Reported Speech Exercises

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reported speech exercises text

Here's a list of all the reported speech exercises on this site:

( Click here to read the explanations about reported speech )

Reported Statements:

  • Present Simple Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy) (in PDF here)
  • Present Continuous Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy) (in PDF here)
  • Past Simple Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy) (in PDF here)
  • Present Perfect Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy) (in PDF here)
  • Future Simple Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy) (in PDF here)
  • Mixed Tense Reported Statement Exercise (intermediate) (in PDF here)
  • 'Say' and 'Tell' (quite easy) (in PDF here)

Reported Questions:

  • Present Simple Reported Yes/No Question Exercise (intermediate) (in PDF here)
  • Present Simple Reported Wh Question Exercise (intermediate) (in PDF here)
  • Mixed Tense Reported Question Exercise (intermediate) (in PDF here)

Reported Orders and Requests:

  • Reported Requests and Orders Exercise (intermediate) (in PDF here)
  • Reported Speech Mixed Exercise 1 (difficult) (in PDF here)
  • Reported Speech Mixed Exercise 2 (difficult) (in PDF here)

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  • B1-B2 grammar

Reported speech

Daisy has just had an interview for a summer job. 

Instructions

As you watch the video, look at the examples of reported speech. They are in  red  in the subtitles. Then read the conversation below to learn more. Finally, do the grammar exercises to check you understand, and can use, reported speech correctly.

Sophie:  Mmm, it’s so nice to be chilling out at home after all that running around.

Ollie: Oh, yeah, travelling to glamorous places for a living must be such a drag!

Ollie: Mum, you can be so childish sometimes. Hey, I wonder how Daisy’s getting on in her job interview.

Sophie: Oh, yes, she said she was having it at four o’clock, so it’ll have finished by now. That’ll be her ... yes. Hi, love. How did it go?

Daisy: Well, good I think, but I don’t really know. They said they’d phone later and let me know.

Sophie: What kind of thing did they ask you?

Daisy: They asked if I had any experience with people, so I told them about helping at the school fair and visiting old people at the home, that sort of stuff. But I think they meant work experience.

Sophie: I’m sure what you said was impressive. They can’t expect you to have had much work experience at your age.

Daisy:  And then they asked me what acting I had done, so I told them that I’d had a main part in the school play, and I showed them a bit of the video, so that was cool.

Sophie:  Great!

Daisy: Oh, and they also asked if I spoke any foreign languages.

Sophie: Languages?

Daisy: Yeah, because I might have to talk to tourists, you know.

Sophie: Oh, right, of course.

Daisy: So that was it really. They showed me the costume I’ll be wearing if I get the job. Sending it over ...

Ollie: Hey, sis, I heard that Brad Pitt started out as a giant chicken too! This could be your big break!

Daisy: Ha, ha, very funny.

Sophie: Take no notice, darling. I’m sure you’ll be a marvellous chicken.

We use reported speech when we want to tell someone what someone said. We usually use a reporting verb (e.g. say, tell, ask, etc.) and then change the tense of what was actually said in direct speech.

So, direct speech is what someone actually says? Like 'I want to know about reported speech'?

Yes, and you report it with a reporting verb.

He said he wanted to know about reported speech.

I said, I want and you changed it to he wanted .

Exactly. Verbs in the present simple change to the past simple; the present continuous changes to the past continuous; the present perfect changes to the past perfect; can changes to could ; will changes to would ; etc.

She said she was having the interview at four o’clock. (Direct speech: ' I’m having the interview at four o’clock.') They said they’d phone later and let me know. (Direct speech: ' We’ll phone later and let you know.')

OK, in that last example, you changed you to me too.

Yes, apart from changing the tense of the verb, you also have to think about changing other things, like pronouns and adverbs of time and place.

'We went yesterday.'  > She said they had been the day before. 'I’ll come tomorrow.' >  He said he’d come the next day.

I see, but what if you’re reporting something on the same day, like 'We went yesterday'?

Well, then you would leave the time reference as 'yesterday'. You have to use your common sense. For example, if someone is saying something which is true now or always, you wouldn’t change the tense.

'Dogs can’t eat chocolate.' > She said that dogs can’t eat chocolate. 'My hair grows really slowly.' >  He told me that his hair grows really slowly.

What about reporting questions?

We often use ask + if/whether , then change the tenses as with statements. In reported questions we don’t use question forms after the reporting verb.

'Do you have any experience working with people?' They asked if I had any experience working with people. 'What acting have you done?' They asked me what acting I had done .

Is there anything else I need to know about reported speech?

One thing that sometimes causes problems is imperative sentences.

You mean like 'Sit down, please' or 'Don’t go!'?

Exactly. Sentences that start with a verb in direct speech need a to + infinitive in reported speech.

She told him to be good. (Direct speech: 'Be good!') He told them not to forget. (Direct speech: 'Please don’t forget.')

OK. Can I also say 'He asked me to sit down'?

Yes. You could say 'He told me to …' or 'He asked me to …' depending on how it was said.

OK, I see. Are there any more reporting verbs?

Yes, there are lots of other reporting verbs like promise , remind , warn , advise , recommend , encourage which you can choose, depending on the situation. But say , tell and ask are the most common.

Great. I understand! My teacher said reported speech was difficult.

And I told you not to worry!

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Reported Speech – Free Exercise

Write the following sentences in indirect speech. Pay attention to backshift and the changes to pronouns, time, and place.

  • Two weeks ago, he said, “I visited this museum last week.” → Two weeks ago, he said that   . I → he|simple past → past perfect|this → that|last …→ the … before
  • She claimed, “I am the best for this job.” → She claimed that   . I → she|simple present→ simple past|this→ that
  • Last year, the minister said, “The crisis will be overcome next year.” → Last year, the minister said that   . will → would|next …→ the following …
  • My riding teacher said, “Nobody has ever fallen off a horse here.” → My riding teacher said that   . present perfect → past perfect|here→ there
  • Last month, the boss explained, “None of my co-workers has to work overtime now.” → Last month, the boss explained that   . my → his/her|simple present→ simple past|now→ then

Rewrite the question sentences in indirect speech.

  • She asked, “What did he say?” → She asked   . The subject comes directly after the question word.|simple past → past perfect
  • He asked her, “Do you want to dance?” → He asked her   . The subject comes directly after whether/if |you → she|simple present → simple past
  • I asked him, “How old are you?” → I asked him   . The subject comes directly after the question word + the corresponding adjective (how old)|you→ he|simple present → simple past
  • The tourists asked me, “Can you show us the way?” → The tourists asked me   . The subject comes directly after whether/if |you→ I|us→ them
  • The shop assistant asked the woman, “Which jacket have you already tried on?” → The shop assistant asked the woman   . The subject comes directly after the question word|you→ she|present perfect → past perfect

Rewrite the demands/requests in indirect speech.

  • The passenger requested the taxi driver, “Stop the car.” → The passenger requested the taxi driver   . to + same wording as in direct speech
  • The mother told her son, “Don’t be so loud.” → The mother told her son   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t
  • The policeman told us, “Please keep moving.” → The policeman told us   . to + same wording as in direct speech ( please can be left off)
  • She told me, “Don’t worry.” → She told me   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t
  • The zookeeper told the children, “Don’t feed the animals.” → The zookeeper told the children   . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don’t

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  • B1-B2 grammar

Reported speech: statements

Reported speech: statements

Do you know how to report what somebody else said? Test what you know with interactive exercises and read the explanation to help you.

Look at these examples to see how we can tell someone what another person said.

direct speech: 'I love the Toy Story films,' she said. indirect speech: She said she loved the Toy Story films. direct speech: 'I worked as a waiter before becoming a chef,' he said. indirect speech: He said he'd worked as a waiter before becoming a chef. direct speech: 'I'll phone you tomorrow,' he said. indirect speech: He said he'd phone me the next day.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Grammar B1-B2: Reported speech 1: 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

Reported speech is when we tell someone what another person said. To do this, we can use direct speech or indirect speech.

direct speech: 'I work in a bank,' said Daniel. indirect speech: Daniel said that he worked in a bank.

In indirect speech, we often use a tense which is 'further back' in the past (e.g. worked ) than the tense originally used (e.g. work ). This is called 'backshift'. We also may need to change other words that were used, for example pronouns.

Present simple, present continuous and present perfect

When we backshift, present simple changes to past simple, present continuous changes to past continuous and present perfect changes to past perfect.

'I travel a lot in my job.' Jamila said that she travelled a lot in her job. 'The baby's sleeping!' He told me the baby was sleeping. 'I've hurt my leg.' She said she'd hurt her leg.

Past simple and past continuous

When we backshift, past simple usually changes to past perfect simple, and past continuous usually changes to past perfect continuous.

'We lived in China for five years.' She told me they'd lived in China for five years. 'It was raining all day.' He told me it had been raining all day.

Past perfect

The past perfect doesn't change.

'I'd tried everything without success, but this new medicine is great.' He said he'd tried everything without success, but the new medicine was great.

No backshift

If what the speaker has said is still true or relevant, it's not always necessary to change the tense. This might happen when the speaker has used a present tense.

'I go to the gym next to your house.' Jenny told me that she goes to the gym next to my house. I'm thinking about going with her. 'I'm working in Italy for the next six months.' He told me he's working in Italy for the next six months. Maybe I should visit him! 'I've broken my arm!' She said she's broken her arm, so she won't be at work this week.

Pronouns, demonstratives and adverbs of time and place

Pronouns also usually change in indirect speech.

'I enjoy working in my garden,' said Bob. Bob said that he enjoyed working in his garden. 'We played tennis for our school,' said Alina. Alina told me they'd played tennis for their school.

However, if you are the person or one of the people who spoke, then the pronouns don't change.

'I'm working on my thesis,' I said. I told her that I was working on my thesis. 'We want our jobs back!' we said. We said that we wanted our jobs back.

We also change demonstratives and adverbs of time and place if they are no longer accurate.

'This is my house.' He said this was his house. [You are currently in front of the house.] He said that was his house. [You are not currently in front of the house.] 'We like it here.' She told me they like it here. [You are currently in the place they like.] She told me they like it there. [You are not in the place they like.] 'I'm planning to do it today.' She told me she's planning to do it today. [It is currently still the same day.] She told me she was planning to do it that day. [It is not the same day any more.]

In the same way, these changes to those , now changes to then , yesterday changes to the day before , tomorrow changes to the next/following day and ago changes to before .

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Grammar B1-B2: Reported speech 1: 2

Language level

Good evening from Turkey.

Is the following example correct: Question: When did she watch the movie?

She asked me when she had watched the movie. or is it had she watched the movie. 

Do Subjects come before the verbs? Thank you. 

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Hello muratt,

This is a reported question, not an actual question, as you can see from the fact that it has no question mark at the end. Therefore no inversion is needed and the normal subject-verb word order is maintained: ...she had watched... is correct.

You can read more about this here:

https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/grammar/b1-b2-grammar/reported-speech-questions

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for your response.

Hello Sir, kindly help with the following sentence-

She said, "When I was a child I wasn't afraid of ghosts." 

Please tell me how to write this sentence in reported/ indirect speech.

Hello! I was studying reported speech and I didn't really understand the difference between 'need' and 'need to' when we shift them. Could you please explain a little bit about the semi-modal need? I came across to this while I was studying: Backshift Changes need (no change) ‘You needn’t come till six o’clock,’ he said. He said we needn’t come till six o’clock. AND need to (becomes needed to) She said, 'I need to have a party.' She said she needed to have a party. Why do we change 'need to' but not 'need'? Could you also please give a positive indirect reported speech with the word 'need' and a negative indirect speech with the word 'need to'? Thanks in advance!

Hello Meldo,

'need' can be used -- and is most often used -- as an ordinary verb. In the text you copied above, this is the second entry ('need to'). Since it is an ordinary verb, in indirect speech, it backshifts in the way other ordinary verbs do. An example of a negative form here is 'They told me I didn't need to bring my passport'.

Particularly in British English (only very rarely in American English), 'need' can also be used as a modal verb. In this case, it behaves as a modal verb, i.e. no 's' is added to a third person singular form, infinitives after it are used without 'to' and 'do/does/did' is not used to form questions, negatives or past simple forms. This is also why '-ed' is not added for a backshift.

When 'need' is a modal, it's most commonly used in the negative. It is possible to use it in questions (e.g. 'Need I bring my passport?' or 'I asked if I need bring my passport'), but it's generally not used in the affirmative.

You might find this BBC page and this  Cambridge Dictionary explanation helpful if you'd like to read more.

Hope this helps.

Best wishes, Kirk LearnEnglish team

Do we change 'had better' in indirect reported speech? I think no, but I just wanted to make sure. Can you also give an example with 'had better' in an indirect speech? Thanks a lot! The best English grammar site ever!

Hello Melis_06,

'had better' is not generally changed in reported speech. Here's an example for you:

  • direct: 'You had better be on time!'
  • indirect: They told us we had better be on time.

Glad you find our site useful!

Could you tell me why say is sometimes used in reported speech instead of said?

Hello Khangvo2812,

In general, it's used when it's something that people say not just in one specific situation, but in general. 

We also sometimes use the present simple to talk about the past when telling stories. You can read more about this on our Present simple page -- scroll down to the very end of the explanation, just after the Present simple 8 exercise.

If there's a specific sentence you want to ask about, please include it in your comment.

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Reported Speech (Indirect Speech)

Exercises on reported speech.

If we report what another person has said, we usually do not use the speaker’s exact words (direct speech), but reported (indirect) speech. Therefore, you need to learn how to transform direct speech into reported speech. The structure is a little different depending on whether you want to transform a statement, question or request.

When transforming statements, check whether you have to change:

  • present tense verbs (3rd person singular)
  • place and time expressions
  • tenses (backshift)

→ more on statements in reported speech

When transforming questions, check whether you have to change:

Also note that you have to:

  • transform the question into an indirect question
  • use the interrogative or if / whether

→ more on questions in reported speech

→ more on requests in reported speech

Additional Information and Exeptions

Apart from the above mentioned basic rules, there are further aspects that you should keep in mind, for example:

  • main clauses connected with and / but
  • tense of the introductory clause
  • reported speech for difficult tenses
  • exeptions for backshift
  • requests with must , should , ought to and let’s

→ more on additional information and exeptions in reported speech

Statements in Reported Speech

  • no backshift – change of pronouns
  • no backshift – change of pronouns and places
  • with backshift
  • with backshift and change of place and time expressions

Questions in Reported Speech

Requests in reported speech.

  • Exercise 1 – requests (positive)
  • Exercise 2 – requests (negative)
  • Exercise 3 – requests (mixed)

Mixed Exercises on Reported Speech

  • Exercise on reported speech with and without backshift

Grammar in Texts

  • „ The Canterville Ghost “ (highlight direct speech and reported speech)

English Grammar Online Exercises and Downloadable Worksheets

Online exercises.

  • Reported Speech

Levels of Difficulty : Elementary Intermediate Advanced

  • RS012 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS011 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS010 - Reporting Verbs Advanced
  • RS009 - Reporting Verbs Advanced
  • RS008 - Reporting Verbs Advanced
  • RS007 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate
  • RS006 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS005 - Reported Speech - Introductory Verbs Advanced
  • RS004 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS003 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate
  • RS002 - Reported Speech Intermediate
  • RS001 - Reported Speech Intermediate
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Reported speech exercises

  • English grammar PDF
  • PDF worksheets
  • Mixed PDF tests
  • Irregular verbs
  • Modal verbs
  • If-conditional
  • Passive voice
  • Reported speech
  • Time clauses
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  • Question tags
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  • Gerund and infinitive
  • Direct | indirect object

Rewrite the sentences in the reported speech

Change the tenses, pronouns, expressions of time and place to rewrite the sentences from the direct to reported speech.

Check test Answer key Clear test

Direct and indirect speech Exercises with answers and grammar rules.

Reported speech worksheets PDF exercises with answers.

Reported questions, commands and requests Exercises and grammar rules.

Reported speech - brief summary

In the reported speech we usually change tenses (one tense back), pronouns, time and place.

"I admire you," said Sarah. Sarah said she admired me.

"We came back yesterday," they told me. They told me they had come the day before.

"Peter has put it here," he thought. He thought that Peter had put it there.

"I'm afraid that your parents won't like me," said George. George said he was afraid that my parents wouldn't like him.

How to avoid the shift of tenses:

It is simple to avoid shift of tenses in the reported speech if you use the reporting verb in the present simple tense instead of the past simple tense.

"I admire you," said Sarah. Sarah says she admires me.

"I'm afraid that your parents won't like me," said George. George says that he is afraid that my parents won't like him.

Reported Speech, Indirect Speech – English Grammar Exercises

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Grammar Exercise - Reported Speech

Do the exercise below on reported speech and click on the button to check your answers..

(Before doing the exercises you may want to read the lesson on reported speech )

Complete the sentences in reported speech.

  • John said, "I love this town." John said
  • "Do you like soccer ?" He asked me. He asked me
  • "I can't drive a lorry," he said. He said
  • "Be nice to your brother," he said. He asked me
  • "Don't be nasty," he said. He urged me
  • "Don't waste your money" she said. She told the boys
  • "What have you decided to do?" she asked him. She asked him
  • "I always wake up early," he said. He said
  • "You should revise your lessons," he said. He advised the students
  • "Where have you been?" he asked me. He wanted to know

Before submitting the test, check the following:

  • Punctuation and capitalization
  • Spaces (don't add any unnecessary spaces)

Related materials:

  • Reported speech exercise (mixed)
  • Reported speech exercise (questions)
  • Reported speech exercise (requests and commands)
  • Reported speech lesson

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Reported Speech Reading Comprehension Activity

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Reported speech or "reported discourse" is when an individual verbally recalls information from something they heard or read. It can be either directly quoted or indirectly conveyed and is an important aspect of communication. Using reported speech in conversations shows listening skills and allows an individual to relate to others.

Read this short excerpt about a funny incident in the park. Once you have finished, answer the reading comprehension questions and complete the reported speech activity.

Guess Who I Bumped Into?

Tim wandered along the path thinking aloud, "If I continue this diet I should lose twenty pounds by the end of..." when BOOM! he bumped into another city dweller out for a day's walk in the park.

"I'm terribly sorry," he apologized, "I was so caught up in my thoughts, I didn't see you!" he managed to stammer.

Smiling, Sheila responded, "It's OK. Nothing's broken... No really, I wasn't watching my step either."

Suddenly they both stopped making excuses and stared at each other.

"Don't I know you from somewhere?" inquired Tim while Sheila exclaimed, "You're Tim, Jack's brother, aren't you?!"

They both began to laugh as they had met each other the week before at a party that Jack had given.

Still laughing, Tim suggested, "Why don't we have a cup a coffee and donut?" to which Sheila replied, "I thought you wanted to continue your diet!" They both were still laughing by the time they reached the Swimming Donut cafe.​

Comprehension Questions

Questions one to five test your comprehension. The remaining questions test reported speech. Fill in the blanks with reported (indirect) speech using the text above.

  • He was on a diet.
  • He wasn't paying attention.
  • He was writing his thoughts down.
  • In the park
  • In the countryside
  • In the city
  • It's not clear
  • At the Swimming Donut
  • At Tim's Brother's house
  • He was supposedly on a diet.
  • The name of the cafe was strange.
  • They were on a walk and there were no donuts in the park.
  • continues... should
  • continued... should
  • both are correct
  • his / hadn't seen
  • my / didn't see
  • hadn't watched
  • hadn't been watching
  • Reported Speech
  • Reading Comprehension Worksheet 1
  • How to Teach Reported Speech
  • Reading Comprehension Worksheet 2
  • Using Reported Speech: ESL Lesson Plan
  • Predictions to Support Reading Comprehension
  • What Is Attribution in Writing?
  • What Are Reporting Verbs in English Grammar?
  • Using Cloze Tests to Determine Reading Comprehension
  • Test Prep Strategies
  • "What to the Slave..." Reading Comprehension Worksheet Answers
  • French Reading Comprehension Test
  • Making Inferences to Improve Reading Comprehension
  • 10 Strategies to Increase Student Reading Comprehension
  • 10 Fun Team-Building Activities for Middle School
  • Third Grade Reading Comprehension Books

reported speech exercises text

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Business English Listening Exercises for A1 with Answers

Business Listening A2

Business English Listening Exercises for A2 with Answers

Business Listening B1

Business English Listening Exercises for B1 with Answers

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Article level 3, article level 4, conversations.

Listening Practice Through Dictation with Transcripts

  • English Grammar Exercises for B2 – Reported speech

English Grammar Exercises for B2

1. Change the direct speech into reported speech.

1   ‘You must take these tablets twice a day.’

      The doctor says I ………………………………………….

2   ‘I’m going to the gym tomorrow.’

      Ben told me ………………………………………….

3   ‘You don’t have to wait for me.’

       Liz said that I ………………………………………….

4   ‘I took my final exam yesterday.’

       Jack told me ………………………………………….

5   ‘I haven’t told you the complete truth.’

       Pablo said ………………………………………….

6   ‘I’ll meet you later today.’

       Jim tells me ………………………………………….

7   ‘I prefer this café to the one opposite.’

      Julia says ………………………………………….

8   ‘I’ll always remember meeting you.’

      Ann told me ………………………………………….

1    must take these tablets twice a day.

2   (that) he was going to the gym the next day.

3    didn’t have to wait for her.

4   (that) he had taken his final exam the day before.

5    (that) he hadn’t told me the complete truth.

6    (that) he’ll meet me later today.

7   (that) she prefers this café to the one opposite.

8    (that) she would always remember meeting me.

2. Complete the sentences with the correct form of the words in brackets. Do not change the order of the words. Use a maximum of five words including the words in brackets.

1   Will asked us …………………………… (time / game / start) the next day.

2   The assistant asked him if …………………………… (he / like / try) on a smaller jacket.

3   My teacher asked me …………………………… (I / finish) the exercise and I said I hadn’t.

4   I asked Maria …………………………… (which / film / seen) the night before.

5   The dentist asked …………………………… (me / why) never used an electric toothbrush before.

6   She asked him if …………………………… (he / going) the park and he said he wasn’t.

7   I asked the policeman whether …………………………… (he / help / us) and he said he could.

1 what time the game started   2 he would like to try

3 if I had finished   4 which film she had seen

5 me why I had   6 he was going to   7 he could help us

3. Change the direct speech into reported speech. Begin with My mum asked me .

1   ‘Why are you home so late?’

      …………………………………..

2   ‘Did you leave school on time today?’

3   ‘You’ve got lots of homework to do, haven’t you?’

4   ‘When are you doing to tidy your room?’

5   ‘Have you seen your brother this afternoon?’

6   ‘Will you help me with the shopping tomorrow?’

7   ‘Would you like me to give you some money for a pizza?’

      …………………………………..

1   My mum asked me why I was home so late.

2    … if I had left school on time that day.

3    … if I had (got) lots of homework to do.

4    … when I was going to tidy my room.

5    … if I had seen my brother that afternoon.

6    … if I’d help her with the shopping the next day.

7    … if I’d like her to give me some money for a pizza.

4. Report the dialogue using say or ask in the past simple.

Dan     Are you going to the concert tomorrow evening?

Zoe      No, I’m not. I haven’t got any money.

Dan     I’ll lend you some. How much do you need?

Zoe      That’s really kind of you, but I have to finish my homework too.

Dan     Would you like me to help you finish it?

Zoe      Do you speak German?

Dan     No, I don’t. Your cousin does, doesn’t she?

Zoe      Yes, she does. Perhaps I should ask her.

      ……………………………………………

Dan asked Zoe if she was going to the concert the next evening. Zoe said she wasn’t. She said she didn’t have any money. Dan said he’d lend her some. He asked her how much she needed. Zoe said that was really kind of him, but she had to finish her homework too. Dan asked her if she’d like him to help her finish it. Zoe asked him if he spoke German. Dan said he didn’t. He asked her if her cousin did. Zoe said she did. She said perhaps she should ask her.

5. Write a second sentence that has a similar meaning to the first. Use the words in brackets.

1   ‘Do you know the answer to these questions?’ Sally asked me. (if)

      ……………………………………………

2   ‘I mustn’t be late for the trip tomorrow,’ said Bella. (next)

3   ‘Have you heard the band’s new album yet?’ asked Kostas. (me)

4   ‘I won’t be at school next week,’ said Mark. (says)

5   ‘Will you be getting a new phone soon?’ asked Harry. (whether)

6   ‘My plane arrives at ten in the morning,’ said Andrew. (tells)

1   Sally asked me if I knew the answer to the / those questions.

2    Bella said that she mustn’t be late for the trip the next day.

3    Kostas asked me if I’d heard the band’s new album yet.

4    Mark says that he won’t be at school next week.

5    Harry asked (me) whether I’d be getting a new phone soon.

6    Andrew tells me that his plane arrives at ten in the morning.

6. Rewrite the sentences using reported speech.

1   ‘I’ll never wear this outfit again.’

      Monica said ……………………………………..

2   ‘I don’t believe you.’

      My dad told my sister ……………………………………..

3   ‘I’ve been talking to Frank.’

      Susanna tells me ……………………………………..

4   ‘You mustn’t tell anyone.’

       Harry told me ……………………………………..

5   ‘I’ll give you an answer tomorrow.’

      Jenny told Tom ……………………………………..

6   ‘I was at a friend’s house yesterday.’

      Lisa said ……………………………………..

1    (that) she would never wear that outfit again

2    (that) he didn’t believe her

3    (that) she’s been talking to Frank

4    (that) I mustn’t tell anyone

5    (that) she would give him an answer the next day

6    (that) she had been at a friend’s house the day before

7. Rewrite the questions using reported speech.

1   ‘Did you see the football match yesterday?’

      Jimmy asked me ……………………………………..

2   ‘You’ve ordered the pizzas, haven’t you?’

      I asked Eddie ……………………………………..

3   ‘What languages do you speak?’

      The tourist asked me ……………………………………..

4   ‘You’re going out later, aren’t you?’

      My dad asked me ……………………………………..

5   ‘Do you like Indian food?’ ‘Yes, I do’

      They asked me ……………………………………..

6   ‘Where does your brother work?’

      I asked Emma ……………………………………..

7   ‘Were you late for school this morning?’

      My mum asked my sister ……………………………………..

8   ‘Are you tired?’ ‘No, I’m not.’

      We asked him ……………………………………..

1   if / whether I had seen the football match the day before.

2   if / whether he had ordered the pizzas

3   what languages I spoke

4   if / whether I was going out later

5   if / whether I liked Indian food and I said I did

6   where her brother worked

7   if / whether she had been late for school that morning

8   if / whether he was tired and he said that he wasn’t

Related Posts

  • English Grammar Exercises for B2 – Unreal past and had better
  • English Grammar Exercises for B2 – Emphasis
  • English Grammar Exercises for B2 – Mixed conditionals
  • English Grammar Exercises for B2 – Criticising past actions
  • English Grammar Exercises for B2 – Relative clauses

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OpenAI built a voice cloning tool, but you can’t use it… yet

reported speech exercises text

As deepfakes proliferate , OpenAI is refining the tech used to clone voices — but the company insists it’s doing so responsibly.

Today marks the preview debut of OpenAI’s Voice Engine , an expansion of the company’s existing text-to-speech API . Under development for about two years, Voice Engine allows users to upload any 15-second voice sample to generate a synthetic copy of that voice. But there’s no date for public availability yet, giving the company time to respond to how the model is used and abused.

“We want to make sure that everyone feels good about how it’s being deployed — that we understand the landscape of where this tech is dangerous and we have mitigations in place for that,” Jeff Harris, a member of the product staff at OpenAI, told TechCrunch in an interview.

Training the model

The generative AI model powering Voice Engine has been hiding in plain sight for some time, Harris said.

The same model underpins the voice and “read aloud” capabilities in ChatGPT , OpenAI’s AI-powered chatbot, as well as the preset voices available in OpenAI’s text-to-speech API. And Spotify’s been using it since early September to dub podcasts for high-profile hosts like Lex Fridman in different languages.

I asked Harris where the model’s training data came from — a bit of a touchy subject. He would only say that the Voice Engine model was trained on a mix of licensed and publicly available data.

Models like the one powering Voice Engine are trained on an enormous number of examples — in this case, speech recordings — usually sourced from public sites and data sets around the web. Many generative AI vendors see training data as a competitive advantage and thus keep it and info pertaining to it close to the chest. But training data details are also a potential source of IP-related lawsuits, another disincentive to reveal much.

OpenAI is already being   sued over allegations the company violated IP law by training its AI on copyrighted content, including photos, artwork, code, articles and e-books, without providing the creators or owners credit or pay.

OpenAI has licensing agreements in place with some content providers, like Shutterstock and the news publisher Axel Springer , and allows webmasters to block its web crawler from scraping their site for training data. OpenAI also lets artists “opt out” of and remove their work from the data sets that the company uses to train its image-generating models, including its latest DALL-E 3 .

But OpenAI offers no such opt-out scheme for its other products. And in a recent statement to the U.K.’s House of Lords, OpenAI suggested that it’s “impossible” to create useful AI models without copyrighted material, asserting that fair use — the legal doctrine that allows for the use of copyrighted works to make a secondary creation as long as it’s transformative — shields it where it concerns model training.

Synthesizing voice

Surprisingly, Voice Engine isn’t trained or fine-tuned on user data. That’s owing in part to the ephemeral way in which the model — a combination of a diffusion process and transformer — generates speech.

“We take a small audio sample and text and generate realistic speech that matches the original speaker,” said Harris. “The audio that’s used is dropped after the request is complete.”

As he explained it, the model is simultaneously analyzing the speech data it pulls from and the text data meant to be read aloud, generating a matching voice without having to build a custom model per speaker.

It’s not novel tech. A number of startups have delivered voice cloning products for years, from ElevenLabs to Replica Studios to Papercup to Deepdub to Respeecher . So have Big Tech incumbents such as Amazon, Google and Microsoft — the last of which is a major OpenAI’s investor  incidentally.

Harris claimed that OpenAI’s approach delivers overall higher-quality speech.

We also know it will be priced aggressively. Although OpenAI removed Voice Engine’s pricing from the marketing materials it published today, in documents viewed by TechCrunch, Voice Engine is listed as costing $15 per one million characters, or ~162,500 words. That would fit Dickens’ “Oliver Twist” with a little room to spare. (An “HD” quality option costs twice that, but confusingly, an OpenAI spokesperson told TechCrunch that there’s no difference between HD and non-HD voices. Make of that what you will.)

That translates to around 18 hours of audio, making the price somewhat south of $1 per hour. That’s indeed cheaper than what one of the more popular rival vendors, ElevenLabs, charges — $11 for 100,000 characters per month. But it does come at the expense of some customization.

Voice Engine doesn’t offer controls to adjust the tone, pitch or cadence of a voice. In fact, it doesn’t offer any fine-tuning knobs or dials at the moment, although Harris notes that any expressiveness in the 15-second voice sample will carry on through subsequent generations (for example, if you speak in an excited tone, the resulting synthetic voice will sound consistently excited). We’ll see how the quality of the reading compares with other models when they can be compared directly.

Voice talent as commodity

Voice actor salaries on ZipRecruiter range from $12 to $79 per hour — a lot more expensive than Voice Engine, even on the low end (actors with agents will command a much higher price per project). Were it to catch on, OpenAI’s tool could commoditize voice work. So, where does that leave actors?

The talent industry wouldn’t be caught unawares, exactly — it’s been grappling with the existential threat of generative AI for some time. Voice actors are increasingly being asked to sign away rights to their voices so that clients can use AI to generate synthetic versions that could eventually replace them. Voice work — particularly cheap, entry-level work — is at risk of being eliminated in favor of AI-generated speech.

Now, some AI voice platforms are trying to strike a balance.

Replica Studios last year signed a somewhat contentious deal with SAG-AFTRA to create and license copies of the media artist union members’ voices. The organizations said that the arrangement established fair and ethical terms and conditions to ensure performer consent while negotiating terms for uses of synthetic voices in new works, including video games.

The writers’ strike is over; here’s how AI negotiations shook out

ElevenLabs, meanwhile, hosts a marketplace for synthetic voices that allows users to create a voice, verify and share it publicly. When others use a voice, the original creators receive compensation — a set dollar amount per 1,000 characters.

OpenAI will establish no such labor union deals or marketplaces, at least not in the near term, and requires only that users obtain “explicit consent” from the people whose voices are cloned, make “clear disclosures” indicating which voices are AI-generated and agree not to use the voices of minors, deceased people or political figures in their generations.

“How this intersects with the voice actor economy is something that we’re watching closely and really curious about,” Harris said. “I think that there’s going to be a lot of opportunity to sort of scale your reach as a voice actor through this kind of technology. But this is all stuff that we’re going to learn as people actually deploy and play with the tech a little bit.”

Ethics and deepfakes

Voice cloning apps can be — and have been — abused in ways that go well beyond threatening the livelihoods of actors.

The infamous message board 4chan, known for its conspiratorial content,  used ElevenLabs’ platform to share hateful messages mimicking celebrities like Emma Watson. The Verge’s James Vincent was able to tap AI tools to maliciously, quickly clone voices, generating samples containing everything from violent threats to racist and transphobic remarks. And over at Vice, reporter Joseph Cox documented generating a voice clone convincing enough to fool a bank’s authentication system.

There are fears bad actors will attempt to sway elections with voice cloning. And they’re not unfounded: In January, a phone campaign employed a deepfaked President Biden to deter New Hampshire citizens from voting — prompting the FCC to move to make future such campaigns illegal.

FCC officially declares AI-voiced robocalls illegal

So aside from banning deepfakes at the policy level, what steps is OpenAI taking, if any, to prevent Voice Engine from being misused? Harris mentioned a few.

First, Voice Engine is only being made available to an exceptionally small group of developers — around 10 — to start. OpenAI is prioritizing use cases that are “low risk” and “socially beneficial,” Harris says, like those in healthcare and accessibility, in addition to experimenting with “responsible” synthetic media.

A few early Voice Engine adopters include Age of Learning, an edtech company that’s using the tool to generate voice-overs from previously cast actors, and HeyGen, a storytelling app leveraging Voice Engine for translation. Livox and Lifespan are using Voice Engine to create voices for people with speech impairments and disabilities, and Dimagi is building a Voice Engine-based tool to give feedback to health workers in their primary languages.

Here’s generated voices from Lifespan:

https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/03/lifespan_generation_ordering.mp3

https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/03/lifespan_generation_talking.mp3

And here’s one from Livox:

https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/03/livox_generation_english.mp3

Second, clones created with Voice Engine are watermarked using a technique OpenAI developed that embeds inaudible identifiers in recordings. (Other vendors including Resemble AI and Microsoft employ similar watermarks.) Harris didn’t promise that there aren’t ways to circumvent the watermark, but described it as “tamper resistant.”

“If there’s an audio clip out there, it’s really easy for us to look at that clip and determine that it was generated by our system and the developer that actually did that generation,” Harris said. “So far, it isn’t open sourced — we have it internally for now. We’re curious about making it publicly available, but obviously, that comes with added risks in terms of exposure and breaking it.”

OpenAI launches a red teaming network to make its models more robust

Third, OpenAI plans to provide members of its red teaming network , a contracted group of experts that help inform the company’s AI model risk assessment and mitigation strategies, access to Voice Engine to suss out malicious uses.

Some experts argue that AI red teaming isn’t exhaustive enough and that it’s incumbent on vendors to develop tools to defend against harms that their AI might cause. OpenAI isn’t going quite that far with Voice Engine — but Harris asserts that the company’s “top principle” is releasing the technology safely.

General release

Depending on how the preview goes and the public reception to Voice Engine, OpenAI might release the tool to its wider developer base, but at present, the company is reluctant to commit to anything concrete.

Harris did give a sneak peek at Voice Engine’s roadmap, though, revealing that OpenAI is testing a security mechanism that has users read randomly generated text as proof that they’re present and aware of how their voice is being used. This could give OpenAI the confidence it needs to bring Voice Engine to more people, Harris said — or it might just be the beginning.

“What’s going to keep pushing us forward in terms of the actual voice matching technology is really going to depend on what we learn from the pilot, the safety issues that are uncovered and the mitigations that we have in place,” he said. “We don’t want people to be confused between artificial voices and actual human voices.”

And on that last point we can agree.

Israel-Gaza latest: Protests in Tel Aviv after 'half a year of hell'; hostage killed in Gaza was 'executed' as sister criticises 'cowardly' Israeli government

Thousands of protesters have gathered in Tel Aviv as the six-month anniversary of the war approaches. Meanwhile, the body of an Israeli hostage has been recovered from Gaza.

Saturday 6 April 2024 23:00, UK

  • Israel-Hamas war

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  • Hostage's body recovered by Israeli military
  • Biden puts pressure on as ceasefire talks begin
  • Iran arrests senior Islamic State operative accused of plotting Ramadan attack
  • US on high alert about possibility of significant Iranian retaliation
  • Biden tells Netanyahu immediate ceasefire is 'essential'
  • Podcast: Should the UK stop selling arms to Israel?

Aid worker killings

  • IDF releases findings of investigation into strikes that killed seven
  • Two senior IDF officers sacked for 'serious failings'
  • Communication the 'epicentre of the failure'| Military needs to 'rebuild trust'
  • IDF apologies are 'cold comfort', charity says
  • Alistair Bunkall: Findings a damning slur on Israeli military
  • Cameron says UK 'carefully reviewing' report

That's all for today, but we'll be back soon with regular updates and analysis.

Until then, you can read through today's updates by scrolling below. 

A Royal Navy ship is to be deployed to help get aid into Gaza, the UK has announced.

Alongside the vessel, the government unveiled a £9.7m package for aid deliveries, logistical expertise and equipment support for a humanitarian corridor in the eastern Mediterranean between Cyprus and Gaza.

Foreign Secretary Lord David Cameron said the UK and its allies needed to "explore all options" including sea and air deliveries to "ease the desperate plight of some of the world's most vulnerable people" in the territory.

"The situation in Gaza is dire and the prospect of famine is real. We remain committed to getting aid to those who so desperately need it," he said. 

"Israel has also agreed to increase the number of aid trucks entering Gaza to a minimum of 500 a day.

"But we need to continue to explore all options, including by sea and air, to ease the desperate plight of some of the world's most vulnerable people."

The British Armed Forces have dropped 40 tonnes of aid into Gaza in recent weeks to tackle the bottleneck in supplies reaching Palestinians.

The five air drops have seen supplies including water, flour and baby formula parachuted into the territory.

The UK continues to stand by Israel's right to defend its security, but Israelis need to ensure aid gets into Gaza more swiftly, Rishi Sunak has said. 

In a statement marking the six-month anniversary of the 7 October Hamas attacks, the prime minister also said the UK remains "appalled" by an Israel Defence Forces (IDF) air strike which killed three British aid workers.

"Today marks six months since the terrorist outrage of October 7 - the most appalling attack in Israel's history, the worst loss of Jewish life since the Second World War," he said. 

"We continue to stand by Israel's right to defeat the threat from Hamas terrorists and defend their security. 

"But the whole of the UK is shocked by the bloodshed, and appalled by the killing of brave British heroes who were bringing food to those in need."

John Chapman, 57, James "Jim" Henderson, 33, and James Kirby, 47, were the three Britons who died in air strikes carried out by the IDF on their aid convoy on April 1.

Mr Sunak highlighted the growing toll on Palestinian civilians, and said the UK had been "straining every sinew" to get aid into Gaza, while emphasising the need for Hamas to release its captives.

He called for an immediate humanitarian pause in the fighting, "leading to a long-term sustainable ceasefire"

In our previous post, we told you Israeli police had reported a female officer had been punched in the face during a demonstration in Tel Aviv. 

Now, the force has issued a clarification, saying it appears the officer was "hit in the nose by an elbow". 

It added that it was incident wasn't done with "malicious intent to harm the policewoman". 

Thousands of people have taken to the streets of the Israeli city today, protesting against Benjamin Netanyahu's government and calling for more to be done to release hostages taken by Hamas. 

Earlier, the police reported a small group of "troublemakers" had started lighting bonfires after the demonstrations ended. 

A protester taking part in a demonstration in Tel Aviv has punched a police officer, the Israeli Police has said.

The force said a small group of "troublemakers" decided to light bonfires and attack police officers after the protest ended. 

"During the attack, a police officer was injured by a punch she received from a protester and was taken for medical treatment," it added, sharing a video of the woman with a bloody nose. 

In a post on X, it said there was a separate incident which saw a person hit three civilians with a car. 

"At this point, it is known that a car driver hit three civilians while driving and continued driving until he was stopped by the police," it said .  

"The injured citizens are receiving medical treatment and the driver will be transferred for investigation." 

People staying at a hotel in a village in southern Lebanon have described the moment it was damaged by a nearby strike.

Lebanon's state-run National News Agency said "Israeli warplanes" targeted a house in the village of Arnoun this morning. 

Workers were seen clearing broken glass and damage from a hotel which was close to the allegedly targeted building.

"We were sleeping when we heard the sound of an airstrike, a loud sound," said Sara Awada, who was staying at the hotel after being displaced from Kfarkila village.

"We woke up to this noise and found all the glass in the room on the floor and on us. We heard a lot of screaming in the hotel, so we went downstairs because it might be safer in case there was a second strike. Everyone was scared and terrified," she said.

Hussein Hamdan, the owner of the hotel, said it had been hosting displaced families since the start of the Israel-Hamas war in October.

"There is a significant damage, especially to the glass windows and the roof. Thank god there were no injuries," he said.

A top Iranian military commander has renewed the country's promise to retaliate after an airstrike in Syria killed 12 people, including two Iranian generals. 

General Mohammad Bagheri, Iran's joint chief of staff, told mourners gathered for the funeral of General Mohammad Reza Zahdi that Iran will decide when and how to stage an "operation" to take revenge.

"The time, type, plan of the operation will be decided by us, in a way that makes Israel regret what it did," Gen Bagheri said. "This will definitely be done."

The attack, which was widely blamed on Israel, destroyed Iran's consulate in Syria. 

Gen Zahdi was the highest ranking commander killed in the strike. 

The attack on an Iranian diplomatic compound was a significant escalation in a long-running shadow war between the two arch enemies, and Israel has been bracing for an Iranian response.

Tensions have flared against the backdrop of the six-month-old Israel-Hamas war in Gaza, and raised renewed fears of a broader regional conflict.

The Islamic militant group Hamas, which has ruled Gaza for 17 years, is one of Iran's proxies, along with Lebanon's Hezbollah militia and Yemen's Houthi rebels.

A German military vessel has intercepted a Houthi missile, the European Union's naval mission in the Red Sea has said. 

The German frigate "Hessen" stopped the missile attack from Houthi controlled territories to protect merchant ships, it said.

"The action performed by Hessen was effective, avoiding any damage to seafarers and merchant shipping", it added. 

The EU's mission, known as Aspides, was launched in February to help protect the key maritime trade route from drone and missile attacks by Yemen's Houthi militia. 

The group has said it is retaliating against Israel's war on Gaza, but it has regularly attacked several ships with no known connection to Israel.

Tomorrow marks six months since Hamas launched its 7 October attacks on Israel. 

Since then, tens of thousands of people in Gaza have been killed and more than 100 Israeli hostages remain trapped inside the besieged strip. 

To mark the anniversary, thousands of protesters have gathered in Tel Aviv, calling for immediate elections in Israel and for all hostages to be released. 

Some held up signs urging the Israeli government to do more to bring them home, with others carried placards reading "Half a year of hell". 

Three "terror tunnels" have been destroyed in Khan Younis, the Israel Defence Forces has claimed. 

In an update on Telegram, the IDF said it has been operating to locate, map and destroy the tunnels in recent months. 

"During the activity, three offensive terror tunnels, that were under intelligence and technological surveillance by the IDF over recent years, were located," it wrote.

"Following preliminary ground activity, they were mapped and destroyed." 

Hamas has a reputation for having some of the best underground tunnels of any militia.

It uses them to transport fighters, not only belonging to Hamas but also other militant groups like Islamic Jihad, from one end of the strip to the other.

They are also used to move and store weapons, launch attacks against Israel and, in this war, to hold hostages.

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OpenAI Unveils A.I. Technology That Recreates Human Voices

The start-up is sharing the technology, Voice Engine, with a small group of early testers as it tries to understand the potential dangers.

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The sun sets behind a large concrete and glass building.

By Cade Metz

Reporting from San Francisco

First, OpenAI offered a tool that allowed people to create digital images simply by describing what they wanted to see. Then, it built similar technology that generated full-motion video like something from a Hollywood movie.

Now, it has unveiled technology that can recreate someone’s voice.

The high-profile A.I. start-up said on Friday that a small group of businesses was testing a new OpenAI system, Voice Engine, that can recreate a person’s voice from a 15-second recording. If you upload a recording of yourself and a paragraph of text, it can read the text using a synthetic voice that sounds like yours.

The text does not have to be in your native language. If you are an English speaker, for example, it can recreate your voice in Spanish, French, Chinese or many other languages.

OpenAI is not sharing the technology more widely because it is still trying to understand its potential dangers. Like image and video generators, a voice generator could help spread disinformation across social media. It could also allow criminals to impersonate people online or during phone calls.

The company said it was particularly worried that this kind of technology could be used to break voice authenticators that control access to online banking accounts and other personal applications.

“This is a sensitive thing, and it is important to get it right,” an OpenAI product manager, Jeff Harris, said in an interview.

The company is exploring ways of watermarking synthetic voices or adding controls that prevent people from using the technology with the voices of politicians or other prominent figures.

Last month, OpenAI took a similar approach when it unveiled its video generator, Sora. It showed off the technology but did not publicly release it.

OpenAI is among the many companies that have developed a new breed of A.I. technology that can quickly and easily generate synthetic voices. They include tech giants like Google as well as start-ups like the New York-based ElevenLabs. (The New York Times has sued OpenAI and its partner, Microsoft, on claims of copyright infringement involving artificial intelligence systems that generate text.)

Businesses can use these technologies to generate audiobooks, give voice to online chatbots or even build an automated radio station DJ. Since last year, OpenAI has used its technology to power a version of ChatGPT that speaks . And it has long offered businesses an array of voices that can be used for similar applications. All of them were built from clips provided by voice actors.

But the company has not yet offered a public tool that would allow individuals and businesses to recreate voices from a short clip as Voice Engine does. The ability to recreate any voice in this way, Mr. Harris said, is what makes the technology dangerous. The technology could be particularly dangerous in an election year, he said.

In January, New Hampshire residents received robocall messages that dissuaded them from voting in the state primary in a voice that was most likely artificially generated to sound like President Biden . The Federal Communications Commission later outlawed such calls .

Mr. Harris said OpenAI had no immediate plans to make money from the technology. He said the tool could be particularly useful to people who lost their voices through illness or accident.

He demonstrated how the technology had been used to recreate a woman’s voice after brain cancer damaged it. She could now speak, he said, after providing a brief recording of a presentation she had once made as a high schooler.

Cade Metz writes about artificial intelligence, driverless cars, robotics, virtual reality and other emerging areas of technology. More about Cade Metz

Explore Our Coverage of Artificial Intelligence

News  and Analysis

Artificial intelligence is peering into restaurant garbage pails  and crunching grocery-store data to try to figure out how to send less uneaten food into dumpsters.

David Autor, an M.I.T. economist and tech skeptic, argues that A.I. is fundamentally different  from past waves of computerization.

Economists doubt that artificial intelligence is already visible in productivity data . Big companies, however, talk often about adopting it to improve efficiency.

OpenAI unveiled Voice Engine , an A.I. technology that can recreate a person’s voice from a 15-second recording.

Amazon said it had added $2.75 billion to its investment in Anthropic , an A.I. start-up that competes with companies like OpenAI and Google.

Gov. Bill Lee of Tennessee signed a bill  to prevent the use of A.I. to copy a performer’s voice. It is the first such measure in the United States.

IMAGES

  1. Reported speech worksheet by traute

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  2. Reported Speech worksheet

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  3. Reported Speech Exercises Commands And Requests

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  4. reported speech practice: English ESL worksheets pdf & doc

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  5. Reported Speech

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  6. Reported speech

    reported speech exercises text

VIDEO

  1. Grammar

  2. 10th English Grammar Chapter 5 Reported Speech Exercises 11, 12

  3. 10th English Grammar Chapter 5 Reported Speech Exercises 5, 6

  4. Reported speech Text book exercises of Degree semester -IV|| Osmania University

  5. 10th Class English Grammar Chapter 5 Reported Speech Exercises 3, 4

  6. Reported speech exercises/ أ. أيمن سعادة

COMMENTS

  1. Reported Speech Exercises

    Perfect English Grammar. Here's a list of all the reported speech exercises on this site: ( Click here to read the explanations about reported speech ) Reported Statements: Present Simple Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy) (in PDF here) Present Continuous Reported Statement Exercise (quite easy)

  2. Indirect speech

    What is indirect speech or reported speech? When we tell people what another person said or thought, we often use reported speech or indirect speech. To do that, we need to change verb tenses (present, past, etc.) and pronouns (I, you, my, your, etc.) if the time and speaker are different.For example, present tenses become past, I becomes he or she, and my becomes his or her, etc.

  3. Unit 7

    Unit 7 - Exercise 1 - Reported speech. Rewrite the direct speech as reported speech to complete the sentences. Use contractions where possible.

  4. Reported speech

    Yes, and you report it with a reporting verb. He said he wanted to know about reported speech. I said, I want and you changed it to he wanted. Exactly. Verbs in the present simple change to the past simple; the present continuous changes to the past continuous; the present perfect changes to the past perfect; can changes to could; will changes ...

  5. Reported Speech

    Rewrite the demands/requests in indirect speech. The passenger requested the taxi driver, "Stop the car.". → The passenger requested the taxi driver . to + same wording as in direct speech. The mother told her son, "Don't be so loud.". → The mother told her son . not to + same wording as in direct speech, but remove don't.

  6. Reported speech

    I'm exhausted. I don't think I can go any further. I really need to stop for a rest. Peter: Don't worry. I'm not surprised you're tired. I'm tired too. I'll tell you what, let's see if we can find a place to sit down, and then we can stop and have our picnic. Reported speech (summary):

  7. Reported speech: statements

    indirect speech: She said she loved the Toy Story films. direct speech: 'I worked as a waiter before becoming a chef,' he said. indirect speech: He said he'd worked as a waiter before becoming a chef. direct speech: 'I'll phone you tomorrow,' he said. indirect speech: He said he'd phone me the next day. Try this exercise to test your grammar.

  8. Reported Speech

    Exercises on Reported Speech. If we report what another person has said, we usually do not use the speaker's exact words (direct speech), but reported (indirect) speech. Therefore, you need to learn how to transform direct speech into reported speech. The structure is a little different depending on whether you want to transform a statement ...

  9. Reported Speech

    RS007 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate. RS006 - Reported Speech Intermediate. RS005 - Reported Speech - Introductory Verbs Advanced. RS004 - Reported Speech Intermediate. RS003 - Reporting Verbs Intermediate. RS002 - Reported Speech Intermediate. RS001 - Reported Speech Intermediate. Reported Speech - English Grammar Exercises.

  10. Reported speech

    Direct and indirect speech Exercises with answers and grammar rules. Reported speech worksheets PDF exercises with answers. Reported questions, commands and requests Exercises and grammar rules. Reported speech - brief summary. In the reported speech we usually change tenses (one tense back), pronouns, time and place. "I admire you," said Sarah.

  11. Reported Speech Exercises

    Exercises. 2315 Backshift of tenses in Reported speech - Exercise. 2321 Conversion of time phrases in Reported speech - Exercise. 2317 Pronouns in Reported speech - Exercise. 2327 Reported commands - affirmative sentences - Exercise. 2329 Reported commands - negations - Exercise. 2323 Reported questions - Exercise.

  12. Grammar Exercise

    He urged me. "Don't waste your money" she said. She told the boys. "What have you decided to do?" she asked him. She asked him. "I always wake up early," he said. He said. "You should revise your lessons," he said.

  13. Reported Speech

    To change an imperative sentence into a reported indirect sentence, use to for imperative and not to for negative sentences. Never use the word that in your indirect speech. Another rule is to remove the word please. Instead, say request or say. For example: "Please don't interrupt the event," said the host.

  14. Reported Speech Exercises (With Printable PDF)

    In English grammar, reported speech is used to tell someone what another person said. It takes another person's words (direct speech) to create a report of what they said (indirect speech.) With the following direct and indirect speech exercises, it will be easier to understand how reported speech works.

  15. Reading Comprehension Activity for Reported Speech

    Reported Speech Reading Comprehension Activity. Reported speech or "reported discourse" is when an individual verbally recalls information from something they heard or read. It can be either directly quoted or indirectly conveyed and is an important aspect of communication. Using reported speech in conversations shows listening skills and ...

  16. Reported speech

    Reported speech 2. Reported requests and orders. Reported speech exercise. Reported questions - worksheet. Indirect speech - worksheet. Worksheets pdf - print. Grammar worksheets - handouts. Grammar - lessons. Reported speech - grammar notes.

  17. English Grammar Exercises for B2

    1 must take these tablets twice a day. 2 (that) he was going to the gym the next day. 3 didn't have to wait for her. 4 (that) he had taken his final exam the day before. 5 (that) he hadn't told me the complete truth. 6 (that) he'll meet me later today. 7 (that) she prefers this café to the one opposite. 8 (that) she would always remember meeting me.

  18. Reported speech exercises

    Exercises: indirect speech. Reported speech - present. Reported speech - past. Reported speech - questions. Reported questions - write. Reported speech - imperatives. Reported speech - modals. Indirect speech - tenses 1. Indirect speech - tenses 2.

  19. Reported Speech Statement Exercise

    See the Video Exercise. Convert the sentences below from direct to indirect speech (reported speech statements). 1. Lena said, "I will invite you to my birthday party.". 2. Anderson said, "I will turn twenty today.". 3. Daniel said, "Things will get better.". 4.

  20. Reported Speech (B1)

    RS008 - Reported Questions. RS007 - Reported Speech. RS006 - Reported Speech. RS005 - Reported Speech. RS004 - Reported Speech. RS003 - Reported Speech. RS002 - Reported Speech - Mixed Exercises. RS001 - Reported Speech - Mixed Exercises. Adjective and Adverbs - Downloadable PDF Worksheets for English Language Learners - Intermediate Level (B1)

  21. PDF Unit 12A Grammar: Reported Speech(1

    Transform the following sentences from direct speech into reported speech: 1. "I am always in a bad mood on Monday mornings," said Brian. 2. "They were working last week," she said. 3. "I have been to Zimbabwe," said Evelyn. 4. "Isabell will give you a lift to the airport tomorrow," he said. 5.

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    Former President Donald Trump was dealt two major setbacks Thursday in his efforts to derail the criminal cases against him, with judges in the Georgia election interference case and in the ...

  23. OpenAI built a voice cloning tool, but you can't use it… yet

    Today marks the preview debut of OpenAI's Voice Engine, an expansion of the company's existing text-to-speech API. Under development for about two years, Voice Engine allows users to upload ...

  24. Israel-Gaza latest: Protests in Tel Aviv after 'half a year of hell

    Earlier, the police reported a small group of "troublemakers" had started lighting bonfires after the demonstrations ended. 21:48:17 Protester 'punches police officer' during demonstration in Tel Aviv

  25. OpenAI Unveils A.I. Technology That Recreates Human Voices

    OpenAI unveiled Voice Engine, an A.I. technology that can recreate a person's voice from a 15-second recording. Amazon said it had added $2.75 billion to its investment in Anthropic, an A.I ...

  26. JCM

    Background: Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a hearing disorder that affects neural activity in the VIIIth cranial nerve and central auditory pathways. Progressive forms have been reported in a number of neurodegenerative diseases and may occur as a result of both the deafferentiation and desynchronisation of neuronal processes. The purpose of this study was to describe changes in auditory function ...