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Words for Speaking: 30 Speech Verbs in English (With Audio)

Words for Speaking: 30 Speech Verbs in English (With Audio)

Speaking is amazing, don’t you think?

Words and phrases come out of our mouths — they communicate meaning, and we humans understand each other (well, sometimes)!

But there are countless different ways of speaking.

Sometimes, we express ourselves by speaking quietly, loudly, angrily, unclearly or enthusiastically.

And sometimes, we can express ourselves really well without using any words at all — just sounds.

When we describe what someone said, of course we can say, “He said …” or “She said …”

But there are so many alternatives to “say” that describe the many different WAYS of speaking.

Here are some of the most common ones.

Words for talking loudly in English

Shout / yell / scream.

Sometimes you just need to say something LOUDLY!

Maybe you’re shouting at your kids to get off the climbing frame and come inside before the storm starts.

Or perhaps you’re just one of those people who just shout a lot of the time when you speak. And that’s fine. I’ve got a friend like that. He says it’s because he’s the youngest kid in a family full of brothers and sisters — he had to shout to make sure people heard him. And he still shouts.

Yelling is a bit different. When you yell, you’re probably angry or surprised or even in pain. Yelling is a bit shorter and more “in-the-moment.”

Screaming is similar but usually higher in pitch and full of fear or pain or total fury, like when you’ve just seen a ghost or when you’ve dropped a box of bricks on your foot.

Comic-style drawing of a man who has just dropped a brick on his foot. He's screaming and "Argh!" is written in large black letters.

“Stop yelling at me! I’m sorry! I made a mistake, but there’s no need to shout!”

Bark / Bellow / Roar

When I hear these words, I always imagine something like this:

Text: Bark, bellow, roar / Image: Aggressive man shouting at two boys on a football field

These verbs all feel rather masculine, and you imagine them in a deep voice.

I always think of an army general walking around the room telling people what to do.

That’s probably why we have the phrase “to bark orders at someone,” which means to tell people what to do in an authoritative, loud and aggressive way.

“I can’t stand that William guy. He’s always barking orders at everyone!”

Shriek / Squeal / Screech

Ooooohhh …. These do not sound nice.

These are the sounds of a car stopping suddenly.

Or the sound a cat makes when you tread on her tail.

Or very overexcited kids at a birthday party after eating too much sugar.

These verbs are high pitched and sometimes painful to hear.

“When I heard her shriek , I ran to the kitchen to see what it was. Turned out it was just a mouse.”

“As soon as she opened the box and saw the present, she let out a squeal of delight!”

Wailing is also high pitched, but not so full of energy.

It’s usually full of sadness or even anger.

When I think of someone wailing, I imagine someone completely devastated — very sad — after losing someone they love.

You get a lot of wailing at funerals.

“It’s such a mess!” she wailed desperately. “It’ll take ages to clear up!”

Words for speaking quietly in English

When we talk about people speaking in quiet ways, for some reason, we often use words that we also use for animals.

In a way, this is useful, because we can immediately get a feel for the sound of the word.

This is the sound that snakes make.

Sometimes you want to be both quiet AND angry.

Maybe someone in the theatre is talking and you can’t hear what Hamlet’s saying, so you hiss at them to shut up.

Or maybe you’re hanging out with Barry and Naomi when Barry starts talking about Naomi’s husband, who she split up with last week.

Then you might want to hiss this information to Barry so that Naomi doesn’t hear.

But Naomi wasn’t listening anyway — she was miles away staring into the distance.

“You’ll regret this!” he hissed , pointing his finger in my face.

To be fair, this one’s a little complicated.

Whimpering is a kind of traumatised, uncomfortable sound.

If you think of a frightened animal, you might hear it make some kind of quiet, weak sound that shows it’s in pain or unhappy.

Or if you think of a kid who’s just been told she can’t have an ice cream.

Those sounds might be whimpers.

“Please! Don’t shoot me!” he whimpered , shielding his head with his arms.

Two school students in a classroom whispering to each other with the text "gossip" repeated in a vertical column

Whispering is when you speak, but you bypass your vocal cords so that your words sound like wind.

In a way, it’s like you’re speaking air.

Which is a pretty cool way to look at it.

This is a really useful way of speaking if you’re into gossiping.

“Hey! What are you whispering about? Come on! Tell us! We’ll have no secrets here!”

Words for speaking negatively in English

Ranting means to speak at length about a particular topic.

However, there’s a bit more to it than that.

Ranting is lively, full of passion and usually about something important — at least important to the person speaking.

Sometimes it’s even quite angry.

We probably see rants most commonly on social media — especially by PEOPLE WHO LOVE USING CAPS LOCK AND LOTS OF EXCLAMATION MARKS!!!!!!

Ranting always sounds a little mad, whether you’re ranting about something reasonable, like the fact that there’s too much traffic in the city, or whether you’re ranting about something weird, like why the world is going to hell and it’s all because of people who like owning small, brown dogs.

“I tried to talk to George, but he just started ranting about the tax hike.”

“Did you see Jemima’s most recent Facebook rant ? All about how squirrels are trying to influence the election results with memes about Macaulay Culkin.”

Babble / Blabber / Blather / Drone / Prattle / Ramble

Woman saying, "Blah blah blether drone ramble blah blah." Two other people are standing nearby looking bored.

These words all have very similar meanings.

First of all, when someone babbles (or blabbers or blathers or drones or prattles or rambles), it means they are talking for a long time.

And probably not letting other people speak.

And, importantly, about nothing particularly interesting or important.

You know the type of person, right?

You run into a friend or someone you know.

All you do is ask, “How’s life?” and five minutes later, you’re still listening to them talking about their dog’s toilet problems.

They just ramble on about it for ages.

These verbs are often used with the preposition “on.”

That’s because “on” often means “continuously” in phrasal verbs .

So when someone “drones on,” it means they just talk for ages about nothing in particular.

“You’re meeting Aunt Thelma this evening? Oh, good luck! Have fun listening to her drone on and on about her horses.”

Groan / Grumble / Moan

These words simply mean “complain.”

There are some small differences, though.

When you groan , you probably don’t even say any words. Instead, you just complain with a sound.

When you grumble , you complain in a sort of angry or impatient way. It’s not a good way to get people to like you.

Finally, moaning is complaining, but without much direction.

You know the feeling, right?

Things are unfair, and stuff isn’t working, and it’s all making life more difficult than it should be.

We might not plan to do anything about it, but it definitely does feel good to just … complain about it.

Just to express your frustration about how unfair it all is and how you’ve been victimised and how you should be CEO by now and how you don’t get the respect you deserve and …

Well, you get the idea.

If you’re frustrated with things, maybe you just need to find a sympathetic ear and have a good moan.

“Pietor? He’s nice, but he does tend to grumble about the local kids playing football on the street.”

Words for speaking unclearly in English

Mumble / murmur / mutter.

These verbs are all very similar and describe speaking in a low and unclear way, almost like you’re speaking to yourself.

Have you ever been on the metro or the bus and seen someone in the corner just sitting and talking quietly and a little madly to themselves?

That’s mumbling (or murmuring or muttering).

What’s the difference?

Good question!

The differences are just in what type of quiet and unclear speaking you’re doing.

When someone’s mumbling , it means they’re difficult to understand. You might want to ask them to speak more clearly.

Murmuring is more neutral. It might be someone praying quietly to themselves, or you might even hear the murmur of voices behind a closed door.

Finally, muttering is usually quite passive-aggressive and has a feeling of complaining to it.

“I could hear him muttering under his breath after his mum told him off.”

Drunk-looking man in a pub holding a bottle and speaking nonsense.

How can you tell if someone’s been drinking too much booze (alcohol)?

Well, apart from the fact that they’re in the middle of trying to climb the traffic lights holding a traffic cone and wearing grass on their head, they’re also slurring — their words are all sort of sliding into each other. Like this .

This can also happen if you’re super tired.

“Get some sleep! You’re slurring your words.”

Stammer / Stutter

Th-th-th-this is wh-wh-when you try to g-g-g-get the words ou-ou-out, but it’s dif-dif-dif-difficu-… hard.

For some people, this is a speech disorder, and the person who’s doing it can’t help it.

If you’ve seen the 2010 film The King’s Speech , you’ll know what I’m talking about.

(Also you can let me know, was it good? I didn’t see it.)

This can also happen when you’re frightened or angry or really, really excited — and especially when you’re nervous.

That’s when you stammer your words.

“No … I mean, yeah … I mean no…” Wendy stammered .

Other words for speaking in English

If you drawl (or if you have a drawl), you speak in a slow way, maaakiiing the voowweeel sounds loooongeer thaan noormaal.

Some people think this sounds lazy, but I think it sounds kind of nice and relaxed.

Some regional accents, like Texan and some Australian accents, have a drawl to them.

“He was the first US President who spoke with that Texan drawl .”

“Welcome to cowboy country,” he drawled .

Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr!

That’s my impression of a dog there.

I was growling.

If you ever go cycling around remote Bulgarian villages, then you’re probably quite familiar with this sound.

There are dogs everywhere, and sometimes they just bark.

But sometimes, before barking, they growl — they make that low, threatening, throaty sound.

And it means “stay away.”

But people can growl, too, especially if they want to be threatening.

“‘Stay away from my family!’ he growled .”

Using speaking verbs as nouns

We can use these speaking verbs in the same way we use “say.”

For example, if someone says “Get out!” loudly, we can say:

“‘Get out!’ he shouted .”

However, most of the verbs we looked at today are also used as nouns. (You might have noticed in some of the examples.)

For example, if we want to focus on the fact that he was angry when he shouted, and not the words he used, we can say:

“He gave a shout of anger.”

We can use these nouns with various verbs, usually “ give ” or “ let out .”

“She gave a shout of surprise.”

“He let out a bellow of laughter.”

“I heard a faint murmur through the door.”

There you have it: 30 alternatives to “say.”

So next time you’re describing your favourite TV show or talking about the dramatic argument you saw the other day, you’ll be able to describe it more colourfully and expressively.

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8 thoughts on “ Words for Speaking: 30 Speech Verbs in English (With Audio) ”

Always enlighten and fun.. thank you

Great job! Thank you so much for sharing with us. My students love your drawing and teaching very much. So do I of course.

Good news: I found more than 30 verbs for “speaking”. Bad news, only four of them were in your list. That is to say “Good news I’m only 50 I still have plenty of time to learn new things, bad news I’m already 50 and still have so much learn. Thanks for your posts, they’re so interesting and useful!

Excellent. Can I print it?

Thanks Iris.

And yes — Feel free to print it! 🙂

Thanks so much! It was very interesting and helpful❤

Great words, shouts and barks, Gabriel. I’m already writing them down, so I can practise with them bit by bit. Thanks for the lesson!

Thank you so much for sharing with us. .It is very useful

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words for speech in english

127 big fancy words to sound smart and boost your eloquence

Karolina Assi

Karolina Assi

Everyone wants to sound smart and come across as someone that can express their thoughts eloquently. And even though you might have this fantastic ability in your native language, you may feel limited doing this in English if you’re beginning your journey in expanding your vocabulary with unusual or rarer words.

Fortunately, the English language has thousands of big words that will make you sound instantly more eloquent and knowledgeable.

These words will help you express yourself in a more elegant way by substituting the basic, everyday words with their more fancy synonyms. Learning those “big” words in English is also a great way to impress those around you - whether it’s at school, at work, or during your next date.

To help you take your English vocabulary to the next level, we’re prepared a list of 120+ big words to sound smart, with their meaning and an example of how to use them in context.

Express yourself in a more elegant way by substituting the basic, everyday words with their more fancy synonyms.

The do’s and don'ts of using big words in English

Throwing in a few fancy words into your conversations or monologue is a good idea to sound more eloquent and impress everyone around you.

It’s also a great way to sound smart when you don’t know what to say on a specific topic but want to make a good impression and appear more knowledgeable than you are (like this English student during his literature class ).

But there’s a fine line between using fancy words that truly make you sound eloquent and those that make you sound like you’re trying too hard.

Sometimes, using big words to sound smart may backfire, especially if you don’t really know what they mean. Then, you may end up saying something that makes no sense and leaving everyone in the room perplexed. Plus, using complex words you don’t understand can make you sound pompous - so tread the line between careful and carefree.

Use them only if you truly understand their meaning and know what context to use them in. But don’t use them mindlessly as it will result in an opposite effect to what you intended.

Aside from learning those fancy words and their meaning, another challenge lies in their pronunciation. If you choose those big words that are also hard to pronounce , like “epitome” or “niche,” you might end up saying something that makes everyone laugh (it wouldn’t be such a bad scenario!).

The point is: if you’re going to use fancy words to sound smart, learn their meaning, understand how to use them in context, and practice their pronunciation first.

Big words to sound smart and their meaning

The smartest way of sounding more eloquent when expressing yourself in English is to change basic, everyday words for their fancier versions. For instance, instead of saying “very big,” say “massive.” Instead of saying “detailed.” say “granular,” and instead of saying “not interesting,” say “banal.”

See? Using the word “granular” in a sentence will inevitably add more elegance to your speech and make you appear more fluent and eloquent.

The words we’ve chosen to include in the tables below follow this exact principle. Most of them are just a fancier version of a basic, simple word you’d normally use. Others are words used in a professional or academic setting that simply add more articulacy to your statement.

Fancy words you can use at work

The question isn’t whether you should learn a couple of fancy words you can use at work to impress your boss and coworkers. The question is, how do you use them without coming across as a pompous know-it-all, irritating everyone around you?

Well, it’s all about using them wisely. Don’t cram 10 fancy words into a simple sentence just to sound smarter. Only use them when they help you get your message across. If they don’t bring any value to your sentence, simply don’t use them.

In other words - don’t force it! Be natural.

With that said, here are some big words you can use at work.

words for speech in english

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Clever words you might use academically

The academic setting does not only encourage you to sound smart. It forces you to. To get higher grades and convince your professors of your knowledge and eloquence, you need to elevate your vocabulary.

Whether it’s in written or spoken assignments, these words will help you express yourself in a more intelligent and elegant way while impressing your colleagues and professors.

words for speech in english

Big interesting words you might use socially

Being the smartest person among your friends is surely a great boost for your ego. It can help you gain their approval, receive compliments, and maybe even get a date or two while hanging out at the bar with your friends.

But the other side of the coin is that using overly sophisticated words in a casual, social setting can make you appear pretentious and out of place. That’s why you need to be careful and not overdo it! If you do, you might only end up humiliating yourself, and that’s a terrible place to be in.

Here are 20+ big words in English you can use in social situations with their meaning and an example of a sentence you could say.

words for speech in english

Impressive words you might use romantically

Even if you’re not a very romantic person, some occasions require a bit of romanticism. Using elegant words in your expressions of love and affection can make your romantic conversations and gestures more special and memorable.

Still, don’t use big words if you don’t mean them! You should always be sincere and genuine in your expressions. Remember that words hold tremendous power in inspiring emotions in those who receive them.

With that said, here are 30 big words you can use in a romantic setting to express your love and affection for your significant other or to take your relationship with the person you’re currently dating to the next level (congrats!).

words for speech in english

Sophisticated words you might use when discussing art and literature

Are you an art or literature? These two areas often require eloquent vocabulary to describe them. At least, that is the sort of language that people expect to hear from someone who’s an avid reader and art connoisseur.

You might want to express how the allegory in that poem made you feel or the way the plot of the book has enthralled you to keep reading but lack the right words to do it. If so, here’s a list of 20+ words you can use to talk about art and literature in different contexts.

words for speech in english

Fancy words you might use when talking about your hobbies

When talking about our hobbies, we want to come across as more knowledgeable than others. After all, they’re our special interests, and we naturally possess a greater deal of expertise in these areas.

Whether you’re into literature, movies, or sports, here are some fancy words you can use to describe your interests.

words for speech in english

Make the Thesaurus your new best friend

In this article, we’ve only covered 126 big words. Understandably, we can’t include all the fancy words you might need in one article. There are simply too many!

But luckily, there’s a free online tool you can use to find the synonyms of everyday words to expand your vocabulary and make yourself sound smarter.

Can you take a guess?

That’s right - it’s the online Thesaurus . You’ve surely heard about it from your English teacher, but in case you haven’t, Thesaurus is a dictionary of synonyms and related concepts. It’s a great way to find synonyms of different words to spice up your oral or written statements and avoid repeating the same old boring words time and time again.

Choose your words wisely

Whether you’re using simple, everyday words in casual conversations or those big, fancy words in a professional or academic environment, remember one thing: words have power.

They’re spells that you cast (there’s a reason why it’s called “spelling”) onto yourself and those who you speak them to. The words you speak inspire emotions and shape how other people perceive you. But they also influence your own emotions and shape how you perceive yourself.

So choose them wisely.

Learn more about the fascinating English language on our English language blog here.

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Frantically Speaking

15 Powerful Speech Opening Lines (And How to Create Your Own)

Hrideep barot.

  • Public Speaking , Speech Writing

powerful speech opening

Powerful speech opening lines set the tone and mood of your speech. It’s what grips the audience to want to know more about the rest of your talk.

The first few seconds are critical. It’s when you have maximum attention of the audience. And you must capitalize on that!

Instead of starting off with something plain and obvious such as a ‘Thank you’ or ‘Good Morning’, there’s so much more you can do for a powerful speech opening (here’s a great article we wrote a while ago on how you should NOT start your speech ).

To help you with this, I’ve compiled some of my favourite openings from various speakers. These speakers have gone on to deliver TED talks , win international Toastmaster competitions or are just noteworthy people who have mastered the art of communication.

After each speaker’s opening line, I have added how you can include their style of opening into your own speech. Understanding how these great speakers do it will certainly give you an idea to create your own speech opening line which will grip the audience from the outset!

Alright! Let’s dive into the 15 powerful speech openings…

Note: Want to take your communications skills to the next level? Book a complimentary consultation with one of our expert communication coaches. We’ll look under the hood of your hurdles and pick two to three growth opportunities so you can speak with impact!

1. Ric Elias

Opening: “Imagine a big explosion as you climb through 3,000 ft. Imagine a plane full of smoke. Imagine an engine going clack, clack, clack. It sounds scary. Well I had a unique seat that day. I was sitting in 1D.”

How to use the power of imagination to open your speech?

Putting your audience in a state of imagination can work extremely well to captivate them for the remainder of your talk.

It really helps to bring your audience in a certain mood that preps them for what’s about to come next. Speakers have used this with high effectiveness by transporting their audience into an imaginary land to help prove their point.

When Ric Elias opened his speech, the detail he used (3000 ft, sound of the engine going clack-clack-clack) made me feel that I too was in the plane. He was trying to make the audience experience what he was feeling – and, at least in my opinion, he did.

When using the imagination opening for speeches, the key is – detail. While we want the audience to wander into imagination, we want them to wander off to the image that we want to create for them. So, detail out your scenario if you’re going to use this technique.

Make your audience feel like they too are in the same circumstance as you were when you were in that particular situation.

2. Barack Obama

Opening: “You can’t say it, but you know it’s true.”

3. Seth MacFarlane

Opening: “There’s nowhere I would rather be on a day like this than around all this electoral equipment.” (It was raining)

How to use humour to open your speech?

When you use humour in a manner that suits your personality, it can set you up for a great speech. Why? Because getting a laugh in the first 30 seconds or so is a great way to quickly get the audience to like you.

And when they like you, they are much more likely to listen to and believe in your ideas.

Obama effortlessly uses his opening line to entice laughter among the audience. He brilliantly used the setting (the context of Trump becoming President) and said a line that completely matched his style of speaking.

Saying a joke without really saying a joke and getting people to laugh requires you to be completely comfortable in your own skin. And that’s not easy for many people (me being one of them).

If the joke doesn’t land as expected, it could lead to a rocky start.

Keep in mind the following when attempting to deliver a funny introduction:

  • Know your audience: Make sure your audience gets the context of the joke (if it’s an inside joke among the members you’re speaking to, that’s even better!). You can read this article we wrote where we give you tips on how you can actually get to know your audience better to ensure maximum impact with your speech openings
  • The joke should suit your natural personality. Don’t make it look forced or it won’t elicit the desired response
  • Test the opening out on a few people who match your real audience. Analyze their response and tweak the joke accordingly if necessary
  • Starting your speech with humour means your setting the tone of your speech. It would make sense to have a few more jokes sprinkled around the rest of the speech as well as the audience might be expecting the same from you

4. Mohammed Qahtani

Opening: Puts a cigarette on his lips, lights a lighter, stops just before lighting the cigarette. Looks at audience, “What?”

5. Darren Tay

Opening: Puts a white pair of briefs over his pants.

How to use props to begin your speech?

The reason props work so well in a talk is because in most cases the audience is not expecting anything more than just talking. So when a speaker pulls out an object that is unusual, everyone’s attention goes right to it.

It makes you wonder why that prop is being used in this particular speech.

The key word here is unusual . To grip the audience’s attention at the beginning of the speech, the prop being used should be something that the audience would never expect. Otherwise, it just becomes something that is common. And common = boring!

What Mohammed Qahtani and Darren Tay did superbly well in their talks was that they used props that nobody expected them to.

By pulling out a cigarette and lighter or a white pair of underwear, the audience can’t help but be gripped by what the speaker is about to do next. And that makes for a powerful speech opening.

6. Simon Sinek

Opening: “How do you explain when things don’t go as we assume? Or better, how do you explain when others are able to achieve things that seem to defy all of the assumptions?”

7. Julian Treasure

Opening: “The human voice. It’s the instrument we all play. It’s the most powerful sound in the world. Probably the only one that can start a war or say “I love you.” And yet many people have the experience that when they speak people don’t listen to them. Why is that? How can we speak powerfully to make change in the world?”

How to use questions to open a speech?

I use this method often. Starting off with a question is the simplest way to start your speech in a manner that immediately engages the audience.

But we should keep our questions compelling as opposed to something that is fairly obvious.

I’ve heard many speakers start their speeches with questions like “How many of us want to be successful?”

No one is going to say ‘no’ to that and frankly, I just feel silly raising my hand at such questions.

Simon Sinek and Jullian Treasure used questions in a manner that really made the audience think and make them curious to find out what the answer to that question is.

What Jullian Treasure did even better was the use of a few statements which built up to his question. This made the question even more compelling and set the theme for what the rest of his talk would be about.

So think of what question you can ask in your speech that will:

  • Set the theme for the remainder of your speech
  • Not be something that is fairly obvious
  • Be compelling enough so that the audience will actually want to know what the answer to that question will be

8. Aaron Beverley

Opening: Long pause (after an absurdly long introduction of a 57-word speech title). “Be honest. You enjoyed that, didn’t you?”

How to use silence for speech openings?

The reason this speech opening stands out is because of the fact that the title itself is 57 words long. The audience was already hilariously intrigued by what was going to come next.

But what’s so gripping here is the way Aaron holds the crowd’s suspense by…doing nothing. For about 10 to 12 seconds he did nothing but stand and look at the audience. Everyone quietened down. He then broke this silence by a humorous remark that brought the audience laughing down again.

When going on to open your speech, besides focusing on building a killer opening sentence, how about just being silent?

It’s important to keep in mind that the point of having a strong opening is so that the audience’s attention is all on you and are intrigued enough to want to listen to the rest of your speech.

Silence is a great way to do that. When you get on the stage, just pause for a few seconds (about 3 to 5 seconds) and just look at the crowd. Let the audience and yourself settle in to the fact that the spotlight is now on you.

I can’t put my finger on it, but there is something about starting the speech off with a pure pause that just makes the beginning so much more powerful. It adds credibility to you as a speaker as well, making you look more comfortable and confident on stage. 

If you want to know more about the power of pausing in public speaking , check out this post we wrote. It will give you a deeper insight into the importance of pausing and how you can harness it for your own speeches. You can also check out this video to know more about Pausing for Public Speaking:

9. Dan Pink

Opening: “I need to make a confession at the outset here. Little over 20 years ago, I did something that I regret. Something that I’m not particularly proud of. Something that in many ways I wish no one would ever know but that here I feel kind of obliged to reveal.”

10. Kelly McGonigal

Opening: “I have a confession to make. But first I want you to make a little confession to me.”

How to use a build-up to open your speech?

When there are so many amazing ways to start a speech and grip an audience from the outset, why would you ever choose to begin your speech with a ‘Good morning?’.

That’s what I love about build-ups. They set the mood for something awesome that’s about to come in that the audience will feel like they just have to know about.

Instead of starting a speech as it is, see if you can add some build-up to your beginning itself. For instance, in Kelly McGonigal’s speech, she could have started off with the question of stress itself (which she eventually moves on to in her speech). It’s not a bad way to start the speech.

But by adding the statement of “I have a confession to make” and then not revealing the confession for a little bit, the audience is gripped to know what she’s about to do next and find out what indeed is her confession.

11. Tim Urban

Opening: “So in college, I was a government major. Which means that I had to write a lot of papers. Now when a normal student writes a paper, they might spread the work out a little like this.”

12. Scott Dinsmore

Opening: “8 years ago, I got the worst career advice of my life.”

How to use storytelling as a speech opening?

“The most powerful person in the world is the storyteller.” Steve Jobs

Storytelling is the foundation of good speeches. Starting your speech with a story is a great way to grip the audience’s attention. It makes them yearn to want to know how the rest of the story is going to pan out.

Tim Urban starts off his speech with a story dating back to his college days. His use of slides is masterful and something we all can learn from. But while his story sounds simple, it does the job of intriguing the audience to want to know more.

As soon as I heard the opening lines, I thought to myself “If normal students write their paper in a certain manner, how does Tim write his papers?”

Combine such a simple yet intriguing opening with comedic slides, and you’ve got yourself a pretty gripping speech.

Scott Dismore’s statement has a similar impact. However, just a side note, Scott Dismore actually started his speech with “Wow, what an honour.”

I would advise to not start your talk with something such as that. It’s way too common and does not do the job an opening must, which is to grip your audience and set the tone for what’s coming.

13. Larry Smith

Opening: “I want to discuss with you this afternoon why you’re going to fail to have a great career.”

14. Jane McGonigal

Opening: “You will live 7.5 minutes longer than you would have otherwise, just because you watched this talk.”

How to use provocative statements to start your speech?

Making a provocative statement creates a keen desire among the audience to want to know more about what you have to say. It immediately brings everyone into attention.

Larry Smith did just that by making his opening statement surprising, lightly humorous, and above all – fearful. These elements lead to an opening statement which creates so much curiosity among the audience that they need to know how your speech pans out.

This one time, I remember seeing a speaker start a speech with, “Last week, my best friend committed suicide.” The entire crowd was gripped. Everyone could feel the tension in the room.

They were just waiting for the speaker to continue to know where this speech will go.

That’s what a hard-hitting statement does, it intrigues your audience so much that they can’t wait to hear more! Just a tip, if you do start off with a provocative, hard-hitting statement, make sure you pause for a moment after saying it.

Silence after an impactful statement will allow your message to really sink in with the audience.

Related article: 5 Ways to Grab Your Audience’s Attention When You’re Losing it!

15. Ramona J Smith

Opening: In a boxing stance, “Life would sometimes feel like a fight. The punches, jabs and hooks will come in the form of challenges, obstacles and failures. Yet if you stay in the ring and learn from those past fights, at the end of each round, you’ll be still standing.”

How to use your full body to grip the audience at the beginning of your speech?

In a talk, the audience is expecting you to do just that – talk. But when you enter the stage and start putting your full body into use in a way that the audience does not expect, it grabs their attention.

Body language is critical when it comes to public speaking. Hand gestures, stage movement, facial expressions are all things that need to be paid attention to while you’re speaking on stage. But that’s not I’m talking about here.

Here, I’m referring to a unique use of the body that grips the audience, like how Ramona did. By using her body to get into a boxing stance, imitating punches, jabs and hooks with her arms while talking – that’s what got the audience’s attention.

The reason I say this is so powerful is because if you take Ramona’s speech and remove the body usage from her opening, the entire magic of the opening falls flat.

While the content is definitely strong, without those movements, she would not have captured the audience’s attention as beautifully as she did with the use of her body.

So if you have a speech opening that seems slightly dull, see if you can add some body movement to it.

If your speech starts with a story of someone running, actually act out the running. If your speech starts with a story of someone reading, actually act out the reading.

It will make your speech opening that much more impactful.

Related article: 5 Body Language Tips to Command the Stage

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Final Words

So there it is! 15 speech openings from some of my favourite speeches. Hopefully, these will act as a guide for you to create your own opening which is super impactful and sets you off on the path to becoming a powerful public speaker!

But remember, while a speech opening is super important, it’s just part of an overall structure.

If you’re serious about not just creating a great speech opening but to improve your public speaking at an overall level, I would highly recommend you to check out this course: Acumen Presents: Chris Anderson on Public Speaking on Udemy. Not only does it have specific lectures on starting and ending a speech, but it also offers an in-depth guide into all the nuances of public speaking. 

Being the founder of TED Talks, Chris Anderson provides numerous examples of the best TED speakers to give us a very practical way of overcoming stage fear and delivering a speech that people will remember. His course has helped me personally and I would definitely recommend it to anyone looking to learn public speaking. 

No one is ever “done” learning public speaking. It’s a continuous process and you can always get better. Keep learning, keep conquering and keep being awesome!

Lastly, if you want to know how you should NOT open your speech, we’ve got a video for you:

Hrideep Barot

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How to Negotiate: The Art of Getting What You Want

10 Hand Gestures That Will Make You More Confident and Efficient

10 Hand Gestures That Will Make You More Confident and Efficient

Interrupted while Speaking: 8 Ways to Prevent and Manage Interruptions

Interrupted while Speaking: 8 Ways to Prevent and Manage Interruptions

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5 Techniques to Achieve Public Speaking Perfection in English

The fear of public speaking has its own term: glossophobia .

You might understand this fear if you are an English language learner who has ever had to give a speech or presentation in English .

It is hard enough in your own language, let alone a foreign one!

In this article, we will share five techniques to prepare you for inspiring, confident public speaking in English .

What Are the Components of a Successful Speech?

1. learn key english phrases for speeches, warm up by thanking the audience:, introduce your topic or the reason for your speech:, interact with the audience:, close the presentation:, 2. master the art of storytelling, introduce characters and the problem:, explain the plan to solve the problem:, offer a happy ending:, 3. learn english body language, 4. incorporate pauses and stresses, 5. practice, practice, practice, and one more thing....

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Any speech you might need to make, from a business presentation to a personal introduction in front of new classmates, requires more than just the spoken words. Great public speaking typically also comprises  three core types of communication : physical, visual and the story.

You can see these core communication types in action in the video “How to Give Speeches in English” on our YouTube channel .

  • Visual:  This includes pictures, charts and graphs, PowerPoint slides—any visual element that reinforces your speech and helps your audience follow along. You can either use a slideshow projected on a screen or bring physical objects to the stage with you.

For example, if you are telling an inspirational story, your facial expression should be uplifting rather than serious. Similarly, if you present the business results of the first quarter, your visuals should probably include graphs and charts but not photographs.

This is where the FluentU language program can help. You can use the program to increase your English vocabulary naturally, as well as watch native English speakers use the language.

It is terrifying when you have to give a talk in front of a group of people in a foreign language. Besides the standard concerns like, “What if I am too boring” or “What if my mind goes blank,” you have an extra worry: the language barrier .

By memorizing these key phrases, you have a set of tools to keep your speech on track. Whenever you start to feel nervous, just use one of these phrases to add some structure to your speech . As long as you rehearse them very well, retrieving them in critical moments will be effortless and you will be amazed how that smooth operation will help with your confidence.

You can even record yourself saying these phrases. If possible, get feedback from other people regarding the recordings.

Here are some phrases for different stages of a presentation .

It is always difficult to start a public talk as the audience is not always totally focused. Some people might be distracted because they came in a bit late, others might let their mind wander as they do not know what to expect. Do not launch into your content immediately, but start with getting the full attention of the audience.

You can use one of the following phrases to warm up and thank your listeners:

  • Thank you all for being here today.
  • I’m happy to see you all today.
  • It’s my honor that you are joining me for this presentation.

After thanking the audience, signify that you are starting your talk with one of these phrases.

  • Let me begin with…
  • I’d like to start by telling you about…
  • Today I am going to present…

Though it is your stage, you should not just talk for the whole time. Invite the audience to ask questions, give feedback and provide comments. That is a great way to keep them engaged . Here are some phrases to give space for audience interaction, at specific moments or throughout your speech:

  • Before I move on, does anyone have any questions?
  • I’d like to pause now and give you an opportunity to respond.
  • Please feel free to raise your hand if you have a question at any point during my talk.

Make sure you address their opinions, even if they are different from yours. Here are some phrases you can use in such a situation.

  • I hear what you are saying, but let me draw your attention to…
  • Would you like to explain more about…
  • Are there any other comments about this point before I give my response?

Do not forget to thank the audience again before finishing your speech. Use one of the following expressions:

  • Thank you all for your time and attention.
  • With that, I want to wrap up (end) my presentation. Thank you for listening.
  • I’d like to end my presentation here. Thanks for coming and if you have any more questions, I’d be happy to answer them afterward.

Why are we waiting so eagerly for the next season of “Game of Thrones” or crying when we read “The Hunger Games?”

It is all about the story. If you want to engage your audience, you will also need to learn the art of storytelling. Even something as dry as a quarter performance review should have a story about how and why those numbers exist.

For example, analyze some great speeches and their story components. Maybe you can start with one of the following:

  • Mahatma Gandhi, “Quit India”
  • Winston Churchill, “Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat”
  • Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have a Dream”

Of course, storytelling is not something you can learn quickly and master after a couple of hours, but we can help you to understand a good story and apply the principles to your next public speaking event.

You need to introduce the characters of your story and their problem as soon and as clearly as possible. For example, if you present a project to build a new school in remote areas in your country, you should tell your audience about a few children living in such areas and the problems they have due to a lack of formal education. Before diving into how beneficial your project would be, let the audience connect with these children and understand their situation.

Here is an example of what you can say:

“Let’s first meet Ching. She is 10 years old. Every day, instead of going to school like other children her age, Ching goes to the field.”

Telling people about a problem is just the beginning. You need to arm your audience with a plan and show them how such a problem could be solved.

By guiding listeners through each step of resolving the issue, you build up momentum and keep them engaged. You can use this structure to describe your plan:

“ First , we will [do X]. Then , when [X] is ready, we can follow up with [Y]. Providing that everything goes as planned, after three months, we can start  [Z].”

Why do we keep telling fairy tales?

Because their happy endings bring us hope. You want to give the same feeling to your audience. So, you should explain how your plan or the information in your presentation will help achieve a happy ending for your story.

You can say something like this:

“Based on the statistics, I believe that this plan could work to help the children in need and solve their education problem in the long run.”

As discussed above, you need to express confidence when you speak in public. Your belief in your own ability and your opinions can be even more evident in the way you hold your body than in your words.

But every culture has different rules for physical communication. If you did not grow up in an English-speaking environment, you might not know which types of body language your audience will respond to.

FluentU is a helpful tool for learning about this with authentic English videos, including a number of speeches like inspirational talks and acceptance speeches.

That means you can watch how native English speakers stand, move and gesture when giving public speeches, with built-in tools like interactive subtitles and personalized quizzes to make sure you understand their message.

As you watch videos of native English speakers giving public speeches, pay particular attention to the following:

  • Hand movements
  • Eye contact

When you have watched a speech that resonates with you, record yourself imitating the talk as well as the body language of the speaker. Watch your video and compare it with the original. Which version do you think the audience would prefer?

Sometimes you make more of an impression by pausing than speaking. The stops provide breaks within your talk and give the audience time to process your ideas. Sometimes, they also help build up the pressure or release it.

Public speakers, especially comedians, use this technique a lot.

In particular, try to pause:

  • After key words and critical ideas
  • During transitions from one segment of your speech to another
  • After noting something on a chart, graph or other visual

Word stress is another way to give your speech rhythm and help your audience understand. On the flip side, if you ignore stress or put it in the wrong places, it can distract your audience.

To practice this, pick an inspiring English speech and identify the pauses and stressed words or syllables. Record yourself delivering the same speech and compare it with the original. I like doing this exercise with standup comedy performances, as I believe comedians are the masters of pauses and stresses. If you want to try it out, here is a YouTube playlist with popular standup specials  for you to choose from.

Last but not least: practice makes perfect .

The best way to improve your English public speaking is to practice giving speeches in English in public. You will find out what you struggle the most with, whether it is maintaining dominant body language, crafting a compelling story or something else. You will also find out the situations in which you might have lost the attention of your audience.

Before going to the public, you should also practice at home. If you are going to give a presentation, do it as many times as you can at home, in front of the mirror or a camera. Watch yourself in action or rewatch your speech afterward.

If you record your speech, it might be helpful to get feedback from other people, especially English native speakers . They can point out any problems with your pronunciation and the places that you put word stress. They can also warn you of the body language that might come across negatively to an English-speaking audience.

If you want more public speaking practice before having to do an important speech at work or school, you can join groups like the Toastmasters International or public speaking meetups in your area. You will meet other people who are enthusiastic about public speaking and willing to help you improve your skills.

Public speaking in English is a great skill to have but not an easy one to master. However, by learning the techniques in this article, you will acquire the tools and gain the confidence for the next time you need to speak before a group of people in English.

If you like learning English through movies and online media, you should also check out FluentU. FluentU lets you learn English from popular talk shows, catchy music videos and funny commercials , as you can see here:

learn-english-with-videos

If you want to watch it, the FluentU app has probably got it.

The FluentU app and website makes it really easy to watch English videos. There are captions that are interactive. That means you can tap on any word to see an image, definition, and useful examples.

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FluentU lets you learn engaging content with world famous celebrities.

For example, when you tap on the word "searching," you see this:

learn-conversational-english-with-interactive-captioned-dialogue

FluentU lets you tap to look up any word.

Learn all the vocabulary in any video with quizzes. Swipe left or right to see more examples for the word you’re learning.

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FluentU helps you learn fast with useful questions and multiple examples. Learn more.

The best part? FluentU remembers the vocabulary that you’re learning. It gives you extra practice with difficult words—and reminds you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. You have a truly personalized experience.

Start using the FluentU website on your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or Google Play store. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

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words for speech in english

The 9 Parts of Speech: Definitions and Examples

  • Ph.D., Rhetoric and English, University of Georgia
  • M.A., Modern English and American Literature, University of Leicester
  • B.A., English, State University of New York

A part of speech is a term used in traditional grammar for one of the nine main categories into which words are classified according to their functions in sentences , such as nouns or verbs. Also known as word classes , these are the building blocks of grammar.

Parts of Speech

  • Word types can be divided into nine parts of speech:
  • prepositions
  • conjunctions
  • articles/determiners
  • interjections
  • Some words can be considered more than one part of speech, depending on context and usage.
  • Interjections can form complete sentences on their own.

Every sentence you write or speak in English includes words that fall into some of the nine parts of speech. These include nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, articles/determiners, and interjections. (Some sources include only eight parts of speech and leave interjections in their own category.)

Learning the names of the parts of speech probably won't make you witty, healthy, wealthy, or wise. In fact, learning just the names of the parts of speech won't even make you a better writer. However, you will gain a basic understanding of sentence structure  and the  English language by familiarizing yourself with these labels.

Open and Closed Word Classes

The parts of speech are commonly divided into  open classes  (nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs) and  closed classes  (pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, articles/determiners, and interjections). The idea is that open classes can be altered and added to as language develops and closed classes are pretty much set in stone. For example, new nouns are created every day, but conjunctions never change.

In contemporary linguistics , the label  part of speech has generally been discarded in favor of the term word class or syntactic category . These terms make words easier to qualify objectively based on word construction rather than context. Within word classes, there is the lexical or open class and the function or closed class.

The 9 Parts of Speech

Read about each part of speech below and get started practicing identifying each.

Nouns are a person, place, thing, or idea. They can take on a myriad of roles in a sentence, from the subject of it all to the object of an action. They are capitalized when they're the official name of something or someone, called proper nouns in these cases. Examples: pirate, Caribbean, ship, freedom, Captain Jack Sparrow.

Pronouns stand in for nouns in a sentence. They are more generic versions of nouns that refer only to people. Examples:​  I, you, he, she, it, ours, them, who, which, anybody, ourselves.

Verbs are action words that tell what happens in a sentence. They can also show a sentence subject's state of being ( is , was ). Verbs change form based on tense (present, past) and count distinction (singular or plural). Examples:  sing, dance, believes, seemed, finish, eat, drink, be, became

Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. They specify which one, how much, what kind, and more. Adjectives allow readers and listeners to use their senses to imagine something more clearly. Examples:  hot, lazy, funny, unique, bright, beautiful, poor, smooth.

Adverbs describe verbs, adjectives, and even other adverbs. They specify when, where, how, and why something happened and to what extent or how often. Examples:  softly, lazily, often, only, hopefully, softly, sometimes.

Preposition

Prepositions  show spacial, temporal, and role relations between a noun or pronoun and the other words in a sentence. They come at the start of a prepositional phrase , which contains a preposition and its object. Examples:  up, over, against, by, for, into, close to, out of, apart from.

Conjunction

Conjunctions join words, phrases, and clauses in a sentence. There are coordinating, subordinating, and correlative conjunctions. Examples:  and, but, or, so, yet, with.

Articles and Determiners

Articles and determiners function like adjectives by modifying nouns, but they are different than adjectives in that they are necessary for a sentence to have proper syntax. Articles and determiners specify and identify nouns, and there are indefinite and definite articles. Examples: articles:  a, an, the ; determiners:  these, that, those, enough, much, few, which, what.

Some traditional grammars have treated articles  as a distinct part of speech. Modern grammars, however, more often include articles in the category of determiners , which identify or quantify a noun. Even though they modify nouns like adjectives, articles are different in that they are essential to the proper syntax of a sentence, just as determiners are necessary to convey the meaning of a sentence, while adjectives are optional.

Interjection

Interjections are expressions that can stand on their own or be contained within sentences. These words and phrases often carry strong emotions and convey reactions. Examples:  ah, whoops, ouch, yabba dabba do!

How to Determine the Part of Speech

Only interjections ( Hooray! ) have a habit of standing alone; every other part of speech must be contained within a sentence and some are even required in sentences (nouns and verbs). Other parts of speech come in many varieties and may appear just about anywhere in a sentence.

To know for sure what part of speech a word falls into, look not only at the word itself but also at its meaning, position, and use in a sentence.

For example, in the first sentence below,  work  functions as a noun; in the second sentence, a verb; and in the third sentence, an adjective:

  • The noun  work  is the thing Bosco shows up for.
  • The verb  work  is the action he must perform.
  • The  attributive noun  [or converted adjective]  work  modifies the noun  permit .

Learning the names and uses of the basic parts of speech is just one way to understand how sentences are constructed.

Dissecting Basic Sentences

To form a basic complete sentence, you only need two elements: a noun (or pronoun standing in for a noun) and a verb. The noun acts as a subject and the verb, by telling what action the subject is taking, acts as the predicate. 

In the short sentence above,  birds  is the noun and  fly  is the verb. The sentence makes sense and gets the point across.

You can have a sentence with just one word without breaking any sentence formation rules. The short sentence below is complete because it's a command to an understood "you".

Here, the pronoun, standing in for a noun, is implied and acts as the subject. The sentence is really saying, "(You) go!"

Constructing More Complex Sentences

Use more parts of speech to add additional information about what's happening in a sentence to make it more complex. Take the first sentence from above, for example, and incorporate more information about how and why birds fly.

  • Birds fly when migrating before winter.

Birds and fly remain the noun and the verb, but now there is more description. 

When  is an adverb that modifies the verb fly.  The word before  is a little tricky because it can be either a conjunction, preposition, or adverb depending on the context. In this case, it's a preposition because it's followed by a noun. This preposition begins an adverbial phrase of time ( before winter ) that answers the question of when the birds migrate . Before is not a conjunction because it does not connect two clauses.

  • Sentence Parts and Sentence Structures
  • 100 Key Terms Used in the Study of Grammar
  • Prepositional Phrases in English Grammar
  • The Top 25 Grammatical Terms
  • Foundations of Grammar in Italian
  • Pronoun Definition and Examples
  • What Is an Adverb in English Grammar?
  • What Are the Parts of a Prepositional Phrase?
  • Definition and Examples of Adjectives
  • Definition and Examples of Function Words in English
  • Lesson Plan: Label Sentences with Parts of Speech
  • Sentence Patterns
  • Nominal: Definition and Examples in Grammar
  • Constituent: Definition and Examples in Grammar
  • Adding Adjectives and Adverbs to the Basic Sentence Unit
  • The Difference Between Gerunds, Participles, and Infinitives

100+ Daily Use English Words for Fluent Communication

Clapingo Team

15 min read

 · spoken english

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Enhance Your English Vocabulary For Fluent Communication 

Basic english words , commonly used phrases , mastering pronunciation through tongue twisters, advanced vocabulary for fluent communication , business english vocabulary for fluent communication, business vocabulary: key to professional success, essential business words and phrases, socializing and small talk , conversation starters:, importance of daily used english words for fluent communication .

Daily use of English words is essential in developing fluency and effective communication skills. By incorporating new words into your daily life conversations, you can expand your vocabulary and improve your ability to express yourself clearly.

Whether you are speaking with friends, colleagues, or clients, having a wide range of vocabulary at your disposal allows you to convey your thoughts and ideas more precisely.

Using simple and common vocabulary is particularly relevant in everyday conversations. Rather than relying on complex or technical terms, using everyday language helps ensure that your message is easily understood by others. It also makes it easier for you to comprehend what others are saying. By using simple words, you can avoid confusion and foster better communication.

The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive list of practical common words for fluent communication. This list will encompass a variety of topics, ranging from basic vocabulary to advanced terms, idioms, and phrases commonly used in different contexts. Each word will be accompanied by its meaning and contextual examples to help you understand how it can be used in real-life situations.

To further support your journey towards English fluency, Clapingo has published an article titled " Learn 10 Ways To Improve Your English Fluency Without Resorting To Grammar. "

This article offers valuable insights and practical tips on improving fluency through techniques that go beyond grammar rules alone, emphasizing strategies to speak English fluently and effectively.

words for speech in english

Learning basic common English words is fundamental for daily use and effective communication. These words form the building blocks of your vocabulary and are frequently used in various situations. Familiarizing yourself with them will greatly enhance your ability to engage in conversations confidently.

Here are some essential basic common English words to get you started:

1. Numbers : One, two, three, four, five...

2. Colors : Red, blue, green, yellow...

3. Days of the week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday...

4. Months : January, February, March...

5. Family members : Mother, father, brother...

6. Food items: Apple, banana, bread...

7. Animals: Dog, cat, bird...

By incorporating these words into your daily life conversations and practicing their pronunciation and usage regularly, you will quickly develop a strong English vocabulary.

Remember that consistent practice is key to retaining and expanding your vocabulary. To further reinforce your learning journey with additional resources, interactive exercises for basic English common words, and many more topics related to English language skills development, visit Clapingo's YouTube channel here.

Learning commonly used phrases is crucial for effective communication. While having a robust vocabulary is important, using everyday phrases in the right context can greatly enhance your ability to communicate fluently and naturally. Here are some reasons why learning commonly used phrases is significant:

1. Improved Fluency : Incorporating commonly used phrases into your conversations helps you sound more fluent and natural in English. It allows you to express yourself effortlessly without thinking too much about constructing sentences.

2. Cultural Understanding: Commonly used phrases often have cultural nuances and show familiarity with the language. By learning these phrases, you gain a deeper understanding of the culture and can connect with native English speakers more personally.

3. Politeness and Etiquette: Using appropriate greetings, expressions of gratitude, and other polite phrases shows respect for others and helps build positive relationships. It allows you to navigate social situations with ease.

4. Confidence Booster:  You feel more confident in conversations when you know commonly used phrases. This confidence lets you express yourself effectively, convey your thoughts clearly, and engage in meaningful discussions.

Now let's dive into a comprehensive list of everyday phrases that will be useful for various situations:

- Good morning/afternoon/evening

- How are you?

- Nice to meet you

- Have a great day!

Expressions of Gratitude:

- Thank you

- I appreciate it

- You're welcome

- I'm grateful for your help

Asking for Directions:

- Excuse me, could you tell me how to get to...?

- Can you please show me the way to...?

- Is there a nearby...?

Ordering Food or Drinks:

- I'd like...

- Could I have...?

- What do you recommend?

Making Apologies:

- I'm sorry

- My apologies

- I didn't mean to...

Asking for Help:

- Can you please assist me with...?

- Could you lend me a hand?

- I need some help with...

Giving Instructions:

- First, you need to...

- Then, you should...

- Finally, make sure to...

Expressing Preferences:

- I prefer...

- I would rather...

- I'm more inclined towards...

These are just a few examples of commonly used phrases. Remember to practice using them in context to improve your fluency and confidence in everyday conversations. For a more extensive list of daily use more words and phrases, you can refer to the following 

Tongue twisters are a fun and effective way to improve pronunciation, focus on enunciation, and tackle those tricky sounds that often slip through the cracks of daily conversation. From the whimsical " wonder wood word work " that challenges our Ws and Rs, to the complex " track transport treat tree, " which tests our ability to transition smoothly between similar sounds, each tongue twister in this collection is designed to refine your speech clarity and speed.

Dive into the dynamic " team teenage television tell ," perfect for practicing T sounds, or try the sibilant " size skill sky sleep " to master the subtle differences between Ss and SKs. The robust " strong sudden suffix sun " rolls off the tongue, pushing your pronunciation to new strengths, while "secure security sentence" focuses on S and C sounds, essential for clear communication.

Moving on to more challenging sounds, " film fine finish fire " and " chief child children " are great for F and Ch sounds, helping you articulate with precision. For those looking to enhance their shadowing skills, " shade shadow shape share " and " deep defeat detail " offer a rich practice ground. " Energy entertainment evening " brings in the E sounds, pushing the envelope of evening elocutions.

On the emotional spectrum, " sad safe sail sand " and " steel story street " evoke vivid scenarios requiring careful articulation. And for the automotive enthusiast, " car cardiac careless carnival " provides a fun ride through hard C and R sounds. Meanwhile, " fake family fan " and " solid something song " explore F and S sounds in familial contexts, adding a personal touch to practice sessions.

For the builders and makers, " too tools " and " cold colour column " are not just practical but also a test of fluid transition between similar sounding words. " Feet fever figure " and " brother bucket building " challenge your ability to maintain rhythm and pace, while " bottle boy branches ," " cow craft cravings ," and " cap capital captain " turn everyday objects into a verbal playground.

Finally, the adventurous " first fish flowers ," " west wet wheels ," " win wings winner ," wrap up our collection with a celebration of victory, be it in mastering the sounds of English or just getting through these tongue-twisting trials with fewer stumbles. Each twist and turn in these phrases is a step towards more fluent, confident speech. So take a deep breath, and let's twist our way to clearer communication!

Incorporating advanced vocabulary into your daily life conversations can significantly enhance your language and communication skills. Here are some benefits of using advanced vocabulary:

1. Precision and Clarity: Advanced vocabulary allows you to express yourself precisely and convey your thoughts accurately. It helps you articulate complex ideas and concepts with clarity.

2. Impressiveness: Using advanced vocabulary demonstrates your command over the language and can leave a lasting impression on others. It showcases your intelligence, sophistication, and ability to communicate effectively.

3 . Enhances Writing Skills: Learning advanced vocabulary not only improves your spoken communication but also enhances your writing skills. It enables you to write with finesse, choose the right words, and communicate your ideas more effectively.

4. Better Reading Comprehension: As you expand your vocabulary, you will find it easier to comprehend and understand a wider range of texts. Advanced vocabulary exposes you to different writing styles and helps you grasp complex ideas in various domains.

To help you enrich your vocabulary, here is a diverse range of advanced words along with their meanings and contextual examples:

Remember to incorporate these words into your daily life conversations and writing to reap the benefits of an enhanced vocabulary.

Learning idioms and phrasal verbs is crucial for achieving fluency in English. While grammar and vocabulary are important, understanding and using idiomatic expressions and phrasal verbs can take your language skills to the next level.

Here's why:

- Idioms and phrasal verbs are commonly used in everyday English conversations. By learning them, you'll be able to understand native speakers better and communicate more effectively.

- Idiomatic expressions add color, depth, and nuance to your language. They can help you express yourself more naturally and sophisticatedly, making your speech sound more native-like.

- Phrasal verbs, which consist of a verb followed by a preposition or an adverb, are an integral part of spoken English. They often have different meanings than their individual components, so understanding them is essential for comprehension.

Now let's dive into some commonly used idioms and phrasal verbs along with their meanings and examples:

1. Break the ice - to initiate a conversation or friendship.

Example: "We played a game to break the ice at the team-building event."

2. Hit the nail on the head - to accurately identify or address a problem.

Example: "Sarah hit the nail on the head when she suggested that we need better time management."

3. Let the cat out of the bag - to reveal a secret.

Example: "Don't let the cat out of the bag about our surprise party!"

Phrasal Verbs:

1. Call off - to cancel something.

Example: "They called off the meeting due to bad weather."

2. Look forward to - to anticipate or be excited about something in the future.

Example: "I'm really looking forward to my vacation next month."

3. Put up with - to tolerate or endure something unpleasant.

Example: "I can't put up with his constant complaining anymore."

These are just a few examples, but there are hundreds of idioms and phrasal verbs in English. Practice using them in context to become more fluent and confident in your English communication. For a comprehensive list of idioms and phrasal verbs, check out the following video

In the fast-paced and competitive world of business, effective communication is crucial. One key aspect of successful communication is having a strong grasp of business vocabulary. Whether you are participating in meetings, giving presentations, or negotiating deals, using the right words and phrases can make all the difference.

In this section, we will explore the importance of business vocabulary and provide you with a list of essential words and phrases commonly used in professional settings.

Having a wide range of business vocabulary is essential for several reasons. Firstly, it enhances your credibility and professionalism. When you use appropriate terminology in your conversations and written communications, you demonstrate that you understand the industry and know how to navigate within it.

Secondly, having a strong business vocabulary allows for clear and concise communication. In professional settings, time is often limited, and being able to express yourself accurately and succinctly is highly valued. Using the right words helps avoid misunderstandings and ensures that your message is effectively conveyed.

Lastly, mastering business vocabulary enables you to build rapport with colleagues and clients. Speaking their language shows that you understand their needs, concerns, and challenges. It establishes trust and fosters stronger relationships.

To help you on your journey to becoming fluent in business English, here is a comprehensive list of essential words and phrases commonly used in various professional settings:

These are just a few examples of the many words and phrases used in business settings. You can find a more extensive list of essential business vocabulary on the Clapingo website.

By familiarizing yourself with these words and phrases, you'll be able to navigate professional environments with confidence and communicate effectively. Incorporate them into your daily conversations, emails, and presentations to enhance your professional image and improve your chances of success.

Remember, mastering business vocabulary takes time and practice. Make it a habit to learn a few new words or phrases every day. Soon enough, you'll notice a significant improvement in your communication skills, leading to better opportunities in your career.

So, don't hesitate! Start expanding your business vocabulary today and watch as your professional prospects soar.

  5 Importance Tips of Mastering the English Language ​

Socializing and small talk play a crucial role in building relationships. Engaging in casual conversations helps to establish connections, create rapport, and foster a sense of community. When you engage in small talk, you show interest in the other person's life and make them feel valued. It is also an effective way to break the ice and initiate conversations with new acquaintances or colleagues. Here are some common conversation starters, questions, and responses for social situations:

1. "Hi, I'm [Name]. What's your name?"

2. "Nice weather we're having today, isn't it?"

3. "Have you been to this event before?"

4. "What do you do for a living?"

5. "Where are you from?"

1. "How was your weekend?"

2. "Are you enjoying the event so far?"

3. "What brings you here today?"

4. "Do you have any exciting plans for the upcoming holidays?"

5. "What are your hobbies or interests?"

1. "Yes, I had a great weekend! How about you?"

2. "Yes, it's my first time here too! Are you enjoying it?"

3. "I'm here because I'm interested in [topic/event]."

4. "I'm planning to visit my family during the holidays."

5. "I enjoy reading and hiking in my free time."

Remember, small talk should be light-hearted and non-controversial to keep the conversation pleasant and enjoyable for both parties involved.

Must read:  Can listening to songs help you improve your Spoken English? ​

Recapping the importance of daily used English words for fluent communication, consistent practice, and exposure to new vocabulary are key factors in language development. By incorporating English vocabulary words into your conversations daily, you become more comfortable and confident in expressing yourself fluently. Daily practice helps you expand your vocabulary and improve your sentence formation.

To effectively develop your language skills, engaging with various resources that offer support for English learners is important. Clapingo is an exceptional online platform that provides resources tailored specifically for Indian learners. With its vast collection of articles, videos, and interactive exercises, Clapingo offers a wealth of learning opportunities to enhance your spoken English skills.

By making a conscious effort to use daily use English vocabulary words regularly, you will notice significant improvements in your communication abilities. Consistency is key in language learning, so strive to incorporate new vocabulary into your daily conversations and interactions. With time and practice, you will become more proficient in expressing yourself fluently and confidently.

Remember, building a strong foundation in the daily used English words is essential for effective communication. Setting clear goals can help achieve the desired or intended result of enhancing your vocabulary and language skills. Regular practice and exposure to new vocabulary will undoubtedly contribute to your overall language development.

​ Spoken English Words List To Learn English Under 15 Days! ​

1. Why is it important to learn daily use English words?

Using English words daily is essential for developing fluency in the language. By incorporating these words into your vocabulary, you can express yourself more clearly and effectively in everyday conversations.

2. What are some examples of simple English words for daily use?

Simple common English words for daily use include common nouns like "house," "car," and "book," as well as verbs such as "eat," "sleep," and "read." These basic words form the foundation of communication and should be mastered by all learners.

3. Can you provide some new words in English for daily use?

Certainly! Here are a few new words that you can incorporate into your everyday conversations:

a) Serendipity - The occurrence of finding something pleasant or valuable by chance.

b) Resilience - The ability to bounce back or recover quickly from difficulties.

c) Equanimity - Mental calmness, composure, and evenness of temper.

d) Ubiquitous - Present or found everywhere.

e) Pernicious - Having a harmful effect, especially in a gradual or subtle way.

4. What are some examples of the daily use of basic English words?

Daily use basic English words, including numbers (one, two, three), colors (red, blue, green), days of the week (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday), months (January, February, March), and common greetings (hello, goodbye).

5. Can you suggest some advanced English words for daily use?

Certainly! Here are a few advanced English words that can elevate your vocabulary:

a) Eloquent - Fluent or persuasive in speaking or writing.

b) Ubiquitous - Present or found everywhere.

c) Tenacious - Tending to keep a firm hold of something; persistent.

d) Acumen - The ability to make good judgments and quick decisions.

e) Mitigate - To make (something) less severe, serious, or painful.

Fluent communication

Daily Use English

english fluency

Free Leadership Course Delivered to Your Email

Learn to speak English like leader. Get our Leadership course at NO COST.

Clapingo connects you with fluent and dynamic English Speakers from India with diverse backgrounds and professions. Practice English conversation over live video calls. Transform your English speaking skills by talking to excellent English speakers over 1-on-1 video calls.

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Oxford House

  • 5 Famous Speeches To Help you Learn English

5 famous speeches to help you learn English | Oxford House Barcelona

  • Posted on 16/06/2021
  • Categories: Blog
  • Tags: Famous Speeches , Listening , Listening Comprehension , Resources to learn English , Speaking

Everyone likes listening to inspiring speeches. Gifted speakers have a way of making people want to listen and take action to change their lives.

But speeches aren’t just interesting because of their content. They are also great tools to help you improve your English.

Listening to a speech and taking notes can help you develop your comprehension skills. Repeating the words of the speaker allows you to improve your pronunciation. And writing a summary can help you practise your spelling and grammar.

To help you get started, we’ve found 5 famous speeches to help you learn English.

1. Steve Jobs: Stanford Commencement Speech

Steve Jobs was no doubt a great speaker. Millions around the globe were enchanted by the presentations that he gave for Apple as the company’s CEO.

However, he wasn’t just known for speeches related to product launches , like the iconic 2007 speech where he introduced the iPhone . He’s also known for inspirational speeches, like the one he gave in 2005 at a Stanford Commencement ceremony.

In this speech, he addresses the graduating students of Stanford University. He starts by saying that he never actually graduated from college. This makes for an honest and heart-warming speech . For nearly 15 minutes, he talks about his life, telling stories that are funny, relatable, and emotional. He also offers tips for students to apply to their own lives.

Why is it good for learning English?

Jobs uses simple language and speaks in short sentences. He clearly pronounces every word so it’s easy to understand and mimic. Also, this video comes with big subtitles that make the speech even easier to follow.

2. Greta Thunberg: 2019 UN Climate Action Summit Speech

At just 18 years old, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg is one of the most well-known speakers of our time. Some of her speeches have even gone viral on social media. And her powerful words have been repeated thousands of times on climate strike placards around the world.

In one of her most moving speeches, Greta Thunberg addresses world leaders at the 2019 UN Climate Action Summit in New York. She challenges them for not taking action to fight global warming and ensure a future for the younger generations.

“How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,” she says.

Greta’s speech is a lesson in how to express yourself on a variety of environmental issues like climate change. It’s full of lots of useful vocabulary. Plus, the subtitles will help you to understand any complicated language!

3. Will Smith: Speech About Self Discipline

You probably know Will Smith as an actor. He’s played a wide variety of characters – from a police officer in Men in Black to a single father in The Pursuit of Happyness . But did you know that he’s also a great motivational speaker?

A few years ago, a video featuring Will Smith talking about the secret to success went viral on YouTube. In it, he talks about mastering self-discipline as a way to achieve your dreams.

“You cannot win the war against the world if you can’t win the war against your own mind,” he says.

As an actor, Will Smith has a clear and compelling voice, which is easy to follow. Some parts of this talk also sound improvised so it’s great for practising natural speech. It’s also excellent listening practice for understanding an American accent. And there’s lots of slang which you’ll have to guess from the context.

4. Emma Watson: Gender Equality Speech

You may associate Emma Watson’s name with Hermione Granger, the quirky and smart witch from the Harry Potter movies. When she’s not chasing evil wizards, Emma Watson campaigns for real-world issues such as gender equality.

In one of her most famous speeches, which she gave at a special event for the UN’s HeForShe campaign, Emma Watson talks about feminism and fighting for women’s rights. In particular, she explains why neither of these should be confused with ‘man-hating’.

While the actress’s voice is pleasant and calming, the issues she talks about are thought-provoking and will leave you thinking long after this short, 4-minute speech.

This talk is great for helping you get used to a southern English accent. It can also give you some essential vocabulary about a relevant topic. Look out for uses of the passive voice in her speech, and write down those sentences to practise this grammar structure.

5. Benjamin Zander: The Transformative Power of Classical Music

Benjamin Zander is the musical director of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra. He is also a well-known motivational speaker who loves to share his love for music.

In his 2008 TED talk, he found an engaging way to talk about classical music to people who know nothing about it. As you can see in the video below, he switches between speaking and playing the piano. And, he isn’t afraid to tell a joke or two.

This speech is a bit more of a challenge than the ones described above. Benjamin Zander speaks fast and in a conversational style, using many examples and short stories to tell his tale .

However, the pauses he takes to play the piano give you time to take some notes. Write down any unfamiliar words you heard him say so you can look them up later. If you’re having trouble understanding him, you can always turn on the subtitles.

Glossary for Language Learners

Find the following words in the article and then write down any new ones you didn’t know.

Gifted (adj): talented.

To enchant (v): to captivate.

Launch (n): a product release.

Heart-warming (adj): emotional.

To go viral (v): something spreads quickly on the internet.

Placards (n): cardboard signs.

Moving (adj): emotional.

Compelling (adj): captivating.

Quirky (adj): interesting and different.

Thought-provoking (adj): something interesting that makes you think a lot about the topic.

To switch (v): to change.

Tale (n): story.

To look something up (v): to search for a piece of information in a dictionary or online.

adj = adjective

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How To Write A B2 First Formal Email/Letter

  • By: oxfordadmin
  • Posted on 01/06/2021

8 Resources To Help Beginner English Learners

  • Posted on 23/06/2021

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10 famous speeches in English and what you can learn from them

Speech is an essential element of language, one that we all employ in our daily lives. What about a speech ?

A speech is a formal address, delivered to an audience, that seeks to convince, persuade, inspire or inform. From historic moments to the present day, the English language has given us some extraordinary examples of the spoken word. A powerful tool in the right – or wrong – hands, spoken English can, and has, changed the world.

We’ve chosen ten of the most famous speeches in English. They range from celebrated, world-changing pieces of rhetoric to our personal favourites, but most importantly they still rouse our emotions when we hear them today. We’ve examined each for the tricks of the oratory trade. After each speech you’ll find some bullet points outlining its most distinctive rhetorical features, and why a speech writer would include them.

Remember these celebrated rhetoricians the next time you have to give a speech in public – be this at a wedding, award ceremony or business conference.

Scroll down to the end of this post for our essential tips on crafting speeches.

1. Martin Luther King I Have a Dream 1963

We couldn’t have an article about speeches without mentioning this one. Incredibly famous and iconic, Martin Luther King changed the character of speech making.

I have a dream that one day down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification – one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together.

What makes this a great speech?

– Abstract nouns like “ dream ” are incredibly emotional. Our dreams are an intimate part of our subconscious and express our strongest desires. Dreams belong to the realm of fantasy; of unworldly, soaring experiences. King’s repetition of the simple sentence “I have a dream” evokes a picture in our minds of a world where complete equality and freedom exist.

– It fuses simplicity of language with sincerity : something that all persuasive speeches seek to do!

– Use of tenses: King uses the future tense (“will be able”, “shall be”, “will be made””), which gives his a dream certainty and makes it seem immediate and real.

– Thanks to its highly biblical rhetoric , King’s speech reads like a sermon. The last paragraph we’ve quoted here is packed with biblical language and imagery .

2. King George VI Radio Address 1939

This speech was brought back to life recently thanks to the film, The King’s Speech (2010). While George VI will never go down in history as one of the world’s gifted orators, his speech will certainly be remembered.

In this grave hour, perhaps the most fateful in history, I send to every household of my peoples, both at home and overseas, this message, spoken with the same depth of feeling for each one of you as if I were able to cross your threshold and speak to you myself. For the second time in the lives of most of us, we are at war. Over and over again, we have tried to find a peaceful way out of the differences between ourselves and those who are now our enemies, but it has been in vain.  

– At only 404 words long, the speech is impressively economical with language. Its short length means that every word is significant, and commands its audiences’ attention.

– This is a great example of how speechwriters use superlatives . George VI says that this moment is “the most fateful in history”. Nothing gets peoples’ attention like saying this is the “most important” or “best”.

– “ We ”, “ us ” and “ I ”: This is an extremely personal speech. George VI is using the first person, “I”, to reach out to each person listening to the speech. He also talks in the third person: “we are at war”, to unite British people against the common enemy: “them”, or Germany.

3. Winston Churchill We shall fight on the beaches 1940

Churchill is an icon of great speech making. All his life Churchill struggled with a stutter that caused him difficulty pronouncing the letter “s”. Nevertheless, with pronunciation and rehearsal he became one of the most famous orators in history.

…we shall defend our Island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this Island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God’s good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.

What makes it a powerful speech?

– Structural repetition of the simple phrase “we shall…”

– Active verbs like “defend” and “fight” are extremely motivational, rousing Churchill’s audience’s spirits.

– Very long sentences build the tension of the speech up to its climax “the rescue and the liberation of the old”, sweeping listeners along. A similar thing happens in musical pieces: the composition weaves a crescendo, which often induces emotion in its audience.

4. Elizabeth I Speech to the Troops 1588

The “Virgin Queen”, Elizabeth I, made this speech at a pivotal moment in English history. It is a remarkable speech in extraordinary circumstances: made by a woman, it deals with issues of gender, sovereignty and nationality.

I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live and die amongst you all; to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.

– Elizabeth puts aside differences in social status and says she will “live and die amongst (her troops)”. This gives her speech a very inclusive message .

– She uses antithesis , or contrasting ideas. To offset the problem of her femininity – of being a “weak and feeble woman” – she swiftly emphasises her masculine qualities: that she has the “heart and stomach of a king”.

– Elizabeth takes on the role of a protector : there is much repetition of the pronoun “I”, and “I myself” to show how active she will be during the battle.

5. Chief Joseph Surrender Speech 1877

We’ve included this speech because there is something extremely raw and humbling about Chief Joseph’s surrender. Combining vulnerability with pride, this is an unusual speech and deserves attention.

Tell General Howard I know his heart. What he told me before, I have it in my heart. I am tired of fighting. Our Chiefs are killed; Looking Glass is dead, Ta Hool Hool Shute is dead. The old men are all dead. It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led on the young men is dead. It is cold, and we have no blankets; the little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are – perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me, my Chiefs! I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever.

What makes this a good speech?

– This speech is a perfect example of a how a non-native speaker can make the English language their own. Chief Joesph’s rhetoric retains the feels and culture of a Native American Indian speaker, and is all the more moving for this.

– Simple, short sentences.

– Declarative sentences such as “I know his heart” and “It is cold” present a listener with hard facts that are difficult to argue against.

6.  Emmeline Pankhurst Freedom or Death 1913

Traditionally silent, women tend to have been left out of rhetoric. All that changed, however, with the advent of feminism. In her struggle for the vote, Pankhurst and her fellow protesters were compelled to find a voice.

You have left it to women in your land, the men of all civilised countries have left it to women, to work out their own salvation. That is the way in which we women of England are doing. Human life for us is sacred, but we say if any life is to be sacrificed it shall be ours; we won’t do it ourselves, but we will put the enemy in the position where they will have to choose between giving us freedom or giving us death.

– Direct acknowledgement of her audience through use of the pronoun you .

– Pankhurst uses stark, irreconcilable contrasts to emphasise the suffragettes’ seriousness. Binary concepts like men/women, salvation/damnation, freedom/imprisonment and life/death play an important role in her speech.

7. John F. Kennedy The Decision to go the Moon 19 61

Great moments require great speeches. The simplicity of Kennedy’s rhetoric preserves a sense of wonder at going beyond human capabilities, at this great event for science and technology.

We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.

– Simple sentence structures: “We choose to go to the moon” = Subject + Verb + Complement. The grammatical simplicity of the sentence allows an audience to reflect on important concepts, i.e. choice. Repetition emphasises this.

– Kennedy uses demonstrative (or pointing) pronouns e.g. “ this decade”, “ that goal” to create a sense of urgency; to convey how close to success the US is.

8. Shakespeare The Tempest  Act 3 Scene 2 c.1610

Of course, any list of great speeches would be incomplete without a mention of the master of rhetoric, the Bard himself.  If you caught the London Olympic Opening Ceremony you would have noticed that Kenneth Branagh delivered Caliban’s speech, from The Tempest .

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises, Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not. Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices That, if I then had waked after long sleep, Will make me sleep again: and then, in dreaming, The clouds methought would open and show riches Ready to drop upon me that, when I waked, I cried to dream again.

– It expresses a wonder and uncertainty of the world, and an inability to comprehend its mystery.

– It is highly alliterative , a rhetorical trick that makes speech memorable and powerful.

– Shakespeare uses onomatopoeia (e.g. “twangling”, “hum”: words whose sound is like they are describing) to make Caliban’s speech evocative.

9.  Shakespeare  Henry V  Act 3 Scene 1, 1598

One of rhetoric’s most primal functions is to transform terrified men into bloodthirsty soldiers. “Once more unto the breach” is a speech that does just that. It is a perfect example of how poetry is an inextricable element of rhetoric.

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead. In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility: But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger; Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, Disguise fair nature with hard-favour’d rage

What makes this such a great rousing battle speech?

-Shakespeare uses some fantastic imagery in King Henry’s speech. His “dear friends”, or soldiers, are tigers, commanded to block their enemies’ way with their dead comrades. This appeals to ideals of masculinity that men should be fierce and strong.

– Orders and imperative verbs give the speaker authority.

– Repetition of key phrases and units of sound: the vowel sounds in the repeated phrase “once more” are echoed by the words “or” and “our”. This makes it an extraordinarily powerful piece of rhetoric to hear spoken.

10. William Lyon Phelps The Pleasure of Books 1933

This speech was read a year before Nazis began their systematic destruction of books that didn’t match Nazi ideals. As major advocates of books at English Trackers, we’re naturally inclined to love speeches about their importance.

A borrowed book is like a guest in the house; it must be treated with punctiliousness, with a certain considerate formality. You must see that it sustains no damage; it must not suffer while under your roof. You cannot leave it carelessly, you cannot mark it, you cannot turn down the pages, you cannot use it familiarly. And then, some day, although this is seldom done, you really ought to return it.

– Phelps personifies books in this speech; that is, he gives books human characteristics – like the capacity to “suffer”. Comparing a book to a guest creates novelty , which engages and holds the interest of a listener.

– This speech uses both modal verbs (“must”, “ought”) and prohibitions (“you cannot”) to demonstrate both proper and improper behaviour.

Some tips to bear in mind when writing a speech

– KISS : the golden rule of Keep It Short and Simple really does apply. Keep your sentences short, your grammar simple. Not only is this more powerful than long rambling prose, but you’re more likely hold your audience’s attention – and be able to actually remember what you’re trying to say!

– Rule of 3 : another golden rule. The human brain responds magically to things that come in threes. Whether it’s a list of adjectives, a joke, or your main points, it’s most effective if you keep it to this structure.

– Imagery : Metaphors, similes and description will help an audience to understand you, and keep them entertained.

– Pronouns : Use “we” to create a sense of unity, “them” for a common enemy, “you” if you’re reaching out to your audience, and “I” / “me” if you want to take control.

– Poetry : Repetition, rhyme and alliteration are sound effects, used by poets and orators alike. They make a speech much more memorable. Remember to also structure pauses and parentheses into a speech. This will vary the flow of sound, helping you to hold your audience’s attention.

– Jokes : Humour is powerful. Use it to perk up a sleepy audience, as well as a rhetorical tool. Laughter is based on people having common, shared assumptions – and can therefore be used to persuade.

– Key words : “Every”, “improved”, “natural”, “pure”, “tested’ and “recommended” will, according to some surveys, press the right buttons and get a positive response from your listeners.

About the Author: This post comes to you from guest blogger, Natalie. Currently blogging, editing and based in London, Natalie previously worked with the English Trackers team.

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parts of speech

Parts of Speech

What is a Part of Speech?

We can categorize English words into 9 basic types called "parts of speech" or "word classes". It's quite important to recognize parts of speech. This helps you to analyze sentences and understand them. It also helps you to construct good sentences.

Parts of Speech Table

Parts of speech examples.

  • Parts of Speech Quiz

This is a summary of the 9 parts of speech*. You can find more detail if you click on each part of speech.

  • lexical Verbs ( work, like, run )
  • auxiliary Verbs ( be, have, must )
  • Determiners may be treated as adjectives, instead of being a separate part of speech.

Here are some examples of sentences made with different English parts of speech:

Here is a sentence that contains every part of speech:

Words with More Than One Job

Many words in English can have more than one job, or be more than one part of speech. For example, "work" can be a verb and a noun; "but" can be a conjunction and a preposition; "well" can be an adjective, an adverb and an interjection. In addition, many nouns can act as adjectives.

To analyze the part of speech, ask yourself: "What job is this word doing in this sentence?"

In the table below you can see a few examples. Of course, there are more, even for some of the words in the table. In fact, if you look in a good dictionary you will see that the word " but " has six jobs to do:

  • verb, noun, adverb, pronoun, preposition and conjunction!

People often ask

FAQ: frequently asked parts of speech questions

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English Speech Topics for Students

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  • Updated on  
  • Apr 2, 2024

english speech topics for students

Writing an exciting and thoughtful speech requires selecting a good topic, researching it thoroughly, and forming individual opinions to express the same. School students are usually asked to speak on a contemporary topic to help them become good public speakers as well as learn the art of expressing oneself in front of an audience. While many speech competitions often allot topics beforehand, you might also have heard of extempore where topics are given on the spot for speech. This blog brings you a list of common English speech topics as well as some helpful tips and tricks that can assist you in effectively expressing your thoughts and opinions in front of an audience. Let’s begin!

Checkout our 200+ Essay Topics for Students in English

This Blog Includes:

List of best english speech topics for students, 1-minute speech topics, 2-minute speech topics, 3-minute speech topics, easy topics for speech in english, english speech topics on environment, english speech topics on technology, english speech topics on independence day, english speech topics on diwali, english speech topics on corruption, english speech topics on feminism, english speech topics on mother’s day, english speaking topics on capitalism, engish speech topics on gandhi jayanti, english speech topics on reading, english speech topics on communism, english speech topics on deforestation, english speech topics on social issues, english speech topics on important days & events, english speech topics on greatest leaders in india & around the world, english speech topics on indian culture, english speech topics on proverbs, english speech topics on human rights, english speech topics on education, english speech topics on the importance of water, miscellaneous speech topics, types of persuasive speech topics, tips for writing and speaking a speech.

Speeches are all about one’s thoughts. It should not be copied from somewhere. It is all about what the speaker thinks of any given topic. However, take a look at the following list of English Speech Topics on different contemporary issues as well as concepts.

  • The Best Day of My Life
  • Social Media: Bane or Boon?
  • Pros and Cons of Online Learning
  • Benefits of Yoga
  • If I had a Superpower
  • I wish I were ______
  • Human Rights
  • Environment Conservation
  • Women Should Rule the World!
  • The Best Lesson I Have Learned
  • Paperbacks vs E-books
  • How to Tackle a Bad Habit
  • My Favorite Pastime/Hobby
  • Why should every citizen vote?
  • Fear of Missing Out (FOMO): Is it real or not?
  • Importance of Reading
  • Importance of Books in Our Life
  • My Favorite Fictional Character
  • Introverts vs Extroverts
  • Lessons to Learn from Sports
  • Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

Quick Read: English Speaking Books

Quick Read: Essay on Peer Pressure

Quick Read: Essay on Health and Fitness for Students

  • I mportance of Kindness
  • Is there Value in Homework?
  • Things I learned in Lockdown
  • How can food be recycled?
  • Should Art be a part of the school curriculum?
  • Should schools teach sign language?
  • Women make better presidents/prime ministers
  • Why books are better than movies?
  • Life was better when technology was simple
  • Impact of technology on our health
  • Should children’s reality shows be banned?
  • Learning in the Wake of COVID-19
  • Hard Work vs Smart Work
  • What Makes Learning Fun?
  • The Coolest Inventions You’ve Seen
  • Nuclear Energy
  • Importance of AI in Education
  • Importance of Extracurricular Activities
  • Should exams be banned?
  • How to Tackle Bullying in Schools?

  • Speech about dreams
  • Speech about life
  • Speech on time
  • Speech on discipline
  • Speech on happiness
  • Speech on kindness
  • Speech on value of time
  • Speech on health and fitness
  • Speech on Doctor
  • Speech on Nurse
  • Graduation Day Speech
  • World Health Day Speech
  • Sex Education Speech
  • Importance of Education
  • Is it beneficial to learn a Second Language?
  • Music has healing power
  • Success in life
  • Self Confidence
  • 18th birthday
  • Love is more powerful than hate
  • Social Impact of Covid-19
  • How can Online Learning be Fun?
  • Make Public Transport Free
  • Should violent video games be banned?
  • Speech on Learning

Exploring English Speech Topics? You must also take a look at Extempore Topics !

  • Climate Change
  • Ozone Layer Depletion
  • Reducing Water Levels
  • Deforestation
  • Global Warming
  • Waste Management
  • Water-Saving Techniques
  • Reducing the Green Cover of Earth
  • Endangered species need protection
  • Importance of fishing regulations
  • Importance of investing in alternative fuels
  • Impact of ocean acidification on marine organisms
  • The misuse of the term “sustainable development” by environmentalists
  • Microbial benefits
  • E-Waste Management
  • Natural Disasters and their impact on economic growth
  • Energy alternatives – Only solution to the environmental damage
  • Extinction of rare species
  • World Environment Day
  • Disaster Management
  • Over and Improper Use of Natural Resources
  • Air, Water and Soil Pollution
  • Efficiency of Recycling

Also Read: How to Write Dialogue: Format, Tips and Examples

  • Technology and Mental Health
  • Privacy in the Digital Age: Navigating the Challenges of Data Collection and Surveillance
  • The Impact of Technology on Society
  • Artificial Intelligence: The New Normal
  • The Role of Social Media in Communication and Social Interactions
  • Sustainable Technology: Innovations for a Greener Future
  • The Rise of E-commerce
  • Gaming Technology: Entertainment, ESports and Interactive Experiences
  • The Digital Divide: Bridging the Gap for Equal Access to Technology
  • The Ethical Dilemmas of Emerging Technologies

Also Read: English Vocabulary: Meaning, Types, Tips to Improve

  • The Journey of Independence Day
  • The Significance of Independence Day
  • Indian Independence Day
  • Remembering the Founding Fathers
  • The Spirit of Independence
  • Independence Day and Volunteering
  • Independence Day Speeches
  • India’s Road to Freedom
  • Independence Day and National Identity
  • Independence Day in the Digital Age
  • Independence Day and Women’s Empowerment
  • Diwali: The Festival of Lights and Its Significance in Hindu Culture
  • Diwali and the Victory of Good Over Evil
  • Diwali and the Art of Giving
  • Diwali and the Spirit of Forgiveness
  • Diwali and Cultural Exchanges
  • Diwali and the Essence of Joy
  • Diwali and Social Responsibility
  • Diwali and Artistic Expressions
  • The Rituals and Traditions of Diwali
  • Diwali and the Symbolism of Light
  • The Economic Consequence of Corruption
  • Corruption and International Aid
  • Media and Corruption
  • Fighting Corruption
  • Corruption in Politics
  • The Role of Transparency and Accountability in Curbing Corruption
  • The Role of Technology in Combating Corruption
  • Whistleblowing and Protecting Mechanism
  • Corruption in Business and Corporate Practices
  • Understanding Feminism
  • The Future of Feminism
  • Feminism and Parenting
  • Feminism and Online Activism
  • Feminism and Environmental Activism
  • Feminism and Reproductive Rights
  • The Gender Pay Gap: Examining Inequalities in the Workplace
  • Feminism and its Evolution
  • Feminism and Body Positivity
  • Feminism and Media Representation: Encouraging Authentic and Diverse Portrayals of Women
  • Expressing Gratitude and Love to Mothers
  • The Influence of Mothers in Shaping Our Values and Beliefs
  • Motherhood and Education
  • Mother’s Day and Volunteerism
  • Mother-Daughter Relationship
  • The Role of Mothers in Shaping Society
  • Mother’s Day Crafts and DIY Gifts
  • Learned Lessons from Mothers
  • Mother’s Day Around the World: Cultural Traditions and Celebrations
  • Capitalism: An Introduction to the Economic System and its Principles
  • The Future of Capitalism
  • Pros and Cons of Capitalism
  • Capitalism and Globalisation
  • Capitalism and Consumerism
  • Capitalism and Financial Crisis: Undertaking the Risk and Mitigation Measures
  • Capitalism and Environmental Sustainability
  • Capitalism and the Role of Government
  • Corporate Social Responsibility in Capitalism
  • Capitalism and the Digital Economy
  • Mahatma Gandhi: The Father of the Nation and His Ideals
  • Remembering Gandhi: Reflecting On His Life and Legacy
  • Gandhi’s Influence on the Indian Independence Movement
  • Satyagraha: The Power of Truth and Nonviolent Resistance
  • Gandhi’s Philosophy of Swaraj
  • The Role of Women in Gandhi’s Freedom Struggle
  • Gandhi’s Teaching on Education and Moral Values
  • Gandhi’s Lasting Legacy
  • Gandhi’s Vision for a Just and Inclusive Society
  • The Relevance of Gandhi’s Principles in Today’s World
  • The Influence of Reading on Emotional Intelligence and Empathy
  • Reading and Mental Health
  • Benefits of Reading
  • Reading and Empowerment
  • The Role of Reading in Academic Success and Lifelong Learning
  • Promoting a Reading Culture: Encouraging Reading Habits in Society
  • Reading Biographies and Memoirs
  • Reading and Social Connections
  • The Joy of Reading: Escaping Into the Different Worlds and Characters
  • Reading and Personal Identity
  • The Current State of Communism
  • Communism: An Introduction to the Ideology and Its Historical Context
  • The Evolution of Communist Movements
  • The Role of the State in a Communist Society
  • The Fall of Communist Regimes
  • Communism and Religious Freedom
  • Communism and Gender Equality
  • Communism and Workers’ Rights
  • The Criticisms of Communism
  • Deforestation: Causes, Consequences and Global Impact
  • Deforestation and Climate Change
  • Deforestation and Carbon Sequestration
  • Deforestation and Individual Actions
  • Deforestation and Wildlife Trafficking
  • Deforestation and Sustainable Development
  • Deforestation and Indigenous Communities
  • Deforestation and Biodiversity Loss
  • Deforestation and Forest Fires
  • The Importance of Forests

Quick Read: Speech on Nuclear Energy

  • Women Empowerment
  • Education of Girl Child
  • Unemployment
  • Casteism 
  • Reservation
  • Importance of Maintaining Hygiene
  • Child Labour
  • Social Distancing
  • Organ Donation
  • Importance of the Right to Education
  • Child Trafficking
  • Cultural Diversity
  • Struggles of Immigrants
  • Impact of Globalisation
  • Adult education
  • Independence Day
  • Mother’s Day
  • World Cancer Day
  • World Population Day
  • World Health Day
  • Ambedkar Jayanti
  • Gandhi Jayanti
  • Human Rights Day
  • Zero Discrimination Day
  • Women’s Day
  • Thanksgiving
  • Anti-Terrorism Day
  • Hindi Diwas 

Check out this list of all the important national and international days in 202 4 !

  • Mahatma Gandhi
  • Jawaharlal Nehru
  • Raja Rammohan Roy
  • George Washington
  • Albert Einstein
  • APJ Abdul Kalam
  • Nelson Mandela
  • Kailash Satyarthi
  • Diversity in India
  • Speech on Holi
  • The Role of Yoga and Meditation in Indian Culture and Its Global Impact
  • The Importance of Traditional Indian Clothing
  • Indian Folklore
  • Indian Festivals
  • The Art of Indian Dance
  • Traditional Indian Medicine (Ayurveda)
  • Indian Epics and Mythology
  • Social Customs and Etiquettes in Indian Society
  • Indian Sports and Games

Also Read: Speech on Indian Culture

  • Honesty is the best policy
  • When there’s a will, there is a way
  • Actions speak louder than words
  • Knowledge is Power
  • Ignorance is Bliss
  • Don’t judge a book by its cover
  • Hard work is the key to success

Explore these proverbs & their meanings through this blog on Difficult Phrases !

  • The Role of International Organisations in Promoting and Protecting Human Rights
  • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: A Milestone in Human History
  • Gender Equality: Breaking Barriers and Empowering Women
  • Ensuring a Safe and Sustainable Environment for the Next Generation
  • The Right to Education: Empowering Minds
  • Bridging the Gap Between the Rich and Poor
  • Human Rights and Armed Conflicts
  • Global Fight to Combat Human Trafficking
  • Human Rights and Climate Change
  • Religious Freedom: Tolerance and Coexistence in a Diverse Society

To know what to mention in such speech topics, explore the Great Personalities in the World !

  • Importance of teacher in your life
  • SAT scores for college application
  • Student bullies should be expelled
  • Consequences of cheating in exams
  • Homeschooling is better than normal schooling
  • Importance of value education
  • Importance of sports and physical exercises
  • Schools vs colleges
  • What is the difference between a school, college and university in the USA?

Check Out: Synonyms List

  • The Water-Energy Nexus
  • The Essence of Water: Exploring the Live-giving Properties of H2O
  • Water as a Driver of Economic Growth and Prosperity
  • Water Security: Ensuring Equal Access and Quality for All
  • Water and Agriculture
  • The Role of Water in Ecosystems
  • Water and Blue Economy
  • Water Diplomacy: Promoting Collaboration for Transboundary Water Management
  • Water and Cultural Significance: Exploring Symbolisms and Rituals
  • Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH): Foundational for Human Health and Dignity
  • Article 370
  • Women rights
  • The Constitution of India
  • Youth of India
  • Culture of India
  • Importance of Unity
  • Generation Gap
  • Importance of Value Education
  • Old Age Homes
  • Family Values
  • Leadership skills
  • Rise of Smart Classes
  • Grading System
  • Importance of Practical Education
  • Benefits of Co-Education
  • Importance of Co-Curricular Activities
  • The uselessness of Power-Point Presentations
  • Rise of Technology
  • Excessive usage of the Internet
  • Speech on Fear
  • Speech on Dependence on Technology
  • Importance of Social Media
  • Speech on India of My Dreams
  • Indian Education System
  • Speech on My India

While exploring persuasive English speech topics, you must make sure that they are stimulating, engaging, concise and clear. There are three main types of Persuasive Speech topics which are:

1. Factual Persuasive Speech : These topics include facts, figures and statistics to thoroughly analyse the given topic and assess whether it’s true or false.

2. Policy Persuasive Speech : Discussing policies, laws and reforms, these speech topics critically examine the advantages and disadvantages of the given policy or law and suggest the improvements that can be made.

3. Value Persuasive Speech : Mainly focusing on social or political issues, these speech topics present the critique and argument of whether certain actions are morally right or not.

While speaking on a particular topic, there are certain things that you must keep in mind to make your speech expressive and effective. Let’s take a look at some useful topics that help you in acing any topic you are speaking on.

tips for writing and speaking

  • Always research the topic. If you are participating in an extempore, then make sure to go through the common and popular topics as well as the unconventional ones that you might get. Preparation is the key to delivering an impressive speech.
  • Whether you are given a topic on the spot or you are prepared for the speech, it is always pivotal that you seem interested in speaking about it. Relate the given issues to your own life and this will help you in giving it your twist.
  • Pay extra attention to your body language and enunciation. While a gesticulative approach will make you seem outward, having timid body language can cause a wrong impression.
  • Ponder upon the different viewpoints on a topic . Try to present a holistic view of the given topic but don’t forget to present your opinion on it as well. Along with this, don’t try to take sides unless the topic demands you to.
  • Involve your audience, if possible. This way, you will be able to interact with the people and it will also be useful in fighting the fear of public speaking.
  • Don’t mug up a speech. It becomes evident when someone just speaks on a topic continuously and the audience might realise that you have memorized it or you might forget a certain part which will let the whole speech fade away from your brain.
  • Instead, make notes about the topic in your mind, remember certain keywords and try to maintain a particular flow in your speech.
  • Incorporate humour in your speech in a way that you do not offend anyone or overdo it but get a positive reaction from the audience. Humour is a great way of lightening the mood as well as ensuring the whole speech is interactive and engaging.
  • When you need more specialized assistance, a  US essay writing service  can be a valuable resource for crafting your speech.

While preparing for English Speech topics, you must also check out IELTS Speaking Topics !

Juvenile delinquency is acceptable. Prostitution should be legal. Underage driving should be punishable by law. Beauty pageants for children should be banned. Prisoner’s right to vote. Voting rights should not be universal. Guns should be banned from college campuses.

A three-minute speech is undoubtedly a wonderful starting point for public speaking. This is because you need to communicate with your audience more effectively when you just have a short amount of time. In addition, the speech ought to be concise, pertinent, and clear.

Life is the gift of God in the form of trust that we will make it meaningful in whatever we can. We are all unique individuals. No one is born like you and no one will ever be, so cherish your individuality. Many times, I come across people accusing God of things that they don’t have. They always cursing their lives.

 2-minute speeches are  short and crisp speeches of about 260-350 words .

Related Reads

Thus, we hope that this list helps you in preparing for different English speech topics. Gearing up for IELTS ? Sign up for an online demo session with our experts at Leverage Edu and we will assist you in preparing for its different sections as well as improving your reading, listening, speaking and writing skills to ensure that you ace the exam with flying colours!

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14 comments

I take english speaking classes, please provide me sone more material to help student’s.

Here are some articles on books and study material that will help your students- https://leverageedu.com/blog/english-speaking-books/ https://leverageedu.com/blog/books-by-charles-dickens/ https://leverageedu.com/blog/best-books-by-george-orwell/

I want topic on students and online classes

It is helpful for my school homework thanks 😸

Glad we could help!

Nice advise 👍

Thank you, Pragya!

Not good topics 🤔🤔

Thanks for the suggestion. We will update the blog!

Helpful for students . So I like it

Thanks for reading! Also, read: Daily Used English Words Speech on Importance of English Reach us at 1800 57 2000 for study-abroad related matters!

You people are giving great contribution in internet learning and it is for all….

Hi, thank you for your valuable feedback.

Awesome! Its really awesome article, I have got much clear idea concerning from this post.

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  • Parts of speech

The 8 Parts of Speech | Chart, Definition & Examples

The 8 Parts of Speech

A part of speech (also called a word class ) is a category that describes the role a word plays in a sentence. Understanding the different parts of speech can help you analyze how words function in a sentence and improve your writing.

The parts of speech are classified differently in different grammars, but most traditional grammars list eight parts of speech in English: nouns , pronouns , verbs , adjectives , adverbs , prepositions , conjunctions , and interjections . Some modern grammars add others, such as determiners and articles .

Many words can function as different parts of speech depending on how they are used. For example, “laugh” can be a noun (e.g., “I like your laugh”) or a verb (e.g., “don’t laugh”).

Table of contents

  • Prepositions
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections

Other parts of speech

Interesting language articles, frequently asked questions.

A noun is a word that refers to a person, concept, place, or thing. Nouns can act as the subject of a sentence (i.e., the person or thing performing the action) or as the object of a verb (i.e., the person or thing affected by the action).

There are numerous types of nouns, including common nouns (used to refer to nonspecific people, concepts, places, or things), proper nouns (used to refer to specific people, concepts, places, or things), and collective nouns (used to refer to a group of people or things).

Ella lives in France .

Other types of nouns include countable and uncountable nouns , concrete nouns , abstract nouns , and gerunds .

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A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun. Pronouns typically refer back to an antecedent (a previously mentioned noun) and must demonstrate correct pronoun-antecedent agreement . Like nouns, pronouns can refer to people, places, concepts, and things.

There are numerous types of pronouns, including personal pronouns (used in place of the proper name of a person), demonstrative pronouns (used to refer to specific things and indicate their relative position), and interrogative pronouns (used to introduce questions about things, people, and ownership).

That is a horrible painting!

A verb is a word that describes an action (e.g., “jump”), occurrence (e.g., “become”), or state of being (e.g., “exist”). Verbs indicate what the subject of a sentence is doing. Every complete sentence must contain at least one verb.

Verbs can change form depending on subject (e.g., first person singular), tense (e.g., simple past), mood (e.g., interrogative), and voice (e.g., passive voice ).

Regular verbs are verbs whose simple past and past participle are formed by adding“-ed” to the end of the word (or “-d” if the word already ends in “e”). Irregular verbs are verbs whose simple past and past participles are formed in some other way.

“I’ve already checked twice.”

“I heard that you used to sing .”

Other types of verbs include auxiliary verbs , linking verbs , modal verbs , and phrasal verbs .

An adjective is a word that describes a noun or pronoun. Adjectives can be attributive , appearing before a noun (e.g., “a red hat”), or predicative , appearing after a noun with the use of a linking verb like “to be” (e.g., “the hat is red ”).

Adjectives can also have a comparative function. Comparative adjectives compare two or more things. Superlative adjectives describe something as having the most or least of a specific characteristic.

Other types of adjectives include coordinate adjectives , participial adjectives , and denominal adjectives .

An adverb is a word that can modify a verb, adjective, adverb, or sentence. Adverbs are often formed by adding “-ly” to the end of an adjective (e.g., “slow” becomes “slowly”), although not all adverbs have this ending, and not all words with this ending are adverbs.

There are numerous types of adverbs, including adverbs of manner (used to describe how something occurs), adverbs of degree (used to indicate extent or degree), and adverbs of place (used to describe the location of an action or event).

Talia writes quite quickly.

Other types of adverbs include adverbs of frequency , adverbs of purpose , focusing adverbs , and adverbial phrases .

A preposition is a word (e.g., “at”) or phrase (e.g., “on top of”) used to show the relationship between the different parts of a sentence. Prepositions can be used to indicate aspects such as time , place , and direction .

I left the cup on the kitchen counter.

A conjunction is a word used to connect different parts of a sentence (e.g., words, phrases, or clauses).

The main types of conjunctions are coordinating conjunctions (used to connect items that are grammatically equal), subordinating conjunctions (used to introduce a dependent clause), and correlative conjunctions (used in pairs to join grammatically equal parts of a sentence).

You can choose what movie we watch because I chose the last time.

An interjection is a word or phrase used to express a feeling, give a command, or greet someone. Interjections are a grammatically independent part of speech, so they can often be excluded from a sentence without affecting the meaning.

Types of interjections include volitive interjections (used to make a demand or request), emotive interjections (used to express a feeling or reaction), cognitive interjections (used to indicate thoughts), and greetings and parting words (used at the beginning and end of a conversation).

Ouch ! I hurt my arm.

I’m, um , not sure.

The traditional classification of English words into eight parts of speech is by no means the only one or the objective truth. Grammarians have often divided them into more or fewer classes. Other commonly mentioned parts of speech include determiners and articles.

  • Determiners

A determiner is a word that describes a noun by indicating quantity, possession, or relative position.

Common types of determiners include demonstrative determiners (used to indicate the relative position of a noun), possessive determiners (used to describe ownership), and quantifiers (used to indicate the quantity of a noun).

My brother is selling his old car.

Other types of determiners include distributive determiners , determiners of difference , and numbers .

An article is a word that modifies a noun by indicating whether it is specific or general.

  • The definite article the is used to refer to a specific version of a noun. The can be used with all countable and uncountable nouns (e.g., “the door,” “the energy,” “the mountains”).
  • The indefinite articles a and an refer to general or unspecific nouns. The indefinite articles can only be used with singular countable nouns (e.g., “a poster,” “an engine”).

There’s a concert this weekend.

If you want to know more about nouns , pronouns , verbs , and other parts of speech, make sure to check out some of our language articles with explanations and examples.

Nouns & pronouns

  • Common nouns
  • Proper nouns
  • Collective nouns
  • Personal pronouns
  • Uncountable and countable nouns
  • Verb tenses
  • Phrasal verbs
  • Types of verbs
  • Active vs passive voice
  • Subject-verb agreement

A is an indefinite article (along with an ). While articles can be classed as their own part of speech, they’re also considered a type of determiner .

The indefinite articles are used to introduce nonspecific countable nouns (e.g., “a dog,” “an island”).

In is primarily classed as a preposition, but it can be classed as various other parts of speech, depending on how it is used:

  • Preposition (e.g., “ in the field”)
  • Noun (e.g., “I have an in with that company”)
  • Adjective (e.g., “Tim is part of the in crowd”)
  • Adverb (e.g., “Will you be in this evening?”)

As a part of speech, and is classed as a conjunction . Specifically, it’s a coordinating conjunction .

And can be used to connect grammatically equal parts of a sentence, such as two nouns (e.g., “a cup and plate”), or two adjectives (e.g., “strong and smart”). And can also be used to connect phrases and clauses.

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What are the parts of speech?

Today's the day for you to learn about this important grammatical concept! But first...let's see what the parts of speech have to do with your clothes.

Parts of Speech Chart

Imagine that it's laundry day, and you've just finished washing and drying your clothes. You dump the contents of the laundry basket onto your bed, and you begin to organize everything. You fold matching socks together, you create a pile of perfectly folded shirts that you would be proud to show Marie Kondo, and you do the same thing with your pants, jackets, and everything else.

In the same way that we organize our clothes into groups based on each item's function and features, we organize our words into categories based on each word's function and features. We call these categories of words the parts of speech .

Some people categorize words into eight parts of speech, and some people categorize them into nine parts of speech. Neither one is wrong; they're just two ways of looking at things. We'll go over these categories below. Here at English Grammar Revolution, we categorize words into eight groups, but I'll tell you about the ninth one as well.

There's one important thing for you to know before we look at these categories: most words can function as more than one part of speech . They will only do one job at a time, but they can do different things in different sentences. Look at the word love in the following sentences.

My  love  of grammar inspired me to make this website.

Here, love is functioning as a noun. It's the subject of the sentence. 

I  love  you.

Now, love is acting as a  verb ! It's telling us an action.

The only way we can know how to categorize a word is to look at how it's acting within a sentence.

Okay, let's check out the parts of speech!

The 8 Parts of Speech

Nouns  name people, places, things, or ideas. They're important parts of our sentences because they perform  important jobs  (subjects, direct objects, predicate nouns, etc.).

A peacock walked through our yard .

The dog howled during the night , and it woke up our whole family .

Sometimes people get bogged down with this part of speech because there are also many subcategories of nouns. This is similar to the way that we have subcategories for our clothes. You may have a whole drawer full of pants, but you may also have different types of pants that you use for different purposes (workout pants, lounge pants, work pants, etc.). This is similar to the way that we can further categorize nouns into smaller groups. 

Here are a few of the subcategories of nouns:  proper nouns, common nouns ,  collective nouns ,  possessive nouns , and compound nouns.

Tip : Other parts of speech also have subcategories. If you're studying this information for the first time, ignore the subcategories and focus on learning about each broader category.

2. Pronouns

Pronouns  take the place of nouns. When most people hear the word pronoun , they think of words like I, we, me, he,   she, and they . These are indeed all pronouns, but they're a part of a subcategory called personal pronouns. Know that there are other kinds of pronouns out there as well. Here are some examples: myself, his, someone , and who .

Here are a few of the subcategories of pronouns:  reflexive pronouns ,  indefinite pronouns ,  possessive pronouns , and  relative pronouns . 

When we walked across the bridge,  we saw someone who  knows you .

I will fix the dishwasher  myself .

Verbs  show actions or states of being. They are integral elements of  sentences .   

The shuttle will fly into space.

The loving mother comforted  and soothed the baby.

In the Montessori tradition of education, they use a large red circle or ball to symbolize a verb, and they often teach children to think of verbs as a sun providing the energy of a sentence. Isn't that a lovely way to think of verbs?

I know that you're getting tired of hearing about subcategories, but linking verbs, action verbs, and helping verbs are described on the  verb page here . 

Modal verbs  are described on that link, and you can learn even more about  action verbs  and  linking verbs  from those links.

4. Adjectives

Adjectives  describe, or  modify , nouns and pronouns. I like to think of them as adding color to language. It would be hard to describe a beautiful sunset or the way a touching story makes us feel without using adjectives.

The wise, handsome owl had orange eyes.

The caring father rocked the baby.

One helpful strategy for learning about and identifying adjectives is to learn how they are diagrammed . Sentence diagrams are pictures of sentences that help us see how all of the words are grammatically related. Since adjectives modify nouns and pronouns, we diagram them on slanted lines under the nouns/pronouns that they are modifying. 

Sentence diagram of adjectives

My green and white book fell.

Book is a noun. It's the subject of this sentence. My, green , and white are all adjectives describing book , so we diagram them on slanted lines underneath book . Isn't that a great way to SEE what adjectives do?

Nine Parts of Speech

When people categorize words into eight parts of speech, they say that articles/determiners ( a, an,   the, this, that, etc. ) are subcategories of adjectives.  

When people categorize words into nine parts of speech, they say that articles/determiners make up their own category and are not a part of the adjective category. 

Adverbs  modify (describe) verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. Adverbs are similar to adjectives in that they both modify things. 

The extremely cute koala hugged its mom very tightly .

The dog howled loudly .

Sentence diagrams also make it really easy to see what adverbs do. Take a look at this diagram. What do you notice about the way the adverbs are diagrammed? 

Sentence diagram with adverbs

James ran very quickly.

Did you notice that the adverbs are diagrammed on slanted lines under the words that they are modifying?

Ran is a verb. Quickly is an adverb telling us more about the verb ran . Very is an adverb telling us more about the adverb quickly .

Doesn't the diagram make it easier to SEE what adverbs do?

6. Prepositions

Prepositions  are probably the most difficult part of speech to explain, but people generally have an easier time understanding them when they look at lots of examples. So...let's start with some examples of commonly used prepositions! 

in, for, of, off, if, until

The frog sat in the flower.

The baby cried for a long time.

I'm so convinced that memorizing some of the prepositions will be helpful to you that  I'll teach you a preposition song . 

Okay, now that we've looked at some examples, let's look at the definition of a preposition. 

Prepositions show the relationship between a noun or a pronoun and some other word in the rest of the sentence. 

Sentence diagrams will come to the rescue again to help us visualize what prepositions do. Think of prepositions as "noun hooks" or "noun bridges." In the diagram below, notice how the preposition down links the noun tree to the rest of the sentence.  

Sentence diagram of a preposition

The cat ran down the tree.

Since prepositions always function as "noun hooks," they'll always be accompanied by a noun. The preposition plus its noun is called a prepositional phrase .

If you find a word from the preposition list that's not a part of a prepositional phrase, it's not functioning as a preposition. (You remember that words can function as different parts of speech , right?)

7. Conjunctions

Conjunctions  join things together. They can join words or groups of words (phrases and clauses).

The hummingbird sat   and   waited .

The conjunction and is joining the words sat and waited .

Do you live  near the park or near the hospital ?

The conjunction or is joining the phrases near the park and near the hospital.  

The two conjunctions we just looked at ( and and or ) belong to a subcategory called coordinating conjunctions, but there are other subcategories of conjunctions as well. The other one that we use most often is  subordinating conjunctions . Subordinating conjunctions are a little trickier to learn because they involve a more complicated concept ( dependent adverb clauses ).

For now, just know that all conjunctions, no matter what type they are, connect things together. In fact, let's LOOK at how they do this by looking at a sentence diagram.

Here is a sentence diagram  showing how the coordinating conjunction  and  connects two clauses. 

words for speech in english

She cooked, and he cleaned. 

8. Interjections

Interjections show excitement or emotion. 

Wow ! That jump was amazing!

Phew , the baby finally fell asleep.

They are different from the other parts of speech in that they're not grammatically related to the rest of the sentence, and the way that we diagram them reflects that. Look at how we diagram interjections :

Sentence diagram with interjection

Yes ! We won the lottery!

The interjection yes sit sits there on its own line floating above the rest of the sentence. This helps show that it's not grammatically related to the other words in the sentence. 

It's time to review what we covered on this page.

  • We can categorize the words that we use into groups based on their functions and features. We call these groups the parts of speech.
  • Many words can function as multiple parts of speech. You need to look at each word in the context of a sentence in order to say what part of speech it is. 
  • The eight parts of speech are nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections. 
  • You just learned about all of the parts of speech. Give yourself a high five! 

If you'd like to teach or learn grammar the easy way—with sentence diagrams—check out our  Get Smart Grammar Program .

It starts from the very beginning and teaches you grammar and sentence diagramming in easy, bite-size lessons. 

The Get Smart Grammar Program

Hello! I'm Elizabeth O'Brien, and my goal is to get you jazzed about grammar. 

This is original content from  https://www.english-grammar-revolution.com/parts-of-speech.html

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Do you wonder how long it takes to deliver your speech?

This website helps you convert the number of words into the time it takes to deliver your speech, online and for free. This tool is useful when preparing a speech or a presentation. The number of minutes you will take is dependent on the number of words and your speed of speech, or reading speed.

Note: This calculator provides an indication only.

Enter details below

The overview below provides an indication of the minutes for a speech (based on an average reading speed of 130 words per minute):

  • Words in a 1 minute speech 130 words
  • Words in a 2 minute speech 260 words
  • Words in a 3 minute speech 390 words
  • Words in a 4 minute speech 520 words
  • Words in a 5 minute speech 650 words
  • Words in a 10 minute speech 1300 words
  • Words in a 15 minute speech 1950 words
  • Words in a 20 minute speech 2600 words
  • How long does a 500 word speech take? 3.8 minutes
  • How long does a 1000 word speech take? 7.7 minutes
  • How long does a 1250 word speech take? 9.6 minutes
  • How long does a 1500 word speech take? 11.5 minutes
  • How long does a 1750 word speech take? 13.5 minutes
  • How long does a 2000 word speech take? 15.4 minutes
  • How long does a 2500 word speech take? 19.2 minutes
  • How long does a 5000 word speech take? 38.5 minutes

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30 English Words You're Probably Saying Wrong

Posted: April 4, 2024 | Last updated: April 4, 2024

<p>Navigating the vast expanse of the English language can sometimes feel like an intricate dance, especially when it comes to pronunciation. English, with its rich tapestry of influences from Latin, French, German, and countless other languages, hosts an array of words that can perplex even the most seasoned linguists. Here, we explore 30 of the most notoriously hard-to-pronounce words in English, delving into their origins, meanings, and, of course, their correct pronunciations. Whether you’re a language learner or a native speaker, mastering these words is a testament to your linguistic prowess.</p>

Navigating the vast expanse of the English language can sometimes feel like an intricate dance, especially when it comes to pronunciation. English, with its rich tapestry of influences from Latin, French, German, and countless other languages, hosts an array of words that can perplex even the most seasoned linguists. Here, we explore 30 of the most notoriously hard-to-pronounce words in English, delving into their origins, meanings, and, of course, their correct pronunciations. Whether you’re a language learner or a native speaker, mastering these words is a testament to your linguistic prowess.

<p>This term refers to both a savory sauce and a county in England. Its pronunciation, “WOOS-tər-shər,” often stumbles non-locals due to its deceptive spelling, leading many to overlook silent letters and add extra sounds. The spelling versus pronunciation conundrum of Worcestershire serves as a prime example of English’s historical layering, where the etymology reflects a blend of cultural influences. This word invites speakers to explore the phonetic heritage of English, providing a window into the language’s past interactions with French and Old English.</p>

Worcestershire

This term refers to both a savory sauce and a county in England. Its pronunciation, “WOOS-tər-shər,” often stumbles non-locals due to its deceptive spelling, leading many to overlook silent letters and add extra sounds. The spelling versus pronunciation conundrum of Worcestershire serves as a prime example of English’s historical layering, where the etymology reflects a blend of cultural influences. This word invites speakers to explore the phonetic heritage of English, providing a window into the language’s past interactions with French and Old English.

<p>Anemone, a type of sea creature and flower, is pronounced “ə-NEM-ə-nee.” The challenge arises from the transition between the ‘n’ and ‘m’ sounds, and the silent ‘e’ at the end, which can confuse those unfamiliar with the word. Pronouncing Anemone correctly requires a nuanced understanding of English’s vowel variability and the way it can influence consonant sounds, showcasing the language’s complexity and its capacity for nuanced expression.</p>

Anemone, a type of sea creature and flower, is pronounced “ə-NEM-ə-nee.” The challenge arises from the transition between the ‘n’ and ‘m’ sounds, and the silent ‘e’ at the end, which can confuse those unfamiliar with the word. Pronouncing Anemone correctly requires a nuanced understanding of English’s vowel variability and the way it can influence consonant sounds, showcasing the language’s complexity and its capacity for nuanced expression.

<p>While seemingly simple, “SQUIR-rel” can be difficult for non-native speakers due to the unique ‘r’ and ‘l’ sounds in English. The word requires the speaker to transition quickly between these sounds. This lexical item exemplifies the intricate phonetics of English, highlighting the challenge of articulating consecutive liquid sounds—a feature that tests the agility of the speaker’s pronunciation skills and underscores the diversity of phonetic patterns in the language.</p>

While seemingly simple, “SQUIR-rel” can be difficult for non-native speakers due to the unique ‘r’ and ‘l’ sounds in English. The word requires the speaker to transition quickly between these sounds. This lexical item exemplifies the intricate phonetics of English, highlighting the challenge of articulating consecutive liquid sounds—a feature that tests the agility of the speaker’s pronunciation skills and underscores the diversity of phonetic patterns in the language.

<p>This Andean superfood has a pronunciation that often surprises: “KEEN-wah.” The confusion comes from its Quechua origin, leading many to attempt a more phonetic pronunciation based on its spelling. Quinoa’s journey into the English lexicon illustrates the globalization of language, where words from indigenous cultures enter mainstream vocabulary, bringing with them a piece of their linguistic and cultural identity, thus enriching the English language with global diversity.</p>

This Andean superfood has a pronunciation that often surprises: “KEEN-wah.” The confusion comes from its Quechua origin, leading many to attempt a more phonetic pronunciation based on its spelling. Quinoa’s journey into the English lexicon illustrates the globalization of language, where words from indigenous cultures enter mainstream vocabulary, bringing with them a piece of their linguistic and cultural identity, thus enriching the English language with global diversity.

<p>Specializing in ear, nose, and throat disorders, otorhinolaryngologists have one of the longest titles in the medical field. Pronounced “o-toh-rhino-laryn-GOL-o-gist,” this word is a true mouthful due to its length and the juxtaposition of several complex morphemes. It reflects the precision of medical terminology, where Greek and Latin roots are combined to create highly specific terms that communicate complex ideas efficiently, albeit with a challenging pronunciation.</p>

Otorhinolaryngologist

Specializing in ear, nose, and throat disorders, otorhinolaryngologists have one of the longest titles in the medical field. Pronounced “o-toh-rhino-laryn-GOL-o-gist,” this word is a true mouthful due to its length and the juxtaposition of several complex morphemes. It reflects the precision of medical terminology, where Greek and Latin roots are combined to create highly specific terms that communicate complex ideas efficiently, albeit with a challenging pronunciation.

<p>The military rank of colonel, pronounced “KERN-el,” confounds many with its ‘l’ sounding as an ‘r’ and its completely silent ‘o’. The discrepancy between its pronunciation and spelling is a remnant of its French origins. This rank’s title is a testament to the historical complexities of English orthography and phonology, where military and governmental lexicons often preserve the idiosyncrasies of language evolution, bridging past and present through pronunciation.</p>

The military rank of colonel, pronounced “KERN-el,” confounds many with its ‘l’ sounding as an ‘r’ and its completely silent ‘o’. The discrepancy between its pronunciation and spelling is a remnant of its French origins. This rank’s title is a testament to the historical complexities of English orthography and phonology, where military and governmental lexicons often preserve the idiosyncrasies of language evolution, bridging past and present through pronunciation.

<p>As one of the longest words in the English dictionary, this condition’s pronunciation, “soo-doh-soo-doh-hahy-poh-par-uh-THAI-roi-diz-əm,” is as complex as its diagnosis. The repetition of prefixes and the mix of phonetic sounds make it a challenging word. This medical term not only tests the speaker’s endurance but also highlights the intricacies of scientific vocabulary, where prefixes and suffixes are layered to create precise descriptors of very specific conditions, illustrating the language’s capacity for detailed scientific communication.</p>

Pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism

As one of the longest words in the English dictionary, this condition’s pronunciation, “soo-doh-soo-doh-hahy-poh-par-uh-THAI-roi-diz-əm,” is as complex as its diagnosis. The repetition of prefixes and the mix of phonetic sounds make it a challenging word. This medical term not only tests the speaker’s endurance but also highlights the intricacies of scientific vocabulary, where prefixes and suffixes are layered to create precise descriptors of very specific conditions, illustrating the language’s capacity for detailed scientific communication.

<p>“RHY-thm,” the pattern of beats in music, presents difficulty with its silent ‘h’ followed by a ‘th’ sound, a combination rarely found at the beginning of English words. This term encapsulates the musicality of English, where even the words used to describe sound patterns have their own rhythmic challenges, reflecting the inherent musicality and rhythmic complexity of the language itself.</p>

“RHY-thm,” the pattern of beats in music, presents difficulty with its silent ‘h’ followed by a ‘th’ sound, a combination rarely found at the beginning of English words. This term encapsulates the musicality of English, where even the words used to describe sound patterns have their own rhythmic challenges, reflecting the inherent musicality and rhythmic complexity of the language itself.

<p>This word, meaning an observable event, is pronounced “fə-NOM-ə-non.” The challenge lies in the shift from ‘f’ to ‘n’ sounds and the silent ‘e’, which can trip up speakers. Phenomenon thus becomes a phonetic phenomenon in its own right, demonstrating the unpredictable nature of English pronunciation and the need for speakers to navigate shifts in vowel and consonant sounds with agility and awareness.</p>

This word, meaning an observable event, is pronounced “fə-NOM-ə-non.” The challenge lies in the shift from ‘f’ to ‘n’ sounds and the silent ‘e’, which can trip up speakers. Phenomenon thus becomes a phonetic phenomenon in its own right, demonstrating the unpredictable nature of English pronunciation and the need for speakers to navigate shifts in vowel and consonant sounds with agility and awareness.

<p>Pronounced “SICKSTH,” this ordinal number combines an ‘x’ sound with a ‘th’, making it difficult to articulate clearly without slurring the sounds together. Sixth challenges speakers to manage the quick succession of consonant sounds, a linguistic obstacle that highlights the precision required in English pronunciation and the effort needed to maintain clarity and accuracy in speech.</p>

Pronounced “SICKSTH,” this ordinal number combines an ‘x’ sound with a ‘th’, making it difficult to articulate clearly without slurring the sounds together. Sixth challenges speakers to manage the quick succession of consonant sounds, a linguistic obstacle that highlights the precision required in English pronunciation and the effort needed to maintain clarity and accuracy in speech.

<p>Referring to a narrow strip of land connecting two larger areas, “ISTH-mus” is tricky due to the initial ‘isth’ sound, which is not intuitive for English speakers. This geographical term not only enriches our vocabulary with a word of Greek origin but also challenges our phonetic skills, demonstrating the way English pronunciation can incorporate complex consonant clusters from other languages, requiring precise articulation.</p>

Referring to a narrow strip of land connecting two larger areas, “ISTH-mus” is tricky due to the initial ‘isth’ sound, which is not intuitive for English speakers. This geographical term not only enriches our vocabulary with a word of Greek origin but also challenges our phonetic skills, demonstrating the way English pronunciation can incorporate complex consonant clusters from other languages, requiring precise articulation.

<p>The word “RURAL,” describing countryside areas, is challenging because of the rolling ‘r’ sounds and the need to articulate them distinctly without blending them together. Its pronunciation difficulty accentuates the linguistic phenomenon where similar sounds are juxtaposed, demanding dexterity in speech production and highlighting the diverse sound patterns that English speakers must master.</p>

The word “RURAL,” describing countryside areas, is challenging because of the rolling ‘r’ sounds and the need to articulate them distinctly without blending them together. Its pronunciation difficulty accentuates the linguistic phenomenon where similar sounds are juxtaposed, demanding dexterity in speech production and highlighting the diverse sound patterns that English speakers must master.

<p>A figure of speech where a part represents the whole, “si-NEK-də-kee” often confuses with its silent ‘c’ and the unusual ‘eck’ sound followed by ‘də’. This literary term not only enriches the English language with a concept that captures the complexity of representation but also presents a pronunciation challenge that reflects the intricate relationship between spelling and sound in English, showcasing the language’s deep literary traditions.</p>

A figure of speech where a part represents the whole, “si-NEK-də-kee” often confuses with its silent ‘c’ and the unusual ‘eck’ sound followed by ‘də’. This literary term not only enriches the English language with a concept that captures the complexity of representation but also presents a pronunciation challenge that reflects the intricate relationship between spelling and sound in English, showcasing the language’s deep literary traditions.

<p>This term from art, pronounced “kee-ahr-ə-SKYOOR-oh,” refers to the contrast between light and dark. Its Italian origin provides a non-intuitive pronunciation for English speakers, with a challenging ‘ch’ sound that is pronounced as ‘kee’. Chiaroscuro not only adds depth to our artistic vocabulary but also exemplifies the phonetic challenges of adopting foreign terms into English, requiring speakers to navigate the nuanced sounds of Italian within an English context.</p>

Chiaroscuro

This term from art, pronounced “kee-ahr-ə-SKYOOR-oh,” refers to the contrast between light and dark. Its Italian origin provides a non-intuitive pronunciation for English speakers, with a challenging ‘ch’ sound that is pronounced as ‘kee’. Chiaroscuro not only adds depth to our artistic vocabulary but also exemplifies the phonetic challenges of adopting foreign terms into English, requiring speakers to navigate the nuanced sounds of Italian within an English context.

<p>In British English, “draught” is pronounced “DRAFT” and refers to a current of air or a serving of drink. The ‘augh’ spelling leading to an ‘aft’ sound can be misleading for those learning English. This word illustrates the complexities of English spelling conventions and the variations in pronunciation that can occur, even within the same language, challenging speakers to adapt to context-specific pronunciations.</p>

In British English, “draught” is pronounced “DRAFT” and refers to a current of air or a serving of drink. The ‘augh’ spelling leading to an ‘aft’ sound can be misleading for those learning English. This word illustrates the complexities of English spelling conventions and the variations in pronunciation that can occur, even within the same language, challenging speakers to adapt to context-specific pronunciations.

<p>This Italian dish, pronounced “NYOH-kee,” has a silent ‘g’, which often leads to pronunciation errors among those unfamiliar with Italian phonetics. Gnocchi highlights the delightful challenges of culinary vocabulary, where food names from various cultures enrich the English language, inviting speakers to explore the sounds and tastes of international cuisines while navigating the intricacies of pronunciation.</p>

This Italian dish, pronounced “NYOH-kee,” has a silent ‘g’, which often leads to pronunciation errors among those unfamiliar with Italian phonetics. Gnocchi highlights the delightful challenges of culinary vocabulary, where food names from various cultures enrich the English language, inviting speakers to explore the sounds and tastes of international cuisines while navigating the intricacies of pronunciation.

<p>Representing words that imitate sounds, “on-uh-mat-uh-PEE-uh” can be perplexing due to its mix of vowels and the ‘poeia’ ending, which is not common in English. Onomatopoeia itself is a linguistic echo of the concept it represents, challenging speakers to articulate a word that mirrors the very phenomenon of sound imitation, embodying the playful and imitative nature of language.</p>

Onomatopoeia

Representing words that imitate sounds, “on-uh-mat-uh-PEE-uh” can be perplexing due to its mix of vowels and the ‘poeia’ ending, which is not common in English. Onomatopoeia itself is a linguistic echo of the concept it represents, challenging speakers to articulate a word that mirrors the very phenomenon of sound imitation, embodying the playful and imitative nature of language.

<p>This berry, pronounced “ah-SAH-ee,” has gained popularity in health circles but its pronunciation can be elusive due to its Brazilian Portuguese origin. Acai’s entry into the English language underscores the global exchange of goods and ideas, challenging speakers to adapt their pronunciation to honor the word’s cultural roots, thus reflecting the linguistic diversity and adaptability inherent in English.</p>

This berry, pronounced “ah-SAH-ee,” has gained popularity in health circles but its pronunciation can be elusive due to its Brazilian Portuguese origin. Acai’s entry into the English language underscores the global exchange of goods and ideas, challenging speakers to adapt their pronunciation to honor the word’s cultural roots, thus reflecting the linguistic diversity and adaptability inherent in English.

<p>“EP-i-tome,” meaning a perfect example, often gets mispronounced due to the ‘tome’ looking like it should sound as in ‘home,’ rather than the correct ‘tuhm’. This word serves as a linguistic epitome of English’s idiosyncratic nature, where pronunciation cannot always be inferred from spelling, necessitating a deeper understanding of phonetic rules and exceptions.</p>

“EP-i-tome,” meaning a perfect example, often gets mispronounced due to the ‘tome’ looking like it should sound as in ‘home,’ rather than the correct ‘tuhm’. This word serves as a linguistic epitome of English’s idiosyncratic nature, where pronunciation cannot always be inferred from spelling, necessitating a deeper understanding of phonetic rules and exceptions.

<p>A word that describes bias or discrimination, “PREJ-uh-dis,” can be tricky because the ‘u’ is pronounced as a ‘j’ sound, which is not immediately obvious. Prejudice in its pronunciation reflects the nuanced and often unexpected nature of English phonetics, where letters can combine to produce sounds that challenge the speaker’s expectations, requiring careful articulation and attention to phonological patterns.</p>

A word that describes bias or discrimination, “PREJ-uh-dis,” can be tricky because the ‘u’ is pronounced as a ‘j’ sound, which is not immediately obvious. Prejudice in its pronunciation reflects the nuanced and often unexpected nature of English phonetics, where letters can combine to produce sounds that challenge the speaker’s expectations, requiring careful articulation and attention to phonological patterns.

<p>A figure of speech that involves exaggeration, “hy-PER-bə-lee” often gets mistaken for its literal spelling pronunciation, leading to confusion. Hyperbole, in both its meaning and pronunciation, exemplifies the dramatic and expressive potential of English, inviting speakers to explore the expressive depth of the language while navigating its phonetic intricacies.</p>

A figure of speech that involves exaggeration, “hy-PER-bə-lee” often gets mistaken for its literal spelling pronunciation, leading to confusion. Hyperbole, in both its meaning and pronunciation, exemplifies the dramatic and expressive potential of English, inviting speakers to explore the expressive depth of the language while navigating its phonetic intricacies.

<p>“Fa-SAHd,” a word that describes the front of a building or a superficial appearance, has a silent ‘c’ and a ‘çade’ that sounds like ‘sahd’, stemming from its French origin. Facade’s pronunciation challenges highlight the aesthetic dimension of English, where words borrowed from other languages bring with them a richness of sound and meaning, requiring speakers to adapt their pronunciation to these linguistic imports.</p>

“Fa-SAHd,” a word that describes the front of a building or a superficial appearance, has a silent ‘c’ and a ‘çade’ that sounds like ‘sahd’, stemming from its French origin. Facade’s pronunciation challenges highlight the aesthetic dimension of English, where words borrowed from other languages bring with them a richness of sound and meaning, requiring speakers to adapt their pronunciation to these linguistic imports.

<p>Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, a whimsical word popularized by the film “Mary Poppins,” is pronounced “soo-per-kal-uh-fraj-uh-lis-tik-eks-pee-al-i-DO-shus.” This term embodies the playful side of English, challenging speakers with its length and the succession of varied phonetic components. Its pronunciation invites a lively rhythm and an engaging articulation, mirroring the word’s intention to convey a sense of wonder and incredibility. It not only tests the speaker’s linguistic dexterity but also highlights the language’s capacity for creative expression, blending whimsy and complexity in a single, memorable utterance. </p>

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, a whimsical word popularized by the film “Mary Poppins,” is pronounced “soo-per-kal-uh-fraj-uh-lis-tik-eks-pee-al-i-DO-shus.” This term embodies the playful side of English, challenging speakers with its length and the succession of varied phonetic components. Its pronunciation invites a lively rhythm and an engaging articulation, mirroring the word’s intention to convey a sense of wonder and incredibility. It not only tests the speaker’s linguistic dexterity but also highlights the language’s capacity for creative expression, blending whimsy and complexity in a single, memorable utterance.

<p>Pronounced “THUR-oh,” this word represents completeness or being done in a detailed and careful manner. The pronunciation challenge comes from the ‘ough’ ending, which can represent various sounds in English, making it a prime example of English’s inconsistency in spelling and pronunciation. Thorough encapsulates the meticulous attention to detail required in both its application and articulation, underscoring the precision and complexity of English phonetics and spelling.</p>

Pronounced “THUR-oh,” this word represents completeness or being done in a detailed and careful manner. The pronunciation challenge comes from the ‘ough’ ending, which can represent various sounds in English, making it a prime example of English’s inconsistency in spelling and pronunciation. Thorough encapsulates the meticulous attention to detail required in both its application and articulation, underscoring the precision and complexity of English phonetics and spelling.

<p>Often mistakenly pronounced as “MIS-chee-vee-us,” the correct pronunciation is “MIS-chiv-us,” with the accent on the first syllable and no ‘ee’ sound in the third syllable. This common mispronunciation reflects the playful nature of the word itself, as well as the complexity of English vowel and consonant placements. Mischievous, with its deceptive pronunciation, invites speakers to engage with the language’s whimsical side, challenging them to navigate its phonetic twists and turns.</p>

Mischievous

Often mistakenly pronounced as “MIS-chee-vee-us,” the correct pronunciation is “MIS-chiv-us,” with the accent on the first syllable and no ‘ee’ sound in the third syllable. This common mispronunciation reflects the playful nature of the word itself, as well as the complexity of English vowel and consonant placements. Mischievous, with its deceptive pronunciation, invites speakers to engage with the language’s whimsical side, challenging them to navigate its phonetic twists and turns.

<p>The quality of being clear and exact, “spe-SIF-i-city,” can be a tongue twister with its repetition of ‘s’ and ‘c’ sounds and the stress on the ‘SIF’. It challenges the speaker to maintain clarity while navigating through a sequence of similar sounds, emphasizing the precision required in both language and thought. Specificity’s pronunciation demands a careful balance of articulation and rhythm, mirroring the exactness the word itself describes, and highlighting the meticulous nature of English pronunciation.</p>

Specificity

The quality of being clear and exact, “spe-SIF-i-city,” can be a tongue twister with its repetition of ‘s’ and ‘c’ sounds and the stress on the ‘SIF’. It challenges the speaker to maintain clarity while navigating through a sequence of similar sounds, emphasizing the precision required in both language and thought. Specificity’s pronunciation demands a careful balance of articulation and rhythm, mirroring the exactness the word itself describes, and highlighting the meticulous nature of English pronunciation.

<p>When something is not in a straight or level position, it’s “a-SKEW.” The ‘ew’ at the end can be misleading, suggesting a different pronunciation. This word playfully challenges our expectations, both in terms of its meaning and its pronunciation, reflecting the whimsical aspects of English. Askew not only tests the speaker’s ability to pronounce vowel combinations accurately but also embodies the language’s capacity for nuanced expression, capturing the slightly off-kilter nature of things that are askew.</p>

When something is not in a straight or level position, it’s “a-SKEW.” The ‘ew’ at the end can be misleading, suggesting a different pronunciation. This word playfully challenges our expectations, both in terms of its meaning and its pronunciation, reflecting the whimsical aspects of English. Askew not only tests the speaker’s ability to pronounce vowel combinations accurately but also embodies the language’s capacity for nuanced expression, capturing the slightly off-kilter nature of things that are askew.

<p>Often colloquially mispronounced as “LI-berry,” the correct pronunciation is “LI-brer-y,” with three syllables and the emphasis on the first. This common error underscores the importance of phonetic accuracy in preserving the integrity of words and their meanings. Library, as a word, encapsulates the wealth of knowledge and learning, and its pronunciation serves as a reminder of the importance of precision and clarity in language, reflecting the careful articulation required to navigate the vast landscape of English vocabulary.</p>

Often colloquially mispronounced as “LI-berry,” the correct pronunciation is “LI-brer-y,” with three syllables and the emphasis on the first. This common error underscores the importance of phonetic accuracy in preserving the integrity of words and their meanings. Library, as a word, encapsulates the wealth of knowledge and learning, and its pronunciation serves as a reminder of the importance of precision and clarity in language, reflecting the careful articulation required to navigate the vast landscape of English vocabulary.

<p>The second month of the year, “FEB-roo-air-ee,” often loses its first ‘r’ in common pronunciation, leading to a widespread mispronunciation as “FEB-yoo-air-ee.” This alteration in pronunciation reflects the natural tendency to simplify complex word structures in everyday speech. February’s pronunciation challenges remind us of the temporal and seasonal markers in our language, highlighting the historical and etymological layers embedded within the words we use to denote time, encouraging speakers to engage with the phonetic heritage of English.</p>

The second month of the year, “FEB-roo-air-ee,” often loses its first ‘r’ in common pronunciation, leading to a widespread mispronunciation as “FEB-yoo-air-ee.” This alteration in pronunciation reflects the natural tendency to simplify complex word structures in everyday speech. February’s pronunciation challenges remind us of the temporal and seasonal markers in our language, highlighting the historical and etymological layers embedded within the words we use to denote time, encouraging speakers to engage with the phonetic heritage of English.

<p>Commonly abbreviated as etc., “et SET-er-ah” frequently gets slurred into “ek-SET-er-ah” or “ek-cet-ra,” obscuring its Latin roots. This abbreviation highlights the challenges of maintaining the integrity of phrases borrowed from other languages, emphasizing the importance of precision in pronunciation. Et cetera invites speakers to explore the nuances of English’s adoption of Latin phrases, serving as a linguistic reminder of the language’s historical breadth and the ongoing dialogue between English and the languages from which it borrows, enriching its expressive capabilities.</p>

Commonly abbreviated as etc., “et SET-er-ah” frequently gets slurred into “ek-SET-er-ah” or “ek-cet-ra,” obscuring its Latin roots. This abbreviation highlights the challenges of maintaining the integrity of phrases borrowed from other languages, emphasizing the importance of precision in pronunciation. Et cetera invites speakers to explore the nuances of English’s adoption of Latin phrases, serving as a linguistic reminder of the language’s historical breadth and the ongoing dialogue between English and the languages from which it borrows, enriching its expressive capabilities.

<p>The English language is a living, breathing entity that continually evolves and surprises us with its complexity. The pronunciation challenges posed by these 30 words highlight the linguistic diversity and rich history embedded within the language. By exploring and mastering these difficult pronunciations, we not only refine our own linguistic skills but also pay homage to the myriad cultures and languages that have influenced English over the centuries. Let these words inspire you to delve deeper into the quirks and idiosyncrasies of English, making your linguistic journey all the more enriching. Overcoming these challenges not only enhances our communication skills but also bridges cultural divides, allowing us to appreciate the vast landscape of human language and expression. This exploration into the hard-to-pronounce words of English not only broadens our vocabulary but also deepens our understanding of the language’s phonetic richness, encouraging a continued curiosity and respect for the intricacies of linguistic expression.</p><p><a href="https://lifestylogy.com/?utm_source=msnstart">For the Latest Lifestyle, Food, Health & Fitness, head to Lifestylogy</a></p>

The English language is a living, breathing entity that continually evolves and surprises us with its complexity. The pronunciation challenges posed by these 30 words highlight the linguistic diversity and rich history embedded within the language. By exploring and mastering these difficult pronunciations, we not only refine our own linguistic skills but also pay homage to the myriad cultures and languages that have influenced English over the centuries. Let these words inspire you to delve deeper into the quirks and idiosyncrasies of English, making your linguistic journey all the more enriching. Overcoming these challenges not only enhances our communication skills but also bridges cultural divides, allowing us to appreciate the vast landscape of human language and expression. This exploration into the hard-to-pronounce words of English not only broadens our vocabulary but also deepens our understanding of the language’s phonetic richness, encouraging a continued curiosity and respect for the intricacies of linguistic expression.

For the Latest Lifestyle, Food, Health & Fitness, head to Lifestylogy

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38 Surprising New Words and Expressions Added to English Dictionaries

‘pessimize,’ ‘mountweazel,’ ‘confuddle’ are among the additions to our common vocabulary   .

Christina Ianzito,

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As our culture evolves, so does our language. In response, dictionaries regularly add new words and expressions — including the 38 mentioned below. Each was added within the last year to either the Oxford English Dictionary (OED); Dictionary.com (D), which uses the Random House Unabridged Dictionary as a source; or Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (MW). Some of the words and phrases can be found in multiple dictionaries.​​

Many additions make perfect sense — the OED added the meteorology term “derecho” (“A line of violent and sustained windstorms formed in association with a rapidly moving band of thunderstorms…”), for example.

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Others are strange but interesting, such as Dictionary.com’s inclusion of “shower orange,” which (who knew?) is “an orange that is peeled and eaten under a steamy shower, the purported benefit being that the steam enhances the orange’s citrusy fragrance and creates a soothing experience for the person who is showering.” ​​Other notable additions to English-language dictionaries:​ ​

adultification , n. : “the action or practice of treating children or young people like adults in ways that are considered harmful or abusive” (OED)​​

binned , adj., colloquial : “put or thrown into a dustbin or wastepaper basket. Now often figurative (of a person or thing): rejected, discarded, or abandoned” (OED)

​​ Blursday , n., informal : “a day not easily distinguished from other days, or the phenomenon of days running together” (D)​​

Chumocracy, n. : “a culture characterized or dominated by influential networks of close friends” (OED) ​​

chatbot , n. : “a computer program designed to respond with conversational or informational replies to verbal or written messages from users” (D)​​

cheffy , adj. : “characteristic of or befitting a professional chef (as in showiness, complexity, or exoticness)” (MW)​​

climate refugee , n. : “a person who has had to flee their home due to the negative effects of climate change ” (D)​​

coffee nap , n. : “ a short nap , usually 15-30 minutes, taken immediately after drinking a cup of coffee, the claimed benefit being that the energizing effect of caffeine may be bolstered by a sleeping body’s drop in adenosine levels” (D)​​

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confuddle , v. : “to perplex, confuse, confound, or befuddle (a person); to muddle or mix up (speech, thoughts, etc.)" (OED)​​

cosplay , v. : “to dress up in costume as (a character, esp. from anime, manga, video games, etc.); to perform as (a character) while dressed in this way” (OED)​​

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cromulent , adj., informal + humorous : “acceptable, satisfactory” (example: “the continental breakfast was perfectly cromulent”) (MW)​​

decision fatigue , n. : “mental and emotional exhaustion resulting from excessive or relentless decision-making, especially the cumulative effect of small decisions that one makes throughout each day” (D)​​

doomscroll , v. : “to spend excessive time online scrolling … through news or other content that makes one feel sad, anxious, angry, etc.” (MW)​​

flirtationship , n. : “a period of repeated flirtatious behavior between two people; a social relationship which is based on and does not go beyond reciprocal flirting” (OED)​​

GOATED , adj., slang : “considered to be the greatest of all time” (MW)​​

headcanon , n. : “a reader or viewer’s personal interpretation of, or beliefs about, a fictional work, esp. an imaginative addition to an event, character, plot line, etc., which is not explicitly contradicted (nor explicitly confirmed) by the original work” (OED)​​

hostile architecture , n. : “design elements of public buildings and spaces that are intended to stop unwanted behavior such as loitering or sleeping in public by making such behavior difficult and uncomfortable” (D)​​

jolabokaflod , n. : “an Icelandic tradition in which books are given as Christmas presents and opened on December 24, after which the evening is spent reading the books: from a practice begun in 1944, when paper goods were among the most available items in postwar Iceland” (D)

​​ jorts , n.: “shorts made of denim or jean: jean shorts” (MW)​​

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kinkeeping , n. : “the labor involved in maintaining and enhancing family ties, including organizing social occasions , remembering birthdays, sending gifts, etc.” (D)​​

mountweazel , n. : “a decoy entry in a reference work, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia, secretly planted among the genuine entries to catch other publishers in the act of copying content” (D)​​

nepo baby , n. : “ a celebrity with a parent who is also famous , especially one whose industry connections are perceived as essential to their success” (D)​​

​​ paraprosdokian , n. : “a sentence or expression in which the second part provides an unexpected resolution or contrast to the first part, as in I’d like to see you again, but I’ve lost my glasses ” (D)​​

​​ pessimize , v. : “to make less good, efficient, fast, functional, etc., especially in the context of computers or information technology” (D)

​​ quiet quit , v. : “to do the minimum amount of work required for a job: to engage in quiet quitting” (MW)

rage quit , v. : “to suddenly stop participating or engaging in (something) in a fit of anger and frustration: to quit (something) in anger” (MW)

rizz , n., slang : “romantic appeal or charm” (MW)

simp , v., informal : “to show excessive devotion to or longing for someone or something” (MW)​​

smishing , n. : “the practice of sending text messages to someone in order to trick the person into revealing personal or confidential information which can then be used for criminal purposes” (MW)​​

spider sense or spidey sense , n. : “originally with reference to the fictional superhero Spider-Man: a supernatural ability or power to perceive things beyond the normal range of human senses, esp. impending danger. Later also in extended and allusive use, with humorous reference to a strong feeling of intuition or prescience, or an acute instinct or awareness” (OED)​​

swear box or swear jar,   n. : “A container into which a person must put a specified amount of money as a penalty for swearing” (OED)

​​thirst trap,   n .: “a photograph (such as a selfie) or video shared for the purpose of attracting attention or desire; also: someone or something that attracts attention or strong desire” (MW)​​

turnt,  adj .: “stimulated or intoxicated by alcohol or drugs. Also: extremely energized or excited; highly charged. Also with up” (OED)

​​UAP,   abbreviation or n .: “unidentified aerial phenomenon (a mysterious flying object in the sky that is sometimes assumed to be a spaceship from another planet)” (MW)​​

underboob ,  n .: “the area under the breasts; esp. the bare skin of the underside of the breasts when exposed by a crop top or other revealing garment” (OED)​​

wrongthink ,  n .: “belief or opinion that is perceived or condemned as socially, ideologically, or morally unacceptable, esp. because it does not conform to a dominant, prevailing political or cultural orthodoxy” (OED)

​Christina Ianzito covers scams and fraud, and is the books editor for aarp.org and AARP The Magazine . Also a longtime travel writer and editor, she received a 2020 Lowell Thomas Award for travel writing from the Society of American Travel Writers Foundation.​

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  1. Parts of SPEECH Table in English

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  2. Parts of Speech in English, Definition and Examples

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  3. Learn 8 Parts of Speech in English Grammar!

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  4. English Speaking Phrases and Tips

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  5. 100 Examples of Direct and Indirect Speech

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  6. English Speaking Phrases and Tips

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COMMENTS

  1. 40 Big Words That Make an Impact In Speech and Writing

    Whether you're writing an essay or speaking in front of a group, there are certain big words you can use to impress your audience. Dictionary Thesaurus Sentences Grammar ... 40 Big Words That Make an Impact In Speech and Writing By Alvin Park , Staff Writer . Updated January 9, 2023 Image Credits.

  2. Words for Speaking: 30 Speech Verbs in English (With Audio)

    Babble / Blabber / Blather / Drone / Prattle / Ramble. These words all have very similar meanings. First of all, when someone babbles (or blabbers or blathers or drones or prattles or rambles), it means they are talking for a long time. Too long. And probably not letting other people speak.

  3. Big words to sound smart: 127 fancy words to boost eloquence

    Big words to sound smart and their meaning. The smartest way of sounding more eloquent when expressing yourself in English is to change basic, everyday words for their fancier versions. For instance, instead of saying "very big," say "massive.". Instead of saying "detailed." say "granular," and instead of saying "not ...

  4. 13 Speeches in English for Listening and Speaking Practice

    13. Mark Antony's Speech by William Shakespeare. Level: Advanced. This speech is part of a play called "Julius Caesar" written by William Shakespeare. The play is based on the life and murder of Caesar who was a leader of the Roman Empire. The speech is considered to be one of the finest pieces of English literature.

  5. 15 Powerful Speech Opening Lines (And How to Create Your Own)

    Analyze their response and tweak the joke accordingly if necessary. Starting your speech with humour means your setting the tone of your speech. It would make sense to have a few more jokes sprinkled around the rest of the speech as well as the audience might be expecting the same from you. 4. Mohammed Qahtani.

  6. The vocabulary of eloquent public speaking

    constitute a speech. rhetoric. study of the technique for using language effectively. The great work [Pg x] of Quintilian is a complete system of rhetoric, in twelve books, entitled De Institutione Oratoria Libre ... Spanish-English dictionary, translator, and learning. Emmersion. Fast and accurate

  7. How to Speak English Fluently: 33 Easy Tips to Reach Your Language

    Try to remember these details the next time you speak and your English will begin to sound more natural. 14. Record Your Own English-language Audiobooks. When we think of practicing a language, we often think of putting ourselves in situations where we have to use the language.

  8. 5 Techniques to Achieve Public Speaking Perfection in English

    5 Techniques to Achieve Public Speaking Perfection in English. 1. Learn Key English Phrases for Speeches. It is terrifying when you have to give a talk in front of a group of people in a foreign language. Besides the standard concerns like, "What if I am too boring" or "What if my mind goes blank," you have an extra worry: the language ...

  9. The 9 Parts of Speech: Definitions and Examples

    Every sentence you write or speak in English includes words that fall into some of the nine parts of speech. These include nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, articles/determiners, and interjections. (Some sources include only eight parts of speech and leave interjections in their own category.)

  10. 100+ Daily Use English Words for Fluent Communication

    Simple common English words for daily use include common nouns like "house," "car," and "book," as well as verbs such as "eat," "sleep," and "read." These basic words form the foundation of communication and should be mastered by all learners. 3.

  11. 5 Famous Speeches To Help you Learn English

    To help you get started, we've found 5 famous speeches to help you learn English. 1. Steve Jobs: Stanford Commencement Speech. Steve Jobs was no doubt a great speaker. Millions around the globe were enchanted by the presentations that he gave for Apple as the company's CEO. However, he wasn't just known for speeches related to product ...

  12. 10 famous speeches in English and what you can learn from them

    George VI is using the first person, "I", to reach out to each person listening to the speech. He also talks in the third person: "we are at war", to unite British people against the common enemy: "them", or Germany. 3. Winston Churchill We shall fight on the beaches 1940. Churchill is an icon of great speech making.

  13. Parts of Speech

    Words with More Than One Job. Many words in English can have more than one job, or be more than one part of speech. For example, "work" can be a verb and a noun; "but" can be a conjunction and a preposition; "well" can be an adjective, an adverb and an interjection. In addition, many nouns can act as adjectives.

  14. 160+ Best & Easy English Speech Topics for Students

    This Blog Includes: List of Best English Speech Topics for Students. 1-minute Speech Topics. 2-Minute Speech Topics. 3-Minute Speech Topics. Easy Topics for Speech in English. English Speech Topics on Environment. English Speech Topics on Technology. English Speech Topics on Independence Day.

  15. The 8 Parts of Speech

    A part of speech (also called a word class) is a category that describes the role a word plays in a sentence.Understanding the different parts of speech can help you analyze how words function in a sentence and improve your writing. The parts of speech are classified differently in different grammars, but most traditional grammars list eight parts of speech in English: nouns, pronouns, verbs ...

  16. 100 Words to Make You Sound Smart

    rudely abrupt or blunt in speech or manner. cacophony. loud confusing disagreeable sounds. camaraderie. the quality of affording easy familiarity and sociability. capricious. determined by chance or impulse rather than by necessity. carte blanche. complete freedom or authority to act.

  17. Free Text to Speech Online with Realistic AI Voices

    Text to speech (TTS) is a technology that converts text into spoken audio. It can read aloud PDFs, websites, and books using natural AI voices. Text-to-speech (TTS) technology can be helpful for anyone who needs to access written content in an auditory format, and it can provide a more inclusive and accessible way of communication for many ...

  18. English Parts of Speech

    The eight parts of speech are nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections. You just learned about all of the parts of speech. Give yourself a high five! If you'd like to teach or learn grammar the easy way—with sentence diagrams—check out our Get Smart Grammar Program.

  19. Parts of Speech: A Super Simple Grammar Guide with Examples

    In the English language, there are around ten common parts of speech. These include nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, interjections, determiners, and articles. Open and Closed Word Classes. Closed word classes are parts of speech that are consistent and do not have newer words introduced to them over time ...

  20. Free Speech to Text Online, Voice Typing & Transcription

    Speech to Text online notepad. Professional, accurate & free speech recognizing text editor. Distraction-free, fast, easy to use web app for dictation & typing. Speechnotes is a powerful speech-enabled online notepad, designed to empower your ideas by implementing a clean & efficient design, so you can focus on your thoughts.

  21. Oxford Learner's Dictionaries

    The largest and most trusted free online dictionary for learners of British and American English with definitions, pictures, example sentences, synonyms, antonyms, word origins, audio pronunciation, and more. Look up the meanings of words, abbreviations, phrases, and idioms in our free English Dictionary.

  22. A List Of Every Word We Know Of

    A List Of Every Word We Know Of. March 31, 2024. For years, we here at Dictionary.com have been working on a pretty ambitious project. We've been compiling a list of words that people use in the English language, and for each word that we add to the list, we write a few sentences about what it means. (A neat thing is that some of the words ...

  23. Convert Words to Minutes

    Words in a 2 minute speech 260 words. Words in a 3 minute speech 390 words. Words in a 4 minute speech 520 words. Words in a 5 minute speech 650 words. Words in a 10 minute speech 1300 words. Words in a 15 minute speech 1950 words. Words in a 20 minute speech 2600 words. How long does a 500 word speech take? 3.8 minutes.

  24. 30 English Words You're Probably Saying Wrong

    English, with its rich tapestry of influences from Latin, French, German, and countless other languages, hosts an array of words that can perplex even the most seasoned linguists.

  25. 38 New Words, Expressions Added to English Dictionaries

    38 Surprising New Words and Expressions Added to English Dictionaries. As our culture evolves, so does our language. In response, dictionaries regularly add new words and expressions — including the 38 mentioned below. Each was added within the last year to either the Oxford English Dictionary (OED); Dictionary.com (D), which uses the Random ...

  26. Mureed Hussain Jasra

    7 likes, 0 comments - englishessay_with_mureedjasra on March 4, 2024: " Word of the Day: Salubrious Parts of speech: Adjective Meaning: health-giving; healthy Synonyms: health, beneficial ...