
  • Best TV Shows on Netflix, Disney+, and More
  • Common Sense Selections for TV
  • Video Reviews of TV Shows

conjuring movie review in english

Best Kids' Shows on Disney+

conjuring movie review in english

Best Kids' TV Shows on Netflix

  • Book Reviews
  • Best Book Lists
  • Common Sense Selections for Books

conjuring movie review in english

8 Tips for Getting Kids Hooked on Books

conjuring movie review in english

50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They're 12

  • Game Reviews
  • Best Game Lists

Common Sense Selections for Games

  • Video Reviews of Games

conjuring movie review in english

Nintendo Switch Games for Family Fun

conjuring movie review in english

  • Podcast Reviews
  • Best Podcast Lists

Common Sense Selections for Podcasts

conjuring movie review in english

Parents' Guide to Podcasts

conjuring movie review in english

  • App Reviews
  • Best App Lists

conjuring movie review in english

Social Networking for Teens

conjuring movie review in english

Gun-Free Action Game Apps

conjuring movie review in english

Reviews for AI Apps and Tools

  • YouTube Channel Reviews
  • YouTube Kids Channels by Topic

conjuring movie review in english

Parents' Ultimate Guide to YouTube Kids

conjuring movie review in english

YouTube Kids Channels for Gamers

  • Preschoolers (2-4)
  • Little Kids (5-7)
  • Big Kids (8-9)
  • Pre-Teens (10-12)
  • Teens (13+)
  • Screen Time
  • Social Media
  • Online Safety
  • Identity and Community

conjuring movie review in english

Explaining the News to Our Kids

  • Family Tech Planners
  • Digital Skills
  • All Articles
  • Latino Culture
  • Black Voices
  • Asian Stories
  • Native Narratives
  • LGBTQ+ Pride
  • Best of Diverse Representation List

conjuring movie review in english

Celebrating Black History Month

conjuring movie review in english

Movies and TV Shows with Arab Leads

conjuring movie review in english

Celebrate Hip-Hop's 50th Anniversary

The conjuring, common sense media reviewers.

conjuring movie review in english

Terrifying paranormal horror movie based on a true story.

The Conjuring Poster Image

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this movie.

The characters take on terrifying challenges, work

The Warrens selflessly put themselves in harm's wa

Not much visible death or gore, but what is shown

A married couple is shown to be comfortable with o

Infrequent language includes one "s--t," plus the

A man is shown to be asleep at his desk with an un

Parents need to know that The Conjuring is a truly scary horror movie that's based on a true story about a haunted house, a demon possession, and an exorcism. It's more frightening than gory; no characters die (except a dog), and not much blood is shown, except during an intense demon-possession scene at the…

Positive Messages

The characters take on terrifying challenges, work together, solve problems, and triumph over the odds. They also show empathy for stressed characters in tense situations.

Positive Role Models

The Warrens selflessly put themselves in harm's way to help a family in need. Lorraine, in particular, is in physical danger, but doesn't hesitate to help. They're based on real-life paranormal investigators who apparently helped many people.

Violence & Scariness

Not much visible death or gore, but what is shown is terrifying, life-altering, and not for the faint of heart. The movie's most intense imagery comes from pure terror. The most disturbing sequences occur during the demon possession sequence. There's a great deal of screaming and fighting and some minor gore, such as a woman vomiting blood while wearing a sheet over her head (a red stain suddenly appears on the sheet). A demon scratches a cop's face, with some blood shown. One character (a dog) dies, and characters are sometimes battered around the room by demons.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Violence & Scariness in your kid's entertainment guide.

Sex, Romance & Nudity

A married couple is shown to be comfortable with one another in the bedroom. There's some innuendo around their sex life, such as "christening the new house" and "do it again."

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Sex, Romance & Nudity in your kid's entertainment guide.

Infrequent language includes one "s--t," plus the occasional "goddamn," "damn," "oh my God," and "hell." A character says, "son of a --- " but doesn't finish the phrase.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Language in your kid's entertainment guide.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A man is shown to be asleep at his desk with an unfinished glass of whisky nearby.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Drinking, Drugs & Smoking in your kid's entertainment guide.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that The Conjuring is a truly scary horror movie that's based on a true story about a haunted house, a demon possession, and an exorcism. It's more frightening than gory; no characters die (except a dog), and not much blood is shown, except during an intense demon-possession scene at the climax. But even though it's mostly based on suggestion, the scary stuff is terrifying. Language includes one "s--t" and a few other words but is infrequent. Sex isn't an issue, other than that a married couple is shown to be comfortable with each other in the bedroom (with a little mild innuendo). One character is shown to have drunk some whisky and fallen asleep at his desk. The main characters, Ed and Lorraine Warren, were real-life paranormal investigators. To stay in the loop on more movies like this, you can sign up for weekly Family Movie Night emails .

Where to Watch

Videos and photos.

conjuring movie review in english

Community Reviews

  • Parents say (60)
  • Kids say (320)

Based on 60 parent reviews

Terrifying theme

What's the story.

In THE CONJURING, in the early 1970s, the Perron family -- Roger ( Ron Livingston ), Carolyn ( Lili Taylor ), and their five daughters -- move into a new home in the Rhode Island countryside. Before long, they start encountering strange noises and smells, stopped clocks, slamming doors, and figures lurking in dark corners. So the Perrons approach paranormal investigators Lorraine ( Vera Farmiga ) and Ed Warren ( Patrick Wilson ) for help. The Warrens believe a demon is causing the trouble, and when Carolyn becomes possessed, they must get approval from the church for an exorcism. Unfortunately, Lorraine's clairvoyant abilities have taken quite a toll on her physical strength, and Ed worries that she might not survive their latest adventure.

Is It Any Good?

This horror film provides a treasure trove of typical haunting tricks that seems fresh and terrifying once again. Best known for co-creating Saw , expert horror director James Wan has happily advanced into more sophisticated tales with Insidious and now The Conjuring . Rather than gore, Wan goes for a more old-fashioned, character-based movie here. What's more, Wan plays with the "based on a true story" motif in interesting ways. Rather than remaining stuck on facts, he uses the story in more metaphysical ways, suggesting that both demons (and angels) could actually exist.

The movie's inspired music score is key: it's a collection of edgy, discordant tones that works beautifully with the images. Wan's choice of actors also adds a level of class. Taylor and Farmiga in particular are two of our finest current actresses, and they bring an intense sense of empathy to the screen. Wilson matches them, making it hard not to hope that a series of true-story horror movies based on the Warrens is in horror fans' future.

Talk to Your Kids About ...

Families can talk about The Conjuring 's violence and how it's presented. How much is actually shown? What's scarier -- lots of gore and blood, or "suggested" scares? Why?

What makes this movie scarier or less scary than other horror movies you've seen?

What do you think about the real-life aspects of the movie? Does the movie make you believe in ghosts and demons? Does it make you want to learn more about the Warrens?

Are the Warrens role models? How do they help out the Perron family?

What's the appeal of demon possession/exorcism movies? What do they have to say about the world?

Movie Details

  • In theaters : July 19, 2013
  • On DVD or streaming : October 22, 2013
  • Cast : Lili Taylor , Patrick Wilson , Vera Farmiga
  • Director : James Wan
  • Inclusion Information : Asian directors, Female actors
  • Studio : Warner Bros.
  • Genre : Horror
  • Run time : 112 minutes
  • MPAA rating : R
  • MPAA explanation : sequences of disturbing violence and terror
  • Last updated : April 25, 2024

Did we miss something on diversity?

Research shows a connection between kids' healthy self-esteem and positive portrayals in media. That's why we've added a new "Diverse Representations" section to our reviews that will be rolling out on an ongoing basis. You can help us help kids by suggesting a diversity update.

Suggest an Update

Our editors recommend.

Poltergeist Poster Image

Poltergeist

Want personalized picks for your kids' age and interests?

The Innkeepers

Insidious Poster Image

Best Horror Movies

Scary movies for kids.

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

clock This article was published more than  10 years ago

‘The Conjuring’ movie review

conjuring movie review in english

" The Conjuring " is one heck of a ghost story. Based on the highly scientific DLPG scale — measured by the number of times I looked over my shoulder as I hurried through a Dimly Lit Parking Garage after the movie — it's a well-above-average thriller. If it isn't quite up there with such classics of the genre as " The Haunting " (1963 version, please) or " The Others ," it isn't far behind.

Set in 1971, the story is said to have been inspired by the files of Ed and Lorraine Warren, a husband-and-wife team of paranormal investigators. The action takes place in a 150-year-old Rhode Island farmhouse, where, almost immediately upon moving in, Roger and Carolyn Perron (Ron Livingston and Lili Taylor) and their five daughters start to experience disturbing events.

First the dog won't come inside. Then there's a foul odor, followed by unexplained cold spots, clocks that stop at 3:07 a.m. and miscellaneous visits by things that go bump in the night. Thankfully, there are no bleeding walls, though the movie does bear an obvious debt of gratitude to " The Amityville Horror ," the real-life setting of which was also, coincidentally, investigated by the Warrens. When things get out of control one night — about the time a female poltergeist tries to body slam one of the daughters from the top of a haunted antique wardrobe — the Perrons invite the Warrens over to have a look-see.

As played by Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga, the Warrens bring a sort of deadpan credibility to the admittedly far-fetched goings-on. With their scientific equipment and professional demeanor, they’re more like supernatural termite inspectors than the “demonologists” that they advertise themselves to be. Their characters keep the film grounded, even when it wobbles and threatens to lose its balance.

Fortunately, director James Wan also knows his way around a haunted house. Although "The Conjuring" exploits a melange of fright-inducing techniques — including ones cadged from " The Exorcist " and the " Chucky " movies — it wields them, for the most part, more judiciously than Wan's " Insidious ." That 2010 film started strong before flying way off the handle , with a demon that looked like Darth Maul crossed with Gene Simmons in his Kiss makeup.

There are times when “The Conjuring” itself could use a bit more restraint. Its climax, for instance, involves an amateur Catholic exorcism that makes “The Exorcist,” William Friedkin’s pioneering 1973 possession drama, seem like a documentary. But the scares that the film delivers, if less than bone-chilling or deeply, deeply creepy, are consistently satisfying.

There’s a quote at the end of the film by Ed Warren about the struggle between good and evil. Demons and malevolent spirits, Warren believed, were real and constantly at war with the forces of love and light for our souls. To a large extent, your predisposition to accept or reject this worldview will determine how much of “The Conjuring” you’re willing to swallow. It’s strongly based on Christian theology.

Whatever your belief system, this much is gospel: Movies like “The Conjuring” are less about the battle between God and Satan than the battle between the silly and the scary. In Hollywood, good usually triumphs over evil, if only temporarily. (Gotta leave room for a sequel.) In “The Conjuring,” the scary casts out the spirit of the silly, permanently, and with a vengeance.

R. At area theaters. Contains intense scenes of terror and violence. 112 minutes.

conjuring movie review in english

an image, when javascript is unavailable

The Definitive Voice of Entertainment News

Subscribe for full access to The Hollywood Reporter

site categories

‘the conjuring: the devil made me do it’: film review.

Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga return as paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren, wrestling once again with demonic possession and satanic curses in the seventh film in the 'Conjuring' universe.

By David Rooney

David Rooney

Chief Film Critic

  • Share this article on Facebook
  • Share this article on Twitter
  • Share this article on Flipboard
  • Share this article on Email
  • Show additional share options
  • Share this article on Linkedin
  • Share this article on Pinit
  • Share this article on Reddit
  • Share this article on Tumblr
  • Share this article on Whatsapp
  • Share this article on Print
  • Share this article on Comment

THE CONJURING: THE DEVIL MADE ME DO IT

James Wan ’s 2013 haunted house spine-tingler The Conjuring  kick-started a $1 billion horror franchise — one of the most lucrative and popular series in recent history. Digging into the sensational case files of real-life paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren, the director dialed up the dread with a thrilling command of atmosphere, a bewitching bag of ‘70s-style practical effects, a balance of familiar tropes with the power of suggestion and an attention to character that’s too often lacking in the genre. His sequel jumped from New England to working-class North London and remained mostly effective by making us care about the family in peril and share the anxieties of the compassionate couple who come to their aid.

Related Stories

'lord of the rings' anime feature, dc's 'creature commandos' set for warner bros. presentation at annecy, peter jackson working on new 'lord of the rings' films for warner bros., targeting 2026 debut.

But even in that 2016 follow-up, relative narrative simplicity had begun to cede ground to chaotic clutter, a weakness that steadily hobbles the third entry after a promising start that will have you jumping out of your seat.

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

Release date : Friday, June 4 Cast : Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Ruairi O’Connor, Sarah Catherine Hook, Julian Hilliard, John Noble Director : Michael Chaves Screenwriter : David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick; story by James Wan, Johnson-McGoldrick, based on characters created by Chad Hayes, Carey W. Hayes

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It is the seventh film in the “Conjuring Universe,” and regrettably, it takes its cue not from the predecessors with which it shares a title but from the less sophisticated spinoffs — the three Annabelle movies and The Nun . Like those films, this one offers plenty of lurid fun and some genuine scares. But the grounding in dark spirituality that made the previous entries focused on the Warrens so compelling gets diluted, despite the reliably dignifying double-act of Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson .

Part of that seems due to Wan handing off directing reins to Michael Chaves, whose feature debut, The Curse of La Llorona , was tenuously connected to the Conjuring world though with none of the nuance. An even bigger issue is the work of solo screenwriter David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick, who collaborated with Wan on The Conjuring 2 and Aquaman . While Wan shares a story credit, the absence of original scripters Chad and Carey W. Hayes is felt in the failure to build out the plot from a solid center.

The powerful emotional bond between Ed and Lorraine, and the united integrity they bring to their fight against evil have always been the heart of the Conjuring movies. Here, that element is spelled out in a sentimental flashback to the origins of their romance, echoed later in syrupy dialogue about dark forces believing love is their weakness when it’s their strength. Johnson-McGoldrick keeps hurrying Ed and Lorraine off on increasingly murky supernatural tangents, resulting in too many busy elements fighting for attention. By the time they pin down the source of all the evil — think the farmer’s wife from Grant Wood’s American Gothic with a hint of Geraldine Chaplin — the movie has spiraled into silly excess.

That’s too bad, because the opening sequence is a ripper. It’s 1981 and the Warrens have been called to document the exorcism of 8-year-old David Glatzel (Julian Hilliard). The officiating priest (Steve Coulter) arrives just in time to witness the kid going full-tilt Regan, calling for an urgent intervention on the kitchen table. Accompanied by the nerve-shredding roar of Joseph Bishara’s score and some tasty visual homages to the William Friedkin classic, the scene is an assault on the senses that induces a major heart attack in Ed as the inhuman spirit jumps from David to his older sister’s boyfriend, Arne Johnson (Ruairi O’Connor).

Oddly, only Ed seems to have noticed that transference and by the time he regains consciousness in hospital, it’s too late to warn anyone about Arne, whose sleep has been troubled and his waking hours plagued by startling visions. At the boarding kennels where Arne’s girlfriend Debbie (Sarah Catherine Hook) works, Blondie’s “Call Me” blasts from the stereo and the dogs are barking like hellhounds as Arne loses control. Soon after, he’s found by a cop wandering along the road drenched in blood, muttering, “I think I hurt someone.” With the support of the Warrens, his case becomes the first American murder trial to claim demonic possession as a defense.

So far so blood-curdlingly good. But the deeper the Warrens delve into the history of David Glatzel’s possession and similar mysteries connecting back to a satanic curse passed on through macabre totems and the home-furnishing felony of the waterbed, the more contrived Johnson-McGoldrick’s screenplay becomes. While the fictional developments reportedly are composites of actual interactions Lorraine Warren had over the years, the pile-up of supernatural mayhem becomes numbingly preposterous.

Ed’s medical condition sidelines Wilson from the physical action for much of the running time, making Lorraine’s clairvoyant gifts the investigative key, more so than in earlier installments. Watching Farmiga front and center is always rewarding, though as Lorraine drifts in and out of all-too-real visions of evil in her matronly blouses and headmistress hairdo, she starts to seem like a psychic Miss Marple. (It’s admirable that costumer Leah Butler honors the real Lorraine’s personal style, but it seems unfair to mortify Farmiga with flouncy frills while Wilson’s Ed gets groovy retro polo shirts and flattering dad suits.)

The movie starts seriously going over the edge when Ed and Lorraine break into a morgue at night and find themselves in reanimated company. Revelations concerning a retired priest known for his occult research (John Noble) tip it even further into overwrought genre bunkum. Are we really still doing horror movies where someone flips through a Renaissance witchcraft text and says something dumb like, “My Latin is rusty?”

Through all this, Arne seems frequently forgotten — a shame, since lean and haunted O’Connor has a striking screen presence. Arne languishes in a prison right out of the Ryan Murphy school of stylistic overstatement, ravaged from within and regularly rattled as the originator of the curse gets closer to claiming his life. I did chuckle at one ghoulish manifestation sitting up in the medical ward droning Blondie lyrics at him. But Arne’s big levitation finale competes with The Ed and Lorraine Show across town, sapping the tension from both. It doesn’t enhance the gravity to have confused Debbie ask, Scary Movie -style, “Honey, what are you doing?” as Arne spider-walks off the bed in rubber-limbed contortions amid a storm of flying debris.

In terms of craftsmanship, The Devil Made Me Do It is certainly slick. DP Michael Burgess’ camera adopts unnerving angles and prowls insidiously through one sepulchral-looking space after another, and the groaning soundscape works in tandem with Bishara’s big scary-ass score to creep under the audience’s skin. But the palpitating storytelling loses its way while trying to do the same.

Full credits

Distributor: Warner Bros./HBO Max Production companies: New Line Cinema, Atomic Monster, The Safran Company Cast: Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Ruairi O’Connor, Sarah Catherine Hook, Julian Hilliard, John Noble, Eugenie Bondurant, Shannon Kook, Keith Arthur Bolden, Steve Coulter, Vince Pisani, Sterling Jerins, Paul Wilson, Charlene Amoia, Paul Wilson, Ingrid Bisu, Andrea Andrade, Ronnie Gene Blevins Director: Michael Chaves Screenwriter: David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick; story by James Wan, Johnson-McGoldrick, based on characters created by Chad Hayes, Carey W. Hayes Producers: James Wan, Peter Safran Executive producers: Richard Brener, Dave Neustadter, Victoria Palmeri, Michael Clear, Judson Scott, Michelle Morrissey Director of photography: Michael Burgess Production designer: Jennifer Spence Costume designer: Leah Butler Music: Joseph Bishara Editors: Peter Gvozdas, Christian Wagner Sound designers: Jon Title, D. Chris Smith, Doobie White Visual effects producer: Eric Bruneau Visual effects supervisor: Robert Nederhorst Casting: Anne McCarthy, Kellie Roy

THR Newsletters

Sign up for THR news straight to your inbox every day

More from The Hollywood Reporter

Luke evans, milla jovovich sci-fi action film ‘world-breaker’ goes to signature for u.k. (exclusive), why willem dafoe knows “the a to z of cannes emotions”, can ‘furiosa’ keep warner bros.’ festival hot streak alive, tribeca adds ‘despicable me 4,’ hannah einbinder stand-up special and roger federer, wnba docs, ‘supergirl’ movie lands june 2026 release in theaters, ‘megalopolis’ executive producer responds to report that francis ford coppola kissed extras on set.

Quantcast

The Conjuring Review

Conjuring, The

02 Aug 2013

112 minutes

Conjuring, The

James Wan arrived on the horror scene in 2004 with the original Saw, but while the Jigsaw killer continued through six trap-happily tortuous sequels, Wan himself largely left gore behind in his own follow-up projects. Dead Silence channelled the ventriloquist dummy scares of the likes of Dead Of Night, The Twilight Zone and Magic, while Insidious riffed on the haunted house. But where the latter veered off into the loonier territory of further dimensions and string-puppet demons, The Conjuring is a more straight-ahead take on well-worn ghost story tropes. It’s at once eerily familiar and devastatingly effective. It would feel like Wan drawing a classy line under the horror phase of his career (he’s off to direct Fast & Furious 7 next) if Insidious: Chapter 2 were not due shortly afterwards.

“Based on a true story” (of course), The Conjuring involves real-life supernatural investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren, who were involved in the Amityville saga (and were convinced it wasn’t a hoax). Like 1979’s The Amityville Horror and its many sequels, imitators and progenitors, Wan’s film sees a family (the Perrons; cry for them) moving into a new old home in which various historical traumas — child murders, witch trials — are manifesting as spooky phenomena. The Conjuring fills its exhausting run-time with a cauldron of stirred echoes from any number of its similarly-themed predecessors: a period 1970s setting; doors that open and close on their own; things under the bed; a dog that won’t enter the house; crawl spaces; a cellar; a doll; a music box; ghosts; possessions; exorcisms; secrets uncovered. Even the bird-strike set-piece has unfortunately already been seen this year, in the inferior Dark Skies (with which The Conjuring shares composer Joseph Bishara).

Yet rather than feeling stale, these ingredients in Wan’s hands combine into a classic, classical horror: you get the feeling that this must finally be the film Lili Taylor hoped Jan de Bont’s 1999 remake of The Haunting would be. Played absolutely straight, the performances are uniformly effective and affecting, whether from Taylor, Ron Livingston, Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson as the couples on either side of the spectral divide (Wilson is also in both Insidiouses — Insidii?), or Mackenzie Foy, Joey King, Hayley McFarland, Shanley Caswell and Kyla Deaver as the Perrons’ five beleaguered daughters. The supporting cast are strong too, down to the doll-bothered girlfriends who open the film with a largely unconnected prologue.

The Conjuring revels in great scares well placed: a witch on a wardrobe and a clapping game of hide-and-seek being particularly nerve-jangling examples. The paranormal activity here is about more than the occasional loud noise, however. It’s a cliché to call the house a character in the film, but suffice to say the production design is impeccable enough to render every nook and cranny both homely and dangerous. Regular Wan collaborator John R. Leonetti’s cinematography too is particularly worthy of mention, painting American Gothic textures on both interiors and exteriors, and rendering the difficult moments with a terrible beauty that only emphasises their ugliness. The slow reveal that there are different spirits with different agendas at work in the house is masterfully handled, and even the lurch into screaming exorcist territory feels like a natural crescendo rather than an onslaught of overwrought effects.

Related Articles

Vera Farmiga

Movies | 10 01 2021

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

Movies | 26 10 2020

Tenet

Movies | 20 07 2020

Annabelle Wallis

Movies | 21 08 2019

Toy Story 4

Movies | 30 06 2019

Annabelle Comes Home

Movies | 28 05 2019

James Wan, Lindsey Beer

Movies | 16 05 2019

The Curse Of La Llorona

Movies | 21 04 2019

THE CONJURING Review

The Conjuring review. Matt reviews James Wan's The Conjuring starring Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Lili Taylor, Joey King, and Ron Livingston.

Director James Wan and I have a disagreement on the meaning of the word "malevolent."  His new film, The Conjuring , features an opening crawl that says the events we're about to see are based on the true story of the most malevolent case in the files of paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren.  The case is so sinister that it's been kept secret until now.  With this kind of billing, I expect something truly horrific and upsetting.  But for Wan, "malevolent" is the equivalent of demons pulling supernatural tricks on a helpless family.  The film features excellent performances and thoughtful cinematography that evokes the time period of the story, but Wan's definition of horror continues to rely on stale spooky images.  His strongest asset is the Warrens, but the malevolence on display becomes redundant and annoying until the third act when Wan is finally able to tap in to true terror.

In 1971 in Harrisville, Rhode Island, the Perron Family began experiencing strange and unsettling phenomenon at a home they bought at auction.  Primarily, the women of the house, mother Carolyn ( Lili Taylor ) and daughters Cynthia ( Mackenzie Foy ), Christine ( Joey King ), Nancy ( Haley McFarland ), and Andrea ( Shanley Caswell ) begin noticing strange sounds, phantoms, banging doors, and a variety of other occurrences that seem like irritating pranks.  Eventually, the unexplained phenomenon becomes too much for the Perrons to bear, and Carolyn seeks out the help of Ed Warren ( Patrick Wilson ), a certified demonologist recognized by the Catholic Church, and his wife Lorraine ( Vera Farmiga ), a clairvoyant.  The Warrens come to the home to find the source of the disturbance, and dispel the "inhuman spirit" before it claims the family.

The Conjuring could almost play as a spin-off of Wan's last film, Insidious .  A family, particularly the mother, is continually startled by ghostly imagery.  The family calls on the help of someone who can communicate with the other side, and that person comes with a team and equipment to monitor the paranormal activity ( Conjuring has the nice touch of going lo-tech with old film cameras, big microphones, and flashbulb photography triggered by temperature drops or trip wires).  Also like Insidious , Wan isn't content with just one ghoul, and goes with a more-is-better philosophy rather than trying to develop a single antagonist with a clear personality.  He also features old horror standbys like creepy dolls, a decomposing old woman/witch, birds flying at the windows, and plenty of jump scares.  Wan knows how to build tension and jolt his audience, but he can't truly unsettle us because we've seen almost everything in his bag of tricks.  When birds started ramming into the house, my immediate response was, "Thank you, Mr. Wan.  I too have seen The Birds ."

By employing these old devices, the "malevolence" lacks power because Wan can never take us beyond the comfort of what we've already seen before, and a creepy doll doesn't build stakes.  It's a creepy doll.  The last thing horror movies should do is pacify the audience.  We fear what we don't understand, but we've seen other horror movies, and so we almost always know what Wan is ready to throw at us.  Although The Conjuring is terrific at evoking the 1970s and the horror movies of the time period, the scares don't feel classic, but tired.  It doesn't matter that this is based on "true events".  As a horror story, we've seen this before, and we saw it from Wan only three years ago when Insidious came out.

The only thing keeping The Conjuring from feeling completely stale are the Warrens.  They're intriguing figures not only because of the great performances from Wilson and Farmiga, but because they're willing to be skeptical.  If the problem is bad pipes and loose floorboards, they'll say so.  They're not scam artists or people who have bought into their own bullshit.  Wan clearly establishes them as the real deal, and they give the Perrons’ haunting some much-needed gravitas as the script gets painfully redundant with the inhuman spirit constantly annoying the family by closing doors, locking them in rooms, throwing pictures off the wall, and other mischievous activity that's supposed to break down their mental barriers.  We can understand why the Perrons would be terrified, but we rarely share their terror because, again, we’ve already visited this haunted house.

If anyone comes out of The Conjuring showing they're afraid, it’s Wan.  He's a director who doesn't push his audience into the unexpected.  His technical execution is solid, and he has a good sense of atmosphere, but the room is always filled with the same toys.  There are brief moments when The Conjuring breaks free of the familiar and Wan can terrify us with something we didn't see coming (unfortunately, one of the trailers spoiled what could have been among the best scares in the movie).  But most of the time, we know what's going to make us jump, but the director doesn't know how to make us feel dread.  I hope one day Wan faces his fears, and abandons the exhausted imagery and clichés that permeate his horror films.

Log in or sign up for Rotten Tomatoes

Trouble logging in?

By continuing, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from the Fandango Media Brands .

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes and to receive email from the Fandango Media Brands .

By creating an account, you agree to the Privacy Policy and the Terms and Policies , and to receive email from Rotten Tomatoes.

Email not verified

Let's keep in touch.

Rotten Tomatoes Newsletter

Sign up for the Rotten Tomatoes newsletter to get weekly updates on:

  • Upcoming Movies and TV shows
  • Trivia & Rotten Tomatoes Podcast
  • Media News + More

By clicking "Sign Me Up," you are agreeing to receive occasional emails and communications from Fandango Media (Fandango, Vudu, and Rotten Tomatoes) and consenting to Fandango's Privacy Policy and Terms and Policies . Please allow 10 business days for your account to reflect your preferences.

OK, got it!

Movies / TV

No results found.

  • What's the Tomatometer®?
  • Login/signup

conjuring movie review in english

Movies in theaters

  • Opening this week
  • Top box office
  • Coming soon to theaters
  • Certified fresh movies

Movies at home

  • Fandango at Home
  • Netflix streaming
  • Prime Video
  • Most popular streaming movies
  • What to Watch New

Certified fresh picks

  • Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes Link to Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes
  • The Fall Guy Link to The Fall Guy
  • The Last Stop in Yuma County Link to The Last Stop in Yuma County

New TV Tonight

  • Interview With the Vampire: Season 2
  • Spacey Unmasked: Season 1
  • After the Flood: Season 1
  • Bridgerton: Season 3
  • Outer Range: Season 2
  • The Big Cigar: Season 1
  • Harry Wild: Season 3
  • The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon: Season 11.1
  • RuPaul's Drag Race: All Stars: Season 9
  • The Killing Kind: Season 1

Most Popular TV on RT

  • Dark Matter: Season 1
  • Bodkin: Season 1
  • Baby Reindeer: Season 1
  • Doctor Who: Season 1
  • Fallout: Season 1
  • A Man in Full: Season 1
  • Blood of Zeus: Season 2
  • The Sympathizer: Season 1
  • Thank You, Next: Season 1
  • Sugar: Season 1
  • Best TV Shows
  • Most Popular TV
  • TV & Streaming News

Certified fresh pick

  • Interview With the Vampire: Season 2 Link to Interview With the Vampire: Season 2
  • All-Time Lists
  • Binge Guide
  • Comics on TV
  • Five Favorite Films
  • Video Interviews
  • Weekend Box Office
  • Weekly Ketchup
  • What to Watch

300 Best Movies of All Time

25 Most Popular TV Shows Right Now: What to Watch on Streaming

Asian-American Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander Heritage

What to Watch: In Theaters and On Streaming

TV Premiere Dates 2024

Pixar Employees Reveal Their Secret Voice Acting Identity

  • Trending on RT
  • Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes
  • The Last Stop in Yuma County
  • TV Premiere Dates

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

Where to watch.

Watch The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It with a subscription on Max, rent on Fandango at Home, Prime Video, or buy on Fandango at Home, Prime Video.

What to Know

The Devil Made Me Do It represents a comedown for the core Conjuring films, although Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson keep the audience invested.

It may not contain many surprises for fans of the franchise, but this threequel more than makes up for it with another scary, tense adventure for the ghostbusting Warrens.

Critics Reviews

Audience reviews, cast & crew.

Michael Chaves

Patrick Wilson

Vera Farmiga

Lorraine Warren

Ruairi O'Connor

Arne Cheyenne Johnson

Sarah Catherine Hook

Debbie Glatzel

Julian Hilliard

David Glatzel

More Like This

Movie news & guides, this movie is featured in the following articles..

The Conjuring (Movie Review)

Colin's rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ½ director: james wan | release date: 2013.

There’s a valuable lesson contained in The Conjuring , director James Wan’s 70s-era spook-fest about the Perrons, a family whose new home has a dark history. Before you buy or rent a residence, take a dog through it. If the dog cowers in fear at the threshold, scratch that place off your list with confidence. This is how Sadie, the Perrons’ pooch, reacts during move-in day, making it seem like a canine consultation during the open house could’ve saved everyone lot of trouble.

Besides being a handy source of real estate tips, The Conjuring  is also one heck of a tense, if formulaic, movie. At first glance, those two things don’t seem to jive. After all, how tense can a movie really be if it follows closely to the tracks laid down by those films which came before it? Behold, the majesty of James Wan. The man plays with audiences’ emotions and expectations with ease, overseeing the proceedings like a deranged conductor. His skill at building scares, and some above-average performances, are chiefly responsible for rising The Conjuring  above its derivative plotting.

Wan’s movie gets its claws in early, dropping viewers in the middle of the story of Annabelle, a demonic doll who runs afoul of paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson, his magnificent sideburns, and Vera Farmiga). Aside from being arguably the film’s most frightening sequence, the Annabelle scenes also work as a microcosm for the film as a whole. The notion of a creepy doll moving on its own and coming back despite being thrown out is hardly groundbreaking. Still, in Wan’s hands, these well-traveled tropes shine once again.

After they wrap up with Annabelle, the Warrens turn to the Perrons, who’ve been having a tough time since their move. The mom (Lili Taylor) is covered in anomalous bruises, whimsical family games have been invaded by unseen entities, and the youngest daughter has an invisible new friend. Soon that all spirals into a whole thing about a demon and a witch’s curse. Perfect fodder for the Warrens.

Annabelle aside, the sequence that may best illustrate what Wan and company are up to involves the Perrons’ second youngest daughter, Christine (Joey King). She wakes up in the middle of the night after feeling something tugging on her leg. She investigates under her bed and eventually spots the culprit standing near her bedroom door. Her tormentor remains invisible to us, the audience, leaving our imaginations free to interpret her babbling, terror-struck description as they see fit. It’s an excruciating sequence, built on excellent selling by King and disorienting camera work, and it illustrates Wan’s gift for knowing when to show audiences something, when to hit us with an audio jolt, and when to let us scare ourselves.

The Conjuring  claims to be based on true events, but the cold truth is that story is its weakest component. Arguments over authenticity aside, most of what the Perrons encounter feels very “been there, screamed at that.” What makes The Conjuring  special, and worth re-watching are the persistent scares Wan and company elegantly deliver. 

Contributor

Colin is a long time fan of horror movies, books and TV shows. Thanks to a childhood viewing of "The Shining," he still always checks behind the shower curtain ... just in case.

  • Colin's Profile

Check It Out

Primal scream: exploring horror from a mental health lens.

Natalie, a licensed clinical psychologist, looks at what your favorite horror films get right (and wrong) about mental health.

In-Extremis: Legal Analysis of Horror

Are you interested in the legal implications of your favorite horror films for strictly educational purposes? Have you met our friend Adam?

Play Along With Our Horror Movie Drinking Games!

One Thursday a month, Sophie lays out the rules for a horror film drinking game! Browse our past entires and be on the look out for new ones.

Movies Like The Conjuring

The entity (1981).

  • The Podcast

conjuring movie review in english

Together Let's Promote Horror

Together Let's Promote Horror

To avoid fainting, keep repeating 'it's only kendall reviews...it's only kendall reviews...', {movie review} the conjuring: the devil made me do it.

7th June 2021 Gavin Kendall Reviews Horror Promo , Kendall Reviews Movies 0

conjuring movie review in english

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

112 Minutes •  Rated R

Starring Patrick Wilson • Vera Farmiga • Ruairi O’Connor

Story by James Wan and David Leslie Johnson – McGoldrick

Screenplay by David Leslie Johnson – McGoldrick

Directed by Michael Chaves

conjuring movie review in english

Review by D. S. Ullery

Before I get to the actual review, I’m going to address something that’s been hovering over the entire The Conjuring franchise since James Wan’s brilliant original was released in 2013: The actual history of Demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren.

For every statement of praise these movies receive on social media, there’s always some retort posted informing everyone the Warrens are con artists and these movies are an exercise in shame for painting a pair of frauds in a positive light.

I can’t offer any insight into that aspect of this cinematic universe. I know of the Warrens and I’ve read about their work, but I wasn’t there and I don’t know them personally. Any opinions in their favor or against them are based on experiences I wasn’t personally a witness to, so as an objective, critical observer, I approach the films the same way I would the Amityville Horror flicks: Perhaps they began with a grain of real-world inspiration, but it’s pretty obvious they used that to create a mostly fictitious, heavily dramatized series of motion pictures meant for entertainment value.

So my approach when evaluating these movies isn’t to go into them ready to shred them apart because I have contempt for the real Ed and Lorraine Warren. I don’t. I’m apathetic towards them. Consequently, I view these strictly through the prism of their quality as horror cinema.

One final observation on this topic before I get on with it: I find it ludicrous there are people who shamed The Conjuring and its first sequel for depicting the lives of the Warrens, then jumped online and demanded Jeepers Creepers 3 be made/released, despite the director of that film having been convicted of paedophilia. If people are so willing to separate the art from the artist in that capacity, it seems reasonable to afford this franchise the same regard. Just some food for thought.

On with the review.

As horror movies, The Conjuring films are, in my opinion, the best of the best in the subgenre of paranormal/haunting stories. The original was the movie that finally knocked Tobe Hooper’s superb Poltergeist out of the number one spot on my list of all-time greats of this type. I was more than a little surprised to discover that I found the sequel to be an even better film a few years later.

Much of that has to do with the skilful direction of James Wan, who guided both films with an assured sense of purpose, delivering strong storytelling while providing memorable scares. The films also enjoyed a tremendous boost from the perfectly cast Patrick Wilson ( one of my favorite actors working today) and Vera Farmiga as, respectively, Ed and Lorraine Warren. It’s these two characters who provide these movies with their soul as we follow their love affair through the terrifying experiences they face while helping people besieged by evil, otherworldly forces.

Adversely, I am not a fan of the Conjuring spin-off universe. I‘ve found the spin-off films lacking in the grace, style and wit of the two core movies about the Warrens.

When I learned James Wan wouldn’t be returning to direct the third film in the original series (which dropped the standard “3” in the title for the far more compelling The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It ) and would be replaced by The Curse of La Llorona helmsman Michael Chaves, I was disheartened. Second sequels ( or threequels, if you prefer) often have a history of being the moment when a franchise starts its downward slide in quality.

To learn a talent as gifted as James Wan would be replaced by a man whose only existing feature credit up to that point was my least favorite film in the entire Conjuring cinematic universe did not instill in me a great amount of confidence. After researching the response to this news by other fans online, I knew I wasn’t alone in my apprehension.

Well, you can put your mind at ease, horror fans. Chaves apparently learned a lot between projects, because he’s delivered a solid sequel that stands on its own as a commendable, worthy addition to the franchise.

The film opens in 1981, with Ed and Lorraine Warren performing an exorcism on an eight-year-old boy named David Glatzel in his family home. It’s an electrifying opening sequence that’s equal parts absorbing and scary as hell. Things go sideways fast and spiral out of control, resulting in Ed suffering a nearly fatal heart attack in the middle of the chaos. This leads to witness Arne Johnson (an outstanding Ruairi O’Connor) – the boyfriend of David’s older sister Debbie- interceding and demanding the demonic force leave the boy and enter him.

It seems to work. Ed is transported to the hospital and life for the Glatzels returns to normal for a few days.

Then Arne begins to experience strange phenomena, such as shadows skittering across otherwise empty rooms and objects moving by themselves in his presence. This culminates in a confrontation with a dark force, resulting in something evil taking up residence inside of him.

Not long after, Johnson and Debbie Glatzel (an immensely likeable Sarah Katherine Hook) find themselves at the boarding house where they live and she works, helping the landlord/her boss fix his stereo. The malevolent force begins to twist Arne’s perception and, before long, the landlord is dead, having been stabbed by Johnson 22 times.

The police arrest Johnson and a frightened Debbie approaches the Warrens for help. Vera is initially reluctant, as Ed is still recovering from his heart attack, but they eventually decide they can’t turn someone in need away. They conduct a test on the accused and quickly realize that whatever force may have compelled him to commit murder is gone. However, Ed witnessed Johnson inviting the demon in to save David while his heart was failing during the earlier exorcism, so he knows something was inside of the young man at some point.

Thus begins the Warrens’ involvement in what would come to be known in very real headlines across America as “The Demon Murder Case” – the first court trial where the plea of the defendant was not guilty by reason of demonic possession.

If you think I’ve given away too much, believe me, I haven’t. Everything I just described is merely the set-up for the true meat of the story, which is the investigation into the case and the terrifying discoveries the Warrens make regarding its direct connection to a local cult.

The cast is excellent across the board. Wilson and Farmiga have never been better and the story this time around allows us a glimpse into how they first met. Their devotion to one another is front and center and their amazing chemistry sells it. In many ways, The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It is as much a love story as it is a horror thriller.

O’Connor is excellent as Arne Johnson, as is Hook as Debbie. It’s a strength of the film that we’re allowed to empathize with what this young couple are going through. There’s a moment late in the movie where Johnson is in his cell and he’s attempting to defend himself from what he knows is an impending demonic onslaught. It struck me during this scene the film had done such a terrific job of establishing him as a relatable character that what was going on had emotional stakes.

Screenwriter David Leslie Johnson – McGoldrick delivers what turned out to be my personal favorite narrative of the three films, working from a story credited to himself and James Wan (Wan is also on hand as a producer, so he was still involved creatively with the project on some level). I loved the writing in this is the way Johnson – McGoldrick slips moments of genuine wit into the movie. A terrific example of this is a scene wherein Ed, Lorraine and Debbie are staring down into a dark, creepy storm cellar, knowing someone has to go down to investigate. Ed doesn’t want his wife going in, but Lorraine refuses to allow her recovering husband to do it, so she tells Ed to hold her purse as she takes the initiative. It’s a funny, unexpectedly warm moment that grows naturally out of what we know about the characters and it works. There a number of moments like that (a conversation about Elvis springs to mind). These movies may not be comedies, but that doesn’t mean there can’t be humor. Johnson – McGoldrick understands that.

Joseph Bisharsa – who composed the music for the first two – returns, utilizing familiar thematic motifs from the previous films while adding a unique, eerie ambience to the proceedings. Bishara always delivers top-notch scores for his projects and this is no exception.

Huge kudos as well to cinematographer Michael Burgess, who uses the visual pallette to create a persistently spooky, ominous atmosphere. From showers full of blood, to the cold indifference of a morgue and into some creepy underground tunnels, his camera masterfully paints each scene with colorful layers of dread.

But the revelation here has to be Michael Chaves, who surprised me with his solid handling of this material. I really didn’t like The Curse of La Llorona and, as I watched this film, I was astonished they share a director.

Chaves has a real eye for knowing how to set up a scare, and as the film progresses, he mounts some of the best-sustained sequences of the trilogy to date, including my favorite, a late-night visit by Ed and Lorraine to a county morgue that blurs the line between reality and Lorraine’s visions with a degree of skill I haven’t seen onscreen since Wes Craven’s original A Nightmare on Elm Street. If Wan chooses not to return again and they want to tap Chaves for the next outing, I’m all in. I feel he redeemed himself here and proved he has the chops for the job.

Having made those observations, I will say there are two factors that work against The Devil Made Me Do It . They’re the reason that – while I genuinely enjoyed the film and think it’s definitely better than most other paranormal flicks out there- I think it falls just shy of the high bar set by its predecessors.

One is the heavy reliance on jump scares in the first half of the film.

Look, I love jump scares. I don’t agree with the acrimony towards them that seems to have developed in the horror community. Some of the most memorable moments in horror film history are jump scares. When they’re executed properly (and, for the most part, the ones in this film are) they can be brilliant.

But for a little while there, it seemed as if this movie was going for the jump shock every few scenes, including one eye-rolling moment where they even set up Debbie entering the frame as a jump scare. That can only go on so long before it begins to be a distraction and, yeah, that kind of happens here. The film is fortunate both the story and characters are so compelling as to make it worth staying with. If it had failed on either of those levels, this would have been downright irritating.

Wisely, this is balanced out as the investigation begins to deepen and they learn what’s happening with the Glatzels and Johnson may be connected to other crimes. At this point, the film slides back into the style of the first two, moving away from the jump scares into longer, more sustained sequences designed to further immerse us in the story and cultivate tension, maintaining this approach until the final credit roll.

The other thing I have an issue with is the “based on a true story” line. They need to just stop this. It worked with the first film because that one was still relatively grounded in its approach to the Perron haunting, one of the most well-documented, real-world paranormal cases on record (ironically, the actual case involved purported events even more intense than what made it into the film).

But right around the time the Crooked Man showed up in The Conjuring 2, it became blatantly obvious we’re a long, long way from any chance these events actually took place. This new entry takes us even further away from the possibility these stories are anything but the creation of the screenwriter.

The Demon Murder Case did happen. Arne Johnson did kill his landlord. The Warrens did investigate it. A plea of not guilty by reason of demonic possession was entered. That’s about as much reality as this film can lay claim to. I have absolutely no doubt that, in all other regards, this is a work of complete fiction. Moving forward, the studio should just go with “This film is a work of fiction inspired by an actual case.” These are terrific horror films, so just let them work as terrific horror films. Stop trying to sell them as something they’re not.

Despite a reliance on jump scares in the first half and a bewildering determination to keep selling these films as true stories, The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It acquits itself as an effective entry in what I consider the best paranormal horror series out there. It does suffer a bit in comparison to the pair of outstanding motion pictures that came before it, but I’d still put it a cut above just about any other film of it is type. I had a lot of fun with this one and I think most fans of the series will as well.

Smart, scary and given a strong emotional boost by the ongoing love affair between the two still extremely lovable protagonists at the center of it all, The Conjuring The Devil Made Me Do It rates a well-deserved **** out of ***** stars.

Highly recommended.

  • D.S. Ullery

conjuring movie review in english

D. S. Ullery is a cartoonist and an author of short Horror fiction. He’s published two single-author collections and his ongoing comic panel Goulash can be found on Webtoons Canvas. An Affiliate Member of the Horror Writers Association, D.S. resides in South Florida, where he shares an apartment with a reasonably unstable feline named Jason, a black cat born on Friday the 13th.

You can read D.S’s ongoing comedy/horror comic series Goulash   HERE

You can buy  Highway 181 , Duane’s most recent horror collection  HERE

conjuring movie review in english

Share this:

  • David Leslie Johnson - McGoldrick
  • Kendall Reviews
  • Michael Chaves
  • Movie Review
  • Patrick Wilson
  • The Conjuring
  • The Devil Made Me Do It
  • Vera Farmiga

Be the first to comment

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

Copyright © 2024 | WordPress Theme by MH Themes

Thanks For Rating

Reminder successfully set, select a city.

  • Nashik Times
  • Aurangabad Times
  • Badlapur Times

You can change your city from here. We serve personalized stories based on the selected city

  • Edit Profile
  • Briefs Movies TV Web Series Lifestyle Trending Medithon Visual Stories Music Events Videos Theatre Photos Gaming

Bollywood actors who changed their real name

Saif Ali Khan to Rajinikanth: Bollywood Actors Who Changed Their Real Name

When Maheep spoke about Sanjay having no work

When Maheep Kapoor spoke about husband Sanjay Kapoor having no work: Money was tight, we were the unsuccessful Kapoor

Video: Kajol shows off her crocheting skills

Video: Kajol shows off her crocheting skills as she gets her hair and make-up ready

When celebs ditched glam for public transport

From Taapsee to Salman: When Bollywood celebs ditched glam for public transport

Kangana Ranaut declares assets worth Rs 91 Cr

Kangana Ranaut declares assets worth Rs 91 Crore as she files nomination for Lok Sabha Elections; says win will be 'biggest turning point'

Seo Ye Ji interacts withfans

'It's Okay to Not Be Okay' actress Seo Ye Ji surprises fans with rare social media interaction

  • Movie Reviews

Movie Listings

conjuring movie review in english

Boonie Bears: Mumma Ki...

conjuring movie review in english

The Sabarmati Report

conjuring movie review in english

Desh Ke Gaddar

conjuring movie review in english

Auron Mein Kahan Dum T...

conjuring movie review in english

Rosy Maam I Love You

conjuring movie review in english

GV Prakash Kumar and Saindhavi’s evergreen romantic songs

conjuring movie review in english

Unseen BTS pictures of 'KGF: Chapter 1' starring Yash

conjuring movie review in english

Keerthy Suresh's Summer Saree Style Steals the Fashion Game Away

conjuring movie review in english

Dreamy allure in Sunny Leone's fairytale gowns

conjuring movie review in english

​Aditi Balan like a diva in sparkling outfits​

conjuring movie review in english

What Sobhitha Dhulipala should wear for her Cannes debut?

conjuring movie review in english

Parul Thakur's stunning pics in white

conjuring movie review in english

Sobhitha looks mindblowing in her white outfit

conjuring movie review in english

Malaika Arora looks like total showstopper in little black dress with matching tulle cape

Srikanth

Pyar Ke Do Naam

WOMB: Women Of My Billion

WOMB: Women Of My Billi...

Gabru Gang

Main Ladega

Ruslaan

Luv You Shankar

Do Aur Do Pyaar

Do Aur Do Pyaar

Appu

Kaam Chalu Hai

Uyir Thamizhukku

Uyir Thamizhukku

Star

Aranmanai 4

Ninnu Vilaiyadu

Ninnu Vilaiyadu

Akkaran

Kurangu Pedal

Rathnam

Finder: Project 1

Krishnamma

Aa Okkati Adakku

Prasanna Vadanam

Prasanna Vadanam

Paarijatha Parvam

Paarijatha Parvam

Tenant

Inti Number 13

Family Star

Family Star

Tillu Square

Tillu Square

Babu: No.1 Bullshit Guy

Babu: No.1 Bullshit Guy

Om Bheem Bush

Om Bheem Bush

Marivillin Gopurangal

Marivillin Gopurangal

Perumani

Malayalee From India

Pavi Caretaker

Pavi Caretaker

Jai Ganesh

Varshangalkku Shesham

The Goat Life

The Goat Life

Jananam 1947 Pranayam Thudarunnu

Jananam 1947 Pranayam T...

Avatara Purusha 2

Avatara Purusha 2

Matinee

Chow Chow Bath

Photo

Hide And Seek

Kerebete

Somu Sound Engineer

Nayan Rahasya

Nayan Rahasya

Dabaru

Bonbibi: Widows Of The ...

Pariah Volume 1: Every Street Dog Has A Name

Pariah Volume 1: Every ...

Bhootpori

Shri Swapankumarer Bada...

Kabuliwala

Shinda Shinda No Papa

Warning 2

Sarabha: Cry For Freedo...

Zindagi Zindabaad

Zindagi Zindabaad

Maujaan Hi Maujaan

Maujaan Hi Maujaan

Chidiyan Da Chamba

Chidiyan Da Chamba

White Punjab

White Punjab

Any How Mitti Pao

Any How Mitti Pao

Gaddi Jaandi Ae Chalaangaan Maardi

Gaddi Jaandi Ae Chalaan...

Buhe Bariyan

Buhe Bariyan

Swargandharva Sudhir Phadke

Swargandharva Sudhir Ph...

Naach Ga Ghuma

Naach Ga Ghuma

Juna Furniture

Juna Furniture

Mylek

Alibaba Aani Chalishita...

Amaltash

Aata Vel Zaali

Shivrayancha Chhava

Shivrayancha Chhava

Lokshahi

Devra Pe Manva Dole

Dil Ta Pagal Hola

Dil Ta Pagal Hola

Ranveer

Ittaa Kittaa

3 Ekka

Jaishree Krishh

Bushirt T-shirt

Bushirt T-shirt

Shubh Yatra

Shubh Yatra

Vash

  • The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

Your Rating

Write a review (optional).

  • Movie Reviews /

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It UA

conjuring movie review in english

Would you like to review this movie?

conjuring movie review in english

Cast & Crew

conjuring movie review in english

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It Movie Review : Chilling horror conjured up a thrilling murder mystery

  • Times Of India

In-depth Analysis

Our overall critic’s rating is not an average of the sub scores below.

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It - Official Hindi Trailer

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It - Offi...

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It - The Making

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It - The ...

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It - Official Telugu Trailer

Users' Reviews

Refrain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks, name calling or inciting hatred against any community. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines by marking them offensive . Let's work together to keep the conversation civil.

conjuring movie review in english

Kaushik Biswas 3330 821 days ago

Good but not as expected, Conjuring fans may little disappointed with this.

heatherkherrington 911 days ago

I’m sorry I don’t understand how people are given this movie of 4205 reading this is just one of the worst movies they have made it had nothing to do with what the regular theme was if it was a completely different cast and the title wasn’t the conjuring and called a different movie I think that would be better but I was very disappointed with this movie. It’s by far the worst conjuring I’ve seen so far and I’m really upset because I wanted to watch this so bad and I hate when you get that good giddy feeling to watch a movie and you watch it and you’re just so disappointed 

raghu6300386775 raghu 110 952 days ago

Bone chilling horrifying movie.

conjuring movie review in english

Deepak Mishra 30732 1005 days ago

Ajay 1007 days ago, visual stories.

conjuring movie review in english

Entertainment

conjuring movie review in english

10 benefits of consuming oregano

conjuring movie review in english

Mimi Chakraborty has a special message on Mother’s Day

conjuring movie review in english

Kiara Advani drops sun-kissed selfies from beach vacation

conjuring movie review in english

8 most famous prehistoric sites in the world; one’s from India

conjuring movie review in english

8 budget-friendly romantic date ideas for couples

conjuring movie review in english

10 deadly blossoms

News - The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

conjuring movie review in english

The Devil On Trial Audience Review: Fans of 'Conjuring'...

conjuring movie review in english

'The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It' beats 'A Quiet...

conjuring movie review in english

'The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It' trailer: Patri...

conjuring movie review in english

Here is the official title of ‘Conjuring 3’

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Get reviews of the latest theatrical releases every week, right in your inbox every Friday.

Thanks for subscribing.

Please Click Here to subscribe other newsletters that may interest you, and you'll always find stories you want to read in your inbox.

Popular Movie Reviews

Kingdom Of The Planet Of The Apes

Kingdom Of The Planet Of The A...

The Deep Dark

The Deep Dark

Boonie Bears: Guardian Code

Boonie Bears: Guardian Code

Monster

The Boy And The Heron

Exhuma

The Fall Guy

Civil War

Challengers

Moviefone logo

The Conjuring (2013) Stream and Watch Online

Watch 'the conjuring' online.

JustWatch yellow logo

Yearning to watch ' The Conjuring ' in the comfort of your own home? Hunting down a streaming service to buy, rent, download, or watch the James Wan-directed movie via subscription can be a challenge, so we here at Moviefone want to do the work for you. Read on for a listing of streaming and cable services - including rental, purchase, and subscription alternatives - along with the availability of 'The Conjuring' on each platform when they are available. Now, before we get into all the details of how you can watch 'The Conjuring' right now, here are some particulars about the Evergreen Media Group, New Line Cinema, The Safran Company thriller flick. Released July 15th, 2013, 'The Conjuring' stars Patrick Wilson , Vera Farmiga , Lili Taylor , Ron Livingston The R movie has a runtime of about 1 hr 52 min, and received a user score of 75 (out of 100) on TMDb, which assembled reviews from 11,088 well-known users. Curious to know what the movie's about? Here's the plot: "Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren work to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their farmhouse. Forced to confront a powerful entity, the Warrens find themselves caught in the most terrifying case of their lives." 'The Conjuring' is currently available to rent, purchase, or stream via subscription on Google Play Movies, Apple iTunes, Microsoft Store, AMC on Demand, Amazon Video, Vudu, and YouTube .

'The Conjuring' Release Dates

Watch 'the conjuring' in theaters, the parkway theater, the conjuring collection.

A supernatural horror film series that started The Conjuring Universe and follows Ed and Lorraine Warren, paranormal investigators and authors associated with prominent cases of haunting. Their reports inspired the Amityville Horror.

The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It poster

Similar Movies

Evil Dead poster

Featured News

New Stephen King Adaptation ‘The Monkey’ Reveals Cast

Movie Reviews

Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes poster

Follow Moviefone

Latest trailers.

'Only Murders in the Building' Season 4 Teaser Trailer

IMAGES

  1. [Movie Review] The Conjuring

    conjuring movie review in english

  2. The Conjuring movie review & film summary (2013)

    conjuring movie review in english

  3. The Conjuring movie review

    conjuring movie review in english

  4. The Conjuring Movie Review

    conjuring movie review in english

  5. The Conjuring movie review & film summary (2013)

    conjuring movie review in english

  6. The 'true' story behind 'The Conjuring'

    conjuring movie review in english

VIDEO

  1. The Conjuring

  2. The Conjuring

  3. The Conjuring (2013) Official Teaser Trailer [HD]

  4. Movie Review: The Conjuring

  5. The True Story Of The Conjuring

  6. "The Conjuring" movie review

COMMENTS

  1. The Conjuring movie review & film summary (2013)

    Watching "The Conjuring" is like getting a tour of a haunted house attraction from someone that pushes, and pulls you through every room. There's nothing really scary about Wan's latest because there's nothing particularly mysterious, or inviting about its proceedings. The film's relentlessly lame expository dialogue, and tedious parade of jump scares are overwhelming in the worst way possible.

  2. The Conjuring (2013)

    Graciously, somewhat rude reader. The Conjuring is creepy, intermittently nightmarish, tense, gross, unsettling, and in its purest form, scary. This is the type of film that dares you not to hug yourself or laugh nervously in the hopes you deflect some iota of the sensation of primal fear.

  3. The Conjuring (2013)

    The Conjuring: Directed by James Wan. With Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Lili Taylor, Ron Livingston. Paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren work to help a family terrorized by a dark presence in their farmhouse.

  4. The Conjuring

    Thu 1 Aug 2013 16.30 EDT. Henry Barnes and Catherine Shoard review The Conjuring guardian.co.uk. The craft - if not the art - of a great horror flick skitters around Saw creator James Wan's ...

  5. The Conjuring

    Rated 4/5 Stars • Rated 4 out of 5 stars 05/09/24 Full Review Sawyer K The Conjuring is the perfect example of a disappointing, ... English. Release Date (Theaters) Jul 19, 2013, Wide. Release ...

  6. Film Review: 'The Conjuring'

    Film Review: 'The Conjuring' A sensationally entertaining old-school freakout and one of the smartest, most viscerally effective thrillers in recent memory.

  7. The Conjuring

    Ten years later, The Conjuring is still one of the best horror films. Full Review | Jul 20, 2023. Perhaps Wan's biggest achievement is that when the traditional sequel setup is revealed, the ...

  8. The Conjuring Review

    Verdict. Despite having a fairly standard haunted house horror plot, James Wan has created a fun, scary and beautiful looking movie. In The Conjuring, Wan uses skills learnt directing his previous ...

  9. 'The Conjuring' Review

    The Conjuring comes our way courtesy of horror director James Wan (Saw, Insidious) and twin brother horror/thriller writing duo Chad and Carey Hayes (The Reaping, House of Wax).While the script has the usual "passable" quality of the Hayes brothers' B-movie signature, it is Wan's uncanny ability to create simple, creative and very effective scare sequences that elevates this movie above just ...

  10. 'The Conjuring' review: the return of true horror

    Movie Review 'The Conjuring' review: the return of true horror. The director of 'Insidious' and 'Saw' ups the ante in his latest ghost story. By Bryan Bishop on July 18, 2013 09:01 am 72Comments.

  11. The Conjuring

    Generally Favorable Based on 35 Critic Reviews. 68. 74% Positive 26 Reviews. 23% Mixed 8 Reviews. 3% Negative 1 Review. All Reviews; ... It was a really good horror movie, maybe One of The greatest of all time. ... Movies like The Conjuring are less about the battle between God and Satan than the battle between the silly and the scary. Read ...

  12. The Conjuring Movie Review

    Parents say ( 60 ): Kids say ( 318 ): This horror film provides a treasure trove of typical haunting tricks that seems fresh and terrifying once again. Best known for co-creating Saw, expert horror director James Wan has happily advanced into more sophisticated tales with Insidious and now The Conjuring. Rather than gore, Wan goes for a more ...

  13. 'The Conjuring' movie review

    "The Conjuring" is one heck of a ghost story. Based on the highly scientific DLPG scale — measured by the number of times I looked over my shoulder as I hurried through a Dimly Lit Parking ...

  14. 'The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It': Film Review

    Screenwriter: David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick; story by James Wan, Johnson-McGoldrick, based on characters created by Chad Hayes, Carey W. Hayes. Rated R, 1 hour 52 minutes. The Conjuring: The ...

  15. The Conjuring Review

    The Conjuring Review. Roger and Carolyn Perron (Livingston, Taylor) move with their daughters to rural Rhode Island, where they are beset by terrifying phenomena. Psychic investigators Ed and ...

  16. THE CONJURING Review. THE CONJURING Stars Vera Farmiga and ...

    Published Jul 19, 2013. The Conjuring review. Matt reviews James Wan's The Conjuring starring Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Lili Taylor, Joey King, and Ron Livingston. Director James Wan and I ...

  17. The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

    Rated: 3.5/5 Jul 26, 2021 Full Review Kimber Myers Crooked Marquee With its third-act stumbles, it never quite catches either The Conjuring or The Conjuring 2, but it proves there is still spirit ...

  18. The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It Review

    Verdict. Though The Devil Made Me Do It is a smart recalibration for The Conjuring series, its successes have little to do with its strengths as a standalone horror movie. Ed and Lorraine Warren's ...

  19. The Conjuring

    The Conjuring is a 2013 American supernatural horror film directed by James Wan and written by Chad Hayes and Carey W. Hayes.It is the inaugural film in The Conjuring Universe franchise. Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga star as Ed and Lorraine Warren, paranormal investigators and authors associated with prominent cases of haunting.Their purportedly real-life reports inspired The Amityville ...

  20. The Conjuring (Movie Review)

    The Conjuring (Movie Review) Colin's rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ½ Director: James Wan | Release Date: 2013. By Colin on June 19th, 2016. There's a valuable lesson contained in The Conjuring, director James Wan's 70s-era spook-fest about the Perrons, a family whose new home has a dark history. Before you buy or rent a residence, take a dog ...

  21. {Movie Review} The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It

    The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It. 112 Minutes • Rated R. Starring Patrick Wilson • Vera Farmiga • Ruairi O'Connor. Story by James Wan and David Leslie Johnson - McGoldrick. Screenplay by David Leslie Johnson - McGoldrick. Directed by Michael Chaves. Review by D. S. Ullery. Before I get to the actual review, I'm going to ...

  22. The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It Movie Review

    The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It Movie Review : Chilling horror conjured up a thrilling murder mystery Times Of India Ronak Kotecha, TNN, Updated: Aug 26, 2021, 12.56 AM IST Critic's Rating ...

  23. The Conjuring (2013) Stream and Watch Online

    Released July 15th, 2013, 'The Conjuring' stars Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga, Lili Taylor, Ron Livingston The R movie has a runtime of about 1 hr 52 min, and received a user score of 75 (out of ...