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Kindergarten Book Report Worksheet Freebie

By: Author jfletcher

Posted on Last updated: February 25, 2021

A graphic showing a girl reading on a stack of books and another one reading that says

Kindergarten book report worksheet printable freebie is an easy way to start teaching story elements and comprehension to young learners. 

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Part of our plan for homeschool in kindergarten is teaching parts of stories and doing some more formal review of what we read together.

My daughter loves reading and being read to and she loves to draw pictures.

This kindergarten book report printable worksheet freebie has been a good way to reinforce simple story elements and document our reading for our end of the year evaluation.

Why Do Book Reports in Kindergarten

Book reports don’t have to be boring!

Especially for little learners! This book report template for kindergarteners engages my homeschool kindergartener by using drawing to show her favorite parts of the story. It also helps introduce the concept of story elements like characters and setting.

This activity gives her a structured way to discuss her favorite stories with me in a way that keeps her interested.

Easy Book Ideas for Kindergarten

The first half of the year, we read and did units based on:

  • Elephant and Piggy: We are in a Book
  • Elephant and Piggy: Pigs Make me Sneeze!
  • Ladybug Girl and the Dress Up Dilemna
  • The Berenstain Bears Four Seasons
  • The First Thanksgiving Day
  • How the Grinch Stole Christmas
  • The Polar Express
  • Snowmen at Night

Right now, we are doing a huge unit loosely based on the Disney Princesses since my daughter loves them so much and more than anything, reading should be fun!

We are reading different versions of the stories- the Disney version that we all know- and the tales they are based on. (If you plan to try this with your little one, do your homework! Some of these stories are very dark but you can find kid friendly versions out there.)

We use this sheet as a springboard for doing a compare and contrast between the Disney version of the tales and the other versions.

So far we have done Frozen, which is based on the Snow Queen, and Sleeping Beauty. 

Chapter Books for Read Aloud for Kindergarten

We’ve also been transitioning into reading aloud each day from chapter books. Again, we let her pick books she is interested in. Some of her favorites have been:

  • The Unicorn Princess Series
  • Cutiecorns (notice a theme here lol?)
  • Lucky Stars Series
  • Baby-Sitters Club Little Sister series

We also plan to dive into The American Girl series as we do a bit of history later this year.

Get your Kindergarten book report worksheet printable!

Grab your free kindergarten book report template here !

Other Homeschool Printables

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  • Winter Alphabet Printables
  • Valentine’s Day Math Printables
  • Puppy Math Printables

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St. Patrick's Day color by number printables for preschool, kindergarten and homeschool - Seasoned Sprinkles

Tuesday 16th of March 2021

[…] Kindergarten Book Report Worksheet […]

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Fun Book Report Templates For Kids

Inspire a love of reading in your kids with book reports that are fun, simple, and creative enjoy these great book report templates for kindergarten & 1st grade, and try some of these great book report tips and ideas.

free simple book report templates for kids

What Grade Should Kids Start Doing Book Reports?

Book reports offer a great opportunity for kids of all ages to learn, discuss, and present. There’s value in teaching this skill to kids at the earliest ages, but for the love of crayons please don’t get too academic too quickly.

If you want to try book reports with your youngest kiddos, your #1 goal should be FUN! Yes, I say it all the time and I”ll continue saying it forever. Focus on the fun! So what age is good to start doing book reports? Younger is just fine, as long as it’s fun.

“Book reports” can really start as soon as toddler age. When you read books to your little 3 year old, ask some questions about what’s happening along the way. When the book is done, talk about the characters in the book, what it would be like to live in the setting, and what was the most exciting part. You just helped your toddler complete an oral book report! Want to go further as your toddlers grow up – without going too far? Draw a picture together of the characters and even try acting out the story. What a fun start to book reports that’s creative and full of precious mommy & me time!

book report ideas for preschool

Should preschoolers do book reports? Coloring a picture and talking about the book is a great start!

Kindergarten Book Reports

If you’re looking into Kindergarten book reports , your starting point should be the same: FUN! Even by age 6, the physical act of writing can be difficult and even painful for kids. Don’t force your kiddo to write too much and work on a book report for too long. Portion a book report into appropriate size projects and keep it simple. Continue your process of asking questions, getting excited to hear your child’s recount of the story, and talk about what the characters went through.

Kindergarten Book Reports can look like a simple one page report . Have your child write the title of the book at the top of a blank piece of paper. Lead them to draw the cover of the book or a favorite scene or character. Inspire them to write one or two phrases or sentences (if they’re ready) at the bottom of the paper about their favorite part of the book. Show them the names of the Author and Illustrator of the book. Make kindergarten book reports simple and one-page assignments and don’t stress about doing them all in one sitting.

one page book report template for kindergarten

For younger grades like kindergarten and first grade, try a one-page,simple book report to keep the fun in reading!

Keep Book Reports Simple To Make Reading Fun

The goal here for our younger kids is to help them LOVE reading. That means keeping things positive from the start and using “mommy time” to make reading a special thing. Your time is the most valuable thing to them, so spending time reading to them, with them, alongside them – this all helps them love reading. Once they love reading, you’ve given them the foundation they’ll need to tolerate more academic book reports when they’re older.

1st Grade Book Reports

First grade is such an exciting time for kids! They’re able to do a little bit more schoolwork at a time (think 20 minute activities at this age with plenty of variety.) First grade book reports can be a little more in depth, but – you know what I’m going to say here – still keep it FUN!

Use creative book reports like making puppets from the characters, a play dough replica of a scene or setting, a mini book with drawings from what happened in the story, a creative lapbook book report project, and so on. Cover just the basics in your 1st grader’s book report like title, author, illustrator, characters, setting, beginning, middle, and end.

make character paper bag puppets for a creative book report idea for kdis

Try having your kid make a paper bag puppet of a character in the book, then write title, author, and story highlights on the back for an easy book report .

Remember that even though your 1st grader is probably writing phrases and sentences at this point, they will most likely still struggle with handwriting. Don’t push them to do too much writing – 2 to 3 sentences is a big assignment for them. If you want them to write more than that, try breaking up the book report assignment over a period of days.

Creative Book Report Ideas

Keep it super fun by using creative book report ideas. A book report doesn’t have to always be a writing assignment. Book reports are great ways to use many different learning styles and skills. The goal of a book report is to be able to identify the key elements of a story and present them back to someone. So any project that accomplishes this is a win!

Ideas for creative book reports:

  • Character puppet: Choose a character from the story and make a paper bag puppet of them. Write the title of the story and the author/illustrator on the back of the paper bag. Have your child use the puppet to tell the beginning, middle, and end of the story to your family.
  • Playdough diorama scene: Discuss the setting of the story. Direct your child to recreate a scene from the book, focusing on the details of the setting. They can add characters too!
  • Mini Book: Fold a piece of paper in half twice to make a mini book. Have your child draw the cover of the book and write the title. Then use the remaining three pages to draw a scene from the beginning, middle, and end of the book. If they’re ready, they can add one simple phrase or sentence to each page to tell what happened. Have your child use the mini book to help them tell the family about the story. This is a great thing to present at the dinner table for sharing board time.
  • Pit & Peak: This is a really simple idea for kids who can’t tolerate a large assignment. Have your child draw a pit and peak on a plank piece of paper – a mountain connected to a valley. Write the title of the book at the top of the page. Inside the mountain write/draw about their favorite or most exciting part of the book. Inside the valley, have them write/draw about the part they liked least.
  • Story Chain: This one is for kids who are comfortable writing sentences, but don’t want to write a long paper. Make strips of construction paper of any color. Help your kiddo think of the events of the story in the order they happened. Write each event on a separate strip of paper and create a chain with them – connecting them in order. Want to go further with this? Use two different colors – one for main events, and one for minor events. You could start the chain with a strip for title, one for author, one for setting, and some for the characters in the book. Again, your child can use the chain to tell the family about the book.
  • Evan Moor How To Report On Books: If you love creative book reports and want a steady supply of ideas for your kids, I highly recommend these workbooks . These are craft based book report templates your kids can use for their book reports. One thing to note, is that each book report tend to focus on one aspect of a book report – scene, characters, etc. This is a great way to begin talking about the different elements of a book without having to tackle all the ideas at once.

should kindergarteners do book reports? Yes, but keep it simple!

If you want your younger kids to do book reports, keep it simple and fun.

low prep book report for beginning readers and writers

Here’s a low prep option for kids who need smaller and simpler book reports.

creative book reports for kindergarten

Make a story chain to help your younger kids report on a book they’ve read.

One Page Book Report Template

Keeping book reports simple and down to one page is a helpful approach to not overwhelming your child. Use a one page book report template to make things easy – and keep the FUN! While it’s perfectly ok to use a blank piece of paper as your starting point, a template is a low-prep way to help your child know exactly what to do. I’ve got plenty of free printable book report templates in the PK1Kids Subscriber Freebies Library:

Free Printable Book Report Templates:

If you’re looking for free printable book report templates for kids , take a look at a few that I’ve got inside my Subscriber Freebies Library. They’re completely free and come with the added bonus of getting access to all my other freebies on my site! Snag my free printable book report bookmarks, my free one page book report template, and my book report lapbook template for young kids.

how to take notes for book reports

Use these bookmarks for your kids to take notes while reading.

free lapbook template for book reports

Lapbooks make great book reports! Try this free template.

one page book report template for kids

A simple one page book report is perfect for kindergarteners and 1st graders.

Simple one page book report for kindergarten

A simple one page book report for younger kids.

free lapbook book report template for 1st grade

A simple lapbook project for young kids to report on book they’ve read.

free book report note taking bookmark for kids

This bookmark helps kids write notes about characters, setting, and events while they read, to make their book report easy to write when they’ve finished the book!

Get these freebies PLUS access to the entire PK1Kids Subscriber Freebies Library by signing up below:

Check your inbox or spam folder for the password to unlock the entire PK1Kids Freebies Library.

Simple Book Report Ideas

I hope you’ve found plenty of simple book report ideas in this post. From the youngest ages you can lead your kids through oral questions and answers about any book you read to them. As your kids get older, begin highlighting the different elements of a story. A book report doesn’t have to be complicated. A simple idea of writing or drawing a few elements of a story on a blank piece of paper is a perfectly appropriate book report for your younger kids! 

Here’s a simple book report idea you can use that’s low prep : Take a piece of paper and fold it into six squares. Label each square: Title & Author, Setting, Characters, Beginning, Middle, & End. Then have your child write and draw in each square. Get them used to doing simple book reports like this that aren’t intimidating, and your kids will love doing reports as they get older!

More Great Book Report Resources:

Book Report Lapbook from Homeschool Share

Free Book Report Template for Homeschool from Homeschool of 1

Books vs Movies – Compare and Contrast FREE Report Template from Homeschool of 1

How To Write A Book Report + FREE Printable Template For Kids from Blessed Homeschool

How We Do Book Reports – 4th Grade Literature from Monkey and Mom

FREE Mini Reading Graphic Organizers from Blessed Learners

Book report ideas for kids

Keep the love of learning by using simple and fun book reports for kindergarteners and first graders!

simple one page book report for kindergarten and first grade

A simple lapbook project for young kids to report on book they’ve read.

free printable to help kids write a book report

This bookmark helps kids write notes about characters, setting, and events while they read, to make their book report easy to write when they’ve finished the book!

Get this freebie PLUS access to the entire PK1Kids Subscriber Freebies Library by signing up below:

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33 Free Book Report Forms and Templates for Kids

By Annette Breedlove on October 19, 2023

I loved writing book reports growing up. My kids, however, do not share the same sentiment. They love to read books and retell the stories to me, but they have a disconnect when it comes to putting it down on paper. That’s why I love using a free book report template to give them a little extra help. 

free book report templates and forms

Fun Book Report Ideas

There are many different ways children can share about a book they read other than writing about it. Check out all of these fun ideas:

  • Act it out. Young students and even older students may enjoy acting out a story that they read in lieu of writing about it. 
  • Make a 3D diorama . This is a great way for students who like to work with their hands and create visuals.
  • Draw it out on a poster . For young kids who don’t have strong writing skills yet, drawing out what they read is a great option.
  • Make a comic book with a free comic book template we have included below. 
  • Oral narration . Narrating back a brief summary of the book  they read is another alternative to writing a book report. You can see if your children comprehended what they read or at least got the main points of the story by asking them basic questions about the book.

Types of Book Reports

If you prefer using book reports, they come in a variety of types and styles. You can write plain-Jane ones or get a little more creative, like the comic strip option below for a different way to format a book report. Whichever you choose, having the option to use a book report template can be helpful for kids. 

While I enjoy book reports and see their value, I much prefer my kids enjoy reading a lot of books and sharing, over the finer points of proper form. So if we can use a simple book report template to keep them excited about reading and not dread the reports, I call that a win-win.

Mix it up with the different types of book reports that you assign to your children. Keep it fun and engaging and they will want to read more books and tell everyone about what they have read. 

Using Book Report Templates

As with anything we print out for school, I like to find cute printables with book report designs and age-appropriate graphics. This is especially for my middle school-aged daughter, who thinks some of the free worksheets I find are too childish.

Using a book report template for 3rd grade might look a little different than what I’d want to use for 7th grade. A pdf book report template for high school students definitely needs to be less kid-friendly and more informative.

There are simple book report templates for beginning writers and more advanced ones. The options are endless when it comes to choosing a book report template for your homeschool children.

Printable Book Report Forms

Whether you are looking for a short book report template or one for high school, book report templates will help students get their thoughts on paper. They will learn to organize their thoughts so that their finished book report project is a success!

Book report templates can encourage all the readers in your homeschool to crank out an organized, thorough book report that they are proud of! Once you select a free template, you can get started. Let your children choose one of their favorite books for their first report as it will help to keep them engaged.

How to Use a Book Report Template

When you are looking for the perfect book report template, keep in mind the age of your child. Some one-page forms are perfect for young children and beginning readers with boxes to draw, lines to write down main characters, setting, the plot, etc.

When you have a high school student needing to write a paper or a book report, you obviously need something more in-depth. A book report template can help them get their ideas on paper well enough to organize thoughts and personal opinions for an essay, or even a research paper. 

The key point of using worksheets for book reports is to have an easy way to get thoughts on paper. A book report template can help your student stay organized so they are able to draft a well-written paper. These types of graphic organizers make book reports a breeze!

What’s included in a book report?

  • A good book report will consist of the book title, author’s name, main idea, main theme, plot points and important details.
  • It will explain the narrative and setting, and cover the main elements of the story as well as describe important characters of the book.
  • You’ll also want to include details on the time period, major conflicts and the book details, or rather a plot summary of the book.
  • Don’t forget to include unusual facts and key elements that stand out. 

Character Description

Besides adding basic details about the key characters in the book, it’s a good idea to include character details. You will want to include details such as; appearance, interests, and list out some adjectives that describe characters on the book report form . 

Analyze what your character looks like so the reader of the book report gets a vivid description of the character. What color is their hair and skin? What is their clothing style like? Do they have a best friend or an animal that is constantly with them?

Is the character an animal? If so, what type of animal are they and what do they look like?

Character Development

Characters develop on in the story as you read about them. Make sure to make note of positive and negative character traits and how those change throughout the plot. Is there a hidden message or reason why the character is behaving the way that they are?

Make notes of how your character has changed and why you think they changed and the reasons for the actions that they took. You can take it a step further and explain how their actions either harmed or helped the story to move along.

Printable Book Report Templates and Forms

If you want a book report template quickly, simply scroll to the bottom of this post to download ours FREE.

DIY Book Report Kit {works with ANY book} This printable book report template is more like a graphic organizer , in my opinion. You can print several different template pages to organize different aspects of the book so you can create a great book report. 

Free Book Report Template for Elementary Students Get your 1st -4th graders writing book reports with ease with these pdf book report pages.

Book Review Templates This cute pack of 5 different book report template pages would be perfect for early learners who know how to write . 

Printable Book Report Form I like this simple book report template that’s perfect for a new reader. The free printable book report template is organized and will prompt your kids to be creative. 

Elementary Book Reports Made Easy An easy one-page pdf download of a book report worksheet that would be good for elementary students.

Printable Book Report Forms (Non-Fiction, Fiction, Biography, Mystery & Fable) You have lots of different options for book report templates. Whether or not you need a book report form for a biography, non-fiction resource , or even a fable, there are several  different pdf templates to choose from. There are also multiple book report poster forms for those kids who prefer to draw.

7 Different Versions of Book Report – If you are looking for different versions for different age levels or grades then these reports are worth reviewing.

Easy Book Report – This features an easy form for younger students as well as outline form for older students.

Book Report Templates for Younger Students

There are different styles of book report templates that you will want to focus on for younger students. A book report template that you use with your middle school aged child will be too difficult for beginning writers.

You will want to look for a book report format with dashed lines, boxes to draw a picture in, and more. 

My Book Report Worksheets These book report worksheets are suitable for children in kindergarten or first grade. 

Comic Strip Book Reports If you have a reluctant writer , or a comic book lover, these free printable comic strip book report templates will likely make a book report less dreaded!

Reading Logs and Bookmarks

Reading Log and Book Report Templates If you are on the hunt for cute reading log printables, these are perfect for elementary students. There are a few different templates that offer options to rate the book and write a review. Using a creative book report template like this might take the sting out of writing book reports for reluctant writers. 

Free Reading Log and Book Report Forms   My Joy-Filled Life has a 2-page book report template and a printable reading log that you can slip into your homeschool binder . 

Free Reading Logs, Bookmarks and Charts – Encourage your readers with fun and colorful bookmarks and charts that they can use to track their reading time as well as the books they have read. Free Instant Download included!

Book Report Template

Book reports don’t have to be boring or something that your children dread. They may be overwhelmed because it is a new thing that they have never done before and may need just a little guidance to get started.

Our FREE DIY Book Report template pack includes four pages of graphic organizers, question prompts, illustration boxes, and more. It is a great start to guiding your children on how to write a book report in a non-threatening way. 

You can download it for free in our subscriber library . 

free DIY book report

In Conclusion

The body of the book report should include the title, the author of the book, characters, setting, major conflicts, direct quotes, and plot. The conclusion can include a personal opinion. Book reports are a fun way to develop critical thinking skills and teach students how to gather information to format into a writing assignment.

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book report kindergarten

Annette has been married to her husband and best friend since 2003. Together they are raising their six children to follow the Lord’s will, no matter what. Annette longs for the day when she will meet her angel babies who have entered heaven before her. She enjoys creating UNIT STUDIES and FREE PRINTABLES for homeschool families. You can follow her crazy life at In All You Do where she blogs about homeschooling, homemaking and marriage while trying to maintain her sanity. She is also the owner of Thrifty Homeschoolers where she shares her tips on homeschooling without breaking the bank.

book report kindergarten

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book report kindergarten

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☘️ St. Patrick's Day Activities: Books, art ideas, experiments, and more!

42 Creative Book Report Ideas for Students

Inspire your students to share their love of books.

book report kindergarten

Responding to what you read is an important literacy skill. Reading about other people’s experiences and perspectives helps kids learn about the world. And although students don’t need to dive deeply into every single book they read, occasionally digging into characters, settings, and themes can help them learn to look beyond the prose. Here are 42 creative book report ideas designed to make reading more meaningful.

1. Concrete Found Poem

A student sample of a concrete found poem

This clever activity is basically a shape poem made up of words, phrases, and whole sentences found in the books students read. The words come together to create an image that represents something from the story.

2. Graphic Novel

Have students rewrite the book they are reading, or a chapter of their book, as a graphic novel. Set parameters for the assignment such as including six scenes from the story, three characters, details about the setting, etc. And, of course, include detailed illustrations to accompany the story.

3. Book Snaps

A picture of a piece of text with comments and visuals added as commentary as an example of creative book report ideas

Book Snaps are a way for students to visually show how they are reacting to, processing, and/or connecting with a text. First, students snap a picture of a page in the book they are reading. Then, they add comments, images, highlights, and more.

4. Diary Entry

Have your students place themselves in the shoes of one of the characters from their book and write a first-person diary entry of a critical moment from the story. Ask them to choose a moment in the story where the character has plenty of interaction and emotion to share in a diary entry.

5. Character To-Do List

A hand written character to do list

This fun activity is an off-the-beaten-path way to dive deep into character analysis. Get inside the head of the main character in a book and write a to-do list that they might write. Use actual information from the text, but also make inferences into what that character may wish to accomplish.

6. Mint Tin Book Report

A mint tin is converted to a book report with an illustration on the inside lid and cards telling about different parts of the book inside as an example of creative book report ideas

There are so many super-creative, open-ended projects you can use mint tins for. This teacher blogger describes the process of creating book reports using them. There’s even a free template for cards that fit inside.

7. Fictional Yearbook Entries

Ask your students to create a yearbook based on the characters and setting in the book. What do they look like? Cut out magazine pictures to give a good visual image for their school picture. What kind of superlative might they get? Best looking? Class clown? What clubs would they be in or lead? Did they win any awards? It should be obvious from their small yearbooks whether your students dug deep into the characters in their books. They may also learn that who we are as individuals is reflected in what we choose to do with our lives.

8. Book Report Cake

A purple cake made from paper cut into slices

This project would be perfect for a book tasting in your classroom! Each student presents their book report in the shape of food. See the sandwich and pizza options above and check out this blog for more delicious ideas.

9. Current Events Comparison

Have students locate three to five current events articles a character in their book might be interested in. After they’ve found the articles, have them explain why the character would find them interesting and how they relate to the book. Learning about how current events affect time, place, and people is critical to helping develop opinions about what we read and experience in life.

10. Sandwich Book Report

A book report made from different sheets of paper assembled to look like a sandwich as an example of creative book report ideas

Yum! You’ll notice a lot of our creative book report ideas revolve around food. In this oldie but goodie, each layer of this book report sandwich covers a different element of the book—characters, setting, conflict, etc. A fun adaptation of this project is the book report cheeseburger.

11. Book Alphabet

Choose 15 to 20 alphabet books to help give your students examples of how they work around themes. Then ask your students to create their own Book Alphabet based on the book they read. What artifacts, vocabulary words, and names reflect the important parts of the book? After they find a word to represent each letter, have them write one sentence that explains where the word fits in.

12. Peekaboo Book Report

A tri-fold science board decorated with a paper head and hands peeking over the top with different pages about the book affixed

Using cardboard lap books (or small science report boards), students include details about their book’s main characters, plot, setting, conflict, resolution, etc. Then they draw a head and arms on card stock and attach them to the board from behind to make it look like the main character is peeking over the report.

13. T-Shirt Book Report

A child wears a t-shirt decorated as a book report as an example of creative book report ideas

Another fun and creative idea: Create a wearable book report with a plain white tee. Come up with your own using Sharpie pens and acrylic paint. Get step-by-step directions .

14. Book Jacket

Have students create a new book jacket for their story. Include an attractive illustrated cover, a summary, a short biography of the author, and a few reviews from readers.

15. Watercolor Rainbow Book Report

This is great for biography research projects. Students cut out a photocopied image of their subject and glue it in the middle. Then, they draw lines from the image to the edges of the paper, like rays of sunshine, and fill in each section with information about the person. As a book report template, the center image could be a copy of the book cover, and each section expands on key information such as character names, theme(s), conflict, resolution, etc.

16. Act the Part

Have students dress up as their favorite character from the book and present an oral book report. If their favorite character is not the main character, retell the story from their point of view.

17. Pizza Box Book Report

A pizza box decorated with a book cover and a paper pizza with book report details as an example of creative book report ideas

If you’re looking for creative book report ideas that use upcycled materials, try this one using a pizza box. It works well for both nonfiction and fiction book reports. The top lid provides a picture of the book cover. Each wedge of the pizza pie tells part of the story.

18. Bookmark

Have students create a custom illustrated bookmark that includes drawings and words from either their favorite chapter or the entire book.

19. Book Reports in a Bag

A group of students pose with their paper bag book reports

Looking for book report ideas that really encourage creative thinking? With book reports in a bag, students read a book and write a summary. Then, they decorate a paper grocery bag with a scene from the book, place five items that represent something from the book inside the bag, and present the bag to the class.

20. Reading Lists for Characters

Ask your students to think about a character in their book. What kinds of books might that character like to read? Take them to the library to choose five books the character might have on their to-be-read list. Have them list the books and explain what each book might mean to the character. Post the to-be-read lists for others to see and choose from—there’s nothing like trying out a book character’s style when developing your own identity.

21. File Folder Book Report

A manilla file folder decorated with elements of a book report as an example of creative book report ideas

Also called a lap book, this easy-to-make book report hits on all the major elements of a book study and gives students a chance to show what they know in a colorful way.

22. Collage

Create a collage using pictures and words that represent different parts of the book. Use old magazines or print pictures from the Internet.

23. Book Report Triorama

A pyradimal shaped 3D book report with illustrations and words written on all sides

Who doesn’t love a multidimensional book report? This image shows a 3D model, but Elisha Ann provides a lesson to show students how to glue four triangles together to make a 4D model.

24. Timeline

Have students create a timeline of the main events from their book. Be sure to include character names and details for each event. Use 8 x 11 sheets of paper taped together or a long portion of bulletin board paper.

25. Clothes Hanger Book Report Mobile

A girl stands next to a book report mobile made from a wire hanger and index cards as an example of creative book report ideas

This creative project doesn’t require a fancy or expensive supply list. Students just need an ordinary clothes hanger, strings, and paper. The body of the hanger is used to identify the book, and the cards on the strings dangling below are filled with key elements of the book, like characters, setting, and a summary.

26. Public Service Announcement

If a student has read a book about a cause that affects people, animals, or the environment, teach them about public service announcements . Once they understand what a PSA is, have them research the issue or cause that stood out in the book. Then give them a template for a storyboard so they can create their own PSA. Some students might want to take it a step further and create a video based on their storyboard. Consider sharing their storyboard or video with an organization that supports the cause or issue.

27. Dodecahedron Book Report

A dodecahedrom 3D sphere made into a book report

Creative book report ideas think outside the box. In this case, it’s a ball! SO much information can be covered on the 12 panels , and it allows students to take a deep dive in a creative way.

28. Character Cards

Make trading cards (like baseball cards) for a few characters from the book. On the front side, draw the character. On the back side, make a list of their character traits and include a quote or two.

29. Book Report Booklets

A book made from folded grocery bags is the template for a student book report as an example of creative book report ideas

This clever book report is made from ordinary paper bags. Stack the paper bags on top of each other, fold them in half, and staple the closed-off ends of the bags together. Students can write, draw, and decorate on the paper bag pages. They can also record information on writing or drawing paper and glue the paper onto the pages. The open ends of the bags can be used as pockets to insert photos, cut-outs, postcards, or other flat items that help them tell their story.

30. Letter to the Author

Write a letter to the author of the book. Tell them three things you really liked about the story. Ask three questions about the plot, characters, or anything else you’re curious about.

31. Book Report Charm Bracelet

A decorated paper hand with paper charms hanging off of it

What a “charming” way to write a book report! Each illustrated bracelet charm captures a character, an event in the plot, setting, or other detail.

32. Fact Sheet

Have students create a list of 10 facts that they learned from reading the book. Have them write the facts in complete sentences, and be sure that each fact is something that they didn’t know before they read the book.

33. Cereal Box TV Book Report

A book report made from cardboard made to resemble a tv set as an example of creative book report ideas

This book report project is a low-tech version of a television made from a cereal box and two paper towel rolls. Students create the viewing screen cut-out at the top, then insert a scroll of paper with writing and illustrations inside the box. When the cardboard roll is rotated, the story unfolds.

34. Be a Character Therapist

Therapists work to uncover their clients’ fears based on their words and actions. When we read books, we must learn to use a character’s actions and dialogue to infer their fears. Many plots revolve around a character’s fear and the work it takes to overcome that fear. Ask students to identify a character’s fear and find 8 to 10 scenes that prove this fear exists. Then have them write about ways the character overcame the fear (or didn’t) in the story. What might the character have done differently?

35. Mind Maps

Mind maps can be a great way to synthesize what students have learned from reading a book. Plus, there are so many ways to approach them. Begin by writing a central idea in the middle of the page. For example, general information, characters, plot, etc. Then branch out from the center with ideas, thoughts, and connections to material from the book.

36. Foldables

A book report made from a paper background and attached flaps as an example of creative book report ideas

From Rainbows Within Reach , this clever idea would be a great introduction to writing book reports. Adapt the flap categories for students at different levels. Adjust the number of categories (or flaps) per the needs of your students.

37. Board games

This is a great project if you want your students to develop a little more insight into what they’re reading. Have them think about the elements of their favorite board games and how they can be adapted to fit this assignment. For more, here are step-by-step directions .

38. Comic strips

A girl stands holding a comic strip book report as an example of creative book report ideas

If you’re looking for creative book report ideas for students who like graphic novels, try comic strips. Include an illustrated cover with the title and author. The pages of the book should retell the story using dialogue and descriptions of the setting and characters. Of course, no comic book would be complete without copious illustrations and thought bubbles.

39. Timeline

Create a timeline using a long roll of butcher paper, a poster board, or index cards taped together. For each event on the timeline, write a brief description of what happens. Add pictures, clip art, word art, and symbols to make the timeline more lively and colorful.

40. Cereal Box

Recycle a cereal box and create a book report Wheaties-style. Decorate all sides of the box with information about the book’s characters, setting, plot, summary, etc.

41. Wanted Poster

book report kindergarten

Make a “wanted” poster for one of the book’s main characters. Indicate whether they are wanted dead or alive. Include a picture of the character and a description of what the character is “wanted” for, three examples of the character showing this trait, and a detailed account of where the character was last seen.

42. Movie Version

If the book your students have read has been made into a movie, have them write a report about how the versions are alike and different. If the book has not been made into a movie, have them write a report telling how they would make it into a movie, using specific details from the book.

What creative book report ideas did we miss? Come share in our We Are Teachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.

Plus, check out the most popular kids’ books in every grade..

Book reports don't have to be boring. Help your students make the books come alive with these 42 creative book report ideas.

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Time 4 Kindergarten

Kindergarten Book Reports

book report kindergarten

cool- I'm off to check out your blog

book report kindergarten

I do the same thing and send home books in a bag for the week. I also have some kids try to turn them in everyday. I don't really know if they are reading them?? I love the idea of making it a little homework to hold them accountable. Plus if they aren't reading it I will know right?? Thanks for inspiration!

Giggles and Squeals- you are very welcome

book report kindergarten

I love your super cute blog! I am your newest follower. Great book report idea....... I'd love for you to come visit me too if you like :0) ✿~jeannie~ ­Kindergarten Lifestyle Kindergarten Lifestyle Facebook Fan Page

Welcome Jeannie-thanks for stopping by- I'm to see your blog

book report kindergarten

Hi Tiffani So glad I found you and I'm your newest follower. Very cute blog! I saw your post on pinterest...I gotta post that one too. I just love pinterest. Have a fun dr. seuss day! Vicky Traditions Laughter and Happily Ever After

Welcome Vicky- thanks for stopping by. I too love interest I think I have over 500 pins

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Teach Beside Me

Guided Book Report for Kids- Printable Template

This post may contain affiliate links.

book report kindergarten

Is it book report time?  It’s always nice to have an easy way to do book reports with your kids. In this post I have a printable guided book report for you!  This is a fun and colorful book report template in a few different styles.

My Guided Book Report

This Guided Book Report is great for elementary aged kids. It has 6 pages. The first two pages are for younger elementary-aged kids, the second set of pages are for upper elementary aged kids, and the last set of pages are for kids to use to take notes on the book as they are reading it.

These guided book report templates are perfect for teaching study skills and note taking in preparation for writing the book report.

I am curious, for my homeschooling parents, do you give your homeschooled kids book reports?  I have from time to time and I think it is a good accountability opportunity for them. I do not always have my kids do book reports on the books they read, though.  They read way too many books!

You can read some of my thoughts about reading in the post on the the Importance of Reading to Kids .

Need help encouraging your kids to read?  Try our 12-Month Reading Challenge , or our Summer Reading Challenge .

book report kindergarten

Want something a little more basic, and with no colors or characters not hem?  Also check out my Elementary Level Book Report Template post.

Need ideas for what books to read with your kids/students?

Check Out Some of Our Favorite Book Posts:

Must Read Classic Books for Kids

Best Books for Tween Boys

Best Books for Tween Girls

Newbery Medal Book List

How to Find Clean Books for Kids to Read

How to Print the Elementary Guided Book Report

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Former school teacher turned homeschool mom of 4 kids. Loves creating awesome hands-on creative learning ideas to make learning engaging and memorable for all kids!

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book report kindergarten

How to Write a Book Report (+ a FREE Step-by-Step Printable for Your Kids)

Just so you know, this post contains affiliate links. That means if you use them to make a purchase, I may earn a commission. You can read my full affiliate disclosure  HERE .

We read a lot of books (homeschool moms, can you relate?). Right now, we are reading the Harry Potter series together as a family, and as my kids have grown, it’s been fun to see them become more interested in reading for fun. As part of our homeschooling this year, we have been learning how to write a book report, which has been a great way for me to evaluate how well my kids are understanding what they read.

My son is in 3rd grade this year and recently had a book report as one of his assignments in English. While there were a couple of steps given to him, he struggled with the process and actually putting the book report together. So I decided to create a step-by-step book report printable to help him learn how to write a book report.

I hope these printables will be a big help to your kids, too! They will walk your kids through the steps of organizing their book report, writing a draft, revising and proofreading, and writing a final copy. Plus, I’ve included a rubric for you that you can use to give helpful feedback if you’d like.

Not only will this template help your kids learn how to write a book report, but they will be fun to add to your homeschool portfolio and look back on in the future.

Why Should You Use Book Reports in Your Homeschool?

Writing a book report or using an organizer to respond to what they have read is a great way to help your kids with their reading comprehension . It’s also fun to see their unique writing styles come to light and learn what they think about the books they have read.

Plus, I have found that incorporating book reports into our homeschool is a fun way for my kids to practice their writing skills because they get to write about a book they have loved. My son doesn’t necessarily love to write, so making the writing topic interesting is really important in our current season.

They also will obviously get to practice their handwriting, and you can include an oral presentation component if you’d like to as well!

Teach Your Kids How to Write a Book Report

A book report is just what it sounds like – a detailed report your kids will write after reading a book. In the report, they will give a summary of the book and share some of the important plot points, as well as share their opinion of the book.

When my son first attempted to do his book report from his English assignment, he struggled with what to write, and how to pull it all together in one cohesive report. I wanted to really lay out the process for him, to break it down into manageable steps .

Writing book reports can be a great way to help your kids with their reading comprehension, writing skills, and handwriting. Teach your kids how to write a book report in easy, manageable chunks with this step-by-step template.

If your child is new to writing book reports, I would recommend doing the first one together . Choose a book you have been reading aloud as a family (or a new one to read together), so you can then walk through the template and process with them.

If you are reading the book together, model how to take notes of important characters and plot points as you read . These notes will be great to reference later when writing the report.

Once you are finished reading and taking notes, grab your book report template and work through the process of putting together the report ( this printable makes it so easy! ).

My Book Report Template for Kids

There are many options out there with ideas for creative and different styles of book reports (I love these ideas from We Are Teachers), but if you are looking for a simple way for your elementary-aged student to organize their thoughts into a basic book report, these are for you.

The pages include:

  • 2 Book Report Planning Pages where your kids will organize their thoughts about the main characters, important plot events, and what they learned and liked about the book. They will also have space to draw out their favorite scene from the story.
  • First Draft Pages where they will write a rough draft. These sheets also include checklists that will walk them through the revision and proofreading process.
  • My Book Report Pages where your kids will write their final copy of their book report.
  • Book Report Rubric which is a sheet you can use to offer comments and suggestions on their work, if desired.
  • Reading Log page that your kids can use to keep track of what they are reading (great for your homeschool record keeping as well!)

book report kindergarten

Using a template like this will help your kids organize their thoughts in the planning pages, so it’s easier for them to put the final review together. They will see all of the important parts that need to go into their book reports, which will help them learn how to write effective reviews and recommendations.

book report kindergarten

Printable Book Report Template

I’d love for this book report template to be a blessing to you and your family as well! Grab it below when you join my subscriber list – I love to send out freebies, homeschool tips, inspiration and more as I go through my own homeschooling journey.

book report kindergarten

Grab your FREE Book Report Printables!

Subscribe to my list and join thousands of other homeschool mamas looking for homeschool help, inspiration, and fun.

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Please check your email for your Book Report Printables.

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And if you love all of those, take a peek at my shop where I share some other helpful printables I’ve created for your home and homeschool.

Drop a comment below and let me know – what are some of your kid’s favorite books they have read, or what are they reading now?

book report kindergarten

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My Book Report Worksheets

My Book Report Worksheets

These book report worksheets are great for kindergarten or grade 1 students. There are large lines for them to easily write in with places to draw and show their creative side as well.

And now we have tons more fun printable kindergarten worksheets to share.

This worksheet pack also includes a reading log so your child can keep track of the books that they’ve read. At this stage, I’d have them use a favorite book of theirs to work on the book report so that it is easier to recall any details. I’d discuss each question first before setting your child off to write. I have boys who are reluctant writers so this helps them think through things first before they get to the daunting task of writing.

Plus, these book report worksheets bring so much fun to the world of reading. Once they find a book that they love to read, have them explore more and record what they read with these simple book reports.

Most book reports allow the students to write down what they saw, but these let them draw them out as well. Who doesn’t like to draw out their thoughts and ideas from a book?

My Book Report Worksheets

This post may contain affiliate links meaning I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post. Read my disclosure policy here.

My simple tip? Print off several and keep them handy. That way, anytime that your child finishes a book, they can grab one of these worksheets as well. Easy, right?

Another tip is that you can laminate them so that they can be used over and over again. There are always ways to make learning more fun for your child! All you have to do is try different things out!

And just in case you needed a few more helpful hints for your book report writing journey, here are some great books that you can get as well that can help your child understand the importance of book reports and how to do them.

Book Report Templates For Kids: Readers and Writers Notebook Journal School Curriculum Idea with Grades Tracker Sheets for Homeschool or Classroom

This book report can be used for any books. I love having the child create their own book cover, they always pull out something interesting from the book that you didn’t think was significant but they really hung on to it.

Do you keep track of the books they read? My son reads a ton so he forgets which books he read that he wanted to continue in the series so it’s a good way to keep track of what they read.

More Book Report Templates

These printable book report templates from Etsy are great. Just print and kids can do their book reports right away. You can either get the Dinosaur Book Report Printable or the Stars Printable Book Report . They both have themes so kids will enjoy writing their book report entries.

Dinosaur Book Report Printable

Even when the kids are older I like having a space for them to draw something. They can get stuck on the writing part but if you can get them to start drawing then they can write about what they drew.

Drawing and writing worksheets about a book

Introduce the different story elements like setting, characters, problem, and solution so kids can start to recognize these elements in each story in your book.

story elements worksheets in book report

We don’t do a book report for each book, I don’t want them to dread finishing a book. So depending on how many books your child is reading, it may be one in every 4 or 5 books.

Or I might have a child do the drawing and writing sheets only and not do the more writing-intensive worksheets for some books. And the go over the story elements and other things orally.

The focus is to get them to read a lot of books so I don’t want to kill that joy.

More Homeschool Worksheets

All About Me Worksheets

Calendar Book

Field Trip Journal

Country Activity Pages

Homeschool Student Planner by Inspire the Mom

I share educational printables and activities to help homeschoolers make learning science fun and engaging!

What a great worksheets! Thanks for sharing on the Thoughtful Spot Blog Hop!

I like this a lot and since Charlie has been wanting to help Blog I can have him review children’s books and use the sheets to write his thoughts out on. Once he is done I can show him how to write them in a Blog post.

This is a great idea-so helpful for students! Thanks for sharing at #OMHGWW

Oh wow, what a great printable. Thanks for sharing on Toddler Fun Friday! Love it!

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book report kindergarten

Book Report Templates for Kinder, First, and Second Grade

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book reports for kindergarten, first grade, and second grade

Often, when we think of writing book reports, we think of older or high school students. However, kids of all ages can also learn valuable elements of a book. It will also help them with reading comprehension and improve their writing skills in a fun way. One thing to remember is that it’s always a good idea to make it simple and fun. Our young students are just beginning to read. Using a book report template printable you can keep up that excitement, not turn it into something negative.

book reports for first graders

Elements of a Story

Before doing a book report on paper, we want to make sure that the students familiarize all the terms that may come up in a book report such as book title, author, illustrator, and the story elements.

You can fit making posters into your lesson plans to introduce different elements of a story. I like to introduce one or two posters at a time to young children. For example, we will talk about authors vs. illustrators and we will study some of our class’s favorites and find out who the authors and illustrators are. We will learn about setting, and compare and contrast the settings in different stories we’ve read.

I like to do a read aloud and identify parts of a book and elements of a story with my students. The more you talk about them, the more they will be comfortable identifying them in the books they read and using them in sentences. All this oral exercise will prepare them to eventually write their own book report.

These are some of the basic questions you can ask as you introduce different parts of a book and elements of a story.

What is the title of the story?

Is the book fiction or nonfiction?

By looking at the cover and the title, can you guess what the book is about?

What is the setting of the story?

Who are the main characters?

What happened at the beginning, middle, and end of the story?

Free Book Response Cues

book response cues freebie

I created these Book Response Cues that you can use once your students are more fluent in identifying the terms in the books they read. Print, cut, and stick them on popsicle sticks or straws, and put them in a little can. After reading a story together, you can have a student pull out a stick to answer the question. This is a great way to do a whole group book study.

book reports for first grade, second grade, and kindergarten

Now, it’s time for a book report! You want to give them something that is kid-friendly and not overwhelming. Let them know they are doing something special- something that older kids do. LEVEL UP! They are growing up!

These printables book report forms were specifically made for kindergarten and first graders who are new to book reports. Writing a book report for young kids should not be intense. For this reason, all of the pages are simple and straightforward, and they focus on a few key words at a time. They can be used in reading/listening centers, as a guided reading extensions, or to assist students in retelling a story.

For me, it is important for my students to familiarize different components and elements of a book, practice writing sentences, and additionally practice handwriting.

Doing a book study together will encourage students to talk about the books that they read. They may have a read a great book and recommend to their friends or they may even talk about a book that was not that fun for them. Reading a book with the intention of reviewing it may even give a little nudge on your students to pay closer attention.

Write a Letter to the Author

a letter template for kindergarten, first grade, and second grade

Another thing you can do when using a book report template printable is get your students to write a friendly letter to the author, illustrator, or to one of the characters. Here’s a link to free letter templates  you can use. An easy way you can make it fun is by dressing up as one of the characters or select a day or week where your kids can dress up as characters in a book. This is always my favorite part of using a book report template printable with the class! If you have any other fun ideas to share, please share them in the comments below! 🙂

See what others have to say about these book reports!

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Writing Reports in Kindergarten? Yes!

Writing Reports in Kindergarten? Yes!

  • Resources & Preparation
  • Instructional Plan
  • Related Resources

This lesson provides three types of reports that can be written and shared by kindergarten students. These reports allow young students to see themselves as writers with important information to share with others. In the first report, students report what they've learned about an apple using all five senses by completing a simple report form. In the second activity, they explore a variety of nonfiction media about animals of their choice. After they write journal pages recording simple information about the animals, completed pages are stapled together, and students create clay representations of their selected animals. In the final report, students use facts they have researched to create and share original riddles about selected animals.

Featured Resources

Apple Report Form : Students fill in this simple form to create a report on apples.

From Theory to Practice

In her book The Writing Workshop , Katie Wood Ray reflects on what it means to be a writer: "I think it comes down to the essential nature of writing. Writing is something that you do , not something that you know , and when you think about it, that is an incredibly important understanding for us to have as teachers of writing." (30)

Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi, in the introduction to their book Writing Workshop , stress the importance of the following factors for our students to become effective writers:

  • that students see themselves as writers,
  • that they develop a genuine feel for writing-its power and purpose, and
  • that they have a strong sense of audience-of real, interested readers. (x-xi)

This lessons gives three examples of reports that can be written by kindergarten students and other emergent readers and writers that will allow them to "do" writing and see themselves as writers with information to share with an interested audience.

Further Reading

Common Core Standards

This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming.

State Standards

This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, standard alignments are not currently available for that state.

NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts

  • 1. Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
  • 3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
  • 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
  • 7. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.
  • 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Materials and Technology

Report 1: Documentation of a Science Exploration Example: An Apple Report

  • Each student will need to bring an apple from home, or the teacher should provide each child with an apple to examine and work with.
  • Unifix cubes
  • String and scissors
  • Apple report forms
  • Pencils and crayons
  • The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall
  • Pick Me An Apple! From Seed to Tree by Shelly Rotner
  • An Apple a Day by Melvin Berger
  • Growing Apples and Pumpkins by Amy and Richard Hutchings
  • The Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree by Gail Gibbons
  • Johnny Appleseed by Madeline Olsen
  • I Am an Apple by Jean Marzollo
  • Bookmarked Websites

Report 2: Picture Journaling Example: An Animal Report

  • My Big Big Book of Animals by Barbara Taylor
  • My First Book of Nature: How Living Things Grow by Dwight Kuhn
  • My First Book of Animals: From A to Z—More than 150 Animals Every Child Should Know by Christopher Egan, Lorraine Hopping Egan, Thomas Campbell Jackson, and Diane Molleson
  • ZooBooks published by Wildlife Education, Ltd.
  • Scholastic's Rookie Read-About Science sets
  • Books from the Life Cycles Set or the World of Animals Set published by Newbridge
  • First Discovery Books published by Scholastic
  • What's Inside? Books published by Scholastic
  • First Facts Books published by KidsBooks Incorporated
  • The Magic School Bus series of books by Joanna Cole
  • Reading Discovery Books by Carolyn MacLulich published by Scholastic
  • The Milk Makers by Gail Gibbon
  • Science for Emergent Readers series from Scholastic
  • Nature Series videos, especially the "A First Look" series distributed by Diamond Entertainment Corporation
  • National Geographic Kids video series, especially the "Really Wild Animals" sets narrated by Dudley Moore
  • Bookmarked Websites about animals
  • (optional) Animal Inquiry Map
  • General writing supplies (pencils, markers, crayons, colored pencils, etc.)
  • A chart tablet and marker
  • Journals: one per student developed from the questions the children decide their reports should answer. (Make extra copies of each page for children that want to revise their first attempts.)
  • One writing file folder per student during the drafting and writing process.

Report 3: Riddle Writing Combined with Art Productions Example: Turning Animal Reports into Riddles

  • A rich variety of nonfiction picture books about many different animals
  • Videos about animals
  • Blank sheets of paper to take notes
  • 9 X 12 inch sheets of construction paper in a variety of colors
  • Art supplies: markers, paint, clay, construction paper in an assortment of colors, tissue paper, etc.
  • Computer for word processing, printer, and paper
  • Upper grade study buddies
  • Animal Q & A: Whose Baby Am I? by Shirley Greenway
  • Where Am I?: Learning Riddles by Peter Ziebel
  • It Begins with an A by Stephanie Calmenson
  • What Am I? by N. N. Charles
  • Set 1: Little Riddles by Educational Insights: riddle cards with 4 clues and the pictured answer on the back
  • The Five Senses
  • Apple Report Form
  • Self-Assessment Rubric

Preparation

  • This report is designed as a concluding activity to a theme exploration on the life cycle of apple trees or a study of apple trees during the four seasons of the year.
  • Gather all materials.
  • Make copies of the report form.
  • Either make a chart or overhead of the Five Senses.
  • Assemble all supplies.
  • This report is designed as a concluding activity to a theme exploration of living things.
  • Head the chart tablet with: What We Wonder About and Want to Know About Animals.
  • Bookmark the Websites .
  • Prepare a letter to parents telling them about the project and inviting them to help their children find sources of information and learn more about their chosen animals.
  • Set up a time for the upper-grade study buddies to meet with your class during 1-3 sessions.
  • Assemble file folders labeled with each student's name and arrange for a place to store them.
  • Prepare journal pages once questions decided by students.
  • This project is designed to follow a theme exploration of living things. I have used riddle writing both as an extension of the animal reports documented above and as an alternative to the journal reports.

Student Objectives

Students will

  • participate in research.
  • record their discoveries.
  • share their information (reports) with others.

Report 1: Documentation of a Science Exploration

Example: An Apple Report

  • Students may work alone, in pairs, or in small groups to do their explorations and record their findings in this report. Each student will need an apple.
  • Each student will need a copy of the report form.
  • Read through the reporting form with the students. Refer to the Five Senses chart to review how we learn about things through our five senses. They will be using all five senses: seeing the apple, touching (and measuring the apple), smelling it, tasting it, and hearing the crunch as they bite into it. They will record the color they see and a picture of the apple, the measurements they take, and the way the apple tastes.
  • Using the Vermont Apples Website, have students try to identify their apples by variety.
  • The students can then report their discoveries by sharing their reports with other members of the class, with other people in your school, and with their parents when they take their reports home. These reports could also be set up at an educational fair for students to share both their reports and their process of exploration.

Report 2: Picture Journaling

Example: An Animal Report

  • Introduce your students to the nonfiction picture books you have assembled. Take picture walks through a sample of the books you have collected. Encourage the students to browse through the books to decide what animal they wish to choose for further research as the topic of their reports.
  • Assemble the children around the chart tablet labeled: What We Wonder About and Want to Know About Animals . Brainstorm with the children some things that they want to learn about their animals. Then star the items that are general enough to include all of the chosen animals that will be researched. (Our lists usually include: what the animal looks like, what it looked like when it was a baby, where its home is, and what it eats.)
  • Prepare journal pages to address those topics. I use the pictures and page numbers so they can make connections between themselves and their animals. For instance on a sheet labeled "My animal lives ____" I would include a picture of a house).
  • Send the information about this project home to parents, inviting them to help their children assemble information and learn about their chosen animals. You might also include a trip to the school or community library to seek out additional books for them to use in researching their animals.
  • Once each child has chosen several books, arrange for upper grade study buddies to come and read to your students. Two 20-minute periods usually work best. Then have your students draw and write about what they learned on their journals pages. Encourage them to write about what they have drawn. (Children may dictate, label, or write about their pictures.)
  • It may work well to have the computer center in your room set up with the bookmarked Websites about animals, or you may want to go to the computer lab to provide better access for this resource.
  • You may also have videos that the children can access.
  • As students complete the pages of their reports, they add them to their file folders. When all pages are completed, each student's journal is stapled together.
  • Students then make a clay representation of their animals.
  • Return to your chart: What We Wonder About and Want to Know About Animals . Have students share informally what they learned from their research and record in a section entitled: What We Learned About Animals . Encourage students to dialogue and do some comparing and contrasting of their chosen animals.
  • If desired, use the Animal Inquiry Map to explore students ideas and findings.
  • Students share their reports with one another, other classes, their parents during conferences or an open house, and/or at an educational fair.

Report 3: Riddle Writing Combined with Art Productions

Example: Turning Animal Reports into Riddles

  • Introduce your students to the nonfiction picture books you have assembled. Take picture walks through a sample of the books you have collected. Encourge the students to browse through the books to decide what animal they wish to choose for further research as the topic of their reports.
  • Once an animal has been chosen, the students need time to research their animals. It may be helpful to meet with upper-grade study buddies to help the kindergartners read their books, review computer sites, or view videos about their animals. The students should be directed to find 3-5 interesting facts about their animals. They may record what they learn on blank sheets of paper.
  • Share the riddles.
  • Discuss what makes good clues: giving you enough information to allow others to make a good guess without telling them the answer.
  • Model writing clues about animals (Choose animals that no one has chosen for their own riddle reports.)
  • Practice writing riddles as a group.
  • Direct the children to look at their animal journals or the information they have collected about their animals and think about the clues they want to use in their own riddles.
  • Meet with one student at a time at the computer. They dictate their clues while you type them and print them out. (I do this during learning center time.)
  • The children share their clues with one another. Some of the students may discover that their clues are too general. They should be encouraged to revise their clues and print out new ones. They may also try these out on friends to see if they are better.
  • Each student chooses a 9 X 12 inch of colored construction paper and folds it in half in a hamburger fold (9 X 6).
  • Glue their clues on the front side (fold is at the top).
  • Open the card and have the students draw a picture of their animal inside. Each student should label the picture with the animal's name.
  • Each student then makes an art production of their animal using any of the supplies listed above. Remind them to make their pictures look as much like their animal as possible.
  • Display these riddles. Surround the riddles with the art productions, but do not put the riddles beside their matching art. (We displayed ours in the hallway outside of our classroom. As other students came down the hallway, they would stop and read the riddles, guess the answers, flip open the cards to see if their guesses were correct, and find the art that represented that animal.)
  • We created this display for our educational fair. This can be combined with the animal journals and clay reproductions. After looking at the riddles, guests can come into the classroom and hear the students tell about their animals, show their journals, and show their clay representation and any other artifacts they have collected about their animals.

Examples of Animal Riddles

My animal is a pet that lives in a house with us and sleeps in a basket. Its babies are called kittens, and they drink milk from their mother. They are born alive from their mother's body. It eats special food we buy for it, but once it caught and ate a mouse. It needs shots and goes to the vet when it is sick. Can you guess my animal? My animal lives on a farm. Its babies are called calves. It eats grass in the pasture when the weather is nice, but lives in the barn and eats grain and hay in the winter. It gives milk that the farmer sells to the dairy. When the milk leaves the dairy, it goes to stores so we can buy it and take it home. Can you guess my animal?

Student Assessment / Reflections

Students should be taught to self-assess through the use of a rubric. The student and the teacher conference together to score the rubric.

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Written by Stacey J • Sep 25, 2023 • Leave a Comment

Reading Log PDF and Book Report Templates

book report kindergarten

Reading logs are a popular tool used to track reading time or the number of pages/books read each day. As someone who values the joy of reading and learning, I’ve created printable reading logs and book review template ks2 in various formats to encourage children to read more and record what they have been reading.

These offer an effective means for students to track the list of books they’ve read at school, as well as encourage them to read at home, over the weekend, and during the holidays. The reading log pdf and book report template are perfect for elementary students, while the reading log coloring pages cater to the needs of preschoolers, making literacy development an enjoyable experience for all.

book report kindergarten

Table of Contents

Reading Log PDF

This book review and reading log printables pack is available in black and white to help save printing costs. It includes a variety of printable pages for kids to complete as they read new books.

The best part? It’s designed for repeated use! Here’s how:

  • Print and Protect: After you’ve printed the pages, take a simple step to ensure their durability. Either laminate each sheet or place them in sheet protectors. This not only safeguards the pages but also helps reduce your overall printing costs.
  • Dry Erase Fun: Equipped with laminated or protected pages, your child can now complete these activities using a dry-erase marker. This means they can enjoy the same worksheets over and over again, without the need for excessive paper consumption.

book report kindergarten

These Book Review and Reading Log printables are a fun way for young children to review books that they have read, while encouraging them to explore further. Reading logs are a wonderful visual reminder of a child’s reading achievements.

The pack offers various advantages for educators, parents, and children.

  • It encourages a consistent reading routine
  • Promotes critical thinking through book reviews and
  • Provides organized record-keeping options.

With flexibility in formats, it accommodates various reading schedules and preferences, making it a valuable resource for fostering a lifelong love of reading and enhancing comprehension skills. Whether tracking daily reading progress, celebrating reading milestones, or accommodating different seasonal cycles, this product empowers children to become enthusiastic and dedicated readers while simplifying the monitoring process for teachers and parents.

printable reading log with parent signature

What’s included?

Whether you’re a parent or an educator, these resources are designed to make reading a delightful and organized experience.

Weekly Reading Logs

Weekly reading logs both with and without a space for a parent signature are included to cater to various preferences, as well as a versatile printable reading log suitable for monthly or yearly use. You can print out a new weekly log for your kids each week. Each reading log template can be printed in either portrait style or landscape which allows ample space for younger children to fill in. Here children will write the title of the book that they have been reading as well as the duration of their reading session in minutes. There is also a spot for children to initial each page and for their supervisor/parent/teacher to also initial. This fosters a sense of accountability and support in their reading journey.

Monthly Reading Logs

Two versions of monthly reading logs are included for students to record how many books they’ve read. The color-to-record version allows children to color in one book for each book they read, whilst the write-to-record version allows kids to write out their list. Encourage children to read more by offering them prizes such as a new book of their choice as a reward for coloring in all the books on their reading log by the end of the month and meeting their reading goals.

These reading log coloring pages are also great for toddlers and preschool students to give them a visual clue as to how many books they have read in amonth. They would also be great for preschool summer reading logs.

reading log coloring pages

Daily Reading Logs and Reading Log Bookmarks

Another format included are reading log templates – one for each day of the week , and reading log bookmarks. It contains information such as the title of the book, the number of pages read, and a space to write out a short summary of the story. Reading log bookmarks are handy bookmarks for students to record the page they started reading at, the page that they stopped reading at, and how long they have read for.

Book Review Templates

Lastly, there are three Book Review templates for students to reflect on their reading. On these pages, children can fill in the title and author of the book they have been reading, as well as rate the book by coloring in the number of stars they give it. There are also spaces for children to write their favorite characters, outline the setting of the book, write out a summary, and draw their favorite scene!

book review template

The book review template gives children practice in learning how to review a book which is great for reading assignments.

A good way to store these pages is in a binder already in sheet protectors so they can be easily removed when needed. In my home, we print out each of these pages and bind them into a folder for easy access and storage.

FREE Reading Log Template

GET THE READING LOG TEMPLATE HERE

book report kindergarten

WHERE TO GET THE PACK

GET THE READING LOG PDF HERE

book report kindergarten

Stacey is a homeschooling mom trying to live a simple, frugal, healthy life. She lives with her husband and two gorgeous boys in the sunshine state of Queensland, Australia. Her blog is called Simple Living Creative Learning.

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10 Book Report Ideas That Kids Will Love

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Fun book report ideas for fourth, fifth and sixth graders.

Book Report Ideas

Book reports don’t need to be painfully boring. In fact, they can be a ton of fun, and with the right project, students will love the entire process of creating and sharing meaningful book projects. There are loads of great book report ideas out there just waiting to happen in your classroom!

Here are 10 book report ideas that kids will love:

1. cereal box book report.

These oh-so-cool reports were always the top-ranked project by my fifth graders. Students loved creating an original book report display using a covered cereal box and ready-made templates. The finished projects made a great classroom display, and students loved looking at their classmates’ creative reports. Read more about Cereal Box Book Reports HERE .

book report kindergarten

2. Paper Bag Book Report

This is a super simple idea that is quite fun for students. Provide each student with a lunch-sized paper bag. Tell them to think about 5 objects that relate to the main character of their book . The objects have to be small enough to fit into the bag . Send the bags home and have students place the 5 objects in the bag and bring them back to school. On the day they are due, have students take turns sharing the objects in their bags and explaining how they relate to the main character of the book. You can even make a great display with the bags, objects, and books to pique the interest of other students.

3. Character Day

Have students dress up as the main character of their book. Then, have each student take a turn standing in front of the class and telling their character’s story in first person point of view.

4. Book Report Lap Book

you need are two file folders, some cardstock or construction paper, scissors, glue, and the FREE book report template found here . The finished products are quite amazing, and your students will probably keep theirs forever! Check out my photo tutorial for making a lap book .

book report kindergarten

5. Book Scene Diorama

Have students construct a diorama of one of the main events of their book. They will make a 3-dimensional scene, including models of characters, the setting, and objects. A shoebox makes a great place to build a diorama. Require students to write a description of the scene.

6. Book Report Posters

This might be the easiest option of the book report ideas. Have students first sketch their posters on a sheet of notebook paper. Then, provide students with a large piece of poster paper or chart paper. Posters must identify main characters, setting, title, problem, and solution. Display finished posters in the classroom or on hallway walls.

7. Book Report Mobiles

Mobiles are easy to make, and it’s fun to watch students use their creativity in designing their own projects. A paper plate folded in half makes a great base/topper for mobiles. Have students write the title of the book on this paper plate semi circle and hang the mobile pieces from it. Provide students with construction paper, yarn, markers, paper hole punches, and any other materials they might need.

8. Book Report Mini Books

book report kindergarten

With just one piece of paper, your students can make a complete, creative book report!

In these clever book projects , students identify:

  • Title/Author
  • Main Character

No tape, glue, or staples required! Photo directions are included in this download.

9. Design a Book Jacket

Show your students several examples of some outstanding book jackets. Point out the front with the title and illustration, the spine and its information, and the back with the book summary. Also show the two inside flaps with information about the author and a smaller summary. Provide them each with a larger piece of paper and have them design a jacket for the book they have just read.

10. Ready-to-Print Templates

Use NO PREP book report templates to save your sanity AND to keep things fun for your students. You could print out all 12 templates in this Book Report Templates Packet and let students choose the one they want to do each month! There is even a really nice digital option for Google classroom included!

book report kindergarten

Regardless of which of these book report ideas you choose, be sure to clearly outline the expectations before your students begin. It’s best if you can model a project to demonstrate the quality of work your students should strive for.

Keep it fun and engaging, and your students will be excited to invest their time in their projects!

Check out these ready to go, easy to use book report projects in my store:

book report kindergarten

SAVE THIS POST FOR LATER!

book report kindergarten

Pin this to your favorite classroom Pinterest board  so you can come back for these book report ideas!

To recap, the 10 Book Report Project Ideas are:

  • Cereal Box Book Report
  • Paper Bag Book Report
  • Character Day
  • Book Report Lapbook
  • Book Scene Diorama
  • Book Report Posters
  • Book Report Mobiles
  • Design a Book Jacket
  • Ready-to-Print Templates

book report kindergarten

Shelly Rees

Hi, I’m Shelly! Thank you for being here. I love helping third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers with fun and engaging activities that require no to little prep! Let me help you by taking some of the stress and work off your plate.

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Book Report Worksheets For Kindergarten Pictures

Book Report Worksheets For Kindergarten With Pictures – Free Book Reports

Preschool Book Report Workbooks PDF Download: Book reports are the best sources when kids start reading books. They can note down important things they learned and remembered, and start thinking about how books made them feel.

Our Book Report Printable Sheets feature helpful questions and prompts to get kid thinking about what they read in a book and what it might actually mean. Using a book report template is an easy method for helping children think figuratively and symbolically about the material and enhance their reading comprehension.

Kindergarten Book Report Activity Sheets With Images

For beginners, printable Book Reports are flexible. They can be used when student reads a new book. These kindergarten Book Reports Templates are ready-made, so you can spend less time planning and more team on teaching or reading. All of our resources are made by teachers and designed to support you in your lessons.

Kids read a lot of books and end up using a lot of book reports. Download and print required number of Book Reports Worksheets for kindergarten students. Use our eco-friendly version so you can save time.

Book Report Worksheets For Kindergarten

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Book Report Form Worksheet

What is a Book Report?

A book report is a way of noting down all the important elements of a book. It’s a helpful tool to provide children a set of prompts and questions to get them thinking about the story more deeply. There are a few ways to write a book report, but most of them include wuestions to think about the story, characters and how it made you feel.

The activities included on the book report are along the lines:

  • Title of Book
  • Describe the setting of the book
  • Describe the main characters of the book
  • My Opinion of the book
  • Write a short summary of the book
  • Main conflict in the story
  • The solution to the conflict

Final Thought

Hoping that the data enclosed here about Book Report Worksheets are helpful for you. If you have any doubts, leave a comment below. Get in touch with our site worksheetsbuddy.com to know more related posts.

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Report Card Comments & Phrases for Kindergarten

Stephen Solomon, TeacherVision Contributor

Wondering how and what to write for report card comments for kindergarten?

Help make the kindergarten grading and evaluation process easier with this selection of editable, categorized comments .

Academic Achievement and Improvement Remarks for Kindergarten Students

Positive Comments:

  • ____________ has made solid progress in [reading/writing/math] and is performing [at grade level/above grade level] benchmarks. Good job!
  • ____________ is an attentive student who has shown regular improvement in [reading/writing/math] skills since [his/her] last report card.
  • ____________ works hard in class and has excellent [reading/writing/math] skills for [his/her] age. [He\she] enjoys [these/this subject(s)]. Please encourage [him/her] to use these skills at home!
  • ____________ enjoys school and [his/her] enthusiasm is reflected in the quality of work [he/she] does in class and at home. [He/she] is a great student!
  • ____________ has shown remarkable progress in [reading/writing/math] and consistently exceeds grade-level expectations. Keep up the excellent work!
  • ____________ demonstrates a strong grasp of [reading/writing/math] concepts and consistently applies them in class. [He/She] is a dedicated learner who consistently strives for improvement.

Needs Improvement Comments:

  • ____________ is making progress in [his/her] core subjects but is having some difficulty with _________. I am not concerned about this at the moment, and believe that with continued hard work [he/she] will see improvement quickly.
  • I am concerned with ___________’s academic progress, and would like to schedule a conference with you to discuss how best to support [his/her] efforts both in school and at home.
  • ____________ is an enthusiastic learner who enjoys school. [He/she] is having some difficulty with [reading/writing/math] - please continue to review with [him/her] nightly.
  • ____________ has continued to struggle with [reading/writing/math], despite additional in-class and at-home support. I would like to schedule a conference with you to discuss benchmark testing and possible specialist support.
  • ____________ is working hard in all core subjects but is facing challenges with ___________. I am confident that with targeted support and continued effort, [he/she] will make significant progress in this area.
  • I have concerns about ___________'s academic progress, particularly in [reading/writing/math]. It would be beneficial to schedule a meeting to discuss strategies and interventions to help [him/her] improve in these areas both at school and at home.

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Language and Literacy Skills Remarks for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ demonstrates a strong vocabulary and uses a variety of words to express ideas and thoughts. Well done!
  • ____________ shows enthusiasm for reading and actively participates in shared reading activities. Keep up the great work!
  • ____________ has made significant progress in letter recognition and is starting to blend sounds to read simple words. Excellent effort!
  • ____________ enjoys writing and is beginning to use punctuation marks and capital letters correctly. Keep practicing!
  • ____________ consistently demonstrates a love for books and actively engages in independent reading. Keep up the great reading habits!
  • ____________ shows great improvement in phonics skills and is now able to decode and blend more complex words. Well done on your progress!
  • ____________ is still developing phonemic awareness skills and needs additional support to identify and manipulate sounds in words.
  • I would like to see ____________ demonstrate more confidence in reading aloud and taking risks in sounding out unfamiliar words.
  • ____________ needs to work on letter formation and improving handwriting legibility. Consistent practice at home will help.
  • ____________ is struggling with comprehending longer texts and needs more practice in summarizing and retelling stories.
  • ____________ shows improvement in recognizing letter sounds, but still needs practice in blending them together to read words fluently.
  • I encourage ____________ to expand [his/ her] vocabulary by using more descriptive words in [his/her] writing and speaking.

Math Skills Remarks for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ demonstrates a solid understanding of basic math concepts, such as number recognition, counting, and basic addition/subtraction. Well done!
  • ____________ shows enthusiasm for math and actively engages in hands-on activities and problem-solving tasks. Keep up the great work!
  • ____________ has made significant progress in understanding and applying math skills, such as identifying shapes, sorting objects, and recognizing patterns. Excellent effort!
  • ____________ enjoys exploring numbers and is beginning to understand basic math operations, such as adding and subtracting small quantities. Keep practicing!
  • ____________ consistently demonstrates a strong foundation in math skills and applies them in various real-life situations. Keep up the great math abilities!
  • ____________ shows great improvement in math skills and is now able to solve simple word problems and use basic math vocabulary. Well done on your progress!
  • ____________ is still developing a solid understanding of basic math concepts, such as number recognition and counting. Additional practice and reinforcement at home will be beneficial.
  • I would like to see ____________ demonstrate more confidence in solving math problems independently and applying math skills in different contexts.
  • ____________ needs to work on developing a stronger grasp of basic math operations, such as addition and subtraction. Consistent practice and support at home will help.
  • ____________ is struggling with understanding and applying more complex math concepts, such as measurement and time. Additional guidance and targeted practice will be beneficial.
  • ____________ shows improvement in math skills, but still needs practice in solving word problems and explaining math thinking. Continued practice and support will help strengthen these areas.
  • I encourage ____________ to expand [his/her] math vocabulary and use more precise math language when explaining math concepts and reasoning.

Art and Creativity Remarks for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ demonstrates a strong sense of creativity and imagination in [his/her] artwork. [He/She] enjoys exploring different materials and techniques.
  • ____________ shows great enthusiasm for art activities and is always eager to experiment with colors and textures.
  • ____________ consistently produces artwork that is unique and showcases [his/her] individuality. [He/She] is not afraid to take risks and try new approaches.
  • ____________ pays attention to details and takes pride in [his/her] artwork. [His/Her] pieces often display a high level of craftsmanship.
  • ____________ effectively uses various art mediums to express [his/her] ideas and emotions. [His/Her] artwork is visually engaging and thought-provoking.
  • ____________ shows a natural talent for art and consistently produces visually appealing and imaginative artwork.
  • ____________ is encouraged to take more risks and explore different art techniques. [He/She] tends to stick to familiar styles and materials.
  • ____________ needs guidance in developing [his/her] fine motor skills for more precise artwork. Encouraging [him/her] to practice control and attention to detail would be beneficial.
  • ____________ sometimes struggles with following instructions in art projects, resulting in incomplete or messy artwork. Encouraging [him/her] to listen carefully and follow step-by-step instructions would help improve [his/her] work.
  • ____________ would benefit from experimenting with a wider range of art materials and techniques to expand [his/her] creativity and artistic expression.
  • ____________ needs to work on focusing on the task at hand during art activities, as [he/she] can become easily distracted and rush through [his/her] work.
  • ____________ is encouraged to put more effort into completing [his/her] artwork. [He/She] sometimes shows a lack of commitment and may need reminders to finish [his/her] projects.

Fine Motor Skills Remarks for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ demonstrates excellent fine motor skills, showing precision and control when handling small objects and tools. [He/She] can manipulate small items with ease.
  • ____________ has made significant progress in developing fine motor skills, such as cutting, coloring, and writing. [He/She] can now complete tasks that require good hand-eye coordination.
  • ____________ shows great dexterity and coordination in [his/her] fine motor activities. [He/She] can complete intricate tasks with ease and accuracy.
  • ____________ is still developing fine motor skills and may need additional practice and support to improve [his/her] handwriting and control when using small tools.
  • I encourage ____________ to work on strengthening [his/her] fine motor skills, such as using scissors and holding a pencil correctly. Consistent practice at home will help improve [his/her] control and precision.
  • ____________ needs to focus on developing better control over [his/her] fine motor movements, such as coloring within the lines and using proper grip while writing. Continued practice and guidance will support [his/her] progress in this area.

Gross Motor Skills Remarks for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ demonstrates excellent gross motor skills, showing coordination and control in activities such as running, jumping, and throwing. [He/She] participates actively and confidently in physical activities.
  • ____________ has made great progress in developing gross motor skills. [He/She] is now able to perform more complex movements, such as skipping and hopping on one foot. Well done!
  • ____________ shows enthusiasm and skill in various gross motor activities. [He/She] can maintain balance and coordination while participating in games and sports.
  • ____________ is still developing gross motor skills and may need additional practice and support to improve [his/her] coordination and balance. Encouraging participation in physical activities at home would be beneficial.
  • I encourage ____________ to work on strengthening [his/her] gross motor skills, such as running, jumping, and catching. Continued practice and engagement in physical activities will help improve [his/her] overall coordination.
  • ____________ needs to focus on developing better control over [his/her] gross motor movements, such as skipping and throwing. Targeted practice and guidance will support [his/her] progress in this area.

Work Habit Remarks for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ has made great progress in improving [his/her] work habits, and is now submitting work that is grade-level appropriate. Great job!
  • ____________ has excellent work habits and always completes [his/her] work and other tasks on time and with great care. [He/she] is a great model for other students in our class!
  • ____________ works very well independently, is enthusiastic and conscientious, and submits neat, correct, and high-quality work every time. Awesome job!
  • ____________ consistently demonstrates excellent work habits and takes pride in completing assignments to the best of [his/her] ability. [He/She] is always focused, and attentive, and ensures that [his/her] work is neat and accurate.
  • ____________ has shown tremendous growth in [his/her] work habits throughout the year. [He/She] consistently demonstrates a strong work ethic, takes initiative, and goes above and beyond in completing tasks. [His/Her] dedication and commitment to quality work are commendable.
  • ____________ does mostly good work, but [he/she] is not consistent. We will continue to work on helping [him/her] submit [his/her] best work every time - please continue with the great support at home!
  • As discussed in previous meetings, ___________’s work habits still require continued support and attention to get [him/her] to an acceptable level.
  • ____________ is struggling with completing work and other tasks on time and without assistance. {He/she] is easily distracted and has difficulty staying on task when this happens.
  • ____________ generally does quality work, but is sometimes too focused on getting [his/her] independent work done too quickly, which leads to issues with accuracy and unnecessary errors. Please help to reinforce a careful and focused work pace at home.
  • ____________ needs help to finish independent assignments. [He/she] has made progress in managing time and making serious efforts, but needs continued support in this area to develop the skills necessary for doing great work on [his/her] own.

Personality and Attitude Remarks for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ is thoughtful, pleasant, curious, and a hard worker. [He/she] enjoys school and is a great classmate. Great job!
  • ____________ shows interest in and enthusiasm for school, [his/her] classmates, and learning and applying new skills and concepts. [He/she] is a joy to have in class.
  • ____________ enjoys participating in class activities, working in groups, and helping others. [He/she] adds a lot to the personality of our classroom and is well-liked by other students.
  • ____________’s attitude toward school and [his/her] classmates has improved dramatically since the last reporting period. Thank you for being so helpful!
  • ____________ consistently demonstrates a positive attitude towards school, showing enthusiasm and a genuine love for learning. [He/She] approaches challenges with a positive mindset and is always willing to help and support classmates.
  • ____________ displays a friendly and respectful demeanor towards peers and teachers. [He/She] actively contributes to a positive classroom environment by being kind, considerate, and inclusive towards others. [His/Her] positive attitude is contagious and helps create a welcoming atmosphere for everyone.
  • ____________ is struggling with consistency in [his/her] attitude in school. While [he/she] is very good at [behavior/attitude], [he/she] sometimes struggles with [behavior/attitude]. We will continue to work on this, and your assistance would be greatly appreciated.
  • ____________ needs to be encouraged to participate more in class activities and group work. [He/she] has progressed with this since the beginning of the year, but has more work to do.
  • ____________ is struggling with consistently following classroom rules, especially those having to do with [behavior/attitude/norm]. I am confident that with ongoing support and reminders, [he/she] will quickly improve this area.
  • ____________ has continued to struggle with adapting to classroom rules and routines. I would like to schedule a conference with you to discuss how we can work together to improve [his/her] behavior.
  • ____________ is having difficulty demonstrating consistent positive behavior and attitude in school. While [he/she] is capable of showing [behavior/attitude], [he/she] sometimes struggles with [behavior/attitude]. Continued support and assistance from both home and school will be beneficial in helping [him/her] improve in this area.
  • ____________ needs encouragement to actively participate in class activities and group work. Although there has been progress since the beginning of the year, [he/she] still has room for improvement. Continued practice and support will help [him/her] become more engaged in these activities.

Social-Emotional Skills Remarks and Comments for Kindergarten Students

  • ____________ manages and regulates [his/her] emotions appropriately and responds well to feedback.
  • ____________ is very good at finishing things that [he/she] starts and seeing them all the way through to the end result.
  • ____________ communicates very effectively with classmates, teachers, and other staff members.
  • ____________ is dependable, responds well to direction and coaching, and follows through on [his/her] commitments to [him/her]self and others.
  • ____________ is responsible and accountable for [his/her] work, behavior, and communication both inside and outside the classroom.
  • ____________ is always looking for ways to be helpful to other students and members of the school community.
  • ____________ works very well with classmates and others on group projects and activities, and is comfortable being a leader.
  • ____________ relates well to others and is appreciative of different perspectives, experiences, and circumstances.
  • ____________ struggles with managing [his/her] emotions appropriately and could benefit from additional support in this area.
  • ____________ has difficulty staying focused and may need reminders to stay on task during class activities.
  • ____________ has shown inconsistent problem-solving skills and would benefit from strategies to help [him/her] approach challenges more effectively.
  • ____________ has difficulty taking responsibility for [his/her] actions and may need guidance in understanding the consequences of [his/her] choices.
  • ____________ has trouble working cooperatively with peers and may need support in developing positive collaboration skills.
  • ____________ has difficulty following classroom rules and would benefit from consistent reminders and reinforcement of expectations.

Featured Kindergarten Resources

The Ultimate Self-Regulation Kit

Related Resources

Report Card Comments & Phrases for Distance Learning

About the author

Stephen Solomon, TeacherVision Contributor

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Home » Pumpkin Book Reports

Pumpkin Book Reports

  • Halloween , Fall , Printables , Family Involvement

A perfect way to incorporate pumpkins, books, and learning! Find out how to incorporate Pumpkin Book Reports into your October lesson plans here!

book report kindergarten

This activity goes well with these resources:

All About Pumpkin Science, Science with Pumpkins Activities for Kindergarten

Here’s how it works:

  • Print the free letter and assign a due date.  Have them be due a couple days before you present them.
  • Families make the pumpkins at home to resemble a book or a character.
  • Students bring them in.  You display them and have the kids present their pumpkins to the class.

Here are a few of my personal favorite Pumpkin Book Reports I have seen over the years:

Pumpkin Book Report - Captain Underpants

(Courtesy of the Ms. Johnson and the other teachers at Richardson Elementary via the  Simply Kinder Teacher Facebook Group ).

Pumpkin Book Report - Bad Case of the Stripes

Do the pumpkins always look so perfect and polished?

Here are some additional samples of pumpkin book reports you may get:.

Pumpkin Book Report - Clifford

What do you do if a student does not bring in a pumpkin?

Get your free pumpkin book report download here:.

We’d love to see your pumpkin book reports pictures! Please share with #Simplykinder on Instagram !

book report kindergarten

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New York Post

NYC school gives kids as young as 5 woke BLM coloring book with ‘queer, trans-affirming’ lessons

A New York City elementary school is facing criticism for doling out a woke Black Lives Matter coloring book to kids as young as 5 that features “queer and transgender affirming” lessons and teachings on revolutionary politics, according to a report.

Students at PS 321 in Brooklyn’s Park Slope — which teaches children from kindergarten through fifth grade — were handed the “What We Believe: A Black Lives Matter Principles Activity Book” coloring book last week as part of a Black History Month lesson, the Free Press reported.

The book, which prominently features the 13 “guiding principles” of the BLM movement, uses various drawings and worksheets to get its message across.

Under the title trans affirming principle, the book spells out that “we know that cisgender (not trans) people in our society have privilege, and we want to uplift trans people, especially black trans women who often experience violence.”

Meanwhile, the book also lists off a slew of the BLM movement’s national demands — including a push to “fund counselors not cops” and “mandate black history & ethnic studies.”

Some parents, however, insisted the coloring book didn’t actually teach their kids about black history — and instead presented controversial ideas “as fact.”

“It’s not necessarily true. It’s not like every black person believes in these principles,” the mom of a fourth-grade student told the Free Press.

She added the book doesn’t go “into enough detail and there is no mention of specific people. It just feels very vague.”  

Other parents took issue with another principle — titled Empathy — and its use of the word “comrades” to describe how people should understand and engage with others — with some interpreting it as a communist term and push to promote political propaganda.

“Using the word comrades comes from Communist times,” a fourth-grade mom, whose grandparents fled China for the US, said.  

“They are using words that I don’t think are appropriate for elementary school.”

While parents acknowledged that some of the lessons appeared harmless, such as the importance of forgiveness, they argued that others were akin to revolutionary politics.

The “Black Villages” principle, for example, describes “disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement.”

And the “Intergenerational” principal calls for a “communal network free from ageism.”

PS 321 and the city’s Department of Education didn’t immediately respond to The Post’s request for comment Thursday.

In a statement, a DOE spokesperson told the Free Press: “Anytime parents have a concern about resources used in school, we encourage them to share their concerns to the school principal or district superintendent.”

NYC school gives kids as young as 5 woke BLM coloring book with ‘queer, trans-affirming’ lessons

IMAGES

  1. Kindergarten Book Report by Jillian

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  2. Book Report for Kindergarten and First Grade by Catherine S

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  3. Kindergarten Book Report by Danielle Warren

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  4. Book Report Forms Fiction and Non Fiction

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  5. Book Report Ideas For Kindergarten

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  6. Kindergarten Book Report Template Free

    book report kindergarten

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  2. Progress report/kindergarten activities/school kids/#school

  3. Kindergarten Report Card Term 2 -- English

  4. Book Report

COMMENTS

  1. Kindergarten Book Report Worksheet Freebie

    This book report template for kindergarteners engages my homeschool kindergartener by using drawing to show her favorite parts of the story. It also helps introduce the concept of story elements like characters and setting. This activity gives her a structured way to discuss her favorite stories with me in a way that keeps her interested.

  2. Fun Book Report Templates For Kids

    Previous Next Fun Book Report Templates For Kids Inspire a love of reading in your kids with book reports that are fun, simple, and creative! Enjoy these great book report templates for kindergarten & 1st grade, and try some of these great book report tips and ideas! Creative Book Report Templates For Kids

  3. Book Report Templates

    We've created PDF book report templates with a variety of activities for students from kindergarten to middle school. These skill-building activities support students in independent research through content organization, summarizing, and sequencing.

  4. 33 Free Book Report Forms and Templates for Kids

    33 Free Book Report Forms and Templates for Kids "I cannot thank you enough for these homeschool-saving resources! Love the open and go aspect, love that I don't need a teacher's guide - but most of all, I am so happy that my son is thriving and not complaining. Thank you!!"

  5. 26 EPIC Book Report Ideas

    Use these creative book report ideas with kindergartners, grade 1, grade 2, grade 3, grade 4, grade 5, and grade 6 students. Whether you are a parent working on improving your child's reading skills, a classroom teacher getting ready for back to school, or a homeschooler - we've got a book report project ideas for everyone! Book project ideas

  6. 42 Creative Book Report Ideas for Every Grade and Subject

    Reading Grades: Elementary School Middle School 42 Creative Book Report Ideas for Students Inspire your students to share their love of books. We Are Teachers; Mrs. Suggs; Mrs. D's Delights By Elizabeth Mulvahill Sep 28, 2023 Responding to what you read is an important literacy skill.

  7. Kindergarten Book Reports

    Kindergarten Book Reports - 7 comments Each week my kinder kids take home a book bag with 5 books to keep and read at home during the week. I have been wondering lately if they take the bags out of their backpack and is someone reading to them, or are they at least looking at the books, if nothing else.

  8. Guided Book Report for Kids- Printable Template

    Need ideas for what books to read with your kids/students? Check Out Some of Our Favorite Book Posts: Must Read Classic Books for Kids Best Books for Tween Boys Best Books for Tween Girls Newbery Medal Book List How to Find Clean Books for Kids to Read How to Print the Elementary Guided Book Report You can find this in my shop! $ 4.50 Add to cart

  9. How To Write A Book Report + FREE Printable Template for Kids

    A book report is just what it sounds like - a detailed report your kids will write after reading a book. In the report, they will give a summary of the book and share some of the important plot points, as well as share their opinion of the book.

  10. My Book Report Worksheets

    My Book Report Worksheets. By Monique August 12, 2015 Updated on January 12, 2023. These book report worksheets are great for kindergarten or grade 1 students. There are large lines for them to easily write in with places to draw and show their creative side as well. And now we have tons more fun printable kindergarten worksheets to share.

  11. Book Report For Kindergarten Teaching Resources

    Book Report For Kindergarten Teaching Resources | TPT Browse book report for kindergarten resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, a marketplace trusted by millions of teachers for original educational resources. Browse Catalog Grades Pre-K - K 1 - 2 3 - 5 6 - 8 9 - 12 Other Subject Arts & Music English Language Arts World Language Math Science

  12. Book Report Templates for Kinder, First, and Second Grade

    These printables book report forms were specifically made for kindergarten and first graders who are new to book reports. Writing a book report for young kids should not be intense. For this reason, all of the pages are simple and straightforward, and they focus on a few key words at a time. They can be used in reading/listening centers, as a ...

  13. Kindergarten Book Report by Jillian

    64 Followers Follow What educators are saying I loved using this "book report" as an accountability piece for my read to self center. It helped me to see which books my students were reading and held them accountable in this center. — Ashley M. Great resource to use at this time of the year when students take books out form our school library.

  14. Book Report Template For Kindergarten Teaching Resources

    These easy-to-follow book reports will serve as a great introduction to learn and write about different features and concepts of book reports. They are ideal for kindergarten, 1st grade, and 2nd grade, but can be applied for different grades and ESOL classrooms. The reponse sheets focus on a few features at a time to not overwhelm young learners.

  15. Writing Reports in Kindergarten? Yes!

    This lesson provides three types of reports that can be written and shared by kindergarten students. These reports allow young students to see themselves as writers with important information to share with others. In the first report, students report what they've learned about an apple using all five senses by completing a simple report form.

  16. Reading Log PDF and Book Report Templates

    The reading log pdf and book report template are perfect for elementary students, while the reading log coloring pages cater to the needs of preschoolers, making literacy development an enjoyable experience for all. Table of Contents Reading Log PDF

  17. 10 Book Report Ideas That Kids Will Love

    2. Paper Bag Book Report. This is a super simple idea that is quite fun for students. Provide each student with a lunch-sized paper bag. Tell them to think about 5 objects that relate to the main character of their book. The objects have to be small enough to fit into the bag.

  18. Book Report Worksheets PDF Download

    Kindergarten Book Report Activity Sheets With Images. For beginners, printable Book Reports are flexible. They can be used when student reads a new book. These kindergarten Book Reports Templates are ready-made, so you can spend less time planning and more team on teaching or reading. All of our resources are made by teachers and designed to ...

  19. FREE Printable Book Report Template pdf 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th Grade

    The book report template 3rd grade has a spot for first grade, second grade, third grade, and fourth grade students to write down book title, author, rate the book, tell their favorite part, give a summary of the book, and more. This is such a handy, free printable, book report template 2nd grade.

  20. Report Card Comments & Phrases for Kindergarten

    This list of 96 ready-to-use report card comments covers academics (including language, literacy, and math), art and creativity, gross and fine motor skills, personality and attitude, work habits, and social skills for kindergarten report cards, and provides both examples of positive feedback for students and suggestions for improvement.

  21. FREE Printable Book Report Form! So Cute!

    My Favourite Book activity can be used as a homework task. Pupils use worksheet to create a poster on their favourite book best printed off at A3. Choice of Fiction and Non-fiction format. Book reports are similar format but slightly harder, can be used as extension tasks during literacy.

  22. Kindergarten Book Reports Teaching Resources

    Do you feel like your assessments are not working for you? Perhaps you feel like all the assessing leaves you with very little time to teach. This is the perfect solution for your

  23. Pumpkin Book Reports

    Pumpkin Patch Field Trip Activities. $5.00. Add to cart. Here's how it works: Print the free letter and assign a due date. Have them be due a couple days before you present them. Families make the pumpkins at home to resemble a book or a character. Students bring them in. You display them and have the kids present their pumpkins to the class.

  24. NYC school gives kids as young as 5 woke BLM coloring book with ...

    A New York City elementary school is facing criticism for doling out a woke Black Lives Matter coloring book to kids as young as 5 that features "queer and transgender affirming" lessons and ...