How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay: All Tips

Table of contents

  • 1 What to Write in the Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay
  • 2.1 Know how to structure your paper
  • 3 How to Start the Conclusion of an Essay?
  • 4.1 Example 1
  • 4.2 Example 2
  • 4.3 Example 3
  • 4.4 Examples 4, 5
  • 5 How to Finish an Argumentative Project Conclusion Paragraph

Want to write a perfect conclusion for your paper but don’t know how? Everyone has been there, and it’s never easy. It is the final part of your writing, so by the time you reach it, you have no energy and can’t focus.

Still, the conclusion part is crucial for the success of every paper. You have to give the final answer to the audience by restating your thesis and noting your claims and findings. If you think you can’t write one, you’d better buy an argumentative essay online and solve your problems.

In this article, you will find everything you need to know about a conclusion to an argumentative essay and how to write it.

What to Write in the Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay

To write a conclusion argumentative essay, you first need to recall all the key points of your writing. The college argumentative essay outline you have written can significantly assist you in this. After you have noted these points, you should restate your rephrased thesis and findings.

Except for those basic points, knowing how to conclude an argumentative essay also requires a few more things:

The first thing to pay attention to is your tone of writing. Make sure it is authoritative yet calm and informative. This way, you will assure readers that your work is essential for the case.

Next is your first sentence. How you start your conclusion does matter. You need to state what you did and why. That will remind the readers once again about what they have read.

After you write it, you will need to point out the key findings of your writing. You must note the important evidence you have written about in your paper. Keep it brief and connect them to your text conclusion.

The last step is to finish the conclusion of your argumentative essay in a meaningful way. Ensure a positive final sentence to make the reader reflect on your work and make them act.

Thus, writing a conclusion for an argumentative essay is a complex process. It can be not easy to come up with a good conclusion on your own, so don’t hesitate to seek essay assistance if you need it. Once again, no matter what kind of conclusion you write, it is crucial to have a good one. That goes even for argumentative essays, where you can write everything straight as it is. You can be assertive and direct without considering whether the reader will like your argument. Still, you must keep a good transition between the sections and stick to the basic structure and rules.

Author Note: Make sure not to present any new arguments or claims in the conclusion. This section of your paper is your final opinion. Writing further details, ideas, or irrelevant findings can ruin the text.

more_shortcode

How to Format the Conclusion of an Argumentative Essay?

To format a conclusion, you have to follow a well-established standard. The best argumentative essay conclusion example includes a “lead” (opening statement). Then point out one vital factor from your paragraph. Usually, one point per paragraph, no more, or it will get too bulky. Finally, add an appropriate finale that will serve as a smooth exit of the whole paper, the final sentence.

By using the standard format, you will have an easier time when you have to write an argumentative essay conclusion. You can focus on the facts and tailor them to appeal to readers. That will re-convince them about your point for the case.

Here we can add that the final sentence should not always be smooth and friendly. When your conclusion tone is assertive, write the final part of the finale as a call to action—an attempt to affect the reader and make them want to research. To find out more about the matter or even take a stand with their own opinion.

Know how to structure your paper

  • 12-point Times New Roman
  • 0″ between paragraphs
  • 1″ margin all around
  • double-spaced (275 words/page) / single-spaced (550 words/page)
  • 0.5″ first line of a paragraph

Knowing the exact way to structure a conclusion in an argumentative essay is crucial. Someone may say that it is not important. But this is one of the first things people pay attention to. So, you have to format the paper and its main points properly. In any assignment, the style of the text adheres to strict requirements. Usually, you can find them by asking your professor or checking the educational institution’s website.

In that sense, you must stick to proper formatting when writing a perfect argumentative essay . To get the best grade, you have to use the  recommended formatting style , which can be APA, AP, or other. So remember, following the proper structure and formatting can make the critical points of your work stand out. As a result, your paper will look better, and your paper results will score higher.

Writing a perfect conclusion for your paper can be difficult, especially when you have no energy and can’t focus. Fortunately, PapersOwl.com is here to help. Our experienced writers can provide you with an excellent conclusion for your paper so that you can confidently submit it.

more_shortcode

How to Start the Conclusion of an Essay?

A conclusion to an argumentative essay must go through various steps. The foremost will be the entry sentence. Then, restate your main idea and critical points from your writing. You can add a question or two, but it depends on the flow of your text. Note how it reads and make sure everything sounds smooth, and the transition is flawless.

Note: You should check your outline for significant findings or arguments. Do that before starting with the first sentence of your conclusion. Make sure not to miss important facts or add new ones by mistake.

Essay Conclusion Examples

If you are still trying to figure out what your conclusion should look like, check below. We have prepared how-to-end argumentative essay examples . These can give you an idea about the structure and format of your paper’s final point.

In this particular sample, the case is about global warming. So, the essay’s conclusion has to give a compelling reason why the reader and the public should act and prevent the issue. You must remember that what you write depends on the type of paper and should be unique.

“Throughout our text, we pointed out findings about the impact of global warming. Nature cannot sustain itself in the ever-changing climate. The ice caps melt, and the shorelines deteriorate, thus causing the extinction of both flora and fauna. Due to the persisting crisis, we must take action and use the best methods to protect the future of our planet.”

Some papers involve public policies and morals. In such cases, you must write in a tone that will feel morally right but will support and justify your arguments. Usually, you write such papers when your topic is pointing towards persuasion. Below, you can see an argumentative essay conclusion example for such texts.

“As time goes on, technology has changed how we, as a society, receive and use information. Media’s influence has been increasing throughout the social applications we use daily. The said impacts public opinion, as we can see from the participants in our study group. Most have stated that their primary information source is social media. These media get large funds from private entities to filter your content. This way, you see their ideas and become part of their audience. If you like your news free of filtering and want truthful information, you must act now and ensure your rights.”
  • Free unlimited checks
  • All common file formats
  • Accurate results
  • Intuitive interface

At one point or another, you will get an assignment to help with your career objectives. Usually, it is connected to your writing as you have to research specific matters. For example, bring out your point of view and make conclusions. You can quickly implement such tasks in essays like the argumentative one. Thus, you have to be ready to write a conclusion of an argumentative essay that can fit well and is decisive.

“Often, when you get the opportunity to launch a new business, you must grab it. Plan business meetings, solve the x, y, and z obstacles, and speed up the process. Business is about profit, producing more revenue, and creating an easily manageable structure. If you choose to act on a different undertaking, there will be risks a or b, which can lead to overstepping the estimated budgets.”

Examples 4, 5

As seen, the conclusion of an argumentative essay can depend on your moral choices. In other cases, on a figure of speech and even sensitivity towards an issue. So, some good argumentative essay topics need an emotional appeal to the reader.

Good conclusion paragraph examples for an argumentative essay can be about any topic. They can be something like whether abortion is a fundamental right for women. In such essay cases, your moral perspective plays a considerable role. But, no matter your point, it is crucial to state your ideas without offending anyone else.

“The right to give birth or not is fundamental for women. They must have it ensured. Otherwise, they have no control or option in their social relationships. The analysis showcases how an unwanted pregnancy can influence and determine the life of a young woman and her child. So without guaranteed rights, women are forced to use dangerous methods to retake ownership of their body, and that must change.” “Life is not a choice given by someone. It is a fundamental right guaranteed by the law. In that sense, denying an unborn child’s right to life is identical to denying any other person’s rights. Furthermore, studies have long proven that life begins with its inception. Therefore, carrying out policies of pro-choice is like murder. With that in mind, saving the unborn by speaking out for them is like giving their rights a voice.”

more_shortcode

How to Finish an Argumentative Project Conclusion Paragraph

How to end an argumentative essay? The answer is a strong finishing line. The final sentence is what will leave a deep impression on your reader. Usually, we finish it smoothly in a cordial tone. It must be in a way that will make the reader think about the case or take some action. In other cases, the call to action is intense. It could be smoother, but its main goal is to influence the audience to contemplate and act.

Taking into consideration the importance of the last sentence, you must write it correctly. Remember that its point is to move the reader, but at the same time to explain why. It should look like, “ If we don’t do it now, we won’t be able to act in the future. ” If your sentence cuts the flow of the whole text, it will not appeal to your reader. If you are having trouble crafting the perfect conclusion for your argumentative essay, you can always pay for essay help from a professional writer to get the job done right.

Now you understand how to write a conclusion for an argumentative essay, but remember to catch up on the whole paper flow and finish it in the same tone. Use the call to action sentence and exit your essay smoothly while giving the readers ideas and making them think about the case. If you can’t, please check our argumentative essay writing services , which can easily tackle the task. Note that by getting it done by a professional, you can learn from examples. Besides, the text can get done in a few hours.

Readers also enjoyed

How to Write an Argumentative Essay

WHY WAIT? PLACE AN ORDER RIGHT NOW!

Just fill out the form, press the button, and have no worries!

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you board with our cookie policy.

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Menu.

  • How It Works
  • Prices & Discounts

How to Write a Clear and Strong Conclusion for Argumentative Essay

Stefani H.

Table of contents

So, you've made it to the end of your argumentative essay. After pouring your efforts into researching and crafting compelling arguments in your introductory and body paragraphs, you're now left wondering, "What on earth do I write in the conclusion paragraph?"

Sound familiar? Well, you're not alone.

Writing conclusion paragraphs often feels like a daunting task. You might find yourself thinking, "What can I say that hasn’t already been said?" However, don't let this uncertainty trick you into undermining the value of a well-written conclusion.

Writing conclusions shouldn't be taken lightly. In fact, the conclusion paragraph is the finishing touch that packages your essay neatly, communicating to the reader that you have provided the closure your argument deserves.

Think about it: you wouldn't gift someone a present without wrapping it, right? Similarly, no matter how strong the arguments you've raised in your essay are, without a solid conclusion, your essay may seem incomplete or lackluster.

In this guide, we'll explore how to write a strong conclusion paragraph in an argumentative essay, ensuring your essay is wrapped up just as beautifully as it was crafted.

The Purpose of a Conclusion Paragraph in an Argumentative Essay

A conclusion paragraph is like the final bow in a performance—it's your last opportunity to impress the audience and leave a lasting impression. In an argumentative essay, this "final bow" serves a few critical roles.

Firstly , the conclusion reaffirms your thesis statement. It brings the reader back to your main argument and reminds them of the stance you've taken. It's not about introducing new ideas, but rather solidifying the ones you've already presented.

Secondly , it's a summary of your main points or arguments. It offers the reader a concise overview of the ground you've covered, tying together all the threads of your argument into a cohesive narrative.

Lastly , it presents a final statement—an impactful sentence or two that leaves the reader with something to ponder. This could be a thought-provoking question, a call to action, or a prediction about the future. It serves to cement your argument in the reader's mind and ensure your essay is memorable.

Now that we've established the critical roles of a conclusion, let's take a closer look at the structure of an argumentative essay, and specifically, how to build a strong conclusion paragraph.

Components of a Strong Conclusion Paragraph

A powerful conclusion to an argumentative essay contains several key elements. Let's break them down:

Restating the Thesis Statement : start by revisiting your thesis statement. This doesn't mean copying it word for word from your introduction, but rather, paraphrasing it in a new light. Given the evidence and arguments you've presented, this reaffirms your position and reminds your reader of the claim you've defended.

Summarizing Main Points/Arguments : next, offer a brief recap of the main points or arguments you've made in the body of your essay. This should be succinct and help tie everything together. Remember, it's a summary—avoid going into too much detail or bringing up any new information.

Presenting the Final Statement : the final statement is your last chance to leave a lasting impression or provoke thought in your reader. This could be a call to action, a quotation, or a forward-looking statement about the implications of your argument. Make sure it reinforces your thesis and wraps up your essay well.

Discussing Broader Implications or Significance : lastly, if appropriate, discuss the broader implications of your topic. How does your argument fit into the larger context? What impact might it have on the future? This helps your reader understand the relevance and potential influence of your argument.

Now that we understand the components let's move on to how to put them together to form an effective conclusion paragraph.

KEY POINTS : " In writing your conclusion, remember to restate your thesis in a fresh and interesting way. Then, summarize your main arguments concisely, ensuring they tie back to your thesis. Consider discussing broader implications or impact of your argument if relevant, to give your conclusion a strong finish. "

Writing a Strong Conclusion: Step-by-Step Approach

Crafting a strong conclusion isn't rocket science, but it does require some thoughtful effort. Follow this step-by-step approach to ensure your conclusion effectively wraps up your argument.

Step 1: Begin by Transitioning Smoothly

First and foremost, don’t abruptly jump into your conclusion. Use transitional phrases such as "in conclusion," "to sum up," or "finally" to signal to the reader that you are wrapping up your argument.

Step 2: Restate Your Thesis

Revisit your thesis statement in the light of the arguments you've made. Remember to paraphrase it—simply copy-pasting the statement won't do. Make it clear that the evidence and points you've presented support your thesis statement .

Step 3: Summarize Your Main Arguments

Next, briefly summarize the main points or arguments you've made in your essay. This is your opportunity to reinforce these points and remind the reader of their importance. Be succinct and avoid introducing any new information.

Step 4: Make Your Final Statement

Your final statement should leave a lasting impression. This could be a provocative question, a prediction, or a call to action—something that will resonate with your reader and encourage further thought or action.

Step 5: Discuss Broader Implications

If it fits your topic, consider discussing the broader implications or significance of your argument. This helps connect your argument to a larger context and can show your reader why your topic matters.

Step 6: Review and Polish

Finally, review your conclusion. Does it flow well? Does it provide a compelling and concise wrap-up of your argument? Make sure to polish your language and check for any errors.

Remember, the conclusion is your last opportunity to leave a lasting impression on your reader, so make it count. If you'd like to see how these steps look in practice, stay tuned for our examples of well-written conclusion paragraphs coming up next.

Examples of Well-Written Conclusion Paragraphs

There's nothing like good examples to illustrate a point. Here are a few well-written conclusion paragraphs from argumentative essays to help you better understand the process we just outlined.

Example 1 : Let's say our thesis statement was, "Despite some drawbacks, the benefits of online learning—such as flexibility and accessibility—make it a viable alternative to traditional education."

Conclusion paragraph : "In conclusion, the rise of online learning is not without its challenges. Technical glitches, lack of interpersonal communication, and the requirement for self-motivation can make it seem less appealing to some. However, when we consider the unmatched flexibility and accessibility it offers to learners worldwide, it's clear that online education is a powerful tool in our educational arsenal. It may not replace traditional education entirely, but it undoubtedly provides a viable alternative for many. As technology continues to advance, we can only anticipate the further enhancement of online learning experiences."

Example 2 : Suppose our thesis statement was, "Even though it is a source of renewable energy, the environmental and social costs of large-scale hydroelectric dams often outweigh their benefits."

Conclusion paragraph : "To sum up, while large-scale hydroelectric dams have long been hailed for their ability to generate renewable energy, we must also consider the significant environmental and social costs associated with them. The destruction of habitats, displacement of local communities, and the risk of catastrophic failure present serious challenges to their continued development. Though the quest for sustainable energy solutions is more critical than ever, it is essential that we weigh these concerns carefully and explore more environmentally and socially responsible alternatives."

These examples should give you a clear picture of how a well-crafted conclusion ties an argumentative essay together. Up next, we'll discuss some common pitfalls to avoid when writing your conclusion.

Common Pitfalls to Avoid When Writing Your Conclusion

As important as it is to know what to include in your conclusion, it's equally crucial to understand what to avoid. Below are some common pitfalls that can weaken your conclusion:

Introducing New Information : your conclusion is not the place to introduce new arguments or information. It should synthesize what you've already discussed, not open up new lines of debate.

Simply Restating the Introduction : while your conclusion should revisit your thesis statement and main points, avoid merely restating your introduction. Your conclusion should add value by providing a fresh perspective or highlighting the implications of your argument.

Making Unsupported Claims : your conclusion should be based on the evidence and arguments you've presented in your essay. Avoid making sweeping claims or statements that aren't backed by your essay's content.

Being Vague or Unclear : your conclusion should be clear and concise. Avoid using vague language or unclear statements that could confuse your reader.

Neglecting the Broader Significance : if it's relevant to your topic, your conclusion is an excellent place to discuss the broader significance or implications of your argument. Avoid missing this opportunity to show your reader why your argument matters.

By being aware of these common pitfalls, you can ensure your conclusion is strong, compelling, and effective. Now, you should be well-equipped to write a strong conclusion for your argumentative essay. But remember, practice makes perfect!

Final Thoughts

Writing a strong conclusion for your argumentative essay is crucial. It provides closure and drives home the main points of your argument one last time. Remember, your conclusion is your last chance to persuade your reader and leave a lasting impression.

Restate your thesis, summarize your main points, make a memorable final statement, and, if applicable, discuss the broader implications of your argument. Avoid common pitfalls like introducing new information or merely restating your introduction.

Take the time to practice this skill and consider utilizing the resources provided above for further learning and improvement. With persistence and patience, you will master the art of writing compelling conclusions.

However, if you find yourself struggling, remember that help is just a click away. At our argumentative essay writing service for students , we have a team of skilled writers who can deliver top-notch custom essays tailored to your specific needs. We're here to help you succeed.

Share this article

Achieve Academic Success with Expert Assistance!

Crafted from Scratch for You.

Ensuring Your Work’s Originality.

Transform Your Draft into Excellence.

Perfecting Your Paper’s Grammar, Style, and Format (APA, MLA, etc.).

Calculate the cost of your paper

Get ideas for your essay

  • Pay Someone to Write a Paper
  • Buy Literature Review
  • Reaction Paper Writing Service
  • Urgent Essay Writing Service
  • Write My Philosophy Paper
  • Buy Biology Paper
  • Marketing Plan Writing Service
  • Presentation Writing Service
  • Paper Editing Service
  • Do My Capstone Project
  • EE writing service
  • Report Writing Service
  • Do My Powerpoint
  • Write My Lab Report
  • Do My Accounting Assignment
  • Write My Book Report
  • Write My Assignment
  • Write My Discussion Post
  • Psychology Essay Writing Service
  • Write My Literature Review
  • Write My Annotated Bibliography
  • Write My Thesis Paper for Me
  • Buy College Paper Now
  • Analytical Essay Writing Service
  • Assessment Help Online
  • Buy Custom Personal Statement
  • Write My Speech
  • Buy Research Proposal
  • Do My Research Paper
  • Buy ToK Essay
  • Do My Coursework Online
  • Do My Case Study
  • Do My Math Problems Online

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Conclusions

OWL logo

Getting writing help is so easy with us

Choose the type, level, urgency, and length to start off

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Argumentative Essay Conclusion - Write a Strong Concluding Paragraph

If you're reading this article, chances are you have been given an assignment that involves writing. And, that's the argumentative one. An argumentative essay does include some basic elements found in other types of academic papers, but here, we'll focus on its conclusion. After reading this article, you'll learn how to write a strong essay conclusion for a text with an argumentative implication.

As always, it's useful to recall that an argumentative essay consists of the introduction, body, and that element we're going to discuss in detail. All of these sections should be organized well and be developed around the main idea of your assignment . An introduction prepares grounds for your ideas, your essay body provides all necessary details and supporting evidence, and an argumentative essay conclusion is the last chance for you to defend a point and strengthen a final impression. All these elements ensure a logical flow and interconnection of the ideas discussed. And, to finish the writing well, it is important to know the standards and requirements of the essay's last part.

So, why is it necessary to have a conclusion in your argumentative essay? First, without it, the entire assignment will appear incomplete. Recall listening to a piece of music or song which abruptly comes to an end, or reading a book that ends in a cliffhanger. That would leave a bad taste in the mouths of those reading your paper or make the audience think poorly of the author's writing skills. Not only is the conclusion an obligatory part of any assignment, but it also brings wholeness to each of those. You may think of it as the last piece of a jigsaw puzzle: whatever is depicted in it, without that last piece, it's still incomplete. Also, a conclusion in the argumentative essay can highlight the central idea once again. That will not only help you end the writing logically but show your attention to details and competence in academic standards.

When people read lengthy argumentative essays, they can easily lose their bearings. One can use too many ideas, counterarguments, or evidence. A concluding paragraph helps the reader sort of "refresh" the whole text in their minds. That said, it isn't merely a mechanical task of summarizing the central points. The essence of doing so is even more meaningful and powerful - it can help to understand and draw connections between the issues under discussion. So, you write an argumentative conclusion to expand your readers' outlook, providing them with some relevant ideas or points they may have missed or never thought about.

Conclusions are significant for all types of papers. And, the process of writing one can be a hurdle for college students . That's because a lot more is expected from them in terms of the complexity of arguments, the use of advanced grammar, relevant references, and length of a written work. In light of this, it makes sense to offer you useful insights into how to write an argumentative essay conclusion.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Writing

There is no best way to end an argumentative essay. The process of writing the conclusion is just as creative and subjective as that of working on other paragraphs of the work. However, some crucial elements should be included here. An argumentative essay requires you to repeat the thesis statement (optional), make the audience believe that the arguments made are valid, and cross all the T's.

Here are 3 simple steps involved in writing a good argumentative conclusion:

  • Writing an outline
  • Opening the conclusion
  • Closing the conclusion

What follows next are some effective ways to accomplish the above-mentioned stages and achieve a well-written text. To start a concluding paragraph, you may want to do the following:

  • Use a transition. Introduce the conclusion in a sequential way. The transition could be a phrase of varying length that somehow mentions previous ideas from the preceding paragraph.
  • Creatively reiterate your thesis statement without being verbatim (i.e., writing it word for word). Consider the following essay conclusion example: Recently, much has been said about the appropriateness of breastfeeding in public places. However, it would not be improper to state that women who choose to do so should neglect the fact that by exposing themselves in public, they run the risk of being shamed, judged, or even sexually abused.

The highlighted part of the above sentences is a possible creative restatement of the main thesis. That can be as follows: Nursing mothers should be able to breastfeed their babies in public places without the fear of being shamed or intimidated.

To end the argumentative conclusion, consider using one of the methods below:

  • End with a question. Closing your essay on a high note is a good way to make your reader want to look into the issues debated. Another way of doing so implies asking a question that invites the audience to analyze the subject beyond the aspects discussed. The question could be a rhetorical one and emphasize the importance of your argument. Here are some examples: If it's normal for a relationship to be like this, would you allow yourself or your sister to be on the receiving end of such abuse? or Would you let your child, who's a mere 5 years away from entering adulthood, be subjected to such strenuous labor to make ends meet?
  • Conclude by introducing a relevant but not-so-obvious idea. That will help you create the effect of surprise, reveal something new, and provide the reader with a fresh outlook frame on the issue. Given its application in space travel and abundance of water on Earth (70% of Earth is made up of water), hydrogen as a fuel source could usher in environmentally-friendly vehicles within the next three decades!

Keep in mind that our examples are just templates. If you're writing an argument essay on a different topic, you need to come up with ideas relevant to it.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Outline

In this section, we'll talk about the outline and give you some advice. This element lists the content of your essay - it can cover the whole text or its part. You may wonder why it's necessary to create an outline for a conclusion. The answer is simple - it helps you figure out how the last paragraph is organized and interconnected with the rest of the writing.

Remember that an outline is only a tool, but a very useful one. Unless you are a versatile and experienced writer, you may have some trouble writing a compelling essay without this element. The outline for an argumentative conclusion can be compared to a skeleton or foundation. Just as a skeleton gives shape and support to the body, it provides form and logical flow to your essay conclusion. Let's look through the following example:

  • Transition. Mention the key idea or thesis in a sequence.
  • Connection. Pick a sentence or two from the body that can support your central idea (use facts).
  • Closing Words. Expand the issue by asking a related question to provoke ideas in the readers' minds.

The example above clearly serves as a foundation upon which the argumentative concluding paragraph can be formulated. Remember - the argumentative essay conclusion isn't for new ideas. Stick to your main questions and make sure your arguments are relevant.

If you have any difficulties or issues with writing your essays, don't hesitate to contact us and receive professional support. Our skilled writers and expert support agents are always ready to help you by creating assignments that will meet your student needs!

Subscribe to get free samples

Writer 147214

Christopher

Writer 35119

More than 176 testimonials from clients make up a 9.6 / 10 rate of success , making our organization one of the best in the industry.

"Had to ask for two revisions of my case study but overall I'm satisfied with it. Earned me a B+, and that's more than enough for me."

"As a regular customer I guarantee that every essay these pros write is a masterpiece! I got my A, as always, and definitely will see you soon :)"

"I use specific writing style and need it to be followed since my tutor can guess if the paper was done by me. Your writers are very smart and experienced. I sent you only one paper I wrote as an example and each essay you write for me fits in with my style. Great!"

"Hey, my term paper turned out rather good, B+ and I am very happy. If I use wiseessays.com again, I would love the same writer. I have more tasks to complete and I expect that you help me get better grades. Thanks you!"

"The essay was just on time. Thank you for good services and friendly support. Every assignment you complete is a surprise, the writing quality is always high and I never needed a single revision. I am happy that I found you one day and I'll order again, as long as I keep studying!"

"Yes, yes, yes! 6 hours and you are done! I got b+ and I am happy!"

PrepScholar

Choose Your Test

Sat / act prep online guides and tips, how to write an a+ argumentative essay.

Miscellaneous

feature_typewriter

You'll no doubt have to write a number of argumentative essays in both high school and college, but what, exactly, is an argumentative essay and how do you write the best one possible? Let's take a look.

A great argumentative essay always combines the same basic elements: approaching an argument from a rational perspective, researching sources, supporting your claims using facts rather than opinion, and articulating your reasoning into the most cogent and reasoned points. Argumentative essays are great building blocks for all sorts of research and rhetoric, so your teachers will expect you to master the technique before long.

But if this sounds daunting, never fear! We'll show how an argumentative essay differs from other kinds of papers, how to research and write them, how to pick an argumentative essay topic, and where to find example essays. So let's get started.

What Is an Argumentative Essay? How Is it Different from Other Kinds of Essays?

There are two basic requirements for any and all essays: to state a claim (a thesis statement) and to support that claim with evidence.

Though every essay is founded on these two ideas, there are several different types of essays, differentiated by the style of the writing, how the writer presents the thesis, and the types of evidence used to support the thesis statement.

Essays can be roughly divided into four different types:

#1: Argumentative #2: Persuasive #3: Expository #4: Analytical

So let's look at each type and what the differences are between them before we focus the rest of our time to argumentative essays.

Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays are what this article is all about, so let's talk about them first.

An argumentative essay attempts to convince a reader to agree with a particular argument (the writer's thesis statement). The writer takes a firm stand one way or another on a topic and then uses hard evidence to support that stance.

An argumentative essay seeks to prove to the reader that one argument —the writer's argument— is the factually and logically correct one. This means that an argumentative essay must use only evidence-based support to back up a claim , rather than emotional or philosophical reasoning (which is often allowed in other types of essays). Thus, an argumentative essay has a burden of substantiated proof and sources , whereas some other types of essays (namely persuasive essays) do not.

You can write an argumentative essay on any topic, so long as there's room for argument. Generally, you can use the same topics for both a persuasive essay or an argumentative one, so long as you support the argumentative essay with hard evidence.

Example topics of an argumentative essay:

  • "Should farmers be allowed to shoot wolves if those wolves injure or kill farm animals?"
  • "Should the drinking age be lowered in the United States?"
  • "Are alternatives to democracy effective and/or feasible to implement?"

The next three types of essays are not argumentative essays, but you may have written them in school. We're going to cover them so you know what not to do for your argumentative essay.

Persuasive Essay

Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative essays, so it can be easy to get them confused. But knowing what makes an argumentative essay different than a persuasive essay can often mean the difference between an excellent grade and an average one.

Persuasive essays seek to persuade a reader to agree with the point of view of the writer, whether that point of view is based on factual evidence or not. The writer has much more flexibility in the evidence they can use, with the ability to use moral, cultural, or opinion-based reasoning as well as factual reasoning to persuade the reader to agree the writer's side of a given issue.

Instead of being forced to use "pure" reason as one would in an argumentative essay, the writer of a persuasive essay can manipulate or appeal to the reader's emotions. So long as the writer attempts to steer the readers into agreeing with the thesis statement, the writer doesn't necessarily need hard evidence in favor of the argument.

Often, you can use the same topics for both a persuasive essay or an argumentative one—the difference is all in the approach and the evidence you present.

Example topics of a persuasive essay:

  • "Should children be responsible for their parents' debts?"
  • "Should cheating on a test be automatic grounds for expulsion?"
  • "How much should sports leagues be held accountable for player injuries and the long-term consequences of those injuries?"

Expository Essay

An expository essay is typically a short essay in which the writer explains an idea, issue, or theme , or discusses the history of a person, place, or idea.

This is typically a fact-forward essay with little argument or opinion one way or the other.

Example topics of an expository essay:

  • "The History of the Philadelphia Liberty Bell"
  • "The Reasons I Always Wanted to be a Doctor"
  • "The Meaning Behind the Colloquialism ‘People in Glass Houses Shouldn't Throw Stones'"

Analytical Essay

An analytical essay seeks to delve into the deeper meaning of a text or work of art, or unpack a complicated idea . These kinds of essays closely interpret a source and look into its meaning by analyzing it at both a macro and micro level.

This type of analysis can be augmented by historical context or other expert or widely-regarded opinions on the subject, but is mainly supported directly through the original source (the piece or art or text being analyzed) .

Example topics of an analytical essay:

  • "Victory Gin in Place of Water: The Symbolism Behind Gin as the Only Potable Substance in George Orwell's 1984"
  • "Amarna Period Art: The Meaning Behind the Shift from Rigid to Fluid Poses"
  • "Adultery During WWII, as Told Through a Series of Letters to and from Soldiers"

body_juggle

There are many different types of essay and, over time, you'll be able to master them all.

A Typical Argumentative Essay Assignment

The average argumentative essay is between three to five pages, and will require at least three or four separate sources with which to back your claims . As for the essay topic , you'll most often be asked to write an argumentative essay in an English class on a "general" topic of your choice, ranging the gamut from science, to history, to literature.

But while the topics of an argumentative essay can span several different fields, the structure of an argumentative essay is always the same: you must support a claim—a claim that can reasonably have multiple sides—using multiple sources and using a standard essay format (which we'll talk about later on).

This is why many argumentative essay topics begin with the word "should," as in:

  • "Should all students be required to learn chemistry in high school?"
  • "Should children be required to learn a second language?"
  • "Should schools or governments be allowed to ban books?"

These topics all have at least two sides of the argument: Yes or no. And you must support the side you choose with evidence as to why your side is the correct one.

But there are also plenty of other ways to frame an argumentative essay as well:

  • "Does using social media do more to benefit or harm people?"
  • "Does the legal status of artwork or its creators—graffiti and vandalism, pirated media, a creator who's in jail—have an impact on the art itself?"
  • "Is or should anyone ever be ‘above the law?'"

Though these are worded differently than the first three, you're still essentially forced to pick between two sides of an issue: yes or no, for or against, benefit or detriment. Though your argument might not fall entirely into one side of the divide or another—for instance, you could claim that social media has positively impacted some aspects of modern life while being a detriment to others—your essay should still support one side of the argument above all. Your final stance would be that overall , social media is beneficial or overall , social media is harmful.

If your argument is one that is mostly text-based or backed by a single source (e.g., "How does Salinger show that Holden Caulfield is an unreliable narrator?" or "Does Gatsby personify the American Dream?"), then it's an analytical essay, rather than an argumentative essay. An argumentative essay will always be focused on more general topics so that you can use multiple sources to back up your claims.

Good Argumentative Essay Topics

So you know the basic idea behind an argumentative essay, but what topic should you write about?

Again, almost always, you'll be asked to write an argumentative essay on a free topic of your choice, or you'll be asked to select between a few given topics . If you're given complete free reign of topics, then it'll be up to you to find an essay topic that no only appeals to you, but that you can turn into an A+ argumentative essay.

What makes a "good" argumentative essay topic depends on both the subject matter and your personal interest —it can be hard to give your best effort on something that bores you to tears! But it can also be near impossible to write an argumentative essay on a topic that has no room for debate.

As we said earlier, a good argumentative essay topic will be one that has the potential to reasonably go in at least two directions—for or against, yes or no, and why . For example, it's pretty hard to write an argumentative essay on whether or not people should be allowed to murder one another—not a whole lot of debate there for most people!—but writing an essay for or against the death penalty has a lot more wiggle room for evidence and argument.

A good topic is also one that can be substantiated through hard evidence and relevant sources . So be sure to pick a topic that other people have studied (or at least studied elements of) so that you can use their data in your argument. For example, if you're arguing that it should be mandatory for all middle school children to play a sport, you might have to apply smaller scientific data points to the larger picture you're trying to justify. There are probably several studies you could cite on the benefits of physical activity and the positive effect structure and teamwork has on young minds, but there's probably no study you could use where a group of scientists put all middle-schoolers in one jurisdiction into a mandatory sports program (since that's probably never happened). So long as your evidence is relevant to your point and you can extrapolate from it to form a larger whole, you can use it as a part of your resource material.

And if you need ideas on where to get started, or just want to see sample argumentative essay topics, then check out these links for hundreds of potential argumentative essay topics.

101 Persuasive (or Argumentative) Essay and Speech Topics

301 Prompts for Argumentative Writing

Top 50 Ideas for Argumentative/Persuasive Essay Writing

[Note: some of these say "persuasive essay topics," but just remember that the same topic can often be used for both a persuasive essay and an argumentative essay; the difference is in your writing style and the evidence you use to support your claims.]

body_fight

KO! Find that one argumentative essay topic you can absolutely conquer.

Argumentative Essay Format

Argumentative Essays are composed of four main elements:

  • A position (your argument)
  • Your reasons
  • Supporting evidence for those reasons (from reliable sources)
  • Counterargument(s) (possible opposing arguments and reasons why those arguments are incorrect)

If you're familiar with essay writing in general, then you're also probably familiar with the five paragraph essay structure . This structure is a simple tool to show how one outlines an essay and breaks it down into its component parts, although it can be expanded into as many paragraphs as you want beyond the core five.

The standard argumentative essay is often 3-5 pages, which will usually mean a lot more than five paragraphs, but your overall structure will look the same as a much shorter essay.

An argumentative essay at its simplest structure will look like:

Paragraph 1: Intro

  • Set up the story/problem/issue
  • Thesis/claim

Paragraph 2: Support

  • Reason #1 claim is correct
  • Supporting evidence with sources

Paragraph 3: Support

  • Reason #2 claim is correct

Paragraph 4: Counterargument

  • Explanation of argument for the other side
  • Refutation of opposing argument with supporting evidence

Paragraph 5: Conclusion

  • Re-state claim
  • Sum up reasons and support of claim from the essay to prove claim is correct

Now let's unpack each of these paragraph types to see how they work (with examples!), what goes into them, and why.

Paragraph 1—Set Up and Claim

Your first task is to introduce the reader to the topic at hand so they'll be prepared for your claim. Give a little background information, set the scene, and give the reader some stakes so that they care about the issue you're going to discuss.

Next, you absolutely must have a position on an argument and make that position clear to the readers. It's not an argumentative essay unless you're arguing for a specific claim, and this claim will be your thesis statement.

Your thesis CANNOT be a mere statement of fact (e.g., "Washington DC is the capital of the United States"). Your thesis must instead be an opinion which can be backed up with evidence and has the potential to be argued against (e.g., "New York should be the capital of the United States").

Paragraphs 2 and 3—Your Evidence

These are your body paragraphs in which you give the reasons why your argument is the best one and back up this reasoning with concrete evidence .

The argument supporting the thesis of an argumentative essay should be one that can be supported by facts and evidence, rather than personal opinion or cultural or religious mores.

For example, if you're arguing that New York should be the new capital of the US, you would have to back up that fact by discussing the factual contrasts between New York and DC in terms of location, population, revenue, and laws. You would then have to talk about the precedents for what makes for a good capital city and why New York fits the bill more than DC does.

Your argument can't simply be that a lot of people think New York is the best city ever and that you agree.

In addition to using concrete evidence, you always want to keep the tone of your essay passionate, but impersonal . Even though you're writing your argument from a single opinion, don't use first person language—"I think," "I feel," "I believe,"—to present your claims. Doing so is repetitive, since by writing the essay you're already telling the audience what you feel, and using first person language weakens your writing voice.

For example,

"I think that Washington DC is no longer suited to be the capital city of the United States."

"Washington DC is no longer suited to be the capital city of the United States."

The second statement sounds far stronger and more analytical.

Paragraph 4—Argument for the Other Side and Refutation

Even without a counter argument, you can make a pretty persuasive claim, but a counterargument will round out your essay into one that is much more persuasive and substantial.

By anticipating an argument against your claim and taking the initiative to counter it, you're allowing yourself to get ahead of the game. This way, you show that you've given great thought to all sides of the issue before choosing your position, and you demonstrate in multiple ways how yours is the more reasoned and supported side.

Paragraph 5—Conclusion

This paragraph is where you re-state your argument and summarize why it's the best claim.

Briefly touch on your supporting evidence and voila! A finished argumentative essay.

body_plesiosaur

Your essay should have just as awesome a skeleton as this plesiosaur does. (In other words: a ridiculously awesome skeleton)

Argumentative Essay Example: 5-Paragraph Style

It always helps to have an example to learn from. I've written a full 5-paragraph argumentative essay here. Look at how I state my thesis in paragraph 1, give supporting evidence in paragraphs 2 and 3, address a counterargument in paragraph 4, and conclude in paragraph 5.

Topic: Is it possible to maintain conflicting loyalties?

Paragraph 1

It is almost impossible to go through life without encountering a situation where your loyalties to different people or causes come into conflict with each other. Maybe you have a loving relationship with your sister, but she disagrees with your decision to join the army, or you find yourself torn between your cultural beliefs and your scientific ones. These conflicting loyalties can often be maintained for a time, but as examples from both history and psychological theory illustrate, sooner or later, people have to make a choice between competing loyalties, as no one can maintain a conflicting loyalty or belief system forever.

The first two sentences set the scene and give some hypothetical examples and stakes for the reader to care about.

The third sentence finishes off the intro with the thesis statement, making very clear how the author stands on the issue ("people have to make a choice between competing loyalties, as no one can maintain a conflicting loyalty or belief system forever." )

Paragraphs 2 and 3

Psychological theory states that human beings are not equipped to maintain conflicting loyalties indefinitely and that attempting to do so leads to a state called "cognitive dissonance." Cognitive dissonance theory is the psychological idea that people undergo tremendous mental stress or anxiety when holding contradictory beliefs, values, or loyalties (Festinger, 1957). Even if human beings initially hold a conflicting loyalty, they will do their best to find a mental equilibrium by making a choice between those loyalties—stay stalwart to a belief system or change their beliefs. One of the earliest formal examples of cognitive dissonance theory comes from Leon Festinger's When Prophesy Fails . Members of an apocalyptic cult are told that the end of the world will occur on a specific date and that they alone will be spared the Earth's destruction. When that day comes and goes with no apocalypse, the cult members face a cognitive dissonance between what they see and what they've been led to believe (Festinger, 1956). Some choose to believe that the cult's beliefs are still correct, but that the Earth was simply spared from destruction by mercy, while others choose to believe that they were lied to and that the cult was fraudulent all along. Both beliefs cannot be correct at the same time, and so the cult members are forced to make their choice.

But even when conflicting loyalties can lead to potentially physical, rather than just mental, consequences, people will always make a choice to fall on one side or other of a dividing line. Take, for instance, Nicolaus Copernicus, a man born and raised in Catholic Poland (and educated in Catholic Italy). Though the Catholic church dictated specific scientific teachings, Copernicus' loyalty to his own observations and scientific evidence won out over his loyalty to his country's government and belief system. When he published his heliocentric model of the solar system--in opposition to the geocentric model that had been widely accepted for hundreds of years (Hannam, 2011)-- Copernicus was making a choice between his loyalties. In an attempt t o maintain his fealty both to the established system and to what he believed, h e sat on his findings for a number of years (Fantoli, 1994). But, ultimately, Copernicus made the choice to side with his beliefs and observations above all and published his work for the world to see (even though, in doing so, he risked both his reputation and personal freedoms).

These two paragraphs provide the reasons why the author supports the main argument and uses substantiated sources to back those reasons.

The paragraph on cognitive dissonance theory gives both broad supporting evidence and more narrow, detailed supporting evidence to show why the thesis statement is correct not just anecdotally but also scientifically and psychologically. First, we see why people in general have a difficult time accepting conflicting loyalties and desires and then how this applies to individuals through the example of the cult members from the Dr. Festinger's research.

The next paragraph continues to use more detailed examples from history to provide further evidence of why the thesis that people cannot indefinitely maintain conflicting loyalties is true.

Paragraph 4

Some will claim that it is possible to maintain conflicting beliefs or loyalties permanently, but this is often more a matter of people deluding themselves and still making a choice for one side or the other, rather than truly maintaining loyalty to both sides equally. For example, Lancelot du Lac typifies a person who claims to maintain a balanced loyalty between to two parties, but his attempt to do so fails (as all attempts to permanently maintain conflicting loyalties must). Lancelot tells himself and others that he is equally devoted to both King Arthur and his court and to being Queen Guinevere's knight (Malory, 2008). But he can neither be in two places at once to protect both the king and queen, nor can he help but let his romantic feelings for the queen to interfere with his duties to the king and the kingdom. Ultimately, he and Queen Guinevere give into their feelings for one another and Lancelot—though he denies it—chooses his loyalty to her over his loyalty to Arthur. This decision plunges the kingdom into a civil war, ages Lancelot prematurely, and ultimately leads to Camelot's ruin (Raabe, 1987). Though Lancelot claimed to have been loyal to both the king and the queen, this loyalty was ultimately in conflict, and he could not maintain it.

Here we have the acknowledgement of a potential counter-argument and the evidence as to why it isn't true.

The argument is that some people (or literary characters) have asserted that they give equal weight to their conflicting loyalties. The refutation is that, though some may claim to be able to maintain conflicting loyalties, they're either lying to others or deceiving themselves. The paragraph shows why this is true by providing an example of this in action.

Paragraph 5

Whether it be through literature or history, time and time again, people demonstrate the challenges of trying to manage conflicting loyalties and the inevitable consequences of doing so. Though belief systems are malleable and will often change over time, it is not possible to maintain two mutually exclusive loyalties or beliefs at once. In the end, people always make a choice, and loyalty for one party or one side of an issue will always trump loyalty to the other.

The concluding paragraph summarizes the essay, touches on the evidence presented, and re-states the thesis statement.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay: 8 Steps

Writing the best argumentative essay is all about the preparation, so let's talk steps:

#1: Preliminary Research

If you have the option to pick your own argumentative essay topic (which you most likely will), then choose one or two topics you find the most intriguing or that you have a vested interest in and do some preliminary research on both sides of the debate.

Do an open internet search just to see what the general chatter is on the topic and what the research trends are.

Did your preliminary reading influence you to pick a side or change your side? Without diving into all the scholarly articles at length, do you believe there's enough evidence to support your claim? Have there been scientific studies? Experiments? Does a noted scholar in the field agree with you? If not, you may need to pick another topic or side of the argument to support.

#2: Pick Your Side and Form Your Thesis

Now's the time to pick the side of the argument you feel you can support the best and summarize your main point into your thesis statement.

Your thesis will be the basis of your entire essay, so make sure you know which side you're on, that you've stated it clearly, and that you stick by your argument throughout the entire essay .

#3: Heavy-Duty Research Time

You've taken a gander at what the internet at large has to say on your argument, but now's the time to actually read those sources and take notes.

Check scholarly journals online at Google Scholar , the Directory of Open Access Journals , or JStor . You can also search individual university or school libraries and websites to see what kinds of academic articles you can access for free. Keep track of your important quotes and page numbers and put them somewhere that's easy to find later.

And don't forget to check your school or local libraries as well!

#4: Outline

Follow the five-paragraph outline structure from the previous section.

Fill in your topic, your reasons, and your supporting evidence into each of the categories.

Before you begin to flesh out the essay, take a look at what you've got. Is your thesis statement in the first paragraph? Is it clear? Is your argument logical? Does your supporting evidence support your reasoning?

By outlining your essay, you streamline your process and take care of any logic gaps before you dive headfirst into the writing. This will save you a lot of grief later on if you need to change your sources or your structure, so don't get too trigger-happy and skip this step.

Now that you've laid out exactly what you'll need for your essay and where, it's time to fill in all the gaps by writing it out.

Take it one step at a time and expand your ideas into complete sentences and substantiated claims. It may feel daunting to turn an outline into a complete draft, but just remember that you've already laid out all the groundwork; now you're just filling in the gaps.

If you have the time before deadline, give yourself a day or two (or even just an hour!) away from your essay . Looking it over with fresh eyes will allow you to see errors, both minor and major, that you likely would have missed had you tried to edit when it was still raw.

Take a first pass over the entire essay and try your best to ignore any minor spelling or grammar mistakes—you're just looking at the big picture right now. Does it make sense as a whole? Did the essay succeed in making an argument and backing that argument up logically? (Do you feel persuaded?)

If not, go back and make notes so that you can fix it for your final draft.

Once you've made your revisions to the overall structure, mark all your small errors and grammar problems so you can fix them in the next draft.

#7: Final Draft

Use the notes you made on the rough draft and go in and hack and smooth away until you're satisfied with the final result.

A checklist for your final draft:

  • Formatting is correct according to your teacher's standards
  • No errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation
  • Essay is the right length and size for the assignment
  • The argument is present, consistent, and concise
  • Each reason is supported by relevant evidence
  • The essay makes sense overall

#8: Celebrate!

Once you've brought that final draft to a perfect polish and turned in your assignment, you're done! Go you!

body_prepared_rsz

Be prepared and ♪ you'll never go hungry again ♪, *cough*, or struggle with your argumentative essay-writing again. (Walt Disney Studios)

Good Examples of Argumentative Essays Online

Theory is all well and good, but examples are key. Just to get you started on what a fully-fleshed out argumentative essay looks like, let's see some examples in action.

Check out these two argumentative essay examples on the use of landmines and freons (and note the excellent use of concrete sources to back up their arguments!).

The Use of Landmines

A Shattered Sky

The Take-Aways: Keys to Writing an Argumentative Essay

At first, writing an argumentative essay may seem like a monstrous hurdle to overcome, but with the proper preparation and understanding, you'll be able to knock yours out of the park.

Remember the differences between a persuasive essay and an argumentative one, make sure your thesis is clear, and double-check that your supporting evidence is both relevant to your point and well-sourced . Pick your topic, do your research, make your outline, and fill in the gaps. Before you know it, you'll have yourself an A+ argumentative essay there, my friend.

What's Next?

Now you know the ins and outs of an argumentative essay, but how comfortable are you writing in other styles? Learn more about the four writing styles and when it makes sense to use each .

Understand how to make an argument, but still having trouble organizing your thoughts? Check out our guide to three popular essay formats and choose which one is right for you.

Ready to make your case, but not sure what to write about? We've created a list of 50 potential argumentative essay topics to spark your imagination.

Need more help with this topic? Check out Tutorbase!

Our vetted tutor database includes a range of experienced educators who can help you polish an essay for English or explain how derivatives work for Calculus. You can use dozens of filters and search criteria to find the perfect person for your needs.

Connect With a Tutor Now

Courtney scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT in high school and went on to graduate from Stanford University with a degree in Cultural and Social Anthropology. She is passionate about bringing education and the tools to succeed to students from all backgrounds and walks of life, as she believes open education is one of the great societal equalizers. She has years of tutoring experience and writes creative works in her free time.

Student and Parent Forum

Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub.PrepScholar.com , allow you to interact with your peers and the PrepScholar staff. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process. Ask questions; get answers.

Join the Conversation

Ask a Question Below

Have any questions about this article or other topics? Ask below and we'll reply!

Improve With Our Famous Guides

  • For All Students

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 160+ SAT Points

How to Get a Perfect 1600, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 800 on Each SAT Section:

Score 800 on SAT Math

Score 800 on SAT Reading

Score 800 on SAT Writing

Series: How to Get to 600 on Each SAT Section:

Score 600 on SAT Math

Score 600 on SAT Reading

Score 600 on SAT Writing

Free Complete Official SAT Practice Tests

What SAT Target Score Should You Be Aiming For?

15 Strategies to Improve Your SAT Essay

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 4+ ACT Points

How to Get a Perfect 36 ACT, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 36 on Each ACT Section:

36 on ACT English

36 on ACT Math

36 on ACT Reading

36 on ACT Science

Series: How to Get to 24 on Each ACT Section:

24 on ACT English

24 on ACT Math

24 on ACT Reading

24 on ACT Science

What ACT target score should you be aiming for?

ACT Vocabulary You Must Know

ACT Writing: 15 Tips to Raise Your Essay Score

How to Get Into Harvard and the Ivy League

How to Get a Perfect 4.0 GPA

How to Write an Amazing College Essay

What Exactly Are Colleges Looking For?

Is the ACT easier than the SAT? A Comprehensive Guide

Should you retake your SAT or ACT?

When should you take the SAT or ACT?

Stay Informed

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Get the latest articles and test prep tips!

Looking for Graduate School Test Prep?

Check out our top-rated graduate blogs here:

GRE Online Prep Blog

GMAT Online Prep Blog

TOEFL Online Prep Blog

Holly R. "I am absolutely overjoyed and cannot thank you enough for helping me!”

How to Write an Argumentative Essay: Step By Step Guide

10 May, 2020

9 minutes read

Author:  Tomas White

Being able to present your argument and carry your point in a debate or a discussion is a vital skill. No wonder educational establishments make writing compositions of such type a priority for all students. If you are not really good at delivering a persuasive message to the audience, this guide is for you. It will teach you how to write an argumentative essay successfully step by step. So, read on and pick up the essential knowledge.

argumentative essay

What is an Argumentative Essay?

An argumentative essay is a paper that gets the reader to recognize the author’s side of the argument as valid. The purpose of this specific essay is to pose a question and answer it with compelling evidence. At its core, this essay type works to champion a specific viewpoint. The key, however, is that the topic of the argumentative essay has multiple sides, which can be explained, weighed, and judged by relevant sources.

Check out our ultimate argumentative essay topics list!

This essay often explores common questions associated with any type of argument including:

Common questions associated with an argument

Argumentative VS Persuasive Essay

It’s important not to confuse argumentative essay with a persuasive essay – while they both seem to follow the same goal, their methods are slightly different. While the persuasive essay is here to convince the reader (to pick your side), the argumentative essay is here to present information that supports the claim.

In simple words, it explains why the author picked this side of the argument, and persuasive essay does its best to persuade the reader to agree with your point of view.

Now that we got this straight, let’s get right to our topic – how to write an argumentative essay. As you can easily recognize, it all starts with a proper argument. First, let’s define the types of argument available and strategies that you can follow.

Types of Argument

Types of Argument

When delving into the types of argument, the vocabulary suddenly becomes quite “lawyerish”; and that makes sense since lawyers stake their whole livelihood on their ability to win arguments. So step into your lawyer shoes, and learn about the five kinds of arguments that you could explore in an argumentative paper:

Claims of cause and effect

This paper focuses on answering what caused the issue(s), and what the resulting effects have been.

Claims of definition

This paper explores a controversial interpretation of a particular definition; the paper delves into what the world really means and how it could be interpreted in different ways.

Claims of Fact

This argumentative paper examines whether a particular fact is accurate; it often looks at several sources reporting a fact and examines their veracity.

Claims of Policy

This is a favorite argumentative essay in government and sociology classes; this paper explores a particular policy, who it affects, and what (if anything) should be done about it.

Claims of Value

This essay identifies a particular value or belief and then examines how and why it is important to a particular cohort or a larger, general population.

The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress. Joseph Joubert

Argument Strategies

Argument Strategies

When mulling over how to approach your argumentative assignment, you should be aware that three main argument strategies exist regarding how exactly to argue an issue: classical, Rogerian, Toulmin.

Classical Argument

This argument structure dates back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. In this strategy, the arguer introduces the issue, provides context, clearly states their claim, provides key arguments backed by lots of evidence, and nullifies opposing arguments with valid data.

Rogerian Argument

Hate conflict? This may be the argumentative paper strategy for you. At its core, this strategy works to identify compromise aspects for both sides; this approach works to find commonality and an ultimate agreement between two sides rather than proclaiming a winner or loser. The focus in this argument is compromise and respect of all sides.

Toulmin Argument

Remember Spock? This is his type of strategy; the Toulmin approach focuses solely on logic to persuade the audience. It is heavy on data and often relies on qualities to narrow the focus of a claim and strengthen the writer’s stance. This approach also tends to rely on exceptions, which clearly set limits on the parameters of an argument, thus making a particular stance easier to agree with.

With that in mind, we can now organize our argument into the essay structure.

Have no time to write your essay? You can buy argumentative essay tasks at Handmade Writing. Our service is available 24/7.

Argumentative essay Example

Organizing the argumentative essay outline.

Organizing the Argumentative Essay Outline

An argumentative essay follows the typical essay format: introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. However, the body paragraphs are structured a bit differently from other body paragraphs. Surely, not something you can see in a cause and effect essay outline .

While the introduction should still begin with an attention-grabbing sentence that catches the reader’s interest and compels him or her to continue reading and provides key background information, the following paragraphs focus on specific aspects of the argument.

Let’s begin with the introduction.

Related Post: How to write an Essay Introduction ?

Introduction Paragraph

As its name suggests, this paragraph provides all the background information necessary for a reader unfamiliar with the argumentative essay topic to understand what it’s about. A solid introduction should:

  • Begin with a descriptive title that communicates your position regarding the topic
  • Rhetorical question
  • Personal anecdote
  • Provide necessary background, including definitions of any relevant words
  • End with a thesis statement that communicates your position
Stuck with your essay task? No more struggle! HandMadeWriting is the top essay writing service. Our online essay writer service not only guides you on writing papers, it can write a high-quality essay for you.

Body Paragraphs

Support the thesis statement

Body paragraphs can range in size from six to fifteen or more sentences. The goal of these paragraphs is to support the thesis statement. Recommended areas of focus for the body paragraphs within an argumentative paper include:

  • Identifying and explaining the problem
  • Identifying the two (or more) sides to the problem
  • Exploring the side the writer believes is more appropriate than the others
  • Shooting down the other sides, with evidence
  • Recommending a course of action for the reader

One important way how this essay differs from other kinds is its specific nature. At the end of reading such an essay, the audience should clearly understand the issue or controversy and have enough information to make an informed decision regarding the issue. But what compels an audience make an informed decision? Several things!

  • Authoritative sources (experts in their field)
  • Real-world examples
  • Attributable anecdotes

Conclusion

In this paragraph, often the shortest of all the paragraphs, the writer reviews his or her most compelling reasons for taking a particular stance on an issue. The persuasion should be strong here, and the writer should use combative language including examples such as:

  • “then” statements
  • There can be no doubt
  • Without immediate action
  • Research strongly supports

It is also appropriate to refute potential opposition in the conclusion. By stating the objections readers could have, and show why they should be dismissed; the conclusion resonates more strongly with the reader.

Check our guide if you have any other questions on academic paper writing!

Argumentative Essay Sample

Be sure to check the sample essay, completed by our writers. Use it as an example to write your own argumentative essay. Link:  Argumentative essay on white rappers’ moral rights to perform .

Remember : the key to winning any argument should be reliable sources — the better, the more trustworthy your sources, the more likely the audience will consider a viewpoint different from their own.

And while you may feel a deep passion towards a particular topic, keep in mind that emotions can be messy; this essay should present all sides to the argument respectfully and with a clear intention to portray each of them fairly.

Let the data, statistics, and facts speak loudly and clearly for themselves. And don’t forget to use opinionated language — using such diction is a must in any strong argumentative writing!

A life lesson in Romeo and Juliet taught by death

A life lesson in Romeo and Juliet taught by death

Due to human nature, we draw conclusions only when life gives us a lesson since the experience of others is not so effective and powerful. Therefore, when analyzing and sorting out common problems we face, we may trace a parallel with well-known book characters or real historical figures. Moreover, we often compare our situations with […]

Ethical Research Paper Topics

Ethical Research Paper Topics

Writing a research paper on ethics is not an easy task, especially if you do not possess excellent writing skills and do not like to contemplate controversial questions. But an ethics course is obligatory in all higher education institutions, and students have to look for a way out and be creative. When you find an […]

Art Research Paper Topics

Art Research Paper Topics

Students obtaining degrees in fine art and art & design programs most commonly need to write a paper on art topics. However, this subject is becoming more popular in educational institutions for expanding students’ horizons. Thus, both groups of receivers of education: those who are into arts and those who only get acquainted with art […]

Enago Academy

8 Effective Strategies to Write Argumentative Essays

' src=

In a bustling university town, there lived a student named Alex. Popular for creativity and wit, one challenge seemed insurmountable for Alex– the dreaded argumentative essay!

One gloomy afternoon, as the rain tapped against the window pane, Alex sat at his cluttered desk, staring at a blank document on the computer screen. The assignment loomed large: a 350-600-word argumentative essay on a topic of their choice . With a sigh, he decided to seek help of mentor, Professor Mitchell, who was known for his passion for writing.

Entering Professor Mitchell’s office was like stepping into a treasure of knowledge. Bookshelves lined every wall, faint aroma of old manuscripts in the air and sticky notes over the wall. Alex took a deep breath and knocked on his door.

“Ah, Alex,” Professor Mitchell greeted with a warm smile. “What brings you here today?”

Alex confessed his struggles with the argumentative essay. After hearing his concerns, Professor Mitchell said, “Ah, the argumentative essay! Don’t worry, Let’s take a look at it together.” As he guided Alex to the corner shelf, Alex asked,

Table of Contents

“What is an Argumentative Essay?”

The professor replied, “An argumentative essay is a type of academic writing that presents a clear argument or a firm position on a contentious issue. Unlike other forms of essays, such as descriptive or narrative essays, these essays require you to take a stance, present evidence, and convince your audience of the validity of your viewpoint with supporting evidence. A well-crafted argumentative essay relies on concrete facts and supporting evidence rather than merely expressing the author’s personal opinions . Furthermore, these essays demand comprehensive research on the chosen topic and typically follows a structured format consisting of three primary sections: an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph.”

He continued, “Argumentative essays are written in a wide range of subject areas, reflecting their applicability across disciplines. They are written in different subject areas like literature and philosophy, history, science and technology, political science, psychology, economics and so on.

Alex asked,

“When is an Argumentative Essay Written?”

The professor answered, “Argumentative essays are often assigned in academic settings, but they can also be written for various other purposes, such as editorials, opinion pieces, or blog posts. Some situations to write argumentative essays include:

1. Academic assignments

In school or college, teachers may assign argumentative essays as part of coursework. It help students to develop critical thinking and persuasive writing skills .

2. Debates and discussions

Argumentative essays can serve as the basis for debates or discussions in academic or competitive settings. Moreover, they provide a structured way to present and defend your viewpoint.

3. Opinion pieces

Newspapers, magazines, and online publications often feature opinion pieces that present an argument on a current issue or topic to influence public opinion.

4. Policy proposals

In government and policy-related fields, argumentative essays are used to propose and defend specific policy changes or solutions to societal problems.

5. Persuasive speeches

Before delivering a persuasive speech, it’s common to prepare an argumentative essay as a foundation for your presentation.

Regardless of the context, an argumentative essay should present a clear thesis statement , provide evidence and reasoning to support your position, address counterarguments, and conclude with a compelling summary of your main points. The goal is to persuade readers or listeners to accept your viewpoint or at least consider it seriously.”

Handing over a book, the professor continued, “Take a look on the elements or structure of an argumentative essay.”

Elements of an Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay comprises five essential components:

Claim in argumentative writing is the central argument or viewpoint that the writer aims to establish and defend throughout the essay. A claim must assert your position on an issue and must be arguable. It can guide the entire argument.

2. Evidence

Evidence must consist of factual information, data, examples, or expert opinions that support the claim. Also, it lends credibility by strengthening the writer’s position.

3. Counterarguments

Presenting a counterclaim demonstrates fairness and awareness of alternative perspectives.

4. Rebuttal

After presenting the counterclaim, the writer refutes it by offering counterarguments or providing evidence that weakens the opposing viewpoint. It shows that the writer has considered multiple perspectives and is prepared to defend their position.

The format of an argumentative essay typically follows the structure to ensure clarity and effectiveness in presenting an argument.

How to Write An Argumentative Essay

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to write an argumentative essay:

1. Introduction

  • Begin with a compelling sentence or question to grab the reader’s attention.
  • Provide context for the issue, including relevant facts, statistics, or historical background.
  • Provide a concise thesis statement to present your position on the topic.

2. Body Paragraphs (usually three or more)

  • Start each paragraph with a clear and focused topic sentence that relates to your thesis statement.
  • Furthermore, provide evidence and explain the facts, statistics, examples, expert opinions, and quotations from credible sources that supports your thesis.
  • Use transition sentences to smoothly move from one point to the next.

3. Counterargument and Rebuttal

  • Acknowledge opposing viewpoints or potential objections to your argument.
  • Also, address these counterarguments with evidence and explain why they do not weaken your position.

4. Conclusion

  • Restate your thesis statement and summarize the key points you’ve made in the body of the essay.
  • Leave the reader with a final thought, call to action, or broader implication related to the topic.

5. Citations and References

  • Properly cite all the sources you use in your essay using a consistent citation style.
  • Also, include a bibliography or works cited at the end of your essay.

6. Formatting and Style

  • Follow any specific formatting guidelines provided by your instructor or institution.
  • Use a professional and academic tone in your writing and edit your essay to avoid content, spelling and grammar mistakes .

Remember that the specific requirements for formatting an argumentative essay may vary depending on your instructor’s guidelines or the citation style you’re using (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago). Always check the assignment instructions or style guide for any additional requirements or variations in formatting.

Prof. Mitchell continued, “An argumentative essay can adopt various approaches when dealing with opposing perspectives. It may offer a balanced presentation of both sides, providing equal weight to each, or it may advocate more strongly for one side while still acknowledging the existence of opposing views.” As Alex listened carefully to the Professor’s thoughts, his eyes fell on a page with examples of argumentative essay.

Example of an Argumentative Essay

Alex picked the book and read the example. It helped him to understand the concept. Furthermore, he could now connect better to the elements and steps of the essay which Prof. Mitchell had mentioned earlier. Aren’t you keen to know how an argumentative essay should be like? Here is an example of a well-crafted argumentative essay , which was read by Alex. After Alex finished reading the example, the professor turned the page and continued, “Check this page to know the importance of writing an argumentative essay in developing skills of an individual.”

Importance of an Argumentative Essay

Importance_of_an_ArgumentativeEssays

After understanding the benefits, Alex was convinced by the ability of the argumentative essays in advocating one’s beliefs and favor the author’s position. Alex asked,

“How are argumentative essays different from the other types?”

Prof. Mitchell answered, “Argumentative essays differ from other types of essays primarily in their purpose, structure, and approach in presenting information. Unlike expository essays, argumentative essays persuade the reader to adopt a particular point of view or take a specific action on a controversial issue. Furthermore, they differ from descriptive essays by not focusing vividly on describing a topic. Also, they are less engaging through storytelling as compared to the narrative essays.

Alex said, “Given the direct and persuasive nature of argumentative essays, can you suggest some strategies to write an effective argumentative essay?

Turning the pages of the book, Prof. Mitchell replied, “Sure! You can check this infographic to get some tips for writing an argumentative essay.”

Effective Strategies to Write an Argumentative Essay

StrategiesOfWritingArgumentativeEssays

As days turned into weeks, Alex diligently worked on his essay. He researched, gathered evidence, and refined his thesis. It was a long and challenging journey, filled with countless drafts and revisions.

Finally, the day arrived when Alex submitted their essay. As he clicked the “Submit” button, a sense of accomplishment washed over him. He realized that the argumentative essay, while challenging, had improved his critical thinking and transformed him into a more confident writer. Furthermore, Alex received feedback from his professor, a mix of praise and constructive criticism. It was a humbling experience, a reminder that every journey has its obstacles and opportunities for growth.

Frequently Asked Questions

An argumentative essay can be written as follows- 1. Choose a Topic 2. Research and Collect Evidences 3. Develop a Clear Thesis Statement 4. Outline Your Essay- Introduction, Body Paragraphs and Conclusion 5. Revise and Edit 6. Format and Cite Sources 7. Final Review

One must choose a clear, concise and specific statement as a claim. It must be debatable and establish your position. Avoid using ambiguous or unclear while making a claim. To strengthen your claim, address potential counterarguments or opposing viewpoints. Additionally, use persuasive language and rhetoric to make your claim more compelling

Starting an argument essay effectively is crucial to engage your readers and establish the context for your argument. Here’s how you can start an argument essay are: 1. Begin With an Engaging Hook 2. Provide Background Information 3. Present Your Thesis Statement 4. Briefly Outline Your Main 5. Establish Your Credibility

The key features of an argumentative essay are: 1. Clear and Specific Thesis Statement 2. Credible Evidence 3. Counterarguments 4. Structured Body Paragraph 5. Logical Flow 6. Use of Persuasive Techniques 7. Formal Language

An argumentative essay typically consists of the following main parts or sections: 1. Introduction 2. Body Paragraphs 3. Counterargument and Rebuttal 4. Conclusion 5. References (if applicable)

The main purpose of an argumentative essay is to persuade the reader to accept or agree with a particular viewpoint or position on a controversial or debatable topic. In other words, the primary goal of an argumentative essay is to convince the audience that the author's argument or thesis statement is valid, logical, and well-supported by evidence and reasoning.

' src=

Great article! The topic is simplified well! Keep up the good work

Rate this article Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published.

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Enago Academy's Most Popular

ResearchSummary

  • Promoting Research

Plain Language Summary — Communicating your research to bridge the academic-lay gap

Science can be complex, but does that mean it should not be accessible to the…

Content Analysis vs Thematic Analysis: What's the difference?

  • Reporting Research

Choosing the Right Analytical Approach: Thematic analysis vs. content analysis for data interpretation

In research, choosing the right approach to understand data is crucial for deriving meaningful insights.…

Types Of Conference Presentations

Beyond the Podium: Understanding the differences in conference and academic presentations

Conferences can be captivating as it where knowledge meets presentation skills. They serve as dynamic…

Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Study Design

Comparing Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Studies: 5 steps for choosing the right approach

The process of choosing the right research design can put ourselves at the crossroads of…

Networking in Academic Conferences

  • Career Corner

Unlocking the Power of Networking in Academic Conferences

Embarking on your first academic conference experience? Fear not, we got you covered! Academic conferences…

Choosing the Right Analytical Approach: Thematic analysis vs. content analysis for…

Beyond the Podium: Understanding the differences in conference and academic…

Comparing Cross Sectional and Longitudinal Studies: 5 steps for choosing the right…

Research Recommendations – Guiding policy-makers for evidence-based decision making

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Sign-up to read more

Subscribe for free to get unrestricted access to all our resources on research writing and academic publishing including:

  • 2000+ blog articles
  • 50+ Webinars
  • 10+ Expert podcasts
  • 50+ Infographics
  • 10+ Checklists
  • Research Guides

We hate spam too. We promise to protect your privacy and never spam you.

I am looking for Editing/ Proofreading services for my manuscript Tentative date of next journal submission:

argumentative essay conclusion layout

When should AI tools be used in university labs?

Banner

Writing an Argumentative Research Paper

  • Library Resources
  • Books & EBooks
  • What is an Argumentative Research Essay?
  • Choosing a Topic
  • How to Write a Thesis Statement Libguide
  • Structure & Outline
  • Types of Sources
  • OER Resources
  • Copyright, Plagiarism, and Fair Use

Examples of argumentative essays

Skyline College libguides: MLA Sample Argumentative Papers

Ebooks in Galileo

Cover Art

Video Tutorial

Structure & Outline

Usually written in the five-paragraph structure, the argumentative essay format consists of an introduction, 2-3 body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

A works cited page or reference page (depending on format) will be included at the end of the essay along with in-text citations within the essay.

When writing an argumentative research essay, create an outline to structure the research you find as well as help with the writing process. The outline of an argumentative essay should include an introduction with thesis statement, 3 main body paragraphs with supporting evidence and opposing viewpoints with evidence to disprove, along with an conclusion.

The example below is just a basic outline and structure

I. Introduction: tells what you are going to write about. Basic information about the issue along with your thesis statement.

 A. Basic information

B. Thesis Statement

II. Body 1 : Reason 1 write about the first reason that proves your claim on the issue and give supporting evidence

A. supporting evidence 

B. Supporting evidence 

II. Body 2 .: Reason 2 write about the third reason that proves your claim on the issue and give supporting evidence

A. supporting evidence

III. Body 3 : Reason 3 write about the fourth reason that proves your claim on the issue and give supporting evidence

IV. Counter arguments and responses. Write about opposing viewpoints and use evidence to refute their argument and persuade audience in your direction or viewpoint

A. Arguments from other side of the issue

B. Refute the arguments

V. Conclusion

  • << Previous: How to Write a Thesis Statement Libguide
  • Next: Conducting Research >>
  • Last Updated: Jan 24, 2024 1:23 PM
  • URL: https://wiregrass.libguides.com/c.php?g=1188383
  • How It Works
  • Order an essay
  • College essay
  • Admission essay
  • Research paper
  • Dissertation

Writing a conclusion for an argumentative essay can be a breaking point for most students. This section is critical to your academic project because it guides your paper to a safe landing. Failing to pay special attention to this part can become your paper’s anticlimax that undoes all your good work. Thus, our essay help service team composed this article to guide you on how to conclude an argumentative essay. It answers critical questions like, “how do you end an argumentative essay?” Read on to learn more tips for crafting a persuasive conclusion for your argumentative papers and improving your writing skills.

How to Write a Good Conclusion For an Argumentative Essay?

An excellent argumentative essay organizes and presents well-reasoned conclusions to make readers agree with them or consider your viewpoint favourably. Therefore, composing a perfect conclusion paragraph for an argumentative essay increases the chances of your piece achieving its primary goal.

Do you still want to master how to write a conclusion for an argumentative essay? Then start by recalling every main argument that defended your thesis. After recollecting these thoughts, summarize them to show how they support your thesis. Afterwards, revisit your paraphrased thesis and findings. Closely consider these issues while drafting a conclusion for this essay type. Except for essential points, concluding an argumentative essay requires considering additional factors:

  • Consider your paper’s writing tone and ensure it is authoritative, calm, and informative.
  • Mind your opening statement to cement the value of what you said and remind your audience of it.
  • Finish your conclusion meaningfully by including a positive final sentence to make readers reflect on your work and act favourably.

Eventually, your conclusion will include the following four primary elements:

  • Restate your topic and show its relevance.
  • Revisit your thesis statement.
  • Address opposing arguments and show readers why they should buy into your viewpoint.
  • Include a call for action or suggest future research possibilities.

According to the simplest essay model, an argumentative essay consists of 3 main parts:

Argumentative essay conclusion

What to Avoid in Argumentative Essay Conclusion Paragraph?

Do you still want to master how to end an argumentative essay? Knowing what to exclude from your argumentative essay conclusion paragraph is necessary. Your conclusion in an argumentative essay is like its landing stage. Like an airplane flight, how you plan to “land” your readers in this closing paragraph can either make or break the entire flight. This closing must be impactful and avoid the following:

  • Introducing New Ideas.  Introducing any new arguments you didn’t discuss in the body paragraphs into this section is a bad idea. Instead, only unify and underscore the importance of your previously discussed thoughts.
  • Starting With Overused Phrases.  Starting with traditional phrases like “in conclusion” or “to wrap it up” is unnecessary. Only use relevant transition words without sounding redundant.
  • Ending With a Quote.  An argumentative essay isn’t a speech. Thus, please don’t end it with a quote, which might do well in the introduction to hook your readers.
  • Hurrying Through the Process.  You might be tempted to rush through this part because you have written the other parts, but don’t give it to the temptation. This section is equally important, and overlooking it can undo the other excellently written sections.
  • Apologizing.  Don’t undermine your paper’s authority and value by apologizing for your position.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Outline

Just like a synthesis essay outline , a structure helps you write down your research materials, explain your facts, and present your evidence logically. It also makes your drafting process convenient because you won’t forget to include any necessary materials. Thus, you should create an argumentative essay conclusion outline before sitting down to write the assignment. Writing a conclusion for an argumentative essay should comprise the following key elements that make it fulfil its goal.

  • Level the ground for completing your assignment.
  • Restate the thesis with new wordings.
  • Restate your paper’s premise.
  • Summarize your assignment’s major arguments.
  • Convince readers to side with your position.

How to Start a Conclusion For an Argumentative Essay?

Mastering how to end an argument essay requires knowing how to start it. Therefore, open it by summarizing or rephrasing your thesis in a reinvented format. This reinvented format emphasizes its importance and strength. Embark on this portion, knowing it’s your last opportunity to convince your readers to agree with your position.

This opening shows the readers that your thesis matters to them. It paves the way for summarizing the arguments that support the thesis. This successful opening saves you from trying to introduce new thoughts.

How to End an Argumentative Essay?

Ending an argumentative paper shouldn’t be hard if you know how to go about it. Generally, your assignment should end by opening with your thesis to demonstrate to readers that it’s worth agreeing with. Underscoring its value ties up your assignment’s value and relevance before your audience. You must also prove that your chosen subject matters and how it does.

Your closing chapter must also address all opposing views and prove your chosen stand is worthwhile without sounding arrogant or demeaning contrary viewpoints. You must also end with a call to favourable action or recommending possible future research.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Examples

Nothing inspires your ability to write killer conclusions for argumentative essays more than a well-written argumentative essay conclusion example. Thus, we set this section apart to offer inspiring conclusion examples for an argumentative essay. These models are critical to future tasks because argumentative essays can depend on your moral choices. Sometimes, you may need to appeal to readers’ emotions to drive your points home.

This perfect model addresses all the issues, demolishes opposing “pro-choice” views, and appeals to the reader’s emotions and intellect.

Unborn children’s life is sacred and not a choice a pregnant mother and abortionist doctor gives. It is a fundamental sacred right the law guarantees. Any attempt to deny an unborn child its right to life amounts to denying any other person’s right to life. Further, studies and common sense observation prove that life begins at conception. Otherwise, why do expectant mothers attend prenatal clinics or carry themselves carefully if they know they aren’t carrying delicate, precious lives? Thus, “pro-choice” is a myth and a cover-up for irresponsible sexual behaviour and legalized child sacrifice. It also ignores commonsense facts, such as that refusing to kill an innocent baby is a valid, sensible decision. So, protecting unborn lives is a choice to become a voice for the rights of the voiceless.

This example is good but wordy.

As time flies, tech has transformed how we, as a people, receive and utilize information. The media has greatly influenced how we think, using an increased number of social apps we use daily. The latter affect public opinions and perception, as our study group participants have demonstrated. Most participants confessed that social platforms are their primary information source. Unfortunately, these media platforms get large funds from private entities to filter the information you receive to promote selfish agendas. For this reason, you see view reality and life using their spectacles and produce their desired effect. So, act now to protect free news and truthful information.

This example is sloppy and doesn’t address specific business challenges. It also has redundant opening phrases.

In closing, when you get the golden chance to start a new business, always seize it. Hold board meetings, solve the A, B, and C challenges, and accelerate processes. Business is all about profits and generating more cash. If you opt for a different venture, you will face challenges X, Y, and Z, which exceed the estimated budgetary limits.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Format

Your argumentative essay conclusion must follow a specific format to enable your thoughts to flow coherently. As a rule of thumb, an excellent concluding format has four main parts that wrap up your argumentative paper well. This part delves deeper into this issue, as discussed below.

  • Revisit your subject and why it matters. This part should answer the “so what?” question. In other words, you should restate your subject’s value to make your readers understand its importance. It should also demonstrate the relevance and significance of your essay’s findings.
  • Recap your thesis. Your paper’s thesis is your primary argument and stand that holds together everything else. Repeat it to give your essay credence and validity.
  • Address opposing viewpoints. This section must address opposing points and show your readers why your position is preferred and worthy of their choice. It must be convincing and appealing to the readers’ emotions and minds to make them see your thesis favourably.
  • Summarize main thoughts. This subsection also summarizes your paper’s primary thoughts. However, don’t rewrite these arguments and reinvent the wheel.
  • A call to favourable action. Your concluding part should contain a call to favourable action and, possibly, a recommendation for further research on the subject.

Need Help With Argumentative Essay Writing?

How to close an argumentative essay is as significant as knowing how to start and continue it. This closing part determines whether your paper achieves its goal or not. It’s your last opportunity to show readers why your position on a given subject is worth your readers’ consideration.

This section can either make or break your paper, depending on how you handle it. Thus, we composed this post to who you how to write a good conclusion for an argumentative essay.

Do you still need more professional help with your essay assignments? Don’t worry because you can use a writer from our expert team. You can benefit from our law essay writing service and other assignment help.

Our writers can handle different essay types for college students at all levels covering all subjects. Go ahead and order your paper today to accelerate your studies. Talk to our team today.

Do you still have questions about how to write an argumentative essay conclusion? Here are the top questions and their answers.

How do you write a conclusion for an argumentative essay?

You write an argument essay conclusion by restating its thesis, summarizing its main points, and addressing opposing opinions.

Do you have conclusion examples for an argumentative essay in the article?

Yes, we have three conclusion paragraph examples for an argumentative essay to show you how a good and shoddy one looks.

What is a conclusion outline for an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay conclusion format is a wireframe containing and ordering your paper’s ideas. It also helps you easily compose your assignment while allowing readers to read it conveniently.

What to write about in an argumentative essay conclusion?

You should revisit your thesis, recap your ideas, and call for favourable reader action toward your thesis.

Argumentative Essay Introduction

In essay writing, the toughest part is always starting it. Most students agree: when you get the introduction paragraph right, you become much more confident about writing the rest of the paper. And, when it comes to more specific academic…  Read More

How to Write an Essay on a Book

Book essay writing is an omnipresent assignment imposed by many professors, especially if you are dealing with literature constantly. An essay on a book is usually a way for your teacher to get proof that you gained something from analyzing…  Read More

How to Write a Conclusion for an Argumentative Essay: Outline and Examples

Writing a conclusion for an argumentative essay can be a breaking point for most students. This section is critical to your academic project because it guides your paper to a safe landing. Failing to pay special attention to this part…  Read More

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • How to write an essay outline | Guidelines & examples

How to Write an Essay Outline | Guidelines & Examples

Published on August 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

An essay outline is a way of planning the structure of your essay before you start writing. It involves writing quick summary sentences or phrases for every point you will cover in each paragraph , giving you a picture of how your argument will unfold.

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Upload your document to correct all your mistakes in minutes

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

Organizing your material, presentation of the outline, examples of essay outlines, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about essay outlines.

At the stage where you’re writing an essay outline, your ideas are probably still not fully formed. You should know your topic  and have already done some preliminary research to find relevant sources , but now you need to shape your ideas into a structured argument.

Creating categories

Look over any information, quotes and ideas you’ve noted down from your research and consider the central point you want to make in the essay—this will be the basis of your thesis statement . Once you have an idea of your overall argument, you can begin to organize your material in a way that serves that argument.

Try to arrange your material into categories related to different aspects of your argument. If you’re writing about a literary text, you might group your ideas into themes; in a history essay, it might be several key trends or turning points from the period you’re discussing.

Three main themes or subjects is a common structure for essays. Depending on the length of the essay, you could split the themes into three body paragraphs, or three longer sections with several paragraphs covering each theme.

As you create the outline, look critically at your categories and points: Are any of them irrelevant or redundant? Make sure every topic you cover is clearly related to your thesis statement.

Order of information

When you have your material organized into several categories, consider what order they should appear in.

Your essay will always begin and end with an introduction and conclusion , but the organization of the body is up to you.

Consider these questions to order your material:

  • Is there an obvious starting point for your argument?
  • Is there one subject that provides an easy transition into another?
  • Do some points need to be set up by discussing other points first?

Receive feedback on language, structure, and formatting

Professional editors proofread and edit your paper by focusing on:

  • Academic style
  • Vague sentences
  • Style consistency

See an example

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Within each paragraph, you’ll discuss a single idea related to your overall topic or argument, using several points of evidence or analysis to do so.

In your outline, you present these points as a few short numbered sentences or phrases.They can be split into sub-points when more detail is needed.

The template below shows how you might structure an outline for a five-paragraph essay.

  • Thesis statement
  • First piece of evidence
  • Second piece of evidence
  • Summary/synthesis
  • Importance of topic
  • Strong closing statement

You can choose whether to write your outline in full sentences or short phrases. Be consistent in your choice; don’t randomly write some points as full sentences and others as short phrases.

Examples of outlines for different types of essays are presented below: an argumentative, expository, and literary analysis essay.

Argumentative essay outline

This outline is for a short argumentative essay evaluating the internet’s impact on education. It uses short phrases to summarize each point.

Its body is split into three paragraphs, each presenting arguments about a different aspect of the internet’s effects on education.

  • Importance of the internet
  • Concerns about internet use
  • Thesis statement: Internet use a net positive
  • Data exploring this effect
  • Analysis indicating it is overstated
  • Students’ reading levels over time
  • Why this data is questionable
  • Video media
  • Interactive media
  • Speed and simplicity of online research
  • Questions about reliability (transitioning into next topic)
  • Evidence indicating its ubiquity
  • Claims that it discourages engagement with academic writing
  • Evidence that Wikipedia warns students not to cite it
  • Argument that it introduces students to citation
  • Summary of key points
  • Value of digital education for students
  • Need for optimism to embrace advantages of the internet

Expository essay outline

This is the outline for an expository essay describing how the invention of the printing press affected life and politics in Europe.

The paragraphs are still summarized in short phrases here, but individual points are described with full sentences.

  • Claim that the printing press marks the end of the Middle Ages.
  • Provide background on the low levels of literacy before the printing press.
  • Present the thesis statement: The invention of the printing press increased circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.
  • Discuss the very high levels of illiteracy in medieval Europe.
  • Describe how literacy and thus knowledge and education were mainly the domain of religious and political elites.
  • Indicate how this discouraged political and religious change.
  • Describe the invention of the printing press in 1440 by Johannes Gutenberg.
  • Show the implications of the new technology for book production.
  • Describe the rapid spread of the technology and the printing of the Gutenberg Bible.
  • Link to the Reformation.
  • Discuss the trend for translating the Bible into vernacular languages during the years following the printing press’s invention.
  • Describe Luther’s own translation of the Bible during the Reformation.
  • Sketch out the large-scale effects the Reformation would have on religion and politics.
  • Summarize the history described.
  • Stress the significance of the printing press to the events of this period.

Literary analysis essay outline

The literary analysis essay outlined below discusses the role of theater in Jane Austen’s novel Mansfield Park .

The body of the essay is divided into three different themes, each of which is explored through examples from the book.

  • Describe the theatricality of Austen’s works
  • Outline the role theater plays in Mansfield Park
  • Introduce the research question : How does Austen use theater to express the characters’ morality in Mansfield Park ?
  • Discuss Austen’s depiction of the performance at the end of the first volume
  • Discuss how Sir Bertram reacts to the acting scheme
  • Introduce Austen’s use of stage direction–like details during dialogue
  • Explore how these are deployed to show the characters’ self-absorption
  • Discuss Austen’s description of Maria and Julia’s relationship as polite but affectionless
  • Compare Mrs. Norris’s self-conceit as charitable despite her idleness
  • Summarize the three themes: The acting scheme, stage directions, and the performance of morals
  • Answer the research question
  • Indicate areas for further study

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

College essays

  • Choosing Essay Topic
  • Write a College Essay
  • Write a Diversity Essay
  • College Essay Format & Structure
  • Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

Here's why students love Scribbr's proofreading services

Discover proofreading & editing

You will sometimes be asked to hand in an essay outline before you start writing your essay . Your supervisor wants to see that you have a clear idea of your structure so that writing will go smoothly.

Even when you do not have to hand it in, writing an essay outline is an important part of the writing process . It’s a good idea to write one (as informally as you like) to clarify your structure for yourself whenever you are working on an essay.

If you have to hand in your essay outline , you may be given specific guidelines stating whether you have to use full sentences. If you’re not sure, ask your supervisor.

When writing an essay outline for yourself, the choice is yours. Some students find it helpful to write out their ideas in full sentences, while others prefer to summarize them in short phrases.

You should try to follow your outline as you write your essay . However, if your ideas change or it becomes clear that your structure could be better, it’s okay to depart from your essay outline . Just make sure you know why you’re doing so.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2023, July 23). How to Write an Essay Outline | Guidelines & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved February 22, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/essay-outline/

Is this article helpful?

Jack Caulfield

Jack Caulfield

Other students also liked, how to create a structured research paper outline | example, a step-by-step guide to the writing process, how to write an argumentative essay | examples & tips, what is your plagiarism score.

What is an Argumentative Essay? How to Write It (With Examples)

Argumentative Essay

We define an argumentative essay as a type of essay that presents arguments about both sides of an issue. The purpose is to convince the reader to accept a particular viewpoint or action. In an argumentative essay, the writer takes a stance on a controversial or debatable topic and supports their position with evidence, reasoning, and examples. The essay should also address counterarguments, demonstrating a thorough understanding of the topic.

Table of Contents

  • What is an argumentative essay?  
  • Argumentative essay structure 
  • Argumentative essay outline 
  • Types of argument claims 

How to write an argumentative essay?

  • Argumentative essay writing tips 
  • Good argumentative essay example 

How to write a good thesis

Frequently asked questions, what is an argumentative essay.

An argumentative essay is a type of writing that presents a coherent and logical analysis of a specific topic. 1 The goal is to convince the reader to accept the writer’s point of view or opinion on a particular issue. Here are the key elements of an argumentative essay: 

  • Thesis Statement : The central claim or argument that the essay aims to prove. 
  • Introduction : Provides background information and introduces the thesis statement. 
  • Body Paragraphs : Each paragraph addresses a specific aspect of the argument, presents evidence, and may include counterarguments. 
  • Evidence : Supports the main argument with relevant facts, examples, statistics, or expert opinions. 
  • Counterarguments : Anticipates and addresses opposing viewpoints to strengthen the overall argument. 
  • Conclusion : Summarizes the main points, reinforces the thesis, and may suggest implications or actions. 

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Argumentative essay structure

Aristotelian, Rogerian, and Toulmin are three distinct approaches to argumentative essay structures, each with its principles and methods. 2 The choice depends on the purpose and nature of the topic. Here’s an overview of each type of argumentative essay format.

Argumentative essay outline

An argumentative essay presents a specific claim or argument and supports it with evidence and reasoning. Here’s an outline for an argumentative essay, along with examples for each section: 3  

1.  Introduction : 

  • Hook : Start with a compelling statement, question, or anecdote to grab the reader’s attention. 

Example: “Did you know that plastic pollution is threatening marine life at an alarming rate?” 

  • Background information : Provide brief context about the issue. 

Example: “Plastic pollution has become a global environmental concern, with millions of tons of plastic waste entering our oceans yearly.” 

  • Thesis statement : Clearly state your main argument or position. 

Example: “We must take immediate action to reduce plastic usage and implement more sustainable alternatives to protect our marine ecosystem.” 

2.  Body Paragraphs : 

  • Topic sentence : Introduce the main idea of each paragraph. 

Example: “The first step towards addressing the plastic pollution crisis is reducing single-use plastic consumption.” 

  • Evidence/Support : Provide evidence, facts, statistics, or examples that support your argument. 

Example: “Research shows that plastic straws alone contribute to millions of tons of plastic waste annually, and many marine animals suffer from ingestion or entanglement.” 

  • Counterargument/Refutation : Acknowledge and refute opposing viewpoints. 

Example: “Some argue that banning plastic straws is inconvenient for consumers, but the long-term environmental benefits far outweigh the temporary inconvenience.” 

  • Transition : Connect each paragraph to the next. 

Example: “Having addressed the issue of single-use plastics, the focus must now shift to promoting sustainable alternatives.” 

3.  Counterargument Paragraph : 

  • Acknowledgement of opposing views : Recognize alternative perspectives on the issue. 

Example: “While some may argue that individual actions cannot significantly impact global plastic pollution, the cumulative effect of collective efforts must be considered.” 

  • Counterargument and rebuttal : Present and refute the main counterargument. 

Example: “However, individual actions, when multiplied across millions of people, can substantially reduce plastic waste. Small changes in behavior, such as using reusable bags and containers, can have a significant positive impact.” 

4.  Conclusion : 

  • Restatement of thesis : Summarize your main argument. 

Example: “In conclusion, adopting sustainable practices and reducing single-use plastic is crucial for preserving our oceans and marine life.” 

  • Call to action : Encourage the reader to take specific steps or consider the argument’s implications. 

Example: “It is our responsibility to make environmentally conscious choices and advocate for policies that prioritize the health of our planet. By collectively embracing sustainable alternatives, we can contribute to a cleaner and healthier future.” 

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Types of argument claims

A claim is a statement or proposition a writer puts forward with evidence to persuade the reader. 4 Here are some common types of argument claims, along with examples: 

  • Fact Claims : These claims assert that something is true or false and can often be verified through evidence.  Example: “Water boils at 100°C at sea level.”
  • Value Claims : Value claims express judgments about the worth or morality of something, often based on personal beliefs or societal values. Example: “Organic farming is more ethical than conventional farming.” 
  • Policy Claims : Policy claims propose a course of action or argue for a specific policy, law, or regulation change.  Example: “Schools should adopt a year-round education system to improve student learning outcomes.” 
  • Cause and Effect Claims : These claims argue that one event or condition leads to another, establishing a cause-and-effect relationship.  Example: “Excessive use of social media is a leading cause of increased feelings of loneliness among young adults.” 
  • Definition Claims : Definition claims assert the meaning or classification of a concept or term.  Example: “Artificial intelligence can be defined as machines exhibiting human-like cognitive functions.” 
  • Comparative Claims : Comparative claims assert that one thing is better or worse than another in certain respects.  Example: “Online education is more cost-effective than traditional classroom learning.” 
  • Evaluation Claims : Evaluation claims assess the quality, significance, or effectiveness of something based on specific criteria.  Example: “The new healthcare policy is more effective in providing affordable healthcare to all citizens.” 

Understanding these argument claims can help writers construct more persuasive and well-supported arguments tailored to the specific nature of the claim.  

If you’re wondering how to start an argumentative essay, here’s a step-by-step guide to help you with the argumentative essay format and writing process.

  • Choose a Topic: Select a topic that you are passionate about or interested in. Ensure that the topic is debatable and has two or more sides.
  • Define Your Position: Clearly state your stance on the issue. Consider opposing viewpoints and be ready to counter them.
  • Conduct Research: Gather relevant information from credible sources, such as books, articles, and academic journals. Take notes on key points and supporting evidence.
  • Create a Thesis Statement: Develop a concise and clear thesis statement that outlines your main argument. Convey your position on the issue and provide a roadmap for the essay.
  • Outline Your Argumentative Essay: Organize your ideas logically by creating an outline. Include an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. Each body paragraph should focus on a single point that supports your thesis.
  • Write the Introduction: Start with a hook to grab the reader’s attention (a quote, a question, a surprising fact). Provide background information on the topic. Present your thesis statement at the end of the introduction.
  • Develop Body Paragraphs: Begin each paragraph with a clear topic sentence that relates to the thesis. Support your points with evidence and examples. Address counterarguments and refute them to strengthen your position. Ensure smooth transitions between paragraphs.
  • Address Counterarguments: Acknowledge and respond to opposing viewpoints. Anticipate objections and provide evidence to counter them.
  • Write the Conclusion: Summarize the main points of your argumentative essay. Reinforce the significance of your argument. End with a call to action, a prediction, or a thought-provoking statement.
  • Revise, Edit, and Share: Review your essay for clarity, coherence, and consistency. Check for grammatical and spelling errors. Share your essay with peers, friends, or instructors for constructive feedback.
  • Finalize Your Argumentative Essay: Make final edits based on feedback received. Ensure that your essay follows the required formatting and citation style.

Argumentative essay writing tips

Here are eight strategies to craft a compelling argumentative essay: 

  • Choose a Clear and Controversial Topic : Select a topic that sparks debate and has opposing viewpoints. A clear and controversial issue provides a solid foundation for a strong argument. 
  • Conduct Thorough Research : Gather relevant information from reputable sources to support your argument. Use a variety of sources, such as academic journals, books, reputable websites, and expert opinions, to strengthen your position. 
  • Create a Strong Thesis Statement : Clearly articulate your main argument in a concise thesis statement. Your thesis should convey your stance on the issue and provide a roadmap for the reader to follow your argument. 
  • Develop a Logical Structure : Organize your essay with a clear introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Each paragraph should focus on a specific point of evidence that contributes to your overall argument. Ensure a logical flow from one point to the next. 
  • Provide Strong Evidence : Support your claims with solid evidence. Use facts, statistics, examples, and expert opinions to support your arguments. Be sure to cite your sources appropriately to maintain credibility. 
  • Address Counterarguments : Acknowledge opposing viewpoints and counterarguments. Addressing and refuting alternative perspectives strengthens your essay and demonstrates a thorough understanding of the issue. Be mindful of maintaining a respectful tone even when discussing opposing views. 
  • Use Persuasive Language : Employ persuasive language to make your points effectively. Avoid emotional appeals without supporting evidence and strive for a respectful and professional tone. 
  • Craft a Compelling Conclusion : Summarize your main points, restate your thesis, and leave a lasting impression in your conclusion. Encourage readers to consider the implications of your argument and potentially take action. 

argumentative essay conclusion layout

Good argumentative essay example

Let’s consider a sample of argumentative essay on how social media enhances connectivity:

In the digital age, social media has emerged as a powerful tool that transcends geographical boundaries, connecting individuals from diverse backgrounds and providing a platform for an array of voices to be heard. While critics argue that social media fosters division and amplifies negativity, it is essential to recognize the positive aspects of this digital revolution and how it enhances connectivity by providing a platform for diverse voices to flourish. One of the primary benefits of social media is its ability to facilitate instant communication and connection across the globe. Platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram break down geographical barriers, enabling people to establish and maintain relationships regardless of physical location and fostering a sense of global community. Furthermore, social media has transformed how people stay connected with friends and family. Whether separated by miles or time zones, social media ensures that relationships remain dynamic and relevant, contributing to a more interconnected world. Moreover, social media has played a pivotal role in giving voice to social justice movements and marginalized communities. Movements such as #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo, and #ClimateStrike have gained momentum through social media, allowing individuals to share their stories and advocate for change on a global scale. This digital activism can shape public opinion and hold institutions accountable. Social media platforms provide a dynamic space for open dialogue and discourse. Users can engage in discussions, share information, and challenge each other’s perspectives, fostering a culture of critical thinking. This open exchange of ideas contributes to a more informed and enlightened society where individuals can broaden their horizons and develop a nuanced understanding of complex issues. While criticisms of social media abound, it is crucial to recognize its positive impact on connectivity and the amplification of diverse voices. Social media transcends physical and cultural barriers, connecting people across the globe and providing a platform for marginalized voices to be heard. By fostering open dialogue and facilitating the exchange of ideas, social media contributes to a more interconnected and empowered society. Embracing the positive aspects of social media allows us to harness its potential for positive change and collective growth.
  • Clearly Define Your Thesis Statement:   Your thesis statement is the core of your argumentative essay. Clearly articulate your main argument or position on the issue. Avoid vague or general statements.  
  • Provide Strong Supporting Evidence:   Back up your thesis with solid evidence from reliable sources and examples. This can include facts, statistics, expert opinions, anecdotes, or real-life examples. Make sure your evidence is relevant to your argument, as it impacts the overall persuasiveness of your thesis.  
  • Anticipate Counterarguments and Address Them:   Acknowledge and address opposing viewpoints to strengthen credibility. This also shows that you engage critically with the topic rather than presenting a one-sided argument. 

The length of an argumentative essay can vary, but it typically falls within the range of 1,000 to 2,500 words. However, the specific requirements may depend on the guidelines provided.

You might write an argumentative essay when:  1. You want to convince others of the validity of your position.  2. There is a controversial or debatable issue that requires discussion.  3. You need to present evidence and logical reasoning to support your claims.  4. You want to explore and critically analyze different perspectives on a topic. 

Argumentative Essay:  Purpose : An argumentative essay aims to persuade the reader to accept or agree with a specific point of view or argument.  Structure : It follows a clear structure with an introduction, thesis statement, body paragraphs presenting arguments and evidence, counterarguments and refutations, and a conclusion.  Tone : The tone is formal and relies on logical reasoning, evidence, and critical analysis.    Narrative/Descriptive Essay:  Purpose : These aim to tell a story or describe an experience, while a descriptive essay focuses on creating a vivid picture of a person, place, or thing.  Structure : They may have a more flexible structure. They often include an engaging introduction, a well-developed body that builds the story or description, and a conclusion.  Tone : The tone is more personal and expressive to evoke emotions or provide sensory details. 

  • Gladd, J. (2020). Tips for Writing Academic Persuasive Essays.  Write What Matters . 
  • Nimehchisalem, V. (2018). Pyramid of argumentation: Towards an integrated model for teaching and assessing ESL writing.  Language & Communication ,  5 (2), 185-200. 
  • Press, B. (2022).  Argumentative Essays: A Step-by-Step Guide . Broadview Press. 
  • Rieke, R. D., Sillars, M. O., & Peterson, T. R. (2005).  Argumentation and critical decision making . Pearson/Allyn & Bacon. 

Paperpal is an AI writing assistant that help academics write better, faster with real-time suggestions for in-depth language and grammar correction. Trained on millions of research manuscripts enhanced by professional academic editors, Paperpal delivers human precision at machine speed.

Try it for free or upgrade to  Paperpal Prime , which unlocks unlimited access to premium features like academic translation, paraphrasing, contextual synonyms, consistency checks and more. It’s like always having a professional academic editor by your side! Go beyond limitations and experience the future of academic writing.  Get Paperpal Prime now at just US$19 a month!

Related Reads:

Empirical research: a comprehensive guide for academics .

  • How to Write a Scientific Paper in 10 Steps 
  • What is a Literature Review? How to Write It (with Examples)
  • Chemistry Terms: 7 Commonly Confused Words in Chemistry Manuscripts

Make Your Research Paper Error-Free with Paperpal’s Online Spell Checker 

The do’s & don’ts of using generative ai tools ethically in academia, you may also like, plagiarism prevention: why you need a plagiarism check..., how long should a chapter be, how to cite social media sources in academic writing , what is a literature review how to write..., how to write a scientific paper in 10..., how to paraphrase research papers effectively, addressing your queries on ai ethics, plagiarism, and..., the do’s & don’ts of using generative ai..., research outlines: how to write an introduction section....

Illustration

  • Essay Guides
  • Main Academic Essays
  • Argumentative Essay Outline: Writing Steps & Examples
  • Speech Topics
  • Basics of Essay Writing
  • Essay Topics
  • Other Essays
  • Research Paper Topics
  • Basics of Research Paper Writing
  • Miscellaneous
  • Chicago/ Turabian
  • Data & Statistics
  • Methodology
  • Admission Writing Tips
  • Admission Advice
  • Other Guides
  • Student Life
  • Studying Tips
  • Understanding Plagiarism
  • Academic Writing Tips
  • Basics of Dissertation & Thesis Writing

Illustration

  • Research Paper Guides
  • Formatting Guides
  • Basics of Research Process
  • Admission Guides
  • Dissertation & Thesis Guides

Argumentative Essay Outline: Writing Steps & Examples

Argumentative Essay Outline

Table of contents

Illustration

Use our free Readability checker

An argumentative essay outline is a roadmap for the writer to organize their thoughts, research, and arguments in a clear and logical way. It helps to stay focused on the topic and effectively present arguments. Creating an outline before writing an argumentative essay allows students to identify the key points and evidence that should back up ideas.

Struggling with an argumentative essay outline? Stuck at the beginning or not sure which format to take? It’s okay, you’ll find some explanations and pieces of advice here, as well as an argument outline template you could use. We’ve collected everything you need to know before composing an outline for your top-notch argumentative paper. This page contains information about:

  • The notion of outline and why it is important
  • Specifics of sketching an essay where you defend your position
  • Argument essay layout
  • Several useful tips and examples.

Ready to receive some help with your work? Let’s get you prepared to write an excellent essay!

What Is an Argumentative Essay Outline?

Before starting to work on an argumentative paper outline, it is important to understand its definition and purpose. So, what is the outline for an argumentative essay? Outline for an argumentative essay involves defending one’s position on a certain topic by using logic and factual evidence. It requires doing preliminary research and presenting your findings in sketch form. An argumentative essay outline forms the essay’s basic structure and contains its main elements, briefly described and connected together using logical transitions. Once you finish and review this short version, it will be much easier to spot mistakes and logical gaps. After correcting them, you’ll be one step away from writing a high-quality essay.

Argumentative Essay Outline Format

Setting a correct format for argumentative essay outline is important, as it ensures that the entire composition will be properly organized. This is where you create the logical structure, which can be checked for gaps and mistakes before writing the complete text. A simple argumentative essay outline should be composed like this:

  • Introduction This part contains your main topic description and your thesis statement. The latter should be provided fully, while the other descriptions can be sketchy at this stage. Try using some kind of a ‘hook’ to engage your readers.
  • Body paragraphs It is where you briefly introduce your arguments, as well as counterarguments you aim to refute. Mention your evidence and include your sources, but don’t be too wordy, as this is just a sketch for now.
  • Conclusion It should briefly summarize the argumentation and how it supports your thesis.

More examples of an argumentative essay structure outline are available in our downloadable materials.

Learn more: How to Write an Argumentative Essay Introduction

Types of an Argumentative Essay Outline

Before learning how to write an outline for an argumentative essay, you must figure out which type is best for your specific topic. This information might be specified in your assignment, otherwise, it is up to you. The layout of an argumentative essay you’re writing depends on the persuasive approach you’ve chosen. There are three main types:

  • Classical, also known as Aristotelian

Now let's talk about each argument essay outline type in detail. We’ll show you what the differences between them are and when it is better to choose one or another.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline

Let’s start with the classical argument outline. It is also named Aristotelian, honoring the memory of the ancient Greek philosopher who perfected the logical method of presenting argumentation. The general structure should follow a 5 paragraph essay format . Here is how you should compose your outline of an argumentative essay when using this structure type:

  • Explain your thesis, making it clear
  • Mention the opposing thesis if there is one
  • List your arguments, referring to evidence you have collected
  • Mention counterarguments, providing evidence that contradicts them
  • Summarize it, showing that your thesis has been proven by your arguments.

This type is used for direct discussions and straightforward topics.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline

In a Rogerian outline for an argumentative essay, you are expected to pay more attention to the opposing viewpoints, considering the strong and weak sides of both. In this case, the paper focuses not on refuting antagonistic argumentation but rather on finding some middle ground. This argumentative essay layout can be used when you’re aiming to help two opposing sides reach a mutual agreement at a certain point. Another situation when you should consider such an approach is when addressing an audience hostile to your viewpoint – for example, when arguing against the rules or habits of a specific group.

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline

When your topic needs some complicated analysis on different levels, use the Toulmin outline of an argumentative essay. This model is based on six main elements:

  • Claim – your central statement
  • Grounds – evidence backing the claim
  • Warrant – logical connection between the grounds and the claim
  • Backings – additional arguments strengthening the warrant
  • Qualifier – the measure of certainty in the claim
  • Rebuttal – refutes possible counterarguments to the claim.

This format of argumentative essay outline should be used for refuting existing argumentation against your own claim. If you are struggling with outlining your argumentative essay, re-check its main points. Correcting mistakes early on saves hundreds of working hours. To save even more, consider to buy college essays from professional academic writers. 

Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Have you picked your paper format? If yes, you should be ready to proceed. Need an argumentative outline template? If you still hesitate and search for extra hints, it's fine – there are plenty of them on this page! We’ve prepared a comprehensive argument essay outline template for each of the main types described in the previous section. You can find them below.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline Template

If your task is to simply present your point of view on a certain subject and back it up with solid facts, you need a classical argument essay outline. This is the most common and straightforward type of structuring your argumentation, so it can be freely used unless your situation requires a different approach. Here is our outline for argumentative essay example:

  • Intriguing description or some wordplay to ‘hook’ your audience
  • Brief context of the problem
  • Your full thesis statement together with an extra explanation if necessary
  • Data set #1
  • Data set #2, etc.
  • Your argument #2: Formatted the same way as the previous one
  • Point out its logical flaws or provide the evidence that refutes it (or refutatio).
  • Briefly mention how this analysis results in reinforcing your own position.
  • Counterargument #2: This and further ones should be formatted in exactly the same way
  • Summarize your argumentation without repeating it and show how it supports your thesis (this part is also known as peroratio).
  • Add some final notes or a call to action to engage your audience.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline Template

When attempting to counter a formidable position, you need to pay great attention to opposing claims. You might want to find some common ground and reach an agreement with the opposing side, and that is what the Rogerian type is meant for. Follow this argument essay template for conducting an extra analysis of conflicting viewpoints:

  • Describe the problem and add brief context if necessary.
  • Explain your own viewpoint on it as well as opposing stances. You might pick the most well-known of them or the one which shares enough common ground with your position if that helps. Highlight this common ground.
  • Give your thesis statement in a full sentence.
  • Explore the evidence which supports it.
  • Analyze the strength of this position, given the quality of evidence. See if it can be refuted.
  • Mention other positions, if any. Follow the same format as used for the first one.
  • Explain that you understand the opposing position and the reasons behind it.
  • Highlight specific details or areas where you have common ground with the opponent.
  • Your argument #1: explain how it is related to your thesis and provide the supporting evidence.
  • Your argument #1: present it in the same format as the 1st one. The same goes for all other arguments.
  • Point out the elements of both positions which you and your opponent could agree upon.
  • Develop a compromising solution that would encompass these agreeable elements from both sides.
  • Summarize the compromise and the arguments from both sides which back it.
  • Explain how both sides could benefit from agreeing upon this common ground position.

Check below for more argumentative essay outline examples.

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline Template

This argument template for an essay will be useful in case of facing complicated argumentation, which should be properly analyzed. The Toulmin format outline argumentative essay example is here:

  • Come up with something interesting to ‘hook’ your audience.
  • Provide a brief context of the problem.
  • Give your full thesis statement.
  • Evidence #1, including the logical connection between it and your claim
  • Evidence #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Briefly show how it supports your thesis.
  • Show which of your evidence elements backs this warrant.
  • Provide qualifiers for your argumentation: be open and show its weak sides.
  • Your warrant #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Analyze their claim, evaluating its warrants and qualifiers.
  • Provide your rebuttal.
  • Opposing viewpoint #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Briefly summarize your warrants.
  • Summarize the opposing viewpoints, mentioning how you have refuted them.
  • Show that your thesis is supported better.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline Step-By-Step

Let’s put together all the tips on how to write an argumentative essay outline . This section contains a quick guide that could serve as your argumentative essay planning sheet. Make sure to follow this recommended course when composing an academic paper:

  • Think it through Making an argumentative writing outline efficient and persuasive requires good knowledge of the selected topic. So, choose one you are familiar with. You must be able to explain your position well and defend it successfully. And don’t pick an easy one. It should be interesting enough for your audience to get engaged.
  • Do your research Gather key information about your problem before writing an argumentative essay outline. Check if you have enough evidence to back your claim and refute possible counterarguments. Verify that it clearly shows what you actually need and doesn’t prove an opposing position.
  • Pick a format Given the specifics of the chosen problem, find out which approach will suit you best: Classical, Rogerian, or Toulmin. If you start creating your argumentative essay outline in one format and then realize that you need to switch to another, you might lose a lot of time. Too risky for those who have tight deadlines!
  • Structure it properly Follow the recommended templates and put every argument outline into a separate paragraph. The same applies to introductory sections. Remember that proper formatting increases your essay’s readability and thus serves your cause.
  • Keep it concise Make it brief but understandable, ensuring that all key points and data are mentioned. Remember that you just need to outline an argumentative essay, not write the full text. Besides, writing briefly saves you some precious time.
  • Review and correct Spend some time going through your argumentative research essay outline and check carefully for errors or gaps. Read it to yourself or ask someone else to give it as much critique as possible. If you miss something important now, it will be more difficult to find and correct this mistake later.

These tips should be enough for creating an argumentative essay outline for high school and college. You can check how to write an argumentative essay in one of our guides. But also check the samples we've collected for you – maybe you’ll get some extra ideas for your own work. 

Argumentative Essay Outline Examples

Searching for a real argumentative outline example? We’ve collected several outlines for essays addressing popular questions. Check them out, and hopefully, you’ll draw some inspiration from them, which will help you with your own work. Just don’t copy any of that content, as it would mean plagiarism. Don’t forget about the downloadable argumentative essay outline sample. Scroll down, and you’ll find it. Death Penalty Argument Outline Example

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Death Penalty

Sample Outline for Argumentative Essay on Abortion

Sample of Argumentative Essay Outline on Abortion

Argument Essay Outline Example on Human Trafficking

Example of Argument Essay Outline on Human Trafficking

Sample of Argumentative Essay Outline on Gender Equality

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Gender Equality

Argumentative Essay Outline Example on Bullying

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Bullying

Browse StudyCrumb’s Blog to find complete argumentative essay examples formatted accordingly.

Argumentative Paper Outline Checklist

Here’s also a brief list of what should be written in an outline for an argument:

  • checkbox My thesis statement is full and clear.
  • checkbox I provided the necessary context of the selected problem.
  • checkbox I considered the ‘hook’ in order to engage your audience.
  • checkbox Main arguments that support the thesis are logically connected to each other.
  • checkbox I selected solid evidence backing the arguments.
  • checkbox I planned the main counterarguments , together with their rebuttal based on facts and logic.
  • checkbox My conclusion is going to summarize the strength of my position compared to opposing ones.
  • checkbox My argument writing template includes a strong call to action and gives some food for thought.

Bottom Line on Argumentative Essay Outline

We have shown in detail how to outline an argumentative essay and what are main structure types you could use for it, namely:

We have also listed what should an outline for an argumentative essay include, particularly:

  • Introduction with context and a ‘hook’
  • Thesis statement
  • Arguments with supporting evidence
  • Counterarguments with their rebuttal
  • Conclusion.

An argumentative writing template has also been provided. We believe that this information will help you complete an excellent paper on any argumentative essay topic .  If you are still unsure about your writing skills, StudyCrumb got you covered. Remember this phrase — " write an argumentative essay for me ." It's a secret pass to tell our Support reps. Say it, and the magic will happen.

Illustration

Our professional writing service will help you with any kind of essay. Just contact us and get any paper written properly.

FAQ About Argumentative Essay Outline

1. why is it important to create an argumentative essay outline.

Writing an argument essay outline helps to form its layout and properly place the main elements: thesis, background, arguments, evidence, and conclusion. It serves as an argumentative essay plan with logical transitions between the key elements. Now you can read this draft version again and spot any inconsistencies before composing the full-text version. That is a much easier task.

3. What should be included in the outline for an argument?

Your argument outline needs to include the following:

  • Analysis of certain aspects of the problem which you could use to clearly maintain your point
  • Logic and reasoning to defend your position using your debate skills
  • Solid evidence retrieved from credible sources to back your claim
  • Visible connection to your thesis and your other arguments, otherwise, your audience might have an issue with understanding your essay.

2. What should include a strong outline for an argumentative essay?

A strong outline for an argumentative essay should include:

  • Strong thesis, preferably about an interesting and controversial problem
  • Proper arguments backed by logic and solid evidence
  • Credible sources you can obtain the evidence from
  • Proper rebuttal for counterarguments, pointing at their weak sides
  • Logical connection between all parts of your outline
  • Conclusion, which summarizes all arguments and rebuttals, showing that your thesis is maintained.

Daniel_Howard_1_1_2da08f03b5.jpg

Daniel Howard is an Essay Writing guru. He helps students create essays that will strike a chord with the readers.

You may also like

thumbnail@2x.png

IMAGES

  1. Academic Conclusion

    argumentative essay conclusion layout

  2. How to Write an Argumentative Essay Step By Step

    argumentative essay conclusion layout

  3. How to Write a Strong Conclusion for Your Essay

    argumentative essay conclusion layout

  4. how to write a good conclusion paragraph for an essay

    argumentative essay conclusion layout

  5. How to write a good conclusion for argumentative essay

    argumentative essay conclusion layout

  6. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    argumentative essay conclusion layout

VIDEO

  1. PERSUASIVE ESSAY Part2 Breakdown

  2. Conclusion Paragraph for Argumentative Essay

  3. Argumentative Essay Topic Selection

  4. 4.2.7

  5. Livestream: Composing an Argumentative Essay

  6. PERSUASIVE ESSAY Part5 Conclusion Paragraph

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Revised on July 23, 2023. An argumentative essay expresses an extended argument for a particular thesis statement. The author takes a clearly defined stance on their subject and builds up an evidence-based case for it. Argumentative essays are by far the most common type of essay to write at university.

  2. How to Conclude an Essay

    Step 1: Return to your thesis To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument. Don't just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction. Example: Returning to the thesis

  3. Argumentative Essay Conclusion [Examples + Tips]

    4.4 Want to write a perfect conclusion for your paper but don't know how? Everyone has been there, and it's never easy. It is the final part of your writing, so by the time you reach it, you have no energy and can't focus. Still, the conclusion part is crucial for the success of every paper.

  4. Argumentative Essay Conclusion

    The three components of the conclusion for an argumentative essay is: restating the thesis summarizing the supporting paragraphs creating a final, general statement What Is an Argumentative...

  5. 3 Strong Argumentative Essay Examples, Analyzed

    The Toulmin model is the most common. It begins with an introduction, follows with a thesis/claim, and gives data and evidence to support that claim. This style of essay also includes rebuttals of counterarguments. The Rogerian model analyzes two sides of an argument and reaches a conclusion after weighing the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  6. How to Form an Argumentative Essay Outline

    An argumentative essay is a piece of writing that uses logical evidence and empirical data to convince readers of a particular position on a topic. Because of its reliance on structure and planning, the first step in writing one is often drafting a solid argumentative essay outline.

  7. Writing Conclusion for Argumentative Essays [Guide & Examples]

    The Purpose of a Conclusion Paragraph in an Argumentative Essay. A conclusion paragraph is like the final bow in a performance—it's your last opportunity to impress the audience and leave a lasting impression. In an argumentative essay, this "final bow" serves a few critical roles. Firstly, the conclusion reaffirms your thesis statement. It ...

  8. Argumentative Essay

    The standard argumentative essay requires extensive research on a topic and is structured in three main sections comprised of five paragraphs: one introductory, three body, and one...

  9. How to Write a Standout Argumentative Essay

    Updated on June 2, 2022 Students An argumentative essay is a piece of writing that uses factual evidence and logical support to convince the reader of a certain way of thinking.

  10. Argumentative Essays

    The argumentative essay is a genre of writing that requires the student to investigate a topic; collect, generate, and evaluate evidence; and establish a position on the topic in a concise manner. Please note: Some confusion may occur between the argumentative essay and the expository essay.

  11. How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Easy Step-by-Step Guide

    Last updated: Sep 9, 2021 • 5 min read When you're writing a persuasive essay, you need more than just an opinion to make your voice heard. Even the strongest stance won't be compelling if it's not structured properly and reinforced with solid reasoning and evidence.

  12. Conclusions

    Complete. Don't try to bring in new points or end with a whiz bang (!) conclusion or try to solve world hunger in the final sentence of your conclusion. Simplicity is best for a clear, convincing message. The preacher's maxim is one of the most effective formulas to follow for argument papers: Tell what you're going to tell them (introduction).

  13. Argumentative Essay Conclusion

    An introduction prepares grounds for your ideas, your essay body provides all necessary details and supporting evidence, and an argumentative essay conclusion is the last chance for you to defend a point and strengthen a final impression. All these elements ensure a logical flow and interconnection of the ideas discussed.

  14. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    Each argument you will make in an essay will be different, but this strategy will often be a useful first step in figuring out the path of your argument. Strategy #2: Use subheadings, even if you remove then later Scientific papers generally include standard subheadings to delineate different sections

  15. How to Write an A+ Argumentative Essay

    #1: Argumentative #2: Persuasive #3: Expository #4: Analytical So let's look at each type and what the differences are between them before we focus the rest of our time to argumentative essays. Argumentative Essay Argumentative essays are what this article is all about, so let's talk about them first.

  16. Argumentative Essay: Topics, Outline and Writing Tips

    An argumentative essay is a paper that gets the reader to recognize the author's side of the argument as valid. The purpose of this specific essay is to pose a question and answer it with compelling evidence. At its core, this essay type works to champion a specific viewpoint. The key, however, is that the topic of the argumentative essay has ...

  17. 8 Effective Strategies to Write Argumentative Essays

    An argumentative essay comprises five essential components: 1. Claim. Claim in argumentative writing is the central argument or viewpoint that the writer aims to establish and defend throughout the essay. A claim must assert your position on an issue and must be arguable. It can guide the entire argument.

  18. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

    Before we dive into the details, here's a basic outline of how to write a conclusion: Restate your thesis: remind readers of your main point. Reiterate your supporting points: remind readers of your evidence or arguments. Wrap everything up by tying it all together. Write a clincher: with the last sentence, leave your reader with something to ...

  19. Structure & Outline

    The outline of an argumentative essay should include an introduction with thesis statement, 3 main body paragraphs with supporting evidence and opposing viewpoints with evidence to disprove, along with an conclusion. The example below is just a basic outline and structure. Outline: I. Introduction: tells what you are going to write about. Basic ...

  20. How to Write a Good Conclusion For an Argumentative Essay?

    Introducing New Ideas. Introducing any new arguments you didn't discuss in the body paragraphs into this section is a bad idea. Instead, only unify and underscore the importance of your previously discussed thoughts. Starting With Overused Phrases.

  21. How to Write an Essay Outline

    Organizing your material At the stage where you're writing an essay outline, your ideas are probably still not fully formed. You should know your topic and have already done some preliminary research to find relevant sources, but now you need to shape your ideas into a structured argument. Creating categories

  22. What is an Argumentative Essay? How to Write It (With Examples)

    An argumentative essay presents a specific claim or argument and supports it with evidence and reasoning. Here's an outline for an argumentative essay, along with examples for each section: 3. 1. Introduction: Hook: Start with a compelling statement, question, or anecdote to grab the reader's attention.

  23. Argumentative Essay Outline: Step-By-Step Writing Guide

    The Toulmin format outline argumentative essay example is here: Come up with something interesting to 'hook' your audience. Provide a brief context of the problem. Evidence #1, including the logical connection between it and your claim. Evidence #2, formatted in the same way, etc.

  24. 125 Strong Argumentative Essay Topics For Your Next Paper

    The format of an argumentative essay typically consists of three basic elements: An introductory paragraph, stating topic and thesis. Supporting paragraphs, presenting arguments and unique facts. The final paragraph, restating supporting evidence and thesis. The length and complexity of the essay will vary depending on the level of the student ...