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Applying for Head Boy or Head Girl at School – The Comprehensive Guide

In A-Level , GCSE , General by Think Student Editor March 29, 2021 4 Comments

Up and down the country, boys and girls apply to be Head Boy and Head Girl. These roles are common in both secondary schools and sixth form colleges. Of course, there is often competition for these high positions at school, so what is the best way to apply and have a good chance at becoming Head Boy or Head Girl?  

Table of Contents

Why Would You Want  to  Be Head Boy Or Head Girl?  

So, why should you aspire to be Head Boy or Head Girl? There are so many benefits to gaining this role , and here are a few of them:  

  • This position looks great on your CV.   When you are applying for a job (especially a position of leadership), being Head Boy/Girl will show your potential employer that you have had experience in leadership and organising things. Not to mention the people skills being Head Boy/Girl will give you.   
  • Being Head Boy/Girl gives you experience in leadership and organisation –  you will most likely be asked to attend events outside of school time and play a part in organising these events too, which will give you an idea as to what it is like to have a position of leadership in the future (possibly even your career).  
  • The position usually sets your university application apart from the rest.  If you are looking to apply to university (especially Russell Group Universities), being a Head Boy/Girl shows them that you have the enthusiasm to study at their university. However, it is important to remember that being Head Boy/Girl will not guarantee your place at university – academic ability takes precedence.  It is also important to note that certain universities (including Oxford) do not look at whether you were Head Boy or Girl at all on your application.   

Think About What  the  Role May Involve  

The amount of work you are given to do as Head Boy or Girl may differ depending on your school,  and it is important to think about the responsibilities you will have to take on before you  apply.   

Head Boys and Girls tend to be involved with events which happen outside of school time such as networking events and parent’s evenings for any year group.  Being a Head Boy or Girl means that you are setting the example for the school , so you will probably be needed at open evenings for prospective students and subsequently  Year 6 induction days.  You should be willing to turn up to these events, and they should take priority over any extracurricular activities you may be a part of.  Because you are setting the example for younger students, your grades at school may play a part in whether you are picked to be Head Boy or Girl.  

As a Head Boy or Girl, you may also be required to deliver speeches to a variety of people , whether it be staff, your own year group, or those lower down the school than you.  This means that you will need at least basic public speaking skills.  

No matter where you become Head Boy or Girl, it will require dedication to what you are doing . A good Head Boy or Girl will put work into everything they organise and show enthusiasm about their role in the school.  

Before you apply for the role of Head Boy or Girl, you should have a good think about whether it is the role for you. Remember, if you decide it isn’t, there are plenty more positions you could take up which may be more suited to you with the same prestige as Head Boy or Girl.   

What Qualities Do You Need  to  Be Head Boy or Girl?  

The majority of  schools have a good idea/picture as to how they want their Head Boy and Girls to behave, and the qualities that they want them to have.  Firstly, you must be willing to take on the responsibilities that the position would involve – writing speeches, meeting new people and being there when and where you are needed.  The whole point of being a Head Boy or Girl is to take on a huge responsibility for the school, so if you are not willing, then maybe it’s not the position for you.   

One of the most important skills you need to be a Head Boy or Girl are leadership skills.  You will most likely be asked to organise events either by yourself or with the other Head Boy/Girl opposite you, and you will most definitely need resilience and management skills to do this. Of course , being Head Boy/Girl is an opportunity to work on these qualities/skills through experience,  but you must have some idea of what you are to do when you apply for the position.   

Another important skill which schools tend to look for is public speaking.  Head Boys and Girls must deliver speeches to their fellow students, as mentioned above. However, do not worry if you feel like this is a weak spot of yours – there are many ways in which you can improve your public speaking before you apply for your position.  For example,  delivering speeches to your friends or family may improve your confidence in speaking in front of people .  For some  more  ideas about how to improve your public speaking, check out  Better Public Speaking – Becoming A Confident, Compelling Speaker .   

Something which some schools may look at is your involvement with the school in general. You may want to join clubs or other extracurricular activities so that your school knows how you interact with the school as a student before you as a Head Boy or Girl.  Schools often looks for Head Boys and Girls who are very enthusiastic about school both in and out of the classroom.  

If you want to read more about the qualities that schools look for in Head Boys and Girls, I would recommend that you have a read of  this useful article , which discusses the top qualities that a Head Boy/Girl should have.   

Famous Head Boys  And  Girl s  

You may be surprised to find out that  many famous faces have been Head Boy or Girl during their time at school.   For some, it  is possible that  their position  at school  even helped them get to where they are today!  

Famous actors who have been Head Boy and Girl include  Kate Winslet  (Titanic) , Matt Smith  (Doctor Who) , Hayley Atwell  (Captain America) , Jenna Coleman  (Doctor Who)  and Christopher Eccleston  (Doctor Who) .   

Notable politicians who were Head Boy or Girl at their schools were  Jeremy Hunt, Alison McGovern and Margaret Thatcher.  

Other famous faces who were Head Boy or Girl include  J.K Rowling  (author, Harry Potter series) , Leigh-Anne Pinnock ( singer,  Little Mix), Prince Charles and Princess Beatrice.   

These all did it, and so could you!  

Tips  For  Applying For Head Boy or Girl  

Obviously,  the way in which you apply for Head Boy or Girl will determine your chance of getting the position , so it is important to really have a think through each step of the process.  The three most common application techniques for Head Boy or Girl are application letters, in-person interviews and speeches, so here are some ways in which you can polish up your skills for them.   

Effectively Compose Your Head  B oy/ G irl  Le tter  

When applying to be Head Boy or Girl in most schools, you will be asked to write a letter to  a senior staff member stating your reasons as to why you want the position.  This letter could be  written to your Head of Year, Head of Sixth Form, or even your Headteacher – it will all depend on which school you go to, so make sure you check!   

Your letter should show off examples of when you have shown the qualities which your school is looking for in their Head Students.  Perhaps you have shown teamwork skills in your sports team or have shown leadership skills when organising a charity event in the past. You should also mention how being Head Boy or Girl would benefit you personally (try not to make it sound as if you only want the position to put it on your CV). It is good to mention the experiences you are looking to gain by being Head Boy or Girl. You may also want to consider discussing the issues that you would like to face within your school, and what practical solutions you have come up with to improve them (if you are looking for ideas,  this article   could be very useful!).   

Of course,  the application letter should use accurate, good English , and you should  proofread  it multiple times.  Leaving spelling and grammar mistakes in your letter will leave a bad impression on the school  and will significantly lower your chances of being asked back for an interview. The best way to proofread your letter is to read it aloud or get your family and friends to read it  as they are more likely to spot mistakes which you might have missed.  

Most importantly, in your application letter, you should really introduce yourself to the reader. Let them know about your hobbies, interests and possible future career paths. This will bring a sense of uniqueness to your application, and make you stand out from the rest. If you don’t do this, your letter could be boring to read.   

Prepare For Your Head Boy/Girl Interview  

If your letter of application is successful, you will be asked to meet a member of staff for an interview.  This may seem nerve-wracking, especially if you are applying to be a younger Head Boy or Girl at your school, but there is no need to panic!  

You should treat this interview as you would a job interview  – following these simple rules can ensure that you appear as a worthy candidate for the role.  

  • Arrive early/on time.  Turning up late to your interview, no matter when it is, will give a bad impression of you to your interviewer. If you cannot turn up on time for your interview, then how are you going to be on time to an open evening or speech in the future? Arriving early will show preparedness for your interview and enthusiasm for the position.  
  • Dress appropriately . Again, not doing this will create a bad first impression for your interviewer. You may be asked to wear your school uniform if you have one . Make sure you have the basics covered – shirt tucked in, tie straightened, hair tidied, and shoes polished. If you are in sixth form, you should arrive in clothes which are smart, modest and not too uncomfortable – you don’t want to be distracted by your clothes while talking to your interviewer. For more information about what you should and shouldn’t wear to an interview, check out  What Should You Wear  To  A University Interview.    
  • Have a think about what you want to talk to your interviewer about  – they may ask about why you applied for the position again, and past experiences you have had with leadership and public speaking. You will most likely be discussing what you have written in your application letter, so it is important not to lie. By thinking through what you want to say beforehand, you will be giving yourself some confidence for when you walk into the interview room.   
  • Thoroughly read the email or letter about your interview . Some schools may ask you to deliver a speech to your interviewer for them to see your public speaking skills. You don’t want to turn up unprepared for something you could have made preparations for beforehand.  Read on for some tips on writing and delivering your speech.  

Write Your Head  B oy/ G irl  S peech  

You may be asked to deliver a speech either before or after you get given the role of Head Boy or Girl . As stated above, some schools get their applicants to show an example of their public speaking through them delivering a speech.   

By the time you are applying for Head Boy or Girl, you will have probably studied speech writing in your English Language classes, but here are a few tips to keep in mind when writing a speech for Head Boy or Girl.   

  • Use paragraphs . This may seem obvious, but it is a technique that many students tend to forget when coming up with a speech. Each paragraph you write should have a slightly different topic, however, these topics will of course depend on the general topic of your speech.   
  • Use anecdotes and personal experiences to make yourself more relatable to your audience.  By doing this, you are making yourself more likeable, and using an advanced literary technique at the same time.  
  • Make sure that you know exactly what your point is and what you want to convey.  There’s no use in writing a speech with no clear conclusion – you should ensure that you know exactly what you want the audience to gain from listening to you. 
  • Proofread your speech! The most important thing to ensure when writing a speech is that it makes sense – if you can’t understand your own speech, then how can you expect your audience to? You may want to ask a friend or family member to do this for you as a fresh pair of eyes often helps when spotting mistakes.
  • Practice!  It is a bad idea to turn up on the day and recite your speech for the first time. It doesn’t matter if you are memorising your speech or reading it from a script – you will need practice in delivering it. This is another good way to proofread your speech while also practicing the way you want to deliver it.  Perhaps you would like to put emphasis on certain words or phrases, or simply just need to go over it a few times to help with some tricky parts which you find difficult to read aloud.   

What If You Don’t Get It?  

If you don’t end up getting offered the position of Head Boy or Girl, then there is no reason to panic!  You will be given plenty more opportunities in the future for positions and experiences which look just as prestigious on your CV. As stated at the beginning of the article,  being Head Boy or Girl will not swing the decision of  whether or not  you get into university.  

It is also important to remember that if you are applying to be Head Boy or Girl  from Year 7 to 11, then you will most likely have another chance to apply for the position again in sixth  form  –  you could even use this time to prepare for the application process even more!  

If you are looking to apply for Head Boy or Girl, you should definitely consider the tips given in this article as they will boost your chances of being successful by a lot. Remember, there are lots of applicants for this position every year up and down the country, so you shouldn’t be hard on yourself if your application is unsuccessful. If you have applied to be Head Boy or Girl lower down the school, you can always apply again in the future for your sixth form.   

guest

i really like this . it was really creative .

Hads

When can you apply to this position? At the start of year, or during summer? Is it okay to apply in the mid term or something ?

ava

in my school they do it near the end of year 10 so around late may to early June

Montavious Jammy

Wow….this is incredibly helpful. Thank you

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Leadership Opportunities in The Sixth Form

Who can become a prefect.

Prefects are the Academy’s role models. If you are a student with an excellent record of behaviour, attendance, punctuality and dress code then you are a suitable candidate. However, please do not be put off from applying, if you are someone who has had problems previously in school but have worked through these.

You should be working with and talking to younger students, and be able to build good working relationships with staff. You should want to make a lasting impact at the Academy and be involved in decision making.

To be an effective Prefect you need to have shown leadership skills, you need to be able to use tact and diplomacy in order to deescalate tricky situations and you need to have a strong understanding of the needs of working within a community.

Why should I apply to become a Prefect?

Prefects play a crucial role in supporting and developing the work of the Academy. You will develop teamwork and leadership skills and enhance your CV and university application.

Prefect Duties

The Senior Student Leadership team meet fortnightly with the Deputy Head of Sixth Form and also attend regular meetings with the Head of The Sixth Form. They line manage the Ambassadors and devise their duties throughout the year so duties may change in response to what is needed to support the school.

It is expected that Prefects will undertake duties including the following:

  • Attending Prefect meetings organised by the Senior Student Leadership Team
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  • In due course you may also line manage a Year 12 Deputy Prefect in your area

Being a Prefect is a prestigious role and students are expected to carry it out well for the duration of the position. Students can be replaced as Prefects if they are not committed to their role.

Prefect Application Process

All students wishing to be a Prefect will be required to submit an application form outlining why they are applying for the position. All applicants will then be interviewed as part of the shortlisting process.

Students wishing to apply for Senior Student Leadership Team positions – Head Students and Deputy Head Students, will need to prepare a 2 minute presentation to the student body along with a letter of application outlining their qualities for the role and their ideas for what they would aim to achieve as part of the Senior Student Leadership Team.

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  • Mar 13, 2022

Classroom Leadership: how to effectively choose school prefects for your subject area

How to ensure you get the right subject prefects...

prefect application letter uk

School Prefects: every school seems to have them, but very few seem to have mastered the art of using them effectively. So why is this the case? And, more importantly, how can you select the ones who will save you time and improve standards? Read on to find out more...

prefect application letter uk

The Historic Problem

Time after time we've all seen the "prefect thing" become a "lip service" exercise... where students often gain the title without having to "buy in" to the expectations, or the workload.

Everyone starts out enthusiastically and with high hopes of great change, but in reality this rarely seems to happen. Prefects turn up to the expected Open Evening and dawdle about (frequently checking their watches!), and the only types of questions they ask are: 'When do you think I can go home?' or 'Are there any biscuits left?'

You might be lucky and get one or two decent prefects and you may even get a bit of a classroom display put up for you ... wonkily, but still, it counts as something. Occasionally, you may win the 'holy grail' of prefects and think 'this year we'll finally get things done'... to then have them stolen away by the allure of a better school position when everyone finally realises how good they are. (And this always seems to happen partway through the year when you thought 'all your ducks were in a row'!)

It seems that (excluding the rare exception) we never seem to get 'our money's worth' when it comes to "hiring" prefects, especially not in the long term.

So why do we even bother?

Well, aside from being directed to do this, what is in it for you? FREE TIME! That’s what’s in it for you... if you get this right. (* And obviously the satisfaction that you are nurturing the hidden leadership talents of the next generation.) But mainly free time. And you'll probably think ' Yeah, right’ , but my department are now in the fortunate position where our prefects not only save us time, but actually help us raise standards too.

It sounds so obvious, but the simple truth is that it’s all about motivation. BUT, it's not simply enough to create it… the trick is sustaining it.

What's in it for them?

Let’s face it, students need motivating factors to do pretty much anything. Some you can buy off with ‘ This will look great on your UCAS application ‘ ( Yes, that ol’ chestnut!) and others you will probably have to literally buy off… with time and biscuits… and Amazon vouchers.

This being said, everyone is motivated by something, and that something is usually success. Benjamin Ball's 'Summary of Motivational Theories’ claims that individuals want to work for an establishment where they feel they are able to make a positive difference. If this moral reason fails, then helping people to feel (and look) important can be a very effective motivational tool, too. My department sustain this sense of importance by creating a student hierarchy for our subject prefects.

prefect application letter uk

The Prefect Hierarchy

The Prefect Hierarchy follows a similar pattern to our own teacher hierarchy. Humans adhere to hierarchical constructs, hence the influence Religion, Monarchs and Politicians have always had over us... and why we try to curry favour with our line managers. Students follow a hierarchy in your own classroom with you as the leader they instinctively know they should follow.

Age and status are the two main ways of creating a strong hierarchy. As prefects are close in age, the only structure left is to create status roles within the subject prefect team. schools have been doing this with their 'Head Girl' and 'Head Boy' roles for decades, but I've rarely seen this idea filter into the subject prefect sphere.

My department aim to employ 5-6 subject prefects with the following roles:

Head Subject Prefect

Deputy Head Subject Prefect

Subject Prefect (specific role)

Subject Prefect

This year we've created a 'Head of Literacy Prefect' as this fits well with our department and school aim, but you could create subject prefects with different roles to suit your own department needs. However, be careful not to give every subject prefect a specific role otherwise you tend to get all leaders and no followers... and too many cooks tend to spoil the broth!

You also need to ensure that your 'Head Subject Prefect' is strong enough to 'rally the troops' and keep them in check, but is also kind enough to not become a power hungry dictator in your absence. Young adults are still in the process of learning to be adults, after all.

So, to choose wisely, you need a suitable application process…

prefect application letter uk

The Application Process

With more and more demand to prepare students for their future careers, treating your school prefect application process like a “real” job interview has multiple benefits:

It weeds out the unmotivated

It provides a sense of gravitas that shows students this is important to you (and so should be to them!)

It’s an opportunity for students to gain some worthwhile interview experience (which works nicely with the Gatsby benchmarks)

It means you can better sense leadership potential for creating your prefect hierarchy

We ”advertise” the posts like a proper job interview. Students are told in lessons and emailed the job posting. The post-COVID world has made this even easier with platforms, like Microsoft Teams, allowing you to set such a thing as a voluntary 'assignment'.

We give them a job description and a deadline, and expect a letter of application that details their suitability for the role(s). It's also a good idea to get them to specify the role(s) they are interested in... this really helps to 'whittle' them down for interview. Finally, we make the benefits of the roles very apparent. It's vital to make it clear what's in it for them as we want to keep motivation levels high.

prefect application letter uk

The Selection Process

Since implementing this system, we are inundated with subject prefect applications. One year we had a record 60% of our course students apply for a post... previous to this we were lucky if we got 2 applicants. However, this comes with its own problems... how do you select the right candidates for interview?

Firstly, you need to know your students. Applying for a role naturally opens you up for the possibility of rejection and that makes you very vulnerable... so managing student feedback and expectations is paramount. An innocent but flippant remark from you could really injure an applicant.

We have THREE golden rules for this:

Applicants MUST meet the deadlines and apply as requested (this instantly whittles out those who are not truly interested and applicants tend to take 'your application was too late' much better than 'we didn't feel you were suitable for interview'.

All applicants are kept confidential and are contacted separately (never as a group). This means a student has full control over whether they tell their peers or not.

Feedback must be provided following the "compliment sandwich" approach : compliment, constructive feedback, bigger compliment e.g. " We absolutely loved your energy, but we felt other candidates had more experience with running extra-curricular clubs and that’s something we really needed, however, we thought your interview answers were strong and we know that Geography are really interested in having you as a prefect".

Don't fall into the trap of interviewing everyone who applies just because you feel bad. It sends the wrong message to the stronger applicants, it wastes a lot of your time, and once people complete the interview stage they have naturally convinced themselves that they are the best person for the job. Therefore, telling them they haven't 'got the job' is much harder on them than if they aren't selected for interview in the first place. If you know it's definitely not going to work out, then don't go there.

Once we've selected students we'd like to interview, all applicants are contacted with either a 'please come to interview' or a 'thank you for applying, however...' email. The former can be very generic, however the latter I like to make more personalised and again adopt the 'compliment sandwich' approach. We tend to follow this up with a face to face conversation too.

prefect application letter uk

The Interview

Again, the interview is just like those for a professional paying job... but a little bit softer. I prefer to have two people on the interview panel - it makes sense to ask one of your main A Level teachers to get involved... to give the interview more gravitas, but also to get relevant team members invested in their prefects. For extra status, you could ask a senior leader or Head of Year to help you interview.

To help with nerves and get the interviews off to a good start, we tell students in their 'please come to interview' email what the first question will be. For us, it's always 'why did you apply for this position?' We pre-decide our questions (choose 4-6 which students can elaborate on... you don't want to be there all day!) and print out answer grids for the panel to fill in and score the answers. This is a bit of extra effort, but really helps with the selection process at the end... especially when trying to decide who to appoint for each role.

Last year 15 applied, we interviewed 10, and gave out 6 positions, and the interview answer grids made the task so much easier. It also means you can give detailed feedback if requested... and helpful constructive criticism is always greatly appreciated.

The interviews are around 10-15 minutes each and for confidentiality, I like to choose a suitable meeting room away from our subject teaching area.

Make sure you tell students when and how they will hear the outcome from you and stick to this agreement. It sounds painfully obvious, but leaving people in limbo is a really good way to pee them off… yet it happens repeatedly. Just think back to your last job interview!

prefect application letter uk

So there you have it, a strong methodology for getting the right prefects for your subject area. Check out the sister blog ' Classroom Leadership: how to effectively use your subject prefects in your subject area' for tips on how to save you time whilst raising standards.

For more useful ideas, check out our blogs on leadership and engagement.

If you have found this blog or any of its related blogs helpful, please subscribe and give us here at Inspire My Teaching a big thumbs up!

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Classroom Leadership: how to get the most out of school prefects in your subject area

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prefect application letter uk

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I am writing this letter in application for the position of Prefect and Head/Deputy Head prefect. I see this position as a central part of the schools foundations, traditions, and effective communication

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I am writing this letter in application for the position of Prefect and Head/Deputy Head prefect. I see this position as a central part of the schools foundations, traditions, and effective communication

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  • Subject English

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leading learning together at Turton

Working together to keep getting better, a heart-warming prefect application.

This half-term year 10 apply to a selection committee to be given the opportunity to become a prefect, taking over from the year 11 prefect team as they begin their GCSE exams.

This process presents an opportunity for them to write one of their first letters of application for a position. It is a time for them to reflect on their years at Turton, their achievements both in school and out and to reflect on how they now contribute to school, society and the world of work as they mature.

Reading the applications is a heart-warming process that focusses our attention onto what wonderful people our students are developing into.

Below is an example of the many thoughtful applications that make us so very proud of our young people.

Prefect Application Form

Dear Turton Prefect application team,

I would love to embark on the journey to becoming a prefect and blossom from the effects of this role. This is because Turton has done so much for me and I would love to give some of that help and understanding back to the younger years. A prefect needs to have the qualities of someone who shows confidence when representing the school that I have come to love. They also need a strong understanding of our wonderful school environment and a desire to contribute to its continuing success. I feel I have these attributes.

As my three years at Turton have played out, I have become aware of the ‘Turton Touchstones’ and how much they represent the face of our caring school. To see the good in others, to be self-aware and witness our development, to be creative via the opportunities we are presented with, to belong to a loving and caring community, to have the relationship of teacher and pupil which Turton delivers to us. These are all things we take for granted. However, I have come to terms with how important they are for us as young people to help us to mature and grow. We are given opportunities others will only dream of, clean drinking water, a free education, and (in our school) a second family. I am unable to stress just how important these things are to us, it is easy for us to go day to day without even thinking about them. Yet there are many less fortunate young people who couldn’t imagine what it would be like to witness these events. I would love to be presented with the privilege of educating the younger years about these events and why they are important

Over the course of the three years I have been at Turton, I have received some amazing help through the challenges I have faced. One of these obstacles is my speech impediment (stammer) which I have suffered with from a young age. When people were mimicking my stammer and making fun of it I turned to my parents who contacted you. Within days the problem was resolved and I was capable to speak freely and confidently. It would be a privilege to help the younger pupils overcome hurdles like my own and strive for their best confidently and freely.

For the past few months I have been volunteering at 78 th Bolton Walmsley Scout Cub group on a Monday night. I help out the three leaders organise activities and I have developed a strong bond with some of the cubs. From this experience I believe that I have learnt how to help and support these younger people. I think that I could carry out these skills to help some of the younger pupils and help them through times when they are struggling. As well as volunteering at cubs, I also volunteer after school at the school’s water polo and swimming team. I help the squad to train and set drills for them to complete, I also take one to one sessions while the others do different drills. This has given me a strong understanding on how to help and encourage younger peers. Finally, I also have a paper round. This means I get up at 05:55 Monday to Friday to deliver around fifty papers. I have learnt to work hard, be reliable and I have become a lot more motivated. I wish to pass these skills to my younger peers.

In conclusion, I feel that I would make a good prefect as I am humble, generous and kind. I feel that I’d be an asset to the prefect team and would try my hardest to become a successful figure in representing the school at events and in day to day life. I would be willing to go to events and it would be a privilege to represent the school and help the senior prefect team as well as staff. I will thrive to do my best and I hope you will accept and welcome me into your prefect team.

Yours sincerely,

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Head Student and Senior Prefect Application Letter and Form

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Home » Letters » School » Application Letter for Class Prefect – Sample Application for the Post of Class Prefect

Application Letter for Class Prefect – Sample Application for the Post of Class Prefect

Application Letter for Class Prefect – Sample Application for the Post of Class Prefect

To The Principal, ____________ (School Name) ____________ (Address of the School)

__/__/____ (Date)

Subject: Application for the class prefect

Respected Sir/Madam

This is to inform you that I am _________ (name), a student of _______ (class) of your reputed school i.e. _________ (mention school name). My student ID is ________ (mention student ID number).

I am writing this letter to inform you that I am willing to apply for the position of class prefect for our class i.e. ________ (mention class). I have been appointed as a __________ (mention) and I am requesting you to kindly consider this as an application letter for the same. ___________ (mention your achievements)

I believe you would consider this as a genuine request and would grant me a chance to be the class prefect.

Yours Truly, _____________ (Signature), _____________ (Name), _____________ (Roll number)

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COMMENTS

  1. Prefect application letter

    Prefect application letter. A. LordMasterm. Dear ____, I am writing to inform you of my application for the position of prefect. The position of prefect is a vital part of the school's anatomy, and a fantastic tradition that helps students grasp skills such as leadership, teamwork, innovative thinking and communication.

  2. Pls Help :)Senior Prefect Application Letter-->

    Hi i'm applying for senior prefect and i would like some constructive criticism to make my letter better. I welcome any changes or criticism, just please don't be rude or nasty, please and thankyou!-----> Dear _____, I am writing this letter in application for the position of Senior Prefect. The Role of Senior Prefect requires someone who shows great commitment to the school environment and ...

  3. PDF Year 11 Prefects 2022-2023

    to satisfy the requirements of the post, my Prefect status and privileges can be withdrawn. I confirm that I have discussed my application with my parents / guardians who support my application. Please enter no more than 100 words in each box. Print and return your completed form to the Prefect application box in reception by 3pm Thursday 8 ...

  4. What is a School Prefect and What Do They Do?

    What is a School Prefect? A school prefect is a n elected student who has been chosen to perform certain responsibilities, giving them some authority in school. There are several advantages that come with this position, which include a positive addition to your CV. There are multiple different categories of prefects, which will be discussed further on in th is article.

  5. Applying for Head Boy or Head Girl at School

    Most importantly, in your application letter, you should really introduce yourself to the reader. Let them know about your hobbies, interests and possible future career paths. This will bring a sense of uniqueness to your application, and make you stand out from the rest. If you don't do this, your letter could be boring to read.

  6. The March CE Primary Prefects

    The March CE Primary appoints prefects at the end of Year 5 to begin in Year 6, to undertake various roles and responsibilities around school and provides opportunities for children to act as positive role models for the other children within our school. All children are invited to apply in writing to become a prefect at the beginning of Year 6 ...

  7. Leadership Opportunities in The Sixth Form

    Supporting an assigned subject or Academy area as chosen by the Prefect on their application. Participating in a pastoral role in shorter projects, such as supporting Year 7 transition. Leading and working on Academy fundraising and charity events. Improving the Academy environment through occasional duties. Being an ambassador for the Academy ...

  8. Classroom Leadership: how to effectively choose school prefects for

    My department aim to employ 5-6 subject prefects with the following roles: Head Subject Prefect. Deputy Head Subject Prefect. Subject Prefect (specific role) Subject Prefect. Subject Prefect. This year we've created a 'Head of Literacy Prefect' as this fits well with our department and school aim, but you could create subject prefects with ...

  9. PDF Please note: Maximum 4 Junior Prefects from each House will be appointed

    Application process and job description Please note: Maximum 4 Junior Prefects from each House will be appointed. Students in Year 10 wishing to become a Junior School Prefect must apply in the Autumn Term. This involves writing a short letter of application to your Head of House, detailing why

  10. The Grange Academy

    Year 10 students, our Prefect application process is now open. For more information about how to apply, please read the following letter: https://bit.ly/3pSw4Hu. ... Email: [email protected] . Quicklinks Academy Information Parents Pupils Curriculum

  11. My Prefect Application letter~~plz help

    My Prefect Application letter~~plz help. I am writing to inform you my application for the position of Senior Prefect. The role of Senior Prefect as I can see, is an essential part of the school's system which act to help the school's community and becoming a model of the school's junior pupil, but more importantly, I see the role of ...

  12. Prefect Applications

    Prefect Application Pack. Thank you for requesting further information for the role of Prefect for 2017/18. We strive for high academic standards and we are proud of our good reputation in the local and wider community. As a Prefect, you will have the opportunity to share in the leadership of the school and it is a very prestigious responsibility.

  13. I am writing this letter in application for the position of Prefect and

    To whom it may concern, I am writing this letter in application for the position of Prefect and Head/Deputy Head prefect. I see this position as a central part of the school's foundations, traditions, and effective communication between students, teachers and the local community.

  14. leading learning together at Turton

    We would like to show you a description here but the site won't allow us.

  15. School Prefect Application Form (teacher made)

    Use this School Prefect Application Form for children to make their case and explain what skills and qualities they have for becoming a prefect. A great opportunity for persuasive writing and to help teachers choose their next prefect! ... Grammar and Punctuation Handwriting and Letter Formation Spelling Interactive English Games Assessment ...

  16. help with prefect application

    OP. 5. HighSkies. I think the whole thing is good, however instead of putting what you put above I'd advise: I would like to become a prefect as I see this is an excellent opportunity to contribute back to this school, which had supported me greatly. I think 'taken so much' sounds a bit like you've ravaged the place.

  17. Head Student and Senior Prefect Application Letter and Form

    You can tell Ofsted what you think about the school, from the quality of teaching, to dealing with bullying and poor behaviour. YOUR VIEWS

  18. Application Letter for Class Prefect

    Application Letter for Class Prefect - Sample Application for the Post of Class Prefect . September 14, 2021 May 20, 2023. ... (mention class). I have been appointed as a _____ (mention) and I am requesting you to kindly consider this as an application letter for the same. _____ (mention your achievements) I believe you would consider this as ...

  19. ...I wrote this letter to apply for senior prefects in my school... any

    Dear Headmaster: I'm writing this letter to inform you of my application for the position of Senior Prefect in the school's sixth form. I am writing this letter in application for the position of Senior Prefect. This position as I see it, is a vital part of the school's foundations as well as its tradition which acts as a helping hand to the school's community, but most ...

  20. Senior Prefect Applications

    Senior Prefect Application Form. Senior Prefect Job Description. Senior Prefect Letter. Senior Prefect Team Roles. Holy Trinity College 9-29 Chapel Street Cookstown / email: [email protected]. HOME. PARENTS.

  21. Application for Senior Prefect Position Free Essay Example

    A Manifesto on Been the Senior Prefect of Your School Pages: 3 (740 words) Prefect Application Pages: 1 (280 words) Prefect or Young Student Leader Letter Pages: 2 (358 words) An Application Letter for a Graphic Designer Internship Position Pages: 1 (290 words) Senior Citizens and Their Health Pages: 10 (2860 words)