Science of People - Logo

333 Informative Speech Topics To Rock Your Presentation

A powerful presentation covers a compelling topic that sparks your interest and hooks the audience. Use this master list to find your next great speech idea.

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter

You have been assigned a speech, presentation, or essay, but you have no clue what to talk about. A powerful presentation begins with a compelling topic that sparks your interest and hooks the audience. But you also need to discuss something you feel excited to research and discuss. 

This guide contains 333 informative speech topics for your next presentation, plus pro tips for delivering the best presentation possible.

What Is An Informative Speech?

Informative speeches aim to teach or instruct the audience about a topic. They include objective information and fact-based research but can incorporate a unique perspective, compelling storytelling , or a powerful take-home message. Unlike a celebratory wedding toast or an inaugural speech , informative speeches are written specifically to educate.

The six key types of informative speeches are: 

  • Definition speeches : This speech aims to explain a concept or theory. For example, a speech topic starting with “What is…?” is usually a definition-type informative speech. 
  • Explanatory speeches : These speeches explain how something works. For example, an explanatory speech could explain how your brain processes information or how an electric car works. 
  • Demonstrative speeches : These classic “how-to’s” show the audience how to perform a task and often include a visual presentation. For example, students could teach their classmates how to be more productive or cook a healthy meal.  
  • Comparative speeches : When a speaker compares or contrasts two alternative things, they help the audience understand the similarities or differences between two topics. For example, a comparative speech may weigh the pros and cons of private versus public schools. 
  • Descriptive speeches : This informative speech describes a person, place, or thing and explains why the subject is essential. For example, a student may teach their classmates about a historical figure, or an entrepreneur may give a descriptive speech about the specifics of their product idea.
  • Persuasive informative speeches : Although persuasive speeches are often categorized separately, some informative speeches can cross over into persuasion by using evidence to convince the audience why a particular method or perspective is better than its alternatives. For example, a salesperson may give a presentation to convince clients to buy their services, or a mental health advocate may give a speech to persuade people to do yoga more regularly. 

How To Pick An Informative Speech Topic: The Five W’s

Whether you want to give a top-notch school speech assignment or a groundbreaking TED Talk , the best informative speeches have one thing in common: they deliver a purposeful message with a captivating delivery. You must understand the basic who, what, when, where, and why to pick the perfect topic. 

  • Who: Before you start looking for topics, you should know who your audience is. A college speech class is a far different audience than a room of conference attendees. Consider what your audience is interested in, why they should care about your speech and their level of knowledge about the topic. If you talk about something too basic, they may be bored, but if you discuss something too technical, they may have difficulty understanding your speech. 
  • What: Consider your passions and existing knowledge about a subject. The “what” of your speech is the meat of the presentation. Imagine a three-circle Venn diagram. The three circles are labeled: “things I am interested in,” “things my audience cares about,” and “things I can research.” The center point where these three circles overlap is the sweet spot for your speech topic. 
  • When (Length): The length of your speech can drastically impact how in-depth you dive into the topic. A five-minute speech should cover a niche topic or a high-level concept. A thirty-minute to an hour-long presentation can teach about a more detailed topic. 
  • Where: If you’re giving a speech in a meeting room at an office, your performance will likely be very different from speaking on stage in a large auditorium. Consider where you will be speaking and what kind of technology (projector, large screen, whiteboard, etc.) you will have available. The geographic location of your speech can also determine your selection of a local or regional topic relevant to the community. 
  • Why: Most importantly, you should know the purpose of your speech. If your goal is to get a good grade, it may help you pay more attention to following the teacher’s rubric. If your goal is to convince the audience to make a lifestyle change or donate to an important cause, you should structure your speech with the core “why” in mind. 

The best speeches combine a simple message with charismatic delivery, an easily digestible structure, and something the audience can relate to. The essence of a great speech is that it arouses something in the audience, such as the motivation to take action or to see things in a new way.

List of Informative Speech Topics: 333 Ideas to Spark Your Creativity

In an informative speech, it is essential to have plenty of evidence or data to support your claims. But even the most well-researched presentation can feel hollow without the passion for delivering it authentically. 

As you explore ideas for your speech, you should naturally gravitate toward intriguing and exciting topics. Giving a speech about something you think your teacher or colleagues will like (rather than what you’re truly interested in) could ultimately be inauthentic or boring. Take note of what makes your heart beat a little faster and follow that curiosity . 

Easy Informative Speech Topics

If you’re in a pinch, choose a speech topic that doesn’t require extensive explanations to get the point across. It may be a good idea to avoid anything controversial or technical. Instead, choose a straightforward demonstrative or descriptive topic with a wide range of online information.

  • How to improve your communication skills
  • The most memorable speeches in history
  • Why you should buy an electric car 
  • The most popular cars of the year
  • How to read body language  
  • Top habits of successful people
  • The most famous actors in history
  • The benefits of time in nature
  • Lesser known presidents
  • Most popular breeds of dogs
  • The worst natural disasters in the world 
  • How to eat healthier  
  • Harmful impacts of technology
  • How to survive without electricity 
  • The richest people in the world 
  • The top companies in the world
  • Child geniuses and prodigies
  • How does sugar influence the body?
  • The history of Disneyland
  • How to break bad habits
  • Top beauty products for younger skin
  • How to do your homework faster 
  • How to be more productive  
  • High school students should do these 5 things before graduating
  • Why high school students should take a gap year before college
  • The best healthy snacks 
  • Why you should go vegan
  • How to be more confident  
  • How to start a business
  • Fashion through the decades 

Pro Tip : Start your speech with an attention-grabbing hook that draws the audience in to listen. Try not to start by mentioning a technical difficulty (“Is this microphone working?”) or saying a lackluster nicety (“Thanks for having me.”).

Instead, try starting with:

  • A story: “I’m here for a reason. And It’s an interesting story….”
  • A big idea: “The single most important thing I want to share with you today is….”
  • A quirky one-liner or interesting fact: “You might have always thought….”

Here is a guide on How to Start a Speech: Best and Worst Speech Openers . 

You can also watch our video to learn the best (and worst) speech openers:

Informative Speech Topics for College

If public speaking isn’t scary enough, college speech classes can be brutal. You want to impress your professor without thoroughly embarrassing yourself in front of your peers. These topics are scholarly without being boring. 

  • How you can reduce your carbon footprint
  • Different forms of learning
  • The truth about microplastics and possible alternatives
  • How to ace a college test 
  • Why schools shouldn’t give homework 
  • America’s fastest-growing cities
  • The differences between female and male communication
  • The best marketing tactics
  • The importance of education for a country’s economy 
  • Ethical questions of artificial intelligence
  • Unique ways to stop global climate change
  • How to live to be 100
  • Benefits of E-learning
  • History of education in America
  • How to eradicate poverty
  • The real picture of foster care in America
  • How to decide on a college major
  • Pros and cons of the current education system
  • Economics of urban versus rural development
  • The history of agriculture 
  • How ancient Egyptians built the pyramids
  • How to prevent the top 5 leading causes of death in America
  • Understanding industrial hemp
  • Pros and cons of remote work
  • How college students can become millionaires by age 50 with monthly investing
  • How to start an organic garden
  • Private vs. public school
  • The importance of discipline
  • The most useful websites for college students
  • Where does public university funding come from

Fun Informative Speech Topics

Most people don’t realize that playful topics like video games and reality TV can still be informative. These less serious subjects have the potential to become great speeches that invoke laughter, excitement, or new perspectives. 

  • Can procrastination be good for you?
  • Myth or reality? We only use 10% of our brains
  • The funniest commercials of all time
  • Bizzare sports you didn’t know existed 
  • How snake venom attacks the body
  • What will humans look like in the future? 
  • Weirdest medical facts
  • The strangest phobias 
  • Secrets to a great relationship
  • The fastest cars in the world 
  • What causes hiccups
  • Evidence of life on Mars 
  • The world history of tattoos 
  • Why college students love fast food 
  • The evolution of video games 
  • How cryptocurrency can change finance 
  • Where do stereotypes come from?
  • The most bizarre conspiracy theories 
  • The most influential musicians of our time
  • Top craziest amusement park rides in the world
  • The most fun things to do when you’re bored
  • History of tattoo art
  • The seven wonders of the world
  • How to survive an annoying roommate
  • The truth about reality shows
  • How to create a bucket list
  • The secrets behind the best TV shows 
  • Weirdest foods taste surprisingly delicious
  • How to talk to people you don’t like 

Interesting Informative Speech Topics

The most viral TED Talks combine a compelling or unique idea with exceptional nonverbal delivery. These interesting topics are sure to get your audience thinking.

  • The neuroscience of attraction
  • Mind-blowing facts about volcanoes
  • The psychology of selling things 
  • Why you should turn your lawn into a garden
  • Proof that aliens are real/fake 
  • How to start a business for under $100
  • The history of America from a minority perspective 
  • How technology affects our brains
  • What would happen to the economy if everyone grew their own food?
  • The science and ethics of genetic modification 
  • How the electric car originated 
  • Elon Musk’s rise to success 
  • What is neuro-linguistic programming (NLP)?
  • How deaf people talk with emotion 
  • Why smiles are contagious 

Informative Speech Topics About Science

From biology to chemistry to genetics, science encompasses many subjects. Where modern technology meets cutting-edge discoveries, these topics are for inquisitive researchers who want to dig into the data. 

  • How your brain works
  • History of space exploration
  • How solar panels work
  • The evolution of plants
  • Fascinating origins of plant medicines
  • How DNA evidence is used
  • How galaxies are formed 
  • How science is influenced by corporations 
  • Why dinosaurs really went extinct
  • The oldest fossils ever found 
  • How does the human brain work?
  • The effects of music on the brain  
  • The life of Albert Einstein
  • How earthquakes can be predicted
  • The craziest scientists in history
  • What is CRISPR?
  • Potential cures for cancer 
  • What is epigenetics?

Pro Tip : Google Scholar and PubMed are two excellent resources for peer-reviewed scientific literature. Accredited institutions conduct these studies and have undergone the rigor of the scientific method. They even include easy copy-and-paste citations if you need to turn in a bibliography with your speech.

Informative Speech Topics about Animals 

From cuddly pets to the alien-like mystery creatures of the deep ocean, animals are universally fascinating. 

  • How to train a dog
  • The most dangerous animals in the ocean
  • How elephants use plants to medicate themselves 
  • The science behind the fastest animals in the world
  • Can depression be treated with emotional support animals?
  • Comparing reptiles versus mammals
  • The strongest animal in the world
  • Top 10 strangest animals on Earth
  • Comparing human and primate brains
  • Animals that have their own languages
  • Ethical questions with animal testing
  • What causes animals to become extinct? 
  • How to adopt a cat
  • Pros and cons of the pet adoption system
  • Is it kind to keep a monkey as a pet?

Informative Speech Topics Sports

Fitness, sports medicine, and professional sports teams are just scraping the surface regarding this subject. You can talk about the inspiring life of your favorite player or game history. The speech topics are perfect for anyone who loves to sweat and cheer.

  • How sports teach kids discipline 
  • The importance of physical activity for stress relief
  • Why companies should promote workplace fitness programs  
  • Top-paying careers in sports 
  • How people with disabilities can still play sports
  • Football culture in the American south 
  • The importance of sports for children’s socialization
  • The role of sports and masculinity in young boys 
  • Gambling problems in sports
  • What makes a great sports coach? 
  • The best football players of all time 
  • How yoga can complement workouts
  • How to prevent sports injuries 
  • The best physical therapy for college athletes
  • The life of Michael Jordan
  • Game-changing athletes in history 
  • Lebron James’ secret to success  
  • How Jackie Robinson transformed baseball 
  • The best nutrition for athletes, based on science
  • Top vegan athletes in the world 
  • Why cheerleading is/isn’t a real sport
  • Controversial moments in the Olympics 
  • Modern controversies about transgender athletes 
  • The most extreme sports in the world
  • How hockey changed my life
  • Pros and cons of CrossFit
  • Why swimming is one of the healthiest workouts
  • How adult hobby sports can improve socialization
  • Daily exercise improves mental health 
  • The best at-home workouts
  • Top marketing strategies used by the Super Bowl
  • How the Olympics promotes international peace 
  • Should pro athletes have salary caps?
  • How college athletes go pro
  • Top female athletes in the world
  • Interesting sports from around the world
  • Why height is not the most important factor in basketball
  • Why soccer is the most popular international sport
  • Why women’s soccer gets less media coverage than men’s
  • The best solo sports for introverts 
  • How handicapped people can still play sports 
  • The most inspirational handicapped athletes 

Bonus Tip: Level Up Your Speech With Stage Presence

Did you know that public speaking is actually a skill? Many people struggle with stage anxiety because they feel they ‘missed the memo’ on public speaking or they are lacking because they do not have a natural stage presence. Not true!

Stage presence and public speaking are skills you need to be taught—very few people have them naturally. 

Watch our video to learn 7 steps to overcome stage fright and beat performance anxiety:

Here are all the aspects of public speaking you can master.

  • How to make a first impression with an audience
  • How to have stage presence
  • Powerful body language
  • How to speak with a commanding voice
  • What to do with your hands while speaking

For every speaking skill you add to your toolbox, the less speaking anxiety you will feel.

If you want help really diving into your presentation skills, be sure to sign-up for our course…

pointing in photos

Master Your People Skills

  • Create a Memorable Presence
  • Communicate with Confidence
  • Achieve Your Goals

Have a question about the presentation or People School? Email Science of People support .

Cultural Informative Speech Topics

Learning about different cultures can drastically expand your viewpoint of the world. These speech ideas cover everything from language to ancient history to pop culture. 

  • How to learn about local culture while traveling
  • The importance of workplace culture
  • How to build a positive corporate culture 
  • How social media connects and promotes culture 
  • The oldest cultures in the world 
  • Modern versus traditional gender roles 
  • How women have transformed corporate leadership 
  • The dangers of hustle culture
  • How social media culture impacts self-esteem
  • How to learn from watching movies
  • The rise of podcasts and their role in modern culture 
  • The role of social media in business 
  • How immigrants maintain cultural traditions in their new countries
  • Ancient archeological artifacts you’ve never heard of
  • Native American spiritual traditions
  • Holy herbs and plants across global cultures
  • How to make an African tribal basket
  • The portrayal of black culture in the media
  • Culture of Scandinavia
  • Burial rituals in ancient Mesopotamia 
  • History and meaning of the Om symbol
  • The history of Buddhism
  • How to show respect in Japanese culture
  • The cultural history of African Americans 
  • Chinese traditional foods 
  • Top 10 foreign dishes you have to try before you die
  • The most important spiritual symbols in the world
  • Generational differences in Mexican culture
  • The symbolism of marigolds in Mexican traditions
  • What is Dia De Los Muertos?  

Want to radically improve your presentation skills? Watch our video for 10 presentation ideas:

Informative Speech Topics About History

They say, “history repeats itself.” Consider giving a unique or lesser-known perspective about historical events for a thought-provoking speech. Use museum artifacts and first-hand accounts to guide your points. 

  • The Civil Rights Movement
  • The oldest civilizations in the world
  • Nelson Mandela’s historical impact
  • The truth about colonization and Thanksgiving 
  • How the Industrial Revolution impacted the environment 
  • The real story of the Titanic 
  • The craziest criminals in history  
  • What caused the Great Depression? 
  • What schools get wrong about black history 
  • Religion during the age of the Aztecs
  • Archeological evidence of aliens
  • Ancient history of dogs and wolves 
  • What caused the Salem witch trials?
  • The American Revolution
  • The role of Christianity in slavery
  • Human rights violations throughout history
  • How life changed for Native Americans after colonization 
  • The role of urbanization on the changing American landscape
  • The cowboy era: myths and truths 
  • The American Constitution
  • The most influential people in world history
  • Forming of the United Nations
  • What caused World War I?
  • Financial panics and recessions throughout history
  • The Prohibition era 
  • What led to consumerism in society? 
  • The Vietnam War
  • The California Gold Rush
  • The true story of Pocahontas
  • Little-known facts about Mexican history

Informative Speech Topics About Music

Music is the soundtrack to our lives. Beyond mere entertainment, its impact dives into the roots of culture, identity, and brain function. Here are some exciting ways to incorporate your love of music into an informative speech. 

  • How music can help mental health 
  • Why you should learn an instrument
  • How listening to music improves your productivity
  • Genres of music 
  • Links between classical music and IQ
  • Why do people bond over music 
  • Rarest instruments in the world
  • The easiest instruments to play
  • Best country musicians of all time
  • How hip hop music has shaped culture in America
  • Evolution of rap and hip hop 
  • The origins of rock n’ roll in southern blues music
  • The history of opera
  • The best electronic dance music
  • The impact of reggae music
  • How punk rock got its start 
  • How folk music shaped Appalachia 
  • Country music hall of fame
  • Must-see musical landmarks around the world
  • Importance of gospel music
  • The ethics of sampling other artist’s music
  • How music shapes subculture 
  • Has social media made record companies obsolete?
  • The importance of musical education in public schools
  • Music as a form of protest
  • How sad music helps you overcome heartbreaks
  • Why music shapes generations
  • How dancing can change your mindset
  • From the phonograph to iPhone: History of music machines

Health Informative Speech Topics

The ever-changing landscape of health offers a wealth of resources. Leave an impact on your audience by inspiring them to improve their eating habits or approach healthy living in a new way. Be sure to find the right sources for these speeches to make sure you are citing correct health science.

  • How to extend your lifespan 
  • Links between diet and mental illnesses 
  • How to cook healthy food on a budget 
  • Why a daily walk outside can transform your health
  • History of herbal medicine 
  • Let food be thy medicine: From Hippocrates to modern day food pyramid
  • Why you should do yoga for 15 minutes a day
  • Benefits and drawbacks of a vegetarian diet
  • The healthiest fruits in the world 
  • What is really in processed food?
  • Is weight lifting or cardio better for burning fat?
  • How agriculture affects our health
  • The gut microbiome
  • The dangers of pesticides in our food system
  • How soil health impacts human health 
  • Who controls the food system? 
  • The science behind keto diets
  • The dangers of low-fat diets
  • Top 5 best foods for brain function
  • The daily habits of the healthiest people in the world
  • Differences in definitions of health
  • European versus American food ingredients 
  • The role of fats in brain function 
  • How to fix a headache
  • The benefits of magnesium
  • The best supplements, according to science 
  • The main signs of a stroke
  • The chronic disease epidemic in America 
  • How to lose weight the healthy way
  • Why you should avoid eating seed oils
  • Why you should stop eating gluten 
  • How to prevent arthritis
  • The real causes of diabetes
  • Is meat actually bad for you? Pros and cons
  • How to stop the mental health epidemic 
  • How dental health impacts your digestion
  • Amazing benefits of black seed oil
  • The Harvard Longevity Project: Why happy people live longer
  • Ancient health remedies from around the world
  • Why you should eat fermented foods
  • Causes of cancer and how to prevent it
  • Why people should donate their organs
  • Effects of radiation
  • The healthiest cultures in the world 
  • Why obesity is a modern problem
  • How to have stronger bones
  • Healthcare access for minorities
  • Why fast food restaurants are addictive
  • Pros and cons of salt
  • How to overcome stress
  • The dangers of e-cigarettes
  • People need to drink more water
  • The insurance and healthcare system in America
  • How friendships improve your health
  • Why couples should exercise together
  • Benefits of dark chocolate
  • Dangerous food additives you’ve never heard of
  • Easy ways to improve your nutrition
  • How to reverse hair loss
  • Secrets to have healthy hair
  • Benefits and drawbacks of stem cell research 
  • Why you should stop drinking soda
  • How to reduce asthma attacks
  • Health benefits of ginger
  • Why you should drink tea

Key Takeaways: Find Inspiration for a Speech

Any informative topic can be used to craft a speech, but a showstopping presentation requires thinking outside the box and approaching your speech from a unique point of view. Before you settle on a topic for your next speech, be sure that your speech idea is:

  • Authentically interesting : Discussing something that doesn’t spark your interest is no use. Choose a topic or idea that you actually care about for an authentic and passionate delivery. 
  • Relevant to your audience : If you don’t know your audience, you might as well be speaking to a wall. Professional presenters understand the general knowledge level of their audience and what information will be valuable or interesting to them. 
  • Easy to research : Obscure topics can be alluring and challenging to research. Choose a topic that has plenty of information available in books or online. Be sure to use reputable sources and cite them when necessary.
  • The proper length : The depth and detail of your speech ultimately depend on the length of time you have to talk. Pick a subject that you can thoroughly describe in the allotted time frame.  

Once you narrow down a few of your favorite topic ideas, start brainstorming how you want your speech to impact the audience. Use these 10 Presentation Ideas That Will Radically Improve Your Presentation Skills , such as:

  • Why you should save the best for first and last
  • How to design epic presentation slides
  • Why you shouldn’t over-rehearse
  • How to own the stage 

Popular Guides

How to deal with difficult people at work.

Do you have a difficult boss? Colleague? Client? Learn how to transform your difficult relationship. I’ll show you my science-based approach to building a strong, productive relationship with even the most difficult people.

Related Articles

Science of People offers over 1000+ articles on people skills and nonverbal behavior.

Get our latest insights and advice delivered to your inbox.

It’s a privilege to be in your inbox. We promise only to send the good stuff.

Are you seeking one-on-one college counseling and/or essay support? Limited spots are now available. Click here to learn more.

126 Good Informative Speech Topics – 2024

June 23, 2024

What is an informative speech? You may be asking this question if you find yourself needing to give one for a class or extracurricular. Unlike a persuasive speech , which is designed to convince an audience of something, or a debate , which can be polemic by nature, an informative speech is meant to educate its listeners on a topic, elucidate an unclear idea, or simply help an audience delve more deeply into a subject. In other words, while informative speeches can persuade or argue, they don’t have to. In this article, we’ll highlight a few tips on how to choose good informative speech topics, and then provide a list of 126 informative speech ideas to get you brainstorming for your next big speech!

How to Choose Informative Speech Topics

Your choice of informative speech topic will depend greatly upon the task at hand: is this speech for a class? A passion project ? A campus rally? A professional development conference? Recruiting for a particular major, club, or community service organization? A high school speech competition? Once you know the purpose and parameters of your speech, it will be easier to select an informative speech topic that is an appropriate subject and size. Additionally, it’s important to consider your audience, expertise, scope, research, and tone before you delve into your writing.

Knowing your target audience is key to creating reciprocity, or the necessary give and take between speaker and listener that creates communication and understanding. Speakers who know their audiences are better able to shape their speeches to be well-received. [i] Imagine, for example, you’re giving an informative speech on “Jane Austen’s narrators.” You must ask yourself: are you giving your speech to a panel of scholars, to educated adult non-experts, or to grade school-aged children? If your audience will be comprised of literature professors, your speech should provide fairly advanced and in-depth knowledge and should be filled with the latest developments in professional literary criticism. If your audience is made up of grade school-aged children, you’ll want to start with the basics, like who was Jane Austen? And what, exactly, is a narrator?

As you give your informative speech, you’ll want to think about not only your audience’s level of expertise in your speech topic, but also your own (and it’s okay if you’re a novice in the subject!). [ii] An informative speech often includes or takes into consideration a synthesis of preexisting scholarship in a field or information around a topic. While you don’t need to apprise your audience of an entire body of research before you begin delivering your speech, you do want to have a working knowledge of the preexisting conversation around your informative speech topic. [iii] This will inform the level of research you’ll need to perform before you begin writing your speech.

In terms of selecting research sources, it’s good to remember the three P’s: peer-reviewed , published , and prestigious . A peer-reviewed source is one that has been evaluated by a group of experts in the field of the writer. It has undergone the most stringent editing and fact-checking and, when first published, is the most up-to-date information in a field. A published source is one that has also usually undergone some editing before publication – though you’ll want to be wary of self-published sources and online publications (these usually don’t receive the same kind of scrutiny as printed texts).

Finally, it’s certainly okay to use online sources, but you want to make sure they are coming from a prestigious or at least well-known source like a national newspaper or even an established commercial website. A good tip for assessing a source’s quality is to check: does this source cite any outside resources in a works cited or in footnotes?

You want to be sure that you are able to cover a topic thoroughly, given the time and resources allotted. For example, if you have five minutes to give an informative speech to your psychology 101 classmates, you could choose a general topic like, “Why was Sigmund Freud important to psychology?” If you have an hour to give an informative speech at a professional psychology conference, you might provide a detailed account of Sigmund Freud’s most important contributions to a particular branch of modern psychology and explain its current significance to the field, including recent developments in research and clinical practice.

Finally, something crucial to consider is the emotional register of your speech. Is the subject matter something serious like an illness or climate change? Or is it a politically charged topic like immigration or gun control? Is it light, like “how to make pizza dough” or “the invention of the roller coaster?” Or is it merely intriguing or educating like, “personality typing and psychology,” “owning a poodle,” or “Ben Franklin’s top five aphorisms?” Gauging the emotional involvement of your audience will help you choose an appropriate informative speech topic for the project at hand and will ultimately let you craft a more effective speech.

The 126 informative speech ideas below run the gamut from broad to very specific and can all serve as starting points as you brainstorm what you’d like to give a speech on. Good luck!

Health & Medicine Informative Speech Topics

1) Ideas on curbing the spread of future global pandemics.

2) What is the endocrine system?

3) What is a physician’s assistant?

4) The importance of blood donation.

5) Disparities in healthcare between different demographic groups.

6) How did Marie Curie contribute to the medical field?

7) What is the role of nurses in primary care settings?

8) What subspecialties are there in women’s health?

9) What recent developments have been made in knee replacement surgery techniques?

Good Informative Speech Topics/Informative Speech Ideas (Continued)

10) What is Traditional Chinese Medicine?

11) Telehealth and patient outcomes in recent years.

12) How to MRI machines work?

13) Comparing healthcare systems in different countries.

14) The five most important cancer research innovations in the past five years.

15) What is a plague?

16) How does social media affect mental health?

17) What is the World Health Organization?

18) What are the differences between a midwife and an obstetrician?

STEM Informative Speech Topics

19) What are some important differences between commercial and government-sponsored space flight programs?

20) How do rollercoasters work?

21) The relationship between AI and defense.

22) How are robots used in surgeries?

23) How do you solve a quadratic equation?

24) Why are information systems an important part of modern marketing?

25) What recent innovations have been made in the field of machine learning algorithms?

26) How has cloud computing changed in the past five years?

27) What is the role of engineers in mining and extraction?

28) What is a black hole?

29) What is internal combustion?

30) How self-driving cars work.

31) What are some differences between aeronautical and aerospace engineers?

32) What is Euclidian geometry?

33) How is probability be used in sport management?

34) Why are we running out of helium?

35) What is the relationship between cybersecurity and national politics?

36) The most important uses of 3D printing?

Arts & Humanities Informative Speech Topics

37) What are the most likely interpretations of Hamlet’s “To be or not to be?” speech ?

38) What was the Dadaism movement?

39) Why is the Mona Lisa so popular?

40) The differences between highbrow, lowbrow, and commercial cultural production.

41) What are the major tenets of postmodernism?

42) The influences of Alfred Hitchcock on modern cinema.

43) What is the difference between “performance” and “performativity?”

44) What are the differences between an early novel and a romance?

45) Recent developments in literature and ecocriticism.

46) What is the debate on the Elgin Marbles?

47) In what ways was fashion an important element of the Belle Epoch era?

48) The top five most influential texts in speculative fiction.

49) What is pop art?

50) Who was Andy Warhol?

51) What is The Iliad ?

52) Postcolonial studies as an academic field.

53) The history of the Louvre museum.

54) Jane Austen’s narrators and free indirect discourse.

Psychology and Sociology Informative Speech Topics

55) What is the Enneagram and how is it used in therapeutic settings?

56) How did Pierre Bourdieu define “fields?”

57) What is the Panopticon?

58) What is intersectionality?

59) The role of psychologists in school settings.

60) How is behavior psychology related to consumerism and marketing?

61) What is gentrification?

62) The role of the pharmaceutical industry in psychiatric treatment.

63) Who was Sigmund Freud and why is he important?

64) What is the difference between clinical and research psychology?

65) What is the relationship between social media and mental health?

66) What is neuropsychology?

67) What is an ethnographic study?

68) How did Habermas define the public sphere?

69) What is multiple personality disorder?

70) What is are the “gaze” and the “mirror stage,” according to Lacan?

71) Describe the prisoner’s dilemma.

72) What is Maslow’s hierarchy of needs?

Nature and Environment Informative Speech Topics

73) What are some pros and cons of wind farming?

74) Why are microbiomes important for health?

75) What is an axolotl?

76) Death Valley: the hottest place on Earth

77) What threats do spotted lanternflies pose?

78) What are the most significant climate change “points of no return?”

79) Water conservation strategies in the American West.

80) What is biodiversity?

81) How do dolphins communicate?

82) Why was Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring significant for the environmentalist movement?

83) How was the Santorini caldera created?

84) What are plate tectonics?

85) How and why tornadoes happen.

86) What is the El Niño phenomenon and why is it important?

87) Fungus and blue spruce disease in Northeast Ohio.

88) What measures are being taken to curb deforestation in the Amazon?

89) How is the Galapagos ecosystem preserved today?

90) Floridian ecosystems and the Red Tide.

Business, Marketing, Finance and Economy

91) The role of sports merchandising in U.S. women’s Olympic events.

92) Subprime mortgages and the housing market crash of 2008.

93) What are the eight best steps you can take to better your personal finances?

94) Which social media platforms are most lucrative for marketing to each current online generation?

95) What is inflation?

96) What is the relationship between politics and the unemployment rate?

97) What is market saturation?

98) How do we measure the GDP of emergent nations?

99) What developments to we expect to see in the industry competition between EVs and regular automobiles?

100) What is an index fund? What is a mutual fund?

101) Bond holdings late in retirement.

102) The role of social justice in branding.

103) How does search engine optimization work for marketing?

104) Is the influencer economy a bubble?

105) Describe the differences between a CFA and a CPA.

106) What developments have we seen in start-up economies in the past five years?

107) What is embezzlement?

108) What is the history of human resource departments?

History and Travel

109) The religious persuasions of each of Henry VIII’s wives .

110) How the aqueduct system worked in ancient Rome

111) What are the tallest buildings in the world?

112) What was the Black Death?

113) The Watergate Scandal.

114) In what ways was the printing press an important invention?

115) What is the Chernobyl site like today?

116) What was the relationship between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla?

117) Why was the Great Wall of China built?

118) Who were medieval anchorites?

119) The political significance of whistle-stop train tours.

120) What was the significance of the Second Boer War?

121) The Tennis Court Oath .

122) What are the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World?

123) Witch hunting in 1600s New England.

124) What was the Space Race?

125) Why are the bodies of Pompeiians preserved?

126) What is Machu Picchu?

Good Informative Speech Topics – Works Cited

[i] Lloyd-Hughes, Sarah. How to Be Brilliant at Public Speaking: Any Audience, Any Situation . Pearson Educated Limited, Edinburgh 2011.

[ii] Downs, Douglas and Elizabeth Wardle. “What Can a Novice Contribute? Undergraduate Researchers in First-Year Composition,” Undergraduate Research in English Studies (2010) pp. 173-90).

[iii] Graff, Gerard, and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing . W.W. Norton & Company, New York, 2006.

Informative Speech Ideas – Additional Reading

  • 149 Capstone Project Ideas and Examples
  • 100 Best Political Science Research Topics
  • 64 Social Issues Topics 
  • High School Success

Jamie Smith

For the past decade, Jamie has taught writing and English literature at several universities, including Boston College, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon University. She earned a Ph.D. in English from Carnegie Mellon, where she currently teaches courses and conducts research on composition, public writing, and British literature.

  • 2-Year Colleges
  • Application Strategies
  • Best Colleges by Major
  • Best Colleges by State
  • Big Picture
  • Career & Personality Assessment
  • College Essay
  • College Search/Knowledge
  • College Success
  • Costs & Financial Aid
  • Data Visualizations
  • Dental School Admissions
  • Extracurricular Activities
  • Graduate School Admissions
  • High Schools
  • Homeschool Resources
  • Law School Admissions
  • Medical School Admissions
  • Navigating the Admissions Process
  • Online Learning
  • Outdoor Adventure
  • Private High School Spotlight
  • Research Programs
  • Summer Program Spotlight
  • Summer Programs
  • Teacher Tools
  • Test Prep Provider Spotlight

“Innovative and invaluable…use this book as your college lifeline.”

— Lynn O'Shaughnessy

Nationally Recognized College Expert

College Planning in Your Inbox

Join our information-packed monthly newsletter.

  • Toastmasters →

50+ Informative Speech Topics to Engage Your Audience

informative-speech-topics

We’ve all been there, staring at a blank page or empty presentation slide, trying to think of a good, informative speech topic that will engage our audience and stop them from staring numbly at their phones. Presentations and speeches can be a difficult task to tackle, especially if you lack a solid idea to get the ball rolling. But don’t worry, we’ve got you covered! Today, we’ll dive into 50+ fresh and creative ideas for informative speech topics to help you capture your audience’s attention and give them something to engage with. Keep reading and you won’t be stuck with a dull speech topic ever again!

Interesting Informative Speech Topics

When it comes to selecting an interesting informative speech topic , there is no shortage of ideas. Choosing a topic that is engaging for both your audience and yourself can make the difference between giving a successful speech or not. There are many topics that have the potential to captivate listeners from politics to health, to relationships, and even to entertainment . The most important thing when deciding on a topic is to pick one that resonates with the interests of your audience, as well as being informative. Interesting topics should be specific enough for the speaker to cover in depth. For example, discussing the history of the American constitution would be too broad for a single speech, whereas discussing the second amendment could provide enough information for a full speech. It is also important to consider controversial topics as these can often be very interesting and engaging for listeners. When debating either side of an argument, it is important to do research and be aware of both sides of the issue. This will ensure that you are properly informed before taking part in any online debates or conversations surrounding the issue at hand. Whether you decide to discuss issues relating to current events or those that focus on more personal interest topics, there is no lack of inspiring ideas out there to create an effective informative speech. No matter what you decide, your goal should be to create an informative, engaging atmosphere that encourages others to learn from and appreciate your message.

What are some good topics for an informative speech?

1. The History of Space Exploration: Discuss the timeline from the first satellite in space to present day space exploration missions and their significance. 2. Advances in Artificial Intelligence: Examine how knowledge processing tools such as machine learning and neural networks have changed society. 3. Plastic Pollution: Outline the types of plastic pollution, explain their effects on ocean life, and provide solutions for reducing plastic waste. 4. Eating Disorders: Explain types of eating disorders, such as anorexia and bulimia, their psychological impacts, and methods of treatment. 5. Alternative Energy Sources: Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of using renewable energy sources (e.g., solar power), future potential developments, and environmental issues associated with traditional methods of generating electricity. 6. Cancer Research: Explore modern cancer detection techniques, how genetics play a role in cancer development, and advances in research leading to new treatments or cures. 7. Food Waste Reduction: Describe current levels of food waste, its environmental costs, innovative strategies being employed to reduce waste production, and practical steps individuals can take to conserve resources. 8. Online Privacy: Investigate data security threats posed by technology companies or other entities and discuss strategies for protecting personal information online. 9. Climate Change: Review current scientific evidence demonstrating the accelerating rate of global climate change, discuss possible societal implications if warming trends continue unabated, and present potential solutions that would limit global temperature increases going forward.

10. The benefits and challenges of sustainable living 11. The history and significance of the world’s ancient wonders 12. The psychology of decision making and how to improve it 13. The evolution and impact of social media on our society 14. The importance of mental health and strategies for self-care 15. The benefits and potential risks of artificial intelligence 16. The role of technology in modern education 17. The history and significance of the Olympic games 18. The science behind climate change and solutions for a sustainable future 19. The benefits and drawbacks of globalization on culture and economy. 20. The art and science of lucid dreaming and how it can be used for personal growth and problem-solving.

Popular Informative Speech Topics

When it comes to giving an informative speech, the most important thing is to pick a topic that will capture your audience’s attention. Some of the more popular topics people are interested in include those related to current events, history, media and technology, health and nutrition, psychology and education. For example, a debate surrounding current events might focus on issues such as immigration policy or global warming. When speaking about historical topics, consider discussing famous leaders or pivotal moments throughout history. If you’re looking for trending topics that are related to media, you may want to cover topics like censorship or virtual reality . When picking out health-related topics, consider exploring areas like medical cannabis or the impact of stress on our bodies. As for psychology and education, you may consider diving deeper into the role of learning styles in education or analyze the effects of bullying on adolescents. No matter what type of informative speech topic you choose to present on, be sure to do thorough research beforehand so that you can present a well-rounded argument. This will help ensure that your audience is engaged throughout your entire presentation and leave feeling informed.

Examples of Popular Informative Speech Topics

21. The history and evolution of the internet and its impact on society 22. The causes and effects of global warming and climate change 23. The importance of a healthy lifestyle and fitness 24. The benefits and drawbacks of social media on communication and relationships 25. The impact of technology on modern business and entrepreneurship 26. The history and impact of the civil rights movement in the United States 27. The effects and potential solutions to the opioid epidemic in America 28. The importance of mental health and strategies for managing stress and anxiety 29. The science behind vaccinations and their importance in public health 30. The history and cultural significance of different types of music, such as jazz, rock, and hip-hop.

Here are 10 more:

31. The benefits and potential drawbacks of renewable energy sources 32. The impact of globalization on international trade and commerce 33. The science behind space exploration and the potential for human colonization of other planets 34. The history and significance of different forms of art, such as painting, sculpture, and photography 35. The effects of social inequality and strategies for promoting diversity and inclusion 36. The history and cultural significance of different types of food, such as sushi, pizza, and tacos 37. The importance of financial literacy and strategies for managing personal finances 38. The impact of technology on the entertainment industry, such as movies, television, and video games 39. The history and significance of different world religions, such as Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism 40. The impact of artificial intelligence on the future of work and the economy.

Reasons to Give an Informative Speech

Informative speeches are often challenging and rewarding to give, as they not only require that the speaker become knowledgable about the topic at hand, but also that they also have the ability to persuade and engage with their audience. Informative speeches are essential elements in both education and industry, helping to promote engagement with a structured presentation and specialized topic or topics. On the one hand, giving an informative speech is beneficial for both the speaker and the audience being addressed. It gives the speaker an opportunity to sharpen their public speaking skills through research and careful preparation of the information being shared. Similarly, the audience members gain knowledge into a specialty field or area of interest, learning more about what they already knew or studying something completely new. Exploring abstract concepts while uncovering hidden facts can also be an invigorating experience for both parties involved in a discussion on an informative topic. However, some may argue that giving an informative speech is burdensome for the speaker for various reasons. Researching for a subject matter can prove difficult when there is limited access to factual information available online or offline. Additionally, informatic speakers must take into account the attention span of their audiences which often means having to parse down large amounts of data quickly or risk having a struggling audience lost in information overload. Despite potential obstacles associated with preparing and delivering an informative speech, opportunities abound when it comes to discovering new conversations and stimulating dialogue among participants. As such, it’s important for speakers to capitalize on these chances by researching thoroughly and honing in on key cornerstones of each topic that bring out its beauty and complexity. With this in mind, we will now move on to exploring best practices for researching an informing speech in the next section.

10 More Unique Informative Speech Topics: 41. The science and psychology of addiction and recovery 42. The history and cultural significance of tattoos in different societies 43. The benefits and challenges of homeschooling versus traditional education 44. The history and significance of different forms of dance, such as ballet, salsa, and hip hop 45. The impact of mindfulness and meditation on mental health and well-being 46. The role of music therapy in improving physical and emotional health 47. The science behind sleep and the importance of a good night’s rest 48. The history and cultural significance of different types of martial arts, such as karate, judo, and kung fu 49. The benefits and drawbacks of remote work and how it’s changing the way we work 50. The science behind alternative medicine and its effectiveness in treating different health conditions.

How to Research for an Informative Speech

When researching for an informative speech, it is important to equip yourself with accurate and trusted sources in order to effectively convey trustworthy information to your audience. It’s important to seek out authoritative sources who possess the most up-to-date details and facts about the chosen topic in order to give an informed and enlightening talk. Resources such as journals, books, websites are all valid places. For example, researching scientific topics may require more reliable resources such as scholarly articles or medical journals instead of online blog posts. It is also recommended that speakers research both sides of an argument if possible before forming their opinion and presenting it on a matter. That way you are well versed in understanding points beyond your own perspective and can provide insight into those perspectives as well. After compiling sufficient data, the next step is organizing them into a coherent message that can be easily digested by your audience. This includes preparing visual aids such as PowerPoint slides or props to both help audiences retain information better but also make the presentation more engaging than solely speaking alone. Questions throughout the presentation can also prompt your audience to become interactive while giving yourself a chance to gauge how well they understand the material presented. Now that you are armed with data from credible sources along with potential organizational tools, you are now ready for the final step which is presenting an informative speech.

How to Present an Informative Speech

When delivering an informative speech, it’s important to provide the audience with an engaging and interactive experience. To do this, speakers should focus on effective structure , clear speaking, and relevant content. Structuring an Informative Speech: Beginning with a strong introduction is essential for getting the attention of the audience. A powerful opening can be done with a joke, story, or quote. It’s also important to end the introduction with a “hook” that entices the audience to want to continue listening. The body of the speech should contain facts, evidence, and statistics to back up the content. Finally, conclude with a memorable statement that reinforces the main idea and encourages thought in the audience. Delivering an Informative Speech: When giving an informative speech, confidence is key. Strive to appear self-assured so that you can persuade your audience into listening. It’s also important to keep a steady pace while addressing the points rather than racing through them quickly – doing so will ensure that the listeners fully comprehend all of your information. Also make sure to clearly articulate each word and pause when necessary in order for certain points to set in before continuing on with other details. Utilizing Relevant Content: When selecting material for your informative speech be sure to pick topics that are not too mundane or complicated…you don’t want this presentation turn into a snooze-fest session! Keep your message lighthearted but still intriguing by offering anecdotes and examples of how this issue has been brought up in life experiences or news stories outside of its primary context. Although using humor is great for captivating an audience make sure you avoid offending anyone since this will not reflect positively on your talk. Lastly, strive to select a subject area that can prompt interesting conversations between you and your attendees. In conclusion, when crafting and delivering an informative speech remember that organization and confident delivery are two key components to getting across your message effectively. Supporting facts and data should also be included within your talk as well as relevant material related to the topic at hand which will allow listeners easily connect with what you are saying and receive value from it.

Creative Ideas to Grab the Audience’s Attention

When giving an informative speech, it is important to grab the audience’s attention right away. This can be done through creative and unique ideas that make the speech more interesting. To start, it is important to create a powerful opening by calling out common myths or misconceptions in the industry that are relevant to your topic. Focusing on one compelling fact can also help introduce the subject and get the listener engaged with your talk. Additionally, you can use personal stories or anecdotes that relate to the topic being discussed in order to draw your audience in and give them further context. Humor is also a great way to engage with an audience. Using jokes or funny stories can lighten any tense conversations and keep listeners engaged throughout the duration of the speech. By making your narrative relatable, instead of focusing on complex ideas, it will help break down difficult concepts and make people relate more closely to your experience and thoughts pertaining to the topic. A simple idea such as this could develop into an interactive experience for all in attendance. Furthermore, using visuals aids like graphics, images and videos can help tell a story for harder-to-grasp topics . This helps break up long passages of text and creates lasting impressions among viewers so they remember the points being put forth more easily. Providing visual representations from different angles of a specific concept makes abstract matters easier to comprehend since they are able to retain those visuals better than long sentences of words alone. These creative ideas should be used strategically so as not to move too far away from the main focus of an informative speech; however, they can be effective tools in engaging an audience when used correctly.

Responses to Common Questions with Explanations

How can i make an informative speech interesting.

Making an informative speech interesting starts with thoroughly researching the topic and understanding what areas of the topic will be most engaging for your audience. Take time to practice delivering the content, paying attention to how you present and pace your speech – vary the speed and style for different points in your presentation. Use humor and storytelling to liven up your delivery and make it more relatable. Incorporate visuals , as well as sound effects or music, to emphasize key points of your speech. Lastly, if you show enthusiasm when you speak and are truly passionate about what you’re presenting, that energy and emotion will be picked up on by your audience and will likely make them more engaged with your speech.

What are the best strategies for research for an informative speech?

The best strategies for research for an informative speech are to start by gathering as much reliable and accurate information as possible. It is essential to have sufficient evidence and facts to back up your claims. Therefore, begin by reading the latest reports on the topic available in books , journals, and articles. Additionally, consider conducting interviews with experts or people who can provide insight into the topic. When you’re researching, make sure you take notes accurately and quickly and that your material is properly organized for easy reference when writing your speech. Also, ensure all sources are up-to-date, credible, and unbiased. To ensure accuracy, cross-check the facts from other sources such as articles from reputable news outlets or interviews with knowledgeable professionals. Finally, anticipate counterarguments and understand different points of view that may exist about the topic. This will ensure you are able to effectively address potential debates during your presentation.

How can I effectively structure an informative speech?

When structuring an informative speech, it is important to keep in mind the goal of providing detailed and accurate information. This begins by understanding your audience and then narrowing the focus of your speech. Here are some key tips to help you effectively structure your informative speech: 1. Create an outline – Start by writing down a few main points you want to get across in your speech. Be sure you know what information each point covers and how it supports your overall message. 2. Make an introduction – Introduce yourself and the topic of your speech, as well as any relevant background information that the audience needs to understand the topic better. 3. Present facts and evidence – Use facts and evidence to support the points you make in your speech. Be sure to cite any sources used for accuracy. 4. Speak clearly – Speak at a steady pace and with a clear, strong voice so that everyone can hear you and understand what you are saying. 5. Reiterate main points – Remind the audience of the main points at least once during the speech, so that they remember them when they think back on what they have heard later on. 6. End with a summary – Summarize the main points of your speech quickly before signing off, again so that everyone remembers them before they leave the room..

Are there any tips for selecting an informative speech topic?

Yes, there are many tips for selecting an informative speech topic. First, pick something that interests you. When the topic is something that you find fascinating or enjoyable to research, it will make it easier to stay motivated while preparing your speech . Second, think of a topic that is broad enough to explore in detail but narrow enough to cover in the allotted time. If your topic is too vague or too specific, you may have difficulty finding information and sticking within the given time limit. Third, aim for a current topic so your speech remains relevant and engaging to your audience. But be sure not to go over topics that are too technical or complex—remember to keep your language accessible. Finally, do some research into any existing material available on the subject so you can avoid repeating information that has already been covered. This will also give you an opportunity to look at the different ways the subject has already been explored and form your own unique angle for presentation.

different types of informative speech topics

Logo for Maricopa Open Digital Press

7 Types of Informative Speeches

Learning Objectives

  • Distinguish types of general informative speech topics.
  • Determine an appropriate informative approach.

Informative Speeches

Now that you know the difference between informative and persuasive approaches, this chapter will explore types of topics and approaches suited well for informative speeches. Again, while any topic can be informative or persuasive, certain topics and approaches will help you to ensure you are delivering an informative speech. As you read the chapter, consider specific topics for each category that you may be able to deliver an informative speech on.

Types of Informative Speech Topics

O’Hair, Stewart, and Rubenstein identified six general types of informative speech topics: objects, people, events, concepts, processes, and issues (O’Hair, et al., 2007).

Objects: Your speech may include how objects are designed, how they function, and what they mean. For example, a student of one of our coauthors gave a speech on the design of corsets, using a mannequin to demonstrate how corsets were placed on women and the amount of force necessary to lace one up. Or you may speak about an artifact and what it means to a certain culture. For instance, the belt (and color of the belt) is significant to the karate culture.

People: People-based speeches tend to be biography-oriented. Such topics could include recounting an individual’s achievements and explaining why the person is important in history. Some speakers, who are famous themselves, will focus on their own lives and how various events shaped who they ultimately became. Dottie Walters is most noted as being the first female in the United States to run an advertising agency. In addition to her work in advertising, Dottie also spent a great deal of time as a professional speaker. She often would tell the story about her early years in advertising when she would push around a stroller with her daughter inside as she went from business to business trying to generate interest in her copywriting abilities. You don’t have to be famous, however, to give a people-based speech. Instead, you could inform your audience about a historical or contemporary hero whose achievements are not widely known.

Events: These are typically either historical or contemporary. For example, you could deliver a speech on a specific battle of World War II or a specific event that changed the course of history. If you’re a history buff, event-oriented speeches may be right up your alley. There are countless historical events that many people aren’t familiar with and would find interesting. You could also inform your audience about a more recent or contemporary event. Some examples include concerts, plays, and arts festivals; athletic competitions; and natural phenomena, such as storms, eclipses, and earthquakes. The point is to make sure that an informative speech is talking about the event (who, what, when, where, and why) and not attempting to persuade people to pass judgment upon the event or its effects.

Concepts:  Concepts are “abstract and difficult ideas or theories” (O’Hair, et al., 2007). For example, you may want to explain a specific communication theory, a religious idea, or inflation. Whether you want to discuss theories related to business, sociology, psychology, religion, politics, art, or any other major area of study, this type of speech can be very useful in helping people to understand complex ideas.

Process: A process speech helps audience members understand how a specific object or system works. For example, you could explain how a bill becomes a law in the United States. There is a very specific set of steps that a bill must go through before it becomes a law, so there is a very clear process that could be explained to an audience.

Issues: This informative speech topic is probably the most difficult for novice public speakers because it requires walking a fine line between informing and persuading. If you attempt to deliver this type of speech, remember the goal is to be balanced when discussing both sides of the issue. You are only explaining an issue, you are not proposing solutions or trying to get your audience to agree with your ideas.

If you are struggling with an informative topic, it helps to brainstorm ideas in each of these categories. Once you have a list of potential ideas, you can begin to narrow your ideas. One way to narrow your ideas is to consider the approach you will use with potential topics.

Approaches to Informative Speeches

Once you have decided on a potential topic, you can help to narrow your focus by determining an informative approach. There are three common informative approaches we will discuss in this section. Those are speeches of definition, description, and explanation.

Definitional Speeches

In definitional speeches the speaker attempts to set forth the meaning of concepts, theories, philosophies, or issues that may be unfamiliar to the audience. In these types of speeches, speakers may begin by giving the historical derivation, classification, or synonyms of terms or the background of the subject. In a speech on “How to identify a sociopath,” the speaker may answer these questions: Where did the word ‘sociopath’ come from? What is a sociopath? How many sociopaths are there in the population? What are the symptoms? Carefully define your terminology to give shape to things the audience cannot directly sense. Describing the essential attributes of one concept compared to another (as through the use of analogies) can increase understanding as well. For a speech on “Elderly Abuse,” the speaker may compare this type of abuse to a child or spousal abuse for contrast.

Regardless of the listeners’ level of knowledge about the subject, it is very important in these types of speeches to show the relevance of the topic to their lives. Often the topics discussed in definitional speeches are abstract—distanced from reality. Speakers need to provide explicit, real-life examples and applications of the subject matter to engage audience members. If you were going to give a speech about civil rights, you would need to go beyond commonly held meanings and show the topic in a new light. In this type of speech, the speaker points out the unique and distinguishing properties or boundaries of a concept in a particular context  (Rinehart, 2002). The meaning of “civil rights” has changed significantly over time. What does it mean today compared to the 1960s? How will knowing this distinction help audience members? What are some specific incidents involving civil rights issues in current news? What changes in civil rights legislation might listeners see in their lifetimes?

DEFINITIONAL EXAMPLE

Title:   “Life is suffering,” and Other Buddhist Teachings  (Thompson, 1999)

Specific Purpose:  At the end of my speech, my audience will understand the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path in Buddhism

Central Idea:  Regardless of your religious beliefs, Buddhist philosophy teaches a number of useful lessons you can apply to your own life.

  • All life involves  dukkha  (suffering)
  • Suffering is caused by  tanha  (longing for things to be other than they are)
  • If this longing stops ( nirodha ), suffering will cease
  • The way to eliminate longing is to follow the Eightfold Path
  • Right intention
  • Right speech
  • Right action
  • Right livelihood
  • Right effort
  • Right mindfulness
  • Right contemplation

Descriptive Speeches

White domed structure with four surrounding pillars against a blue sky

To gaze in wonder at that magnificent dome and elegant gardens will be a moment that you remember for the rest of your life. The Taj Mahal just takes your breath away. What is immediately striking is its graceful symmetry—geometric lines run through formal gardens ending in a white marble platform. Atop this platform is great white bulbous dome complemented by four towering minarets in each corner. The whole image shimmers in a reflecting pool flanked by beautiful gardens—the effect is magical. The first stretch by the reflecting pool is where most people pose for their photos. But we were impressed by the fresh, green gardens. As you approach through the gardens two mosques come into view flanking the Taj—both exquisitely carved and built of red sandstone.

In the descriptive speech, determine the characteristics, features, functions, or fine points of the topic. What makes the person unique? How did the person make you feel? What adjectives apply to the subject? What kind of material is the object made from? What shape is it? What color is it? What does it smell like? Is it part of a larger system? Can it be seen by the naked eye? What is its geography or location in space? How has it changed or evolved over time? How does it compare to a similar object? When preparing for the speech, try to think of ways to appeal to as many of the senses as possible. As an example, in a speech about different types of curried dishes, you could probably verbally describe the difference between yellow, red, and green curry, but the speech will have more impact if the audience can see, smell, and taste samples.

DESCRIPTIVE EXAMPLE

An enormous stone carved into a human head

Specific Purpose:  At the end of my speech, my audience will be able to visualize some of the main attractions on Easter Island.

Central Idea:  Easter Island hosts a number of ancient, mysterious, and beautiful attractions that make it an ideal vacation destination.

  • Average 13 feet high; 14 tons
  • Play sacred role for Rapa Nui (native inhabitants)
  • Central Ahu ceremonial sites
  • Snorkeling & Scuba
  • Giant crater
  • Sheer cliffs to ocean

Explanatory Speeches

An  explanatory speech (also known as a briefing) is similar to a descriptive speech in that they both share the function of clarifying the topic. But explanatory speeches focus on reports of current and historical events, customs, transformations, inventions, policies, outcomes, and options. Whereas descriptive speeches attempt to paint a picture with words so that audiences can vicariously experience it, explanatory speeches focus on the  how  or  why  of a subject and its consequences. Thus, a speaker might give a  descriptive  speech on the daily life of Marie Antoinette, or an  explanatory  speech on how she came to her death. Recall that definitional speeches focus on delineating concepts or issues. In this case, a speaker might give a  definitional  speech about the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, or an  explanatory  speech on why the financial bailout was necessary for U.S. financial stability.

If a manager wanted to inform employees about a new workplace internet use policy, s/he might cover questions like: Why was a policy implemented? How will it help? What happens if people do not follow established policies? Explanatory speeches are less concerned with appealing to the senses than connecting the topic to a series of related other subjects to enhance a deep understanding (McKerrow, Gronbeck, Ehninger, & Monroe, 2000). For example, to explain the custom of the Thai  wai  greeting (hands pressed together as in prayer), you also need to explain how it originated to show one had no weapons, and the ways it is tied to religion, gender, age, and status.

EXPLANATORY EXAMPLE

Title:   Giant Waves, Death, and Devastation: The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami  (National Geographic, 2006)

Specific Purpose:  At the end of my speech, my audience will be aware of the nature of the 2004 Tsunami and the destruction it caused.

Central Idea:  The 2004 Asian Tsunami was one of the worst natural disasters in human history in terms of magnitude, loss of human life, and enduring impact.

  • Earthquake epicenter and magnitude
  • Tsunami forms (waves reach up to 100 feet)
  • Tsunami strikes land of various countries with no warning
  • The countries and people involved
  • Loss of food, water, hospitals, housing, electricity, and plumbing
  • Threat of disease
  • Environmental destruction
  • Economic devastation
  • Psychological trauma

Setting yourself up for a successful informative speech begins in the early stages when you first start thinking about your topic. Remember to consider the type of informative speech topics and the informative approaches you can take as you are selecting a topic.

Key Takeaways

  • Six general informative speech topics are objects, people, events, concepts, processes, and issues. Use these general categories to brainstorm ideas for your upcoming informative speech.
  • Once you have decided on a potential topic, you can help to narrow down your topic by considering which informative approach you will use. Will you define, describe, or explain your topic?

Licenses and Attributions

Chapter 15 Types of Informative Speeches.  Authored by : Lisa Schreiber, Ph.D..  Provided by : Millersville University, Millersville, PA.  Located at :  http://publicspeakingproject.org/psvirtualtext.html .  Project : Public Speaking Project.  License :  CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives

Taj Mahal, Agra, India.  Authored by : Yann.  Located at :  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Taj_Mahal,_Agra,_India.jpg .  License :  CC BY-SA: Attribution-ShareAlike

Maoi at Rano Raraku.  Authored by : Aurbina.  Located at :  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Moai_Rano_raraku.jpg .  License :  Public Domain: No Known Copyright

Public Speaking Copyright © by Dr. Layne Goodman; Amber Green, M.A.; and Various is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Share This Book

Public Speaking Resources

Informative Speech Topics and Ideas: The Ultimate Guide

Before proceeding to the main topic, let us get some idea on Informative speech. Well, it is the type of speech that gives information about a particular subject to audiences.

Its main goal is to help audiences to recognize the information presented by you. Additionally, it makes a complex topic simple to understand providing different opinions and perspectives.

It also provides engaging information which is unique and desired by the audience.

Besides, informative speech can include objects, procedures, events, and other innovative ideas. This does not include the limited list as it is the topic plan that every useful speech contains. Speech can only be handy if it delivers genuine and informative information.

Informative speech describes the topic of your interest. For an instance, if you are giving an informative speech on coffee, focus on the topic.

Think about, what does coffee do, why do you love coffee, and how does it affect your health.

Also, to get rid of the health effect how much coffee do you need to drink per day. You can also conclude by summarizing all these things in a creative way. This makes your speech more interesting.

When you present, you might like to expand some topics or reduce the others. Here, you should be sensitive to your audience and think too much like this can distract the topic.

So focus on your plan and subject. Keep in mind, informative speech just to inform audiences. Do not pick up the topic based on your view as it is a convincing speech.

Remember, too much argumentative speech attempting to influence might take your audiences away.

These kinds of speech are polemical and are wrongly argumentative. You can also find places and time to make an appropriate polemical speech. But, it is not good to include it in the middle of the speech.

You can mention like “Coffee encourages me to work, giving me company during the work. I start my day with a cup of coffee.

It also inspires me to carry out research well. Yet, it can affect my health as well. So, I need to be conscious and drink coffee to the limit”. You can add more here describing different circumstances.

Table of Contents

Informative Speech Topics in History:

Informative speech topics in health and medicine:, informative speech topics in teaching, education, and students:, informative speech topics in music:, informative speech topics in food:, informative speech topics on environment:, informative speech topics in technology:, informative speech topics on economy:, informative speech topics in life:, other informative speech topics, 1. introduction, body, and conclusion, 2. clear, influential, and grabbing introduction, 3. seamless transitions, 4. do not forget to summarize at last, sample of informative speech, a) note list of wide-ranging subject area corresponding your knowledge and expertise, b) focus on the subject area relevant you don’t know yet but would love to, c) pick up the particular purpose of your speech, d) from the list of your topics, pick the one you can express clearly, a) carry out the initial research, b) think about how your research might change your topic, a) think about your audiences earlier than writing the speech, b) summarize your speech, c) elaborate the key points to make it interesting, d) write an introduction, e) write conclusion, a) make sufficient time to practice your speech, b) practice slowing down, c) if possible practice your speech with your friends, 1) make sure you do not speak fast, 2) practice speaking clearly and comprehensibly, 3) speak with your parents and friends, 4) get help from the internet, 5) carry out the outline properly, 6) understand the difference between persuasive and informative speech, 1) the audiences, 2) languages, 4) try to become clear and concise, 5) use audio or visuals if possible, informative speech topics.

Informative Speech Topics and Ideas

  • The Great Depression
  • Famous riots
  • The British Royal Family
  • Women in the military
  • Unique funeral customs across the world
  • The origin of alphabets
  • The history of tobacco use
  • The evolution of marriage
  • Top secret government experiments
  • The most fascinating accidental inventions
  • History of witchcraft
  •      The history of language
  • History of beauty products
  •  The Industrial Revolution
  • The Middle Ages
  • How did the Olympics come to be?
  • Albert Einstein’s Contributions to Science
  • Helen Keller’s Life
  • History of art and expression
  • Civil disobedience
  • Why do we celebrate Valentine’s day?
  • Where did fortune cookies come from
  • A look into World wars
  • Understanding cults
  • Evolution of comic books
  • Most exciting prison breaks of history
  • Why have street gangs been so prevalent?
  • Life and Works of Mahatma Gandhi
  • Most shocking murders the world has seen
  • Evolution of immigration in the US
  • Life and Works of Mother Teresa
  • People Who Changed the World
  • How the Earth was formed
  • How antibiotics came to be
  • The history of greyhound dogs
  • Different philosophical perspectives
  • Evolution of movies
  • How Modern art came to be
  • Understanding Millenials and Gen-Z
  • History of Superstitions
  • History of Genocide
  • Indian Culture
  • Haitian Music
  • The trucking industry
  • The 80’s: more than just denim and hairdos
  • The funniest inventions ever
  • An analysis of smoking in movies through the years
  • Women in space
  • World’s most wanted criminals
  • Most ridiculous laws throughout history
  • Medicines from nature
  • Memory loss
  • How the brain works
  • Mental illnesses
  • Fast food culture
  • Basic first aid
  • Lucid dreams
  • Organ donation
  • Medicinal properties of ginger
  • Why I am better than you: A look into Narcissistic Disorder
  •  Are home remedies actually worth it?
  • How DNA testing changed the world
  • How vitamins can enrich your everyday life
  • Why you need to stretch before your workout
  • Different personality disorders
  • The true horror of chemical warfare
  •  How makeup affects your skin
  • Birth control and its negative effects
  • Leaps made by stem cell research
  • Signs of early on-set Alzheimers
  • How vaccines work
  • How to avoid wrinkles
  • Understanding insomnia
  • Understanding addiction
  • How nicotine deteriorates your life
  • Herbs as medicine
  • Life as a child of a drug addict
  • Why do we itch?
  • Botox: the good and the bad
  • Human cadavers – history of, uses of
  • How to have a better memory
  • DNA evidence.
  • The intelligence of dolphins
  • Is dark chocolate healthy?
  • Importance of vitamins and minerals
  • Pros and cons of LASIK surgery
  • Weight Issues.
  • Teen pregnancy
  • How stress can cripple your health
  • How a vegan diet can better your life
  • Why understanding health is vital to your weight loss journey
  • Unique medical conditions
  • Crazy things people have done on an adrenaline rush
  • Why does our body crave danger?
  • How to make an income while a student
  • How to survive freshman year
  • How to take the GRE
  • How to get a student job on campus
  • How to save money while in college
  • Virtual learning and its impact on Modern Education
  • Education and its role in unemployment
  • Great vacation bargains for students
  • Ethnic diversity for a more open learning experience
  • What to do in your senior year
  • Why do you need a college degree?
  • Moving out of the dorm to an apartment off-campus
  • Freebies and discounts for students
  • How to pay off your student loans in 10 years
  • Graduation checklist
  • How to pick a major you care about
  • The evolution of testing
  • The basics of financial aid
  •  How to get that great internship
  • Current issues in education and what we can do about them
  • Basics of getting a fellowship
  • Learning disabilities teachers should be aware of
  • Banned books
  • Why travel is beneficial to education.
  • Diploma mills
  • Poverty and its impact on students
  • A look at the different testing methods
  • Online learning: A breakthrough in Modern Education
  • What to do on spring break?
  • Is homeschooling an effective learning method?
  • The history of your favorite musical group
  • How music has changed the world
  • What music has been to society
  • Classical and Modern Music: A comparison
  • The benefits of Music Therapy
  • Music and its effects on mood
  • Music and its effects on plant growth
  • Music and its effects on the psychological response of infants
  • The impact your favorite artist has had in the music world
  • The evolution of music
  • How different genres of music promote empowerment through self-expression
  • Modern earphones and tinnitus
  • Music and devotion explained through the life of an artist
  • How our brain reacts to music
  • How music can be used in rehabilitation
  • Does our music tastes define our personality?
  • What really makes a rockstar?
  • Strangest musical instruments across the world
  • Food additives: What are they and how they affect us
  • Food etiquettes across different countries
  • The food crisis
  • We are what we eat
  • Culinary modernism
  • The most exotic foods you can eat
  • Different types of coffee
  • Can peanut butter and jelly get any better than it is?
  • Understanding the food chain
  • Understanding food allergies
  •      Understanding nutrition
  • Playing matchmaker: Condiments in foods
  • Baking your own bread
  • Wedding cakes: The bigger the better?
  • How to plan a diet that works
  • How to make the perfect cocktail
  • A quick guide to wine tasting
  • Junk food: More than just a packet of chips
  • Food disorders: What we can do to help
  • What is better than sliced bread?
  • How branding is shaping our perception of food
  • Cereal, soda, and obesity
  • Eggs: the most versatile food
  • How to go green in our eating habits
  • A practical guide to balanced eating
  • Are superfoods all that they claim to be?
  • How to master herbs and spices
  • How to make your own pasta
  • How to pair your wine with your food?
  • How to plan a culinary itinerary?
  • Ocean pollution and how serious the issue has become
  • Organic agriculture: Why the switch is worth it
  • The true impact of Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
  • Pollution laws and who it is actually protecting
  • Is it over for coal?
  • Plant species that have gone extinct
  • Animal species that have gone extinct
  • Our environment is dying and here’s why
  • Water shortage across the globe
  • How much of what we eat is pesticides and insecticides?
  • Domestic wastes and how to better manage it
  • What we can do to protect our environment?
  • COVID-19 as a blessing to Mother Nature
  • How a meat-based diest impacts the environment
  • How to preserve finite resources?
  • How we are contributing to global pollution
  • How Global Warming is coming for us
  • How corporations are destroying our environment
  • Are rainforests going extinct?
  • Genetically modified crops: Boon or curse?
  • How would life adjust without electricity?
  • 3D printers have been a game-changer
  • Evolution of computer programming
  • Gadgets I love most
  • Useful websites
  • The internet as a boon or curse for human interaction
  • How Google became the widespread power that is is
  • Choosing a digital camera
  • New technologies
  • Biometrics: New development or a threat to biological data?
  • Pros and cons of going electric
  • How do 3D glasses work?
  • Violence and Video Games: Is this still a thing?
  • Evolution of content consumption
  • How to stay safe online?
  • How the content we consume makes us
  • How to start a good personal inventory
  • How search engines work
  • Social Networking
  • The Evolution of video games
  • VR gaming: Blurring the line of reality
  • The downside of smartphones
  • Pros and Cons of Smartphones
  • Is freedom of speech real over the Internet?
  • How technology has compromised our safety
  • Are blogs the new diaries?
  • How to build better credit
  • What you need to know about online banking security
  • Is your money safe?
  • Taxing the rich: Is that the solution?
  • The best investment tactics
  • How to beat the market
  • How to get a credit card
  • Price hike in the agricultural field
  • Where does our currency come from?
  • The ever-increasing cost of education
  • How education affects economy
  • Economic impacts of people growing their own foods
  •      Why you need to save money
  • How to eat well on just $5 a day?
  • The budgeting secret you’ve needed all your life
  • How to get along with your roommate
  • Some inexpensive places to take your date
  • What to do when your roommate moves out
  • Being Confident.
  • Believing in Yourself.
  • Breaking Bad Habits.
  • Being Optimistic in Life.
  • Being a Positive Talker.
  • Types of birth control
  • How to fall for the right person
  • Choosing the right tires for your car
  • How to perform a magic trick
  • How a single parent upbringing affects the child
  • How to build your own brand?
  • How to achieve Goals
  • How Does Self-motivation Work?
  • Different leadership styles and how they help employee productivity
  • Handling Responsibility
  • Importance of Discipline
  • Importance of Meditation
  • Powerful Communication
  • The most dangerous jobs
  • Should assisted suicide be legalized?
  • The secret for a lasting marriage
  • How to grow your own home garden
  • How to retain good employees
  • How to recognize toxic behaviors
  • How to master negotiations
  • Become a more persuasive speaker
  • The benefits of reading every day
  • Differences in male and female communication
  • Muscle cars
  • Antique collecting
  • Dog training
  • My first job
  • Overcoming conflict
  • Favorite place
  • My favorite food
  • Prohibition
  • Airplane stunts
  • Model railroading
  • Roadside attractions
  • Multi-Level marketing
  • Why are smiles contagious
  • Is it love or simply a habit?
  • Interesting world records
  • Favorite TV Shows
  • The Welfare system
  • City planning
  • Reality TV shows
  • Coin collecting
  • Ice cream making
  • Reality of a dream
  • What winners do to win?
  • Near-death experiences
  • The beauty of wolves
  • Funeral oration
  • Pesticide use in agriculture
  • How to change a flat tire
  • How to drive a stick shift

What to include in informative speech?

Know what to include in an informative speech.

Usually, an informative speech contains an introduction, an informative body, and a meaningful and convincing conclusion. You have to follow the format one after another.

While working on the introduction part, you have to be clean to draw the attention of the audience. Generally, an introduction is a gateway to the key points.

The way you present the introduction part of the speech can influence the audience. It should have a clear relationship between the presenter and the topic.

Add some interesting example that attracts them and does not get bored. Focusing more on the body, develop the speech. Make sure your audiences will listen with an interest from the start.

While delivering an informative speech, the body should harmonize the main points. It must also present the information. Better follow the given time limit and convey information in an understandable way. This makes the audience convenient to engage and understand.

You need to think about a comfortable and natural way of presenting the speech. This way your speech gets appreciated by the audience. Here, the presenter should reveal a vibrant interest or desire for the topic. Keep the correct eye contact. The advancement from one point to another should not look uncomfortable.

In the conclusion part, do not forget to summarize your previous points. The main goal of the conclusion is to end with the main points of the speech. This will set your information in the mind of audiences. The ending should be the medium speaker signals the speech is heading towards an end.

Besides, analyze and repeat the most projecting ideas, innovations, or features of the speech. You should conclude the speech in a similar flow used during the speech. The essential thing to note down is that ending the speech is important. It needs to take the attention of the audience until the last hour.

For your ease, here are some samples that can be helpful for efficient informative speech.

How to write informative speech?

1) pick up the the topic.

The informative speech should cover all the procedures and ideas focusing on the topic. Better to start with a larger image and convincing points that you are confident to speak on.

For an instance, work on the subjects that you usually do or love to do. You can also include the activities that you have been practicing for years. The more you understand the topic, the easier it will be to carry out the useful speech.

Spend some time on the speech that builds up the confidence to deliver the speech. Prepare and come with a long-tail list. This benefits you with more choices to improve the speech that you love to present.

For example, if you like traveling, you might have lots of interesting travel experiences. You will feel comfortable speaking on that topic. Also, you love researching more on the topic of your interest.

Better include these kinds of topics in the list of your subject area. For an instance, you can say that you want to become a tech blogger. But you might not know much about the subject.

You can show it, saying you need to research more on the topic to pursue your aim. This makes your speech and subject influential.

First of all, find out the time you take to cover the topic and focus on completing the speech within the allocated time.

Pick up the particular purpose of the speech to direct the attention of your audience.

Think about making your speech influential. Only delivering the important speech is not going to help to attract your audiences.

Delivering the thing that your audiences already know might bore them. So make it interesting including the practical things and add your experience as well.

Be precise with the topic, do not move away from the topic. Suppose, you are speaking on the National animal of a country.

Focus on the topic of national animals, do not divert your speech explaining more about the country. Your speech may look meaningless.

Deep research and understanding of the topic make your speech more remarkable and appealing.

Better focus on a particular topic that you can express without too much work. If you try to speak about an unfamiliar topic, you might be in trouble later. Better pick up the topic workable for you to speak.

2) Research on the topic

One of the rules to write an informative speech is -Know your subject. Carry out your research with proper understanding and honesty. You can do this by utilizing trustworthy resources to write the notes.

While gathering research elements, divide the resources that you will use in the speech. Also, try to learn more about the subject area related to the topic. You may have to respond to the queries about the speech topic. Better learn the things that are helpful to answer the queries.

For an instance, you are speaking about European culture. If the audience asks about it, you should be smart enough to answer to the query.

Once you complete your research, find something new that makes your speech more effective. Instead of ignoring it, take some time to prepare it.

When preparing an informative speech on social media, you understand different things during the research. You may find the research on Social media Myth more interesting. If you have more confidence to speak on the social media myths, you can pursue it. You have done lots of research that makes you able to deliver the speech in an interesting way.

3) About writing the speech

It is ideal to expect your audiences are a little familiar with your topic. Keeping in mind, you may still deliver the background information of the related topic. Beware of the shortcuts you use while explaining the topic. Until your task says otherwise, do not rush to clarify anything.

Nobody desires to know about the actors and actresses when you are giving a speech in the movie. You do not need to provide lots of background information as they are already familiar with the topic.

List out the information you are willing to include and keep it in logical order. To carry out how to informative speech, including the reason for what you are doing and how you do it will be fine.

For example, if your speech is on preparing hamburgers, you should explain every step you carry out. Additionally, do not forget to explain how you use the ingredient for the perfect result. This makes your speech interesting.

Better elaborate on the main points to make your informative speech more interesting and informative. The common method to carry out the speech is to emerge with the key points. These key points for a speech should be in sequential order or spatial order.

This procedure helps to give a useful, informative, and engaging speech. For an instance, start the speech on My trip to Lumbini with a short introduction of Lumbini. Then, your experience while visiting Lumbini and conclude with summarizing them.

The introduction is the main gateway to your speech. It should take the attention of audiences and let them understand what you are talking about. Usually, if your speech is long or complicated, make sure to provide the points you aim to cover.

Better start the speech with interesting jokes or quotes related to your topic. Make sure you will not speak out of the topic. This will be useful to build a strong connection between your speech and the audience. Yet, it might go wrong if you prefer unpleasant statements or meaningless jokes.

For an instance, starting the speech as “I just came from the universe” might sound weird. This can make your speech boring and unimpressive. Better try some relevant sentences and speech.

The conclusion should sum up the key points of your speech. Better conclude the speech with your opinion. The audience usually remembers the first and last things they hear.

Thus, be sure, you are in the right sequence to deliver your message to your audiences. It will help to start and conclude your speech with some essential memorizing messages.

Attempt to put your conclusion into the introduction. Emerging with a complete circle provides will make your speech in the heart of your audience.

For an instance, you used some precise jokes or quotes making the speech impressive. If your movie speech started with a story about an actor struggling to make his career.  

It might sound useless and inappropriate with the topic. So, talk about the thing that is necessary and appropriate.

4) Practicing your speech

Practice makes us perfect so make enough time to practice your speech. Include or cut off the points as necessary.

Try completing your speech in the precise time. Even if you are not assigned the time limitation, do not make the speech long and boring. You might not know this while delivering the speech. Better think about it earlier than you give the speech.

If you are speaking for some event, be sure that it does not cross the time limitation. Audiences might get your speech boring if you take a too long time or you may have to end with an incomplete speech. So, be sure that it works according to the time.

While presenting in a mass of people, you might f try to end the speech instantly. You may also speak quickly and in that way, audiences might not understand you.

To be sure the audiences enjoy what you present, attempt to slow down. Better use, video recorder while practicing. This way you can analyze your speech by yourself. It will be effective if you point out the mistakes and work to fix that.

Try to include dramatic pauses to make your speech more attractive. Dramatic pauses can strike a particular bit of information providing the audience time to reflect.

Best speakers use them carefully with great consequence. You have to be alert about the list of information. Make some time to practice after you list out the information.

You might be nervous to present in front of a huge mass of people. So, try practicing in front of your friend. This makes you able to build confidence.

Being nervous will mess up your speech. Better prepare well by working with your friends. Get feedback from them as an audience and work on the drawbacks. If you go with the wrong plan then recover from the mistake. This gives you the strength to deliver an interesting speech.

So, these are some effective ways to write informative speeches. Following these points will help to deliver an interesting speech.

Tips for Informative Speech

Now, let us proceed towards the tips to make your informative speech more efficient

While presenting in front of lots of people, it is likely to get nervous. When you get nervous, you try to complete the speech by talking quickly.

This might make the speech confusing and unimpressive. Think about it, while practicing try to slow down and make your speech clear and loud.

Even if you are good at writing the speech, it will not be effective unless you speak clearly. If you mumble while speaking, it might sound unclear. So, practice more and more until you speak clearly and comprehensibly.

You are most likely good at informative speech but you might not realize that. You can speak with your parents and friends about different topics of your interest. This builds up your confidence to speak in public.

If you are having a problem deciding on the topic of your speech, get help from the internet. There, you can find lots of websites with a list of prospective and interesting topics.

Or else, you can also think about the time you spend the most. For an instance, you spend most of your time cooking.  Talk about cooking the dishes that you are proficient at.

Your outline plays a significant role to help you take your speech in an organized way. Yet, you should not take it lightly.

When you work on the speech, you might get that some points mentioned in the outline is unnecessary. You can add essential points and remove the points which you do not need. As outline helps to find necessary points, do it properly.

Persuasive and informative speeches are two different things. You should know that. Persuasive speech is convincing while informative speech gives information about a particular topic.

Simple ways to approach an informative speech

Think about your audience. This is the most challenging as the speaking circumstances, forums, and topics can vary. Before presenting the speech, analyze who your audiences are? Why are they present in your speech? Focusing on these details, you can explore the best ways to present your speech.

If you are speaking about lung cancer, you should know its basics as well. Some audiences might not understand the depth.

So start your speech from the basics. Do not presume that audiences are familiar with the background of your topic. Again, do not assume they do not know. This is the main reason, knowing the audience is essential. Besides, it depends on the situation of the speech.

Use proper language. Speak the language that audiences desire to listen to. You deliver the speech with the goal to provide useful information to the audience.

If audiences do not understand what you speak, the speech becomes useless. The main target of an informative speech is to give knowledge about a particular topic.

If you can explain well the topic in simple language better use it. Try to make the speech simple and understandable.

Do not rush to complete the speech quickly. Instead, think about educating your audiences with your speech. Explain the term if necessary.

Understanding the time flow of the speech will be helpful to make your speech effective. Speakers should create a link between their topic and the interest of audiences.

Here describe the significance of the topic. Also, express the main points with some interesting examples and quotes.

A speaker confessing their own experience encourages the audiences to share the same interest.

To become a good speaker, you have to be clear and concise at first. Spend lots of time on simple concepts instead of the harder ones.

Since giving many examples to prove a single point might not work well. This way your audiences may find your speech boring.

Better, explore some new ideas and prepare the topic well. Try to provide detailed information. Most of the audience gets influenced by details and descriptive presentation.

Try practicing using audio or visuals if possible. They help to find out your mistake. You can improve after you know where the mistake is.

Additionally, informative speech can be effective with demo presentation and visual support. So, using them properly helps to deliver your speech in a proper way.

The above-mentioned topics and tips for informative speech should help you prepare and deliver a powerful informative speech. If you have any suggestions or feedback, please let me know in the comment below.

Informative Speeches — Types, Topics, and Examples

What is an informative speech.

An informative speech uses descriptions, demonstrations, and strong detail to explain a person, place, or subject. An informative speech makes a complex topic easier to understand and focuses on delivering information, rather than providing a persuasive argument.

Types of informative speeches

The most common types of informative speeches are definition, explanation, description, and demonstration.

Types of informative speeches

A definition speech explains a concept, theory, or philosophy about which the audience knows little. The purpose of the speech is to inform the audience so they understand the main aspects of the subject matter.

An explanatory speech presents information on the state of a given topic. The purpose is to provide a specific viewpoint on the chosen subject. Speakers typically incorporate a visual of data and/or statistics.

The speaker of a descriptive speech provides audiences with a detailed and vivid description of an activity, person, place, or object using elaborate imagery to make the subject matter memorable.

A demonstrative speech explains how to perform a particular task or carry out a process. These speeches often demonstrate the following:

How to do something

How to make something

How to fix something

How something works

Demonstrative speeches

How to write an informative speech

Regardless of the type, every informative speech should include an introduction, a hook, background information, a thesis, the main points, and a conclusion.

Introduction

An attention grabber or hook draws in the audience and sets the tone for the speech. The technique the speaker uses should reflect the subject matter in some way (i.e., if the topic is serious in nature, do not open with a joke). Therefore, when choosing an attention grabber, consider the following:

What’s the topic of the speech?

What’s the occasion?

Who’s the audience?

What’s the purpose of the speech?

Attention grabbers/hooks

Common Attention Grabbers (Hooks)

Ask a question that allows the audience to respond in a non-verbal way (e.g., a poll question where they can simply raise their hands) or ask a rhetorical question that makes the audience think of the topic in a certain way yet requires no response.

Incorporate a well-known quote that introduces the topic. Using the words of a celebrated individual gives credibility and authority to the information in the speech.

Offer a startling statement or information about the topic, which is typically done using data or statistics. The statement should surprise the audience in some way.

Provide a brief anecdote that relates to the topic in some way.

Present a “what if” scenario that connects to the subject matter of the speech.

Identify the importance of the speech’s topic.

Starting a speech with a humorous statement often makes the audience more comfortable with the speaker.

Include any background information pertinent to the topic that the audience needs to know to understand the speech in its entirety.

The thesis statement shares the central purpose of the speech.

Demonstrate

Include background information and a thesis statement

Preview the main ideas that will help accomplish the central purpose. Typically, informational speeches will have an average of three main ideas.

Body paragraphs

Apply the following to each main idea (body) :

Identify the main idea ( NOTE: The main points of a demonstration speech would be the individual steps.)

Provide evidence to support the main idea

Explain how the evidence supports the main idea/central purpose

Transition to the next main idea

Body of an informative speech

Review or restate the thesis and the main points presented throughout the speech.

Much like the attention grabber, the closing statement should interest the audience. Some of the more common techniques include a challenge, a rhetorical question, or restating relevant information:

Provide the audience with a challenge or call to action to apply the presented information to real life.

Detail the benefit of the information.

Close with an anecdote or brief story that illustrates the main points.

Leave the audience with a rhetorical question to ponder after the speech has concluded.

Detail the relevance of the presented information.

Informative speech conclusion

Before speech writing, brainstorm a list of informative speech topic ideas. The right topic depends on the type of speech, but good topics can range from video games to disabilities and electric cars to healthcare and mental health.

Informative speech topics

Some common informative essay topics for each type of informational speech include the following:

Informative speech topics
What is the electoral college? Holidays in different cultures/different countries Best concert Bake a cake
What is a natural disaster? Cybersecurity concerns Childhood experience Build a model (airplane, car, etc.)
What is the “glass ceiling?” Effect of the arts Day to remember Build a website
What is globalization? How the stock market works Dream job Apply for a credit card
What is happiness? Impact of global warming/climate change Embarrassing moment Change a tire
What is humor? Important lessons from sports Favorite place Learn an instrument
What is imagination? Influence of social media and cyberbullying First day of school Play a sport
What is love? Social networks/media and self-image Future plans Register to vote
What is philosophy? Evolution of artificial intelligence Happiest memory Train a pet
What was the Great Depression? Impact of fast food on obesity Perfect vacation Write a resume

Informative speech examples

The following list identifies famous informational speeches:

“Duties of American Citizenship” by Theodore Roosevelt

“Duty, Honor, Country” by General Douglas MacArthur

“Strength and Dignity” by Theodore Roosevelt

Explanation

“Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” by Patrick Henry

“The Decision to Go to the Moon” by John F. Kennedy

“We Shall Fight on the Beaches” by Winston Churchill

Description

“I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Pearl Harbor Address” by Franklin Delano Roosevelt

“Luckiest Man” by Lou Gehrig

Demonstration

The Way to Cook with Julia Child

This Old House with Bob Vila

Bill Nye the Science Guy with Bill Nye

Logo for M Libraries Publishing

Want to create or adapt books like this? Learn more about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices.

16.2 Types of Informative Speeches

Learning objectives.

  • Identify several categories of topics that may be used in informative speaking.
  • Describe several approaches to developing a topic.

A man tutoring a woman while using a dry-erase board

Erica minton – Late Night Dry Erase Board Session – CC BY-NC 2.0.

For some speakers, deciding on a topic is one of the most difficult parts of informative speaking. The following subsections begin by discussing several categories of topics that you might use for an informative presentation. Then we discuss how you might structure your speech to address potential audience difficulties in understanding your topic or information.

The term “objects” encompasses many topics we might not ordinarily consider to be “things.” It’s a category that includes people, institutions, places, substances, and inanimate things. The following are some of these topics:

  • Mitochondria
  • Dream catchers
  • Hubble telescope
  • Seattle’s Space Needle
  • Silicon chip
  • Spruce Goose
  • Medieval armor
  • DDT insecticide

You will find it necessary to narrow your topic about an object because, like any topic, you can’t say everything about it in a single speech. In most cases, there are choices about how to narrow the topic. Here are some specific purpose statements that reflect ways of narrowing a few of those topics:

  • To inform the audience about the role of soy inks in reducing toxic pollution
  • To inform the audience about the current uses of the banned insecticide DDT
  • To inform the audience about what we’ve learned from the Hubble telescope
  • To inform the audience about the role of the NAACP in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • To describe the significance of the gigantic Spruce Goose, the wooden airplane that launched an airline

These specific purposes reflect a narrow, but interesting, approach to each topic. These purposes are precise, and they should help you maintain your focus on a narrow but deep slice of knowledge.

This category applies both to specific individuals and also to roles. The following are some of these topics:

  • Dalai Lamas
  • Tsar Nicholas II
  • Modern midwives
  • Catherine the Great
  • Navajo code talkers
  • Mahatma Gandhi
  • Justice Thurgood Marshall
  • Madame Curie
  • Leopold Mozart
  • The Hemlock Society
  • Sonia Sotomayor
  • Jack the Ripper

There is a great deal of information about each one of these examples. In order to narrow the topic or write a thesis statement, it’s important to recognize that your speech should not be a biography, or time line, of someone’s life. If you attempt to deliver a comprehensive report of every important event and accomplishment related to your subject, then nothing will seem any more important than anything else. To capture and hold your audience’s interest, you must narrow to a focus on a feature, event, achievement, or secret about your human topic.

Here are some purpose statements that reflect a process of narrowing:

  • To inform the audience about the training program undergone by the first US astronauts to land on the moon
  • To inform the audience about how a young Dalai Lama is identified
  • To inform the audience about why Gandhi was regarded as a mahatma, or “great heart”
  • To inform the audience about the extensive scientific qualifications of modern midwives

Without a limited purpose, you will find, with any of these topics, that there’s simply too much to say. Your purpose statement will be a strong decision-making tool about what to include in your speech.

An event can be something that occurred only once, or an event that is repeated:

  • The murder of Emmett Till
  • The Iditarod Dogsled Race
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • The discovery of the smallpox vaccine
  • The Bikini Atoll atomic bomb tests
  • The Bay of Pigs
  • The Super Bowl
  • The Academy Awards

Again, we find that any of these topics must be carefully narrowed in order to build a coherent speech. Failure to do so will result in a shallow speech. Here are a few ways to narrow the purpose:

  • To explain how the murder of Emmett Till helped energize the civil rights movement
  • To describe how the Industrial Revolution affected the lives of ordinary people
  • To inform the audience about the purpose of the Iditarod dogsled race

There are many ways to approach any of these and other topics, but again, you must emphasize an important dimension of the event. Otherwise, you run the risk of producing a time line in which the main point gets lost. In a speech about an event, you may use a chronological order , but if you choose to do so, you can’t include every detail. The following is an example:

Specific Purpose: To inform the audience about the purpose of the Iditarod dogsled race.

Central Idea: The annual Iditarod commemorates the heroism of Balto, the sled dog that led a dog team carrying medicine 1150 miles to save Nome from an outbreak of diphtheria.

Main Points:

  • Diphtheria broke out in a remote Alaskan town.
  • Dogsleds were the only transportation for getting medicine.
  • The Iditarod Trail was long, rugged, and under siege of severe weather.
  • Balto the dog knew where he was going, even when the musher did not.
  • The annual race commemorates Balto’s heroism in saving the lives of the people of Nome.

In this example, you must explain the event. However, another way to approach the same event would describe it. The following is an example:

Specific Purpose: To describe the annual Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

Central Idea: It’s a long and dangerous race.

  • The 1150-mile, ten- to seventeen-day race goes through wilderness with widely spaced checkpoints for rest, first aid, and getting fresh dogs.
  • A musher, or dogsled driver, must be at least fourteen years old to endure the rigors of severe weather, exhaustion, and loneliness.
  • A musher is responsible for his or her own food, food for twelve to sixteen dogs, and for making sure they don’t get lost.
  • Reaching the end of the race without getting lost, even in last place, is considered honorable and heroic.
  • The expense of participation is greater than the prize awarded to the winner.

By now you can see that there are various ways to approach a topic while avoiding an uninspiring time line. In the example of the Iditarod race, you could alternatively frame it as an Alaskan tourism topic, or you could emphasize the enormous staff involved in first aid, search and rescue, dog care, trail maintenance, event coordination, financial management, and registration.

Concepts are abstract ideas that exist independent of whether they are observed or practiced, such as the example of social equality that follows. Concepts can include hypotheses and theories.

  • The glass ceiling
  • Ethnocentrism
  • Honor codes
  • Fairness theory
  • The American Dream
  • Social equality

Here are a few examples of specific purposes developed from the examples:

  • To explain why people in all cultures are ethnocentric
  • To describe the Hindu concept of karma
  • To distinguish the differences between the concepts of wellness and health
  • To show the resources available in our local school system for children with autism
  • To explain three of Dr. Stephen Suranovic’s seven categories of fairness

Here is one possible example of a way to develop one of these topics:

Specific Purpose: To explain why people in all cultures are ethnocentric.

Central Idea: There are benefits to being ethnocentric.

  • Ethnocentrism is the idea that one’s own culture is superior to others.
  • Ethnocentrism strongly contributes to positive group identity.
  • Ethnocentrism facilitates the coordination of social activity.
  • Ethnocentrism contributes to a sense of safety within a group.
  • Ethnocentrism becomes harmful when it creates barriers.

In an example of a concept about which people disagree, you must represent multiple and conflicting views as fully and fairly as possible. For instance:

Specific Purpose: To expose the audience to three different views of the American Dream.

Central Idea: The American Dream is a shared dream, an impossible dream, or a dangerous dream, depending on the perspective of the individual.

  • The concept of the American Dream describes a state of abundant well-being in which an honest and productive American can own a home; bring up a family; work at a permanent, well-paying job with benefits; and retire in security and leisure.
  • Many capitalists support the social pattern of working hard to deserve and acquire the material comforts and security of a comfortable life.
  • Many sociologists argue that the American Dream is far out of reach for the 40 percent of Americans at the bottom of the economic scale.
  • Many environmentalists argue that the consumption patterns that accompany the American Dream have resulted in the depletion of resources and the pollution of air, water, and soil.

If your speech topic is a process, your goal should be to help your audience understand it, or be able to perform it. In either instance, processes involve a predictable series of changes, phases, or steps.

  • Soil erosion
  • Cell division
  • Physical therapy
  • Volcanic eruption
  • Paper recycling
  • Consumer credit evaluations
  • Scholarship money searches
  • Navy Seal training
  • Portfolio building
  • The development of Alzheimer’s disease

For some topics, you will need presentation aids in order to make your meaning clear to your listeners. Even in cases where you don’t absolutely need a presentation aid, one might be useful. For instance, if your topic is evaluating consumer credit, instead of just describing a comparison between two different interest rates applied to the same original amount of debt, it would be helpful to show a graph of the difference. This might also be the sort of topic that would strongly serve the needs of your audience before they find themselves in trouble. Since this will be an informative speech, you must resist the impulse to tell your listeners that one form of borrowing is good and another is bad; you must simply show them the difference in numbers. They can reach their own conclusions.

Organizing your facts is crucially important when discussing a process. Every stage of a process must be clear and understandable. When two or more things occur at the same time, as they might in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, it is important to make it clear that several things are occurring at once. For example, as plaque is accumulating in the brain, the patient is likely to begin exhibiting various symptoms.

Here’s an example of the initial steps of a speech about a process:

Specific Purpose: To inform the audience about how to build an academic portfolio.

Central Idea: A portfolio represents you and emphasizes your best skills.

  • A portfolio is an organized selection containing the best examples of the skills you can offer an employer.
  • A portfolio should contain samples of a substantial body of written work, print and electronically published pieces, photography, and DVDs of your media productions.
  • A portfolio should be customized for each prospective employer.
  • The material in your portfolio should be consistent with the skills and experience in your résumé.

In a speech about the process of building a portfolio, there will be many smaller steps to include within each of the main points. For instance, creating separate sections of the portfolio for different types of creative activities, writing a table of contents, labeling and dating your samples, making your samples look attractive and professional, and other steps should be inserted where it makes the most sense, in the most organized places, in order to give your audience the most coherent understanding possible.

You’ve probably noticed that there are topics that could be appropriate in more than one category. For instance, the 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helen’s could be legitimately handled as an event or as a process. If you approach the eruption as an event, most of the information you include will focus on human responses and the consequences on humans and the landscape. If you approach the eruption as a process, you will be using visual aids and explanations to describe geological changes before and during the eruption. You might also approach this topic from the viewpoint of a person whose life was affected by the eruption. This should remind you that there are many ways to approach most topics, and because of that, your narrowing choices and your purpose will be the important foundation determining the structure of your informative speech.

Developing Your Topic for the Audience

One issue to consider when preparing an informative speech is how best to present the information to enhance audience learning. Katherine Rowan suggests focusing on areas where your audience may experience confusion and using the likely sources of confusion as a guide for developing the content of your speech. Rowan identifies three sources of audience confusion: difficult concepts or language, difficult-to-envision structures or processes, and ideas that are difficult to understand because they are hard to believe (Rowan, 1995). The following subsections will discuss each of these and will provide strategies for dealing with each of these sources of confusion.

Difficult Concepts or Language

Sometimes audiences may have difficulty understanding information because of the concepts or language used. For example, they may not understand what the term “organic food” means or how it differs from “all-natural” foods. If an audience is likely to experience confusion over a basic concept or term, Rowan suggests using an elucidating explanation composed of four parts. The purpose of such an explanation is to clarify the meaning and use of the concept by focusing on essential features of the concept.

The first part of an elucidating explanation is to provide a typical exemplar, or example that includes all the central features of the concept. If you are talking about what is fruit, an apple or orange would be a typical exemplar.

The second step Rowan suggests is to follow up the typical exemplar with a definition. Fruits might be defined as edible plant structures that contain the seeds of the plant.

After providing a definition, you can move on to the third part of the elucidating explanation: providing a variety of examples and nonexamples. Here is where you might include less typical examples of fruit, such as avocados, squash, or tomatoes, and foods, such as rhubarb, which is often treated as a fruit but is not by definition.

Fourth, Rowan suggests concluding by having the audience practice distinguishing examples from nonexamples. In this way, the audience leaves the speech with a clear understanding of the concept.

Difficult-to-Envision Processes or Structures

A second source of audience difficulty in understanding, according to Rowan, is a process or structure that is complex and difficult to envision. The blood circulation system in the body might be an example of a difficult-to-envision process. To address this type of audience confusion, Rowan suggests a quasi-scientific explanation, which starts by giving a big-picture perspective on the process. Presentation aids or analogies might be helpful in giving an overview of the process. For the circulatory system, you could show a video or diagram of the entire system or make an analogy to a pump. Then you can move to explaining relationships among the components of the process. Be sure when you explain relationships among components that you include transition and linking words like “leads to” and “because” so that your audience understands relationships between concepts. You may remember the childhood song describing the bones in the body with lines such as, “the hip bone’s connected to the thigh bone; the thigh bone’s connected to the knee bone.” Making the connections between components helps the audience to remember and better understand the process.

Difficult to Understand because It’s Hard to Believe

A third source of audience confusion, and perhaps the most difficult to address as a speaker, is an idea that’s difficult to understand because it’s hard to believe. This often happens when people have implicit, but erroneous, theories about how the world works. For example, the idea that science tries to disprove theories is difficult for some people to understand; after all, shouldn’t the purpose of science be to prove things? In such a case, Rowan suggests using a transformative explanation. A transformative explanation begins by discussing the audience’s implicit theory and showing why it is plausible. Then you move to showing how the implicit theory is limited and conclude by presenting the accepted explanation and why that explanation is better. In the case of scientists disproving theories, you might start by talking about what science has proven (e.g., the causes of malaria, the usefulness of penicillin in treating infection) and why focusing on science as proof is a plausible way of thinking. Then you might show how the science as proof theory is limited by providing examples of ideas that were accepted as “proven” but were later found to be false, such as the belief that diseases are caused by miasma, or “bad air”; or that bloodletting cures diseases by purging the body of “bad humors.” You can then conclude by showing how science is an enterprise designed to disprove theories and that all theories are accepted as tentative in light of existing knowledge.

Rowan’s framework is helpful because it keeps our focus on the most important element of an informative speech: increasing audience understanding about a topic.

Honesty and credibility must undergird your presentation; otherwise, they betray the trust of your listeners. Therefore, if you choose a topic that turns out to be too difficult, you must decide what will serve the needs and interests of the audience. Shortcuts and oversimplifications are not the answer.

Being ethical often involves a surprising amount of work. In the case of choosing too ambitious a topic, you have some choices:

  • Narrow your topic further.
  • Narrow your topic in a different way.
  • Reconsider your specific purpose.
  • Start over with a new topic.

Your goal is to serve the interests and needs of your audience, whoever they are and whether you believe they already know something about your topic.

Key Takeaways

  • A variety of different topic categories are available for informative speaking.
  • One way to develop your topic is to focus on areas that might be confusing to the audience. If the audience is likely to be confused about language or a concept, an elucidating explanation might be helpful. If a process is complex, a quasi-scientific explanation may help. If the audience already has an erroneous implicit idea of how something works then a transformative explanation might be needed.
  • Choose a topic such as “American Education in the Twenty-First Century.” Write a new title for that speech for each of the following audiences: financial managers, first-year college students, parents of high school students, nuns employed in Roman Catholic schools, psychotherapists, and teamsters. Write a specific purpose for the speech for each of these audiences.
  • Think about three potential topics you could use for an informative speech. Identify where the audience might experience confusion with concepts, processes, or preexisting implicit theories. Select one of the topics and outline how you would develop the topic to address the audience’s potential confusion.

Rowan, K. E. (1995). A new pedagogy for explanatory public speaking: Why arrangement should not substitute for invention. Communication Education, 44 , 236–249.

Stand up, Speak out Copyright © 2016 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Share This Book

  • Games, topic printables & more
  • The 4 main speech types
  • Example speeches
  • Commemorative
  • Declamation
  • Demonstration
  • Informative
  • Introduction
  • Student Council
  • Speech topics
  • Poems to read aloud
  • How to write a speech
  • Using props/visual aids
  • Acute anxiety help
  • Breathing exercises
  • Letting go - free e-course
  • Using self-hypnosis
  • Delivery overview
  • 4 modes of delivery
  • How to make cue cards
  • How to read a speech
  • 9 vocal aspects
  • Vocal variety
  • Diction/articulation
  • Pronunciation
  • Speaking rate
  • How to use pauses
  • Eye contact
  • Body language
  • Voice image
  • Voice health
  • Public speaking activities and games
  • About me/contact

Informative speech examples

4 types of informative speeches: topics and outlines

By:  Susan Dugdale  | Last modified: 08-05-2023

The primary purpose of an informative speech is to share useful and interesting, factual, and accurate information with the audience on a particular topic (issue), or subject.

Find out more about how to do that effectively here. 

What's on this page

The four different types of informative speeches, each with specific topic suggestions and an example informative speech outline: 

  • description
  • demonstration
  • explanation

What is informative speech?

  • The 7 key characteristics of an informative speech

Image - Label: 4 Informative speech example outlines: definition, description, explanation, demonstration

We all speak to share information. We communicate knowledge of infinite variety all day, every day, in multiple settings.

Teachers in classrooms world-wide share information with their students.

Call centers problem solve for their callers.

News outlets (on and offline) issue reports on local, national and international events and issues, people of interest, weather, traffic flow around cities...

Health care professionals explain the treatment of addictive behaviors, the many impacts of long Covid, the development of new treatments...

Specialist research scientists share their findings with colleagues at conferences.

A pastry chef demonstrates how to make perfect classic croissants.

The range of informative public speaking is vast!  Some of us do it well. Some of us not so well - largely because we don't fully understand what's needed to present what we're sharing effectively. 

Return to Top

The key characteristics of an informative speech

So, what are the key characteristics or essential elements, of this type of speech? There are seven.

1. Objectivity

The information you give is factual, neutral and objective. You make no attempt to persuade or push (advocate) a particular viewpoint.

Your personal opinions: feelings thoughts, or concerns about the topic you're presenting are not given. This is not a persuasive speech.

As an example,  here's an excerpt from a Statistics Department report on teenage births in New Zealand - the country I live in.

Although it's a potentially a firecracker subject: one arousing all sorts of emotional responses from outright condemnation of the girls and their babies to compassionate practical support, the article sticks to the facts. 

The headline reads: "Teenage births halved over last decade"

"The number of teenage women in New Zealand giving birth has more than halved over the last decade, Stats NZ said today.

There were 1,719 births registered to teenage women (those aged under 20 years) in 2022, accounting for around 1 in every 34 births that year. In 2012, there were 3,786 births registered to teenage mothers, accounting for around 1 in every 16 births that year."

For more see: Statistics Department NZ - Teenage births halved over last decade 

You present your information clearly and concisely, avoiding jargon or complex language that may confuse your audience.

The candidate gave a rousing stump speech , which included a couple of potentially inflammatory statements on known wedge issues .

If the audience is familiar with political jargon that sentence would be fine. If they're not, it would bewilder them. What is a 'stump speech' or a 'wedge issue' ?

Stump speech: a candidate's prepared speech or pitch that explains their core platform.

Wedge issue: a controversial political issue that divides members of opposing political parties or the same party.

For more see: political jargon examples

3. Relevance

The content shared in your speech should be relevant and valuable. It should meet your audience's needs or spark their curiosity.

If the audience members are vegetarians, they're highly unlikely to want to know anything about the varying cuts of beef and what they are used for.

However, the same audience might be very interested in finding out more about plant protein and readily available sources of it.  

4. Organizational pattern

The speech should have a logical sequential structure with a clear introduction, body, and conclusion.

If I am giving a demonstration speech on how to bake chocolate chip cookies, to be effective it needs to move through each of the necessary steps in the correct order.

Beginning with how to spoon the mixture on to the tray, or how to cool the cookies on a wire rack when you've taken them out of the oven, is confusing.   

5. Research and credibility

Informative speeches are based on thorough research and reliable sources to ensure accuracy and credibility. And sources need to be properly cited.

My friend told me, my mother says, or I saw it on Face Book is neither authoritative nor enough. ☺

Example: My speech is on literacy rates in USA. To be credible I need to quote and cite reputable sources.

  • https://www.apmresearchlab.org/10x-adult-literacy
  • https://www.thinkimpact.com/literacy-statistics/

6. Visual aids

Slides, charts, graphs, or props are frequently used to help the audience fully understand what they're being told.

For example, an informative speech on the rise and fall of a currency's daily exchange rate is made a great deal easier to follow and understand with graphs or charts illustrating the key points.

Or for a biographical speech, photos of the person being talked about will help hold the attention of your audience.  

7. Effective delivery

To be effective your speech needs to be delivered in a way that captures and hold the audience's attention. That means all aspects of it have been rehearsed or practiced. 

If you're demonstrating, you've gone through every step to ensure you have the flow of material right.

If you're using props (visual aids) of any sort you've made sure they work. Can they be seen easily? Do they clearly illustrate the point you're making?

Is your use of the stage (or your speaking space) good? Does your body language align with your material? Can your voice be heard? Are you speaking clearly? 

Pulling together a script and the props you're going to use is only part of the task of giving a speech. Working on and refining delivery completes it.

To give a successful speech each of these seven aspects needs to be fine-tuned: to hook your audience's interest, to match their knowledge level, your topic, your speech purpose and, fit within the time constraints you've been given.

Types of informative speeches

There are four types of informative speeches: definition, description, explanation and demonstration. A speech may use one, or a mix of them.

1. Informing through definition 

An informative speech based on definition clearly, and concisely, explains a concept * , theory, or philosophy. The principal purpose is to inform the audience, so they understand the main aspects of the particular subject being talked about.

* Definition of concept from the Cambridge dictionary - an  abstract principle or idea 

Examples of topics for definition or concept speeches

A good topic could be:

  • What is global warming?
  • What are organics?
  • What are the core beliefs of Christianity?
  • What is loyalty?
  • What is mental health?
  • What is modern art? 
  • What is freedom?
  • What is beauty?
  • What is education?
  • What are economics?
  • What is popular culture?

These are very broad topic areas- each containing multiple subtopics, any of which could become the subject of a speech in its own right. 

Example outline for a definition or concept informative speech

Speech title:.

What is modern art?

- people who want an introductory overview of modern art to help them understand a little more about what they're looking at - to place artists and their work in context 

Specific purpose:

- to provide a broad outline/definition of modern art 

Image: The Scream - Edvard Munch Text: What is modern art? An example outline for a concept or definition informative speech

Modern art refers to a broad and diverse artistic movement that emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and continued to develop throughout the 20th century. 

It is characterized by a radical departure from traditional artistic styles and conventions and encompasses a wide range of artistic styles, techniques, and media, reflecting the cultural, social, and technological changes of the time.

Key characteristics or main points include:

  • Experimentation and innovation : Modern artists sought to break away from established norms and explore new ways of representing the world. They experimented with different materials, techniques, and subjects, challenging the boundaries of traditional art forms.
  • Abstraction : Modern art often features abstract and non-representational elements, moving away from realistic depictions. Artists like Wassily Kandinsky and Piet Mondrian explored pure abstraction, using shapes, lines, and colors to convey emotions and ideas.
  • Expression of the inner self : Many modern artists aimed to convey their inner emotions, thoughts, and experiences through their work. This led to the development of various movements like Expressionism (See work of Evard Munch) and Surrealism (See work of Salvador Dali). 
  • Rejection of academic conventions : Artists sought to break free from the rigid rules of academic art and embrace more individualistic and avant-garde approaches. For example: Claude Monet, (1840 -1926) Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Édouard Manet
  • Influence of industrialization and urbanization : The rapid changes brought about by industrialization and urbanization in the 19th and 20th centuries influenced modern art. Artists were inspired by the dynamics of the modern world and its impact, often negative, on human life. 
  • Multiple art movements : Modern art encompasses a wide array of movements and styles, for example Cubism, Futurism, Dadaism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art... Each movement brought its own unique perspective on art and society.
  • Focus on concept and process : Modern artists began to emphasize the underlying ideas and concepts behind their work, giving greater importance to the creative process itself. 

Modern art should not be confused with contemporary art. While modern art refers specifically to the artistic developments of the early to mid-20th century, contemporary art encompasses art created by artists living and working in the present day. The transition from modern art to contemporary art happened around the late 20th century- 1950s onward.

References:

  • mymodernmet.com/abstract artists
  • differencess.com/expressionism vs surrealism
  • lorimcnee.com/artists who died without recognition
  • industrial revolution the influence on art
  • mymodernmet.com/important art movements
  • theartstory.org/conceptual-art
  • Image: The Scream, Edvard Munch  

2. Informing through description

Informing through description means creating detailed, vivid verbal pictures for your audience to make what you're talking about come to life in the minds of those listening which in turn, will make your subject matter memorable.

Examples of good informative speech topics that could be used for descriptive speeches

  • How I celebrate Christmas
  • My first day at school
  • My home town
  • A time I feared for my life
  • A time when I felt contented and happy

My first car

  • An object I find fascinating: lotus shoes, bustles, corsets, panniers (These are historical items of women's clothing.)
  • Working from home: the joys, the hazards
  • My dream home, job, or holiday
  • An event I'll never forget
  • The most valuable or interesting thing I own
  • Martin Luther King, Benjamin Franklin, President Lincoln... a notable person from the past or present, including someone you may know: a family member, friend or yourself, or a public figure (an artist, singer, dancer, writer, entrepreneur, inventor...)

Example outline for a descriptive informative speech

- to take the audience with me back to the time when we bought our first car and have them appreciate that car's impact on our lives 

Central idea:

Our Austin A50 was a much-loved car

Image: Austin A50 advertising picture Text: Austin A50 Cambridge - the car that gives you more

About the car:

- English, Austin A50, 1950ish model - curvy, solid, a matron of cars

Background to purchase:

  • 1974 - we were 20 and 21 - young and broke
  • The car cost $200 - a lot of money for me at that time. I raided my piggy bank to buy it.
  • It was a trade up from the back of the motorbike - now I could sit side by side and talk, rather than sit behind and poke my husband, when I wanted to say important things like, 'Slow down', or 'I'm cold'. The romance of a motorbike is short-lived in winter. It diminishes in direct proportion to the mountain of clothes needing to be put on before going anywhere - coats, scarf, boots, helmet... And this particular winter was bitter: characterized by almost impenetrable grey fog and heavy frosts. It was so cold the insides of windows of the old house we lived in iced up.
  • It was tri-colored - none of them dominating - bright orange on the bonnet, sky blue on the rear doors and the roof, and matt black on the front doors and the boot. (Bonus - no one would ever steal it - far too easily identified!)
  • The chrome flying A proudly rode the bonnet.
  • The boot, (trunk lid) was detachable. It came off - why I can't remember. But it needed to be opened to fill the tank, so it meant lifting it off at the petrol station and leaning it up against the boot while the tank filled, and then replacing it when done.
  • There were bench seats upholstered in grey leather (dry and cracked) front and back with wide arm rests that folded down.
  • The windows wound up and down manually and, in the rear, there were triangle shaped opening quarter-windows.
  • The mouse-colored lining that had been on the doors and roof was worn, torn and in some patches completely missing. Dust poured in through the crevices when we drove on the metal roads that were common where we lived.
  • It had a column gear change - 4 gears, a heater that didn't function, proper old-school semaphore trafficators indicators that flicked out from the top of the door pillars and blinked orange, a clutch that needed a strong push to get it down, an accelerator pedal that was slow to pick up and a top speed of around 50 mph. 

Impact/benefits:

We called her Prudence. We loved, and remember, her fondly because:

  • I was taught to drive in her - an unforgettable experience. I won the bunny hopping record learning to coordinate releasing the clutch and pressing down on the accelerator. Additionally, on metal roads, I found you needed to slow before taking corners. Sliding on two wheels felt precarious. The bump back down to four was a relief.  
  • We did not arrive places having to disrobe - take off layers of protective clobber.
  • We could talk to each without shouting and NOW our road trips had a soundtrack - a large black portable battery driven tape player sat on the back parcel shelf blasting out a curious mix of Ry Cooder, Bach, Mozart's Flute Concerto, Janice Joplin... His choice. My choice. Bliss.
  • My father-in-law suggested we park it down the street rather than directly outside his house when we visited. To him Prudence was one eccentricity too many! An embarrassment in front of the neighbors. ☺
  • austinmemories.com/styled-33/styled-39/index.html
  • wikipedia.org/Austin_Cambridge
  • archive.org/1956-advertisement-for-austin-a-50

3. Informing through demonstration

Informing through demonstration means sharing verbal directions about how to do a specific task: fix, or make, something while also physically showing the steps, in a specific chronological order.

These are the classic 'show-n-tell', 'how to' or process speeches.

Examples of process speech topics:

  • How to bake chocolate chip cookies
  • How to use CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) correctly
  • How to prepare and plant a tub of vegetables or flowers
  • How to read a topographic map
  • How to make a tik-tok reel
  • How to knit a hat

How to brainstorm material for a speech

For literally  100s more demonstration topic ideas

A demonstrative informative speech outline example

To demonstrate the brainstorming process and to provide practical strategies (helpful tips) for freeing and speeding up the generation of ideas

Main ideas:

Understanding brainstorming - explanation of what brainstorming is and its benefits

Preparing for brainstorming - the starting point - stating the problem or topic that needs brainstorming, working in a comfortable place free from distractions, encouraging open-mindedness and suspension of judgment.

Techniques for brainstorming : (Show and tell on either white board or with large sheets of paper that everyone can see) mind mapping, and free writing. Take topic ideas from audience to use.

Example : notes for maid of honor speech for sister

Example of brainstorming notes - free writing - ideas for a maid of honor speech for my sister

Benefits : Demonstrate how mind maps can help visually organize thoughts and connections, how free writing allows ideas to flow without stopping to judge them

Encourages quantity over quality - lots of ideas - more to choose from. May generate something you'd never have thought of otherwise.

Select, refine, develop (show and tell) 

For more see: brainstorm examples

4. Informing through explanation 

Informing through explanation is explaining or sharing how something works, came to be, or why something happened, for example historical events like the Civil War in the United States. The speech is made stronger through the use of visuals - images, charts of data and/or statistics.

Examples of explanatory informative speech topics

  • How did the 1919 Treaty of Versailles contribute to the outbreak of World War Two?
  • What led to The American Civil War (April 12, 1861 – May 26, 1865)?
  • Why is there an increase in type two diabetes and problems associated with obesity in first world countries, for example, in UK and USA?
  • How do lungs work?
  • What causes heart disease?
  • How electric vehicles work?   
  • What caused the Salem witch trials?
  • How does gravitation work?
  • How are rainbows formed?
  • Why do we pay taxes?
  • What is cyberbullying? Why is it increasing?

Example explanatory informative speech outline

The Treaty of Versailles: how did it contribute to the outbreak of World War Two

Image: Signing The Treaty of Versailles 1919 - dignitaries gather in the Hall of Mirrors, Palace of Versailles to sign the treaty, June 28, 1919

- to explain how the Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a significant causal factor leading up World War two

Central ideas:

Historical context : World War One, 'the war to end all wars' ended in 1918. The Allied Powers: USA, UK, France, Italy and Japan, met in Paris at the Paris Peace Conference 1919 to work out the details and consequences of the Treaty of Versailles, which would impact the defeated Central Powers, principally Germany. 

These included:

  • territorial boundary changes which stripped Germany of land in Europe, and established new nations - e.g. Poland and Czechoslovakia
  • military restrictions - the disarmament of the German military, restrictions on weapons and technology, demilitarization of the Rhineland
  • reparations - demands that they were unable to meet, plus being forced to accept a "war guilt" clause (Article 231) had an enormous impact, economically and psychologically. The country plunged into deep recession - albeit along with many other countries. (The Great Depression 1929-1939 which ended with the beginning of World War Two.)

The League of Nations - The League of Nations was an international diplomatic group developed after World War I as a way to solve disputes between countries before they erupted into open warfare. Despite being active in its set up, USA refused to join it - a stance that weakened its effectiveness.

Controversies within Germany: Public anger and resentment, plus political instability as result of reparations, territory loss and economic hardships

Controversies with Treaty partners: The Treaty's perceived fairness and effectiveness: Italy and Japan felt their settlements were inadequate compared to what had been taken by UK, USA and France.

The rise of 'isms'   Simmering discontent eventually emerged as the rise of Fascism in Italy, Nazism in Germany and Statism (a mix of nationalism, militarism and “state capitalism”) in Japan.

Expansionist Nationalism Spread of expansionist nationalism - a state's right to increase its borders because it is superior in all ways. Therefore, Hitler was 'right' to take back what had previously been regarded as German territory (Czechoslovakia and Austria), and to go after more, all the while goading the Allied Powers to act. When his armies went into Poland, Britain declared war against Germany - 21 years after the end of the last.

  • history.com/treaty-of-versailles-world-war-ii-guilt-effects
  • tinyurl.com/Treaty-of-Versailles
  • Image:  tinyurl.com/signing-Treaty-of-Versailles

speaking out loud 

Subscribe for  FREE weekly alerts about what's new For more see  speaking out loud  

Susan Dugdale - write-out-loud.com - Contact

Top 10 popular pages

  • Welcome speech
  • Demonstration speech topics
  • Impromptu speech topic cards
  • Thank you quotes
  • Impromptu public speaking topics
  • Farewell speeches
  • Phrases for welcome speeches
  • Student council speeches
  • Free sample eulogies

From fear to fun in 28 ways

A complete one stop resource to scuttle fear in the best of all possible ways - with laughter.

Public speaking games ebook cover - write-out-loud.com

Useful pages

  • Search this site
  • About me & Contact
  • Blogging Aloud
  • Free e-course
  • Privacy policy

©Copyright 2006-24 www.write-out-loud.com

Designed and built by Clickstream Designs

different types of informative speech topics

April 9, 2024

100+ Ideas for informative speech topics 

Easy, fun, and educational ideas and inspiration for your next informative speech. Check out these starter topics and example presentations

different types of informative speech topics

Co-founder, CEO

An informative speech topic should captivate and educate your viewers. Likewise, you should take pleasure in delivering and discussing the subject matter.

However, choosing a subject that resonates with your audience and aligns with your interests at the same time can be overwhelming.  

To give you some inspiration, we’ve done the legwork and compiled 110 ideas for informative speech topics. The first 100 are categorized by difficulty, while the last 10 are more on the entertaining side (though with plenty of educational value).

For your convenience, we’ve even given you hints on how to structure your speech and presentation for each of the topics below, along with a topic selection guide and advice for making an effective presentation.  

25 Ideas for easy informative speech topics

different types of informative speech topics

These ideas are for simple yet educational and thought-provoking topics you can use for speeches in middle school, or high school, or to practice public speaking at your Toastmasters club. These topics don’t demand exhaustive research, but you’ll want to spruce your slides up with exciting visuals and keep the speaking points short to engage your audience. 

1. How electric cars work 

Electric cars are in higher demand and more accessible than ever before, but how they work remains a mystery to many — especially to your middle or high school peers. Load your slide deck with images of these cars’ key components. Explain how they work using short bullets, then compare and contrast their operation with that of their gas-fueled counterparts.  

2. Most popular sports around the world 

Most of us view baseball as a distinctly American pastime, but did you know that it’s the most popular sport in Japan, Taiwan, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic? There are plenty of such surprises in the world of sports, so this topic is bound to excite and inform in a school setting. Organize the deck by sport for a short, impactful presentation, and pack each slide with relevant statistics. 

3. Tips for healthy eating 

Inspire your audience to pursue a better diet with basic, practical advice on healthy foods and meal plans. You’ll have to do a bit of research, and the nutrition guidelines from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) are a credible — source of information. Beyond focusing on the nutritious value of different foods, be sure to include sample recipes and meal plans anyone can follow. And don’t forget to enliven the presentation with colorful images! 

4. Healthiest desserts you can make 

Show your viewers some healthy alternatives to the sugar-laden and ultra-processed treats that occupy most supermarket shelves. Dig up some recipes (lots are available online) and ensure that each slide has an appetizing image of the treat along with ingredients and truncated preparation steps. Be ready to explain why each of your chosen desserts is healthy — for example, is it made without sugar, with wholewheat flour, or using a notably nutritious ingredient? 

5. How to improve your sleep 

Advice on improving the length and quality of sleep is a helpful topic for almost any audience — sleep is a vital part of healthy living, and most of us don’t get enough of it. Dedicate each of your slides to a specific habit that enhances sleep hygiene and use images that show the behavior in action. Share some statistics on how each habit impacts sleep quality. 

6. Mac vs PC comparison: what’s the best computer? 

Mac and PC users often clash over which computer and operating system is best, so use your speech to present factual arguments for and against each contender. Slides with screenshots showing the best and worst features of each machine will serve as an effective visual aid. To engage your audience further, build a discussion section into your presentation and let your viewers present and debate their opinions. 

7. iOS vs Android: which smartphone operating system is best?

Comparing two of the world’s most prominent mobile operating systems is bound to stir some debate among your viewers — each likely has one of these devices in their pocket and is probably ready to opine on its superiority. Your job is to educate your audience on the capabilities and known shortfalls of each system so that they can make an informed opinion. Leave some room for discussion as you conclude the presentation to keep your audience absorbed until the end.  

8. Basics of personal finance 

Learning (or brushing up on) healthy financial habits is a useful exercise for anyone, including you — the presenter. The subject matter may be a bit dry for younger viewers, so equip your slide deck with visual content that’s relevant and captivating. Instead of using piggy bank stock images, find YouTube videos of people sharing their experience with a specific money habit. A quick Q&A session at the end of your speech will also give younger viewers ask you questions about concepts they didn’t grasp. 

9. Worldwide weather patterns and their causes 

An informative speech about the earth’s weather patterns and their causes will fascinate viewers of all ages. After all, weather is a topic that permeates our daily lives, but few of us understand the forces that shape it. Focus your speech on meteorological trends that change with seasons and explain what drives them. Maps that show changing weather conditions are effective visuals to use in your speech. 

10. Types of weather phenomena 

Hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts, and atmospheric rivers are weather phenomena worth learning about as their pace and intensity quickens due to climate change. An informative speech on these meteorological events should discuss their characteristics, causes, any relevant statistics, and resilience tips for the populations they affect. 

11. The greatest natural disasters of all time 

Humans have an innate interest in catastrophes, so an educational speech on the world’s greatest natural disasters is bound to captivate your audience. However, to make your presentation informative, don’t rely on the shock value of disaster photographs alone. Focus on facts — causes, characteristics, casualties, and resilience measures being taken to mitigate the impact of natural calamities in the future. 

12. How to prepare a 72-hour survival kit 

Floods, wildfires, hurricanes, and earthquakes can displace entire cities at a moment’s notice, so knowing how to pack a survival kit is an essential life skill — and an excellent speech topic. Base your presentation on FEMA’s guidelines for gathering an emergency preparedness kit. Go beyond listing items and teach your audience how to use them through images and instructional videos embedded in your slides. 

13. First aid skills everyone should know

First aid saves lives, so basic first responder techniques are an excellent educational speech topic for any audience. At the very minimum, let your speech cover the fundamentals of CPR, choking aid, and wound care, but feel free to expand the topicality if you’re experienced in the subject matter. Instructional videos are the most handy visual aid since they show the steps for performing various life-saving procedures.  

14. How to live off the grid

Living off the grid is a fun and informative speech topic that centers on a popular ongoing trend. Teach your audience how to live off the land with slides that explain how to meet basic necessities like food, shelter, water, and heat without relying on modern facilities. Images and videos (or even interviews) of successful off-grid dwellers will serve as effective visual aids.  

15. Basics of home gardening

Teach the aspiring gardeners in your audience the basic skills of growing plants at home. An informative speech on the fundamentals of home gardening should discuss vital elements such as lighting, irrigation, humidity, ambient air temperatures, and ways of preventing and controlling plant diseases. If you spell out specific gardening techniques, demonstrate them to your viewers by embedding relevant instructional videos in your slides.  

16. Best plants to decorate your home 

Show your viewers the ideal plants for incorporating into a home’s decor. This should be a largely visual presentation, with slides depicting different plant species and their integration into a home’s interior design. Getting these visuals right may take some time, effort, and even Photoshop skills if available stock images don’t show the right plant in the right setting. Prepare good notes to explain why you’ve chosen these plants.  

17. Wonders of architecture: world’s most unusual buildings

The world’s most unusual buildings make for an educational and visually intriguing speech topic. While your audience will marvel at the images depicting these peaks of human achievement, be sure your slide content conveys the most essential relevant facts. These include the building architect, date of completion, and materials used in construction. 

18. What is a smart city?

Educate your audience on the “smart city” concept by explaining the various systems that work in unison to gather, analyze, and utilize data in an urban environment. Since this functionality differs between municipalities, focus your speech on one smart city example (such as Singapore or Amsterdam), and explain each of its intelligent features slide-by-slide.    

19. World’s longest bridges 

Your speech on the world’s longest bridges should educate viewers about vital facts, such as the bridges’ geographic location, span, support system, purpose, and construction timeframes. You can also add interesting bits of history about each bridge to make the subject matter more exciting. For a more impactful presentation, find high-quality images of each bridge and leave the longest span for the last slide. 

20. 10 best gap year trips

Help viewers make an informed decision about their gap year destinations with slides that highlight vital information about each location. Here are some facts to include in each destination slide: best attractions, places to stay, estimated daily spending, local currency and languages, ideal time to visit, and any hazards to be aware of. 

21. How to reduce your carbon footprint while traveling 

Inform your audience of the best tips for staying green while on the go. These may include choosing rail over flights for short trips, switching off electronics in the hotel room, or avoiding frequent room cleanings on long hotel stays. Dedicate a slide to each of these strategies and explain how and why they help reduce greenhouse gas emissions with relevant statistics.

22. World’s best universities for engineering

Guide prospective engineering students through their best university options around the world with a presentation that features each school’s most vital information. Dedicate each slide to a specific school and list available programs, average tuition fees, most common employers of the graduates, and basic info about the location. To avoid boring viewers with the same dry facts, include each school’s most unique and intriguing feature in the slide deck. 

23. Best countries to study abroad  

Create an informative presentation that ranks the world’s best countries for international students. Each slide should feature one of the nations and list information such as the top local universities and programs, cost of living, student visa requirements, and crucially — the reason this nation made your list. 

24. How to make your resume stand out 

Show an audience of job seekers tips and tricks for standing out amidst a sea of other applicants’ resumes. Each of your slides should feature a specific tip with a screenshot of an example in the resume (don’t bother with generic stock images). Ideally, find a video featuring an interview with an HR professional who discusses these resume-crafting strategies and why they work. 

25. How to use body language in an interview 

A speech exploring the use of body language during job interviews should inform viewers via images and (if possible) videos of the do’s and don'ts. Video clips with a body language expert discussing and demonstrating different postures will add credibility to your presentation and keep the audience immersed in the material. 

25 Ideas for intermediate informative speech topics

different types of informative speech topics

The 25 speech topics below are a bit more involved but not quite scholarly, so they’re suitable for high school students in their senior year and their peers in college. You’ll need to research each of the topics thoroughly to convey as much information as possible to educate the viewers and promote critical thought. That said, note that the more data you stuffed into your slide decks, the higher your chances of boring your viewers and losing their attention. So, keep the content info-rich but succinct, and rely heavily on captivating images and videos to tell your story. 

26. How screen time affects children and teens 

Present the relationship between screen time and childrens’ well-being through slides featuring recent study findings. Base your presentation on more than a single study, and reinforce the evidence with videos showing interviews of child psychologists, parents, and children discussing their experience. Since the subject matter is a bit controversial, keep your presentation objective and informative — your viewers can draw their own conclusions.  

27. Why are adults in love with superheroes?

Explore our fascination with superheroes and discuss theories that explain its causes. Start by highlighting the theme’s prevalence in Western culture, then move on to the innate human attitudes that shape it — escapism, optimism, hope, and others. Use credible scientific sources to back up your presentation and give the audience a chance to share their thoughts as you conclude. 

28. A look at the four key parenting styles 

Walk your viewers through the four distinct parenting techniques — authoritarian, authoritative, permissive, and neglectful. You’ll need several slides for each parenting type; use them to address the style’s methods and characteristics, prevalence in modern society, advantages, and disadvantages. Find a video of a child psychologist weighing each style’s effectiveness. 

29. What is pop psychology and why are we obsessed with it? 

Discuss the popularization of psychology in modern culture and overview the primary ideologies. Start with a timeline showing the rise of pop psychology, and dedicate slides to specific theories and notable individuals. Crucially, present theories that attempt to explain this cultural phenomenon. 

30. What are “blue zones”? 

Take your audience on a tour of the world’s blue zones — regions known for the longevity of their populations. Overview each region, give its life expectancy statistics, prevalence of chronic illnesses, and lifestyle factors thought to promote longer lifespans. Pay particular attention to factors like diet, exercise, socialization patterns, and work-life balance. If possible, include videos with interviews of blue zone residents and their perspective on longevity. 

31. A look at the centenarian diet 

Overview the known, identified dietary patterns among blue zone inhabitants. These may vary by region, but all have certain commonalities in terms of the most prevalent food and nutrient groups. Include a dish or recipe that embodies each dietary pattern you discuss in your presentation. Crucially, explain why scholars believe these eating habits contribute to longevity and good health. 

32. Diet trends across generations

Discuss how diet trends have changed between generations. The simplest way to organize your speech is by generation — start with the Lost Generation and work your way to Alpha. Overview each cohort’s typical regimen and favorite dishes, and try to rationalize the contributing factors behind each culinary shift. To get your viewers thinking critically, leave time for an interactive session at the end of your speech and discuss whether the dietary changes are beneficial for health and the environment. 

33. Why cuisine is a cultural shaping force

Explain how cultural values and ideals are embodied in recipes and culinary traditions. Organize your speech by cuisines, with each slide showing either prominent dishes that reflect aspects of the nation’s culture, or customs surrounding food preparation and service. 

34. How alcohol consumption has changed over time

This speech should highlight the shifts in alcohol consumption across all of the world’s regions. You may not be able to find enough data (or have sufficient time) to discuss drinking statistics from every nation on earth, but show the most prominent examples of changing attitudes — i.e. which nations and regions drink more, and which have curbed their consumption over time. Accompany each finding with factors that may have driven changes in alcohol use. 

35. Factors contributing to the mental health crisis

Present the findings of academic studies on possible triggers behind the ongoing mental health crisis. Use statistics to compare the effects of different factors, and back up your statements with authoritative quotes from clinical psychiatrists. Given the significance and thorniness of the subject matter, keep your speech professional and respectful, and stay objective while presenting. 

36. How social media affects our mental health

Use your speech to educate the audience on the observed mental health effects of social media and their mechanisms. Include positive and negative impacts in your presentation. For each one (for example, loss of sleep quality), include research-based evidence and hypotheses as to why the effect takes place. To keep your viewers’ attention, intersperse video clips of interviews with psychiatrists involved in this research or their test subjects. 

37. What is an LLM? 

Inform the audience about Large Language Models (LLM) by explaining the processes that enable their functionality. Dedicate several slides to addressing common questions about LLMs. For example:

  • Can LLMs reason? 
  • Are LLMs conscious beings? 
  • Can LLMs evolve into Artificial General Intelligence (AGI)? 

38. What are the ethical dilemmas of artificial intelligence?

Discuss the various ethical dilemmas that emerge as artificial intelligence gains a foothold in our daily lives. These may include inherent bias, workforce disruption, and AI-powered lethal decision-making in warfare. This speech should stimulate critical thought as much as it informs, so discuss each dilemma you present with your audience.   

39. What is blockchain technology?

Educate your viewers on the basics of blockchain technology. Use relevant visuals and give concrete examples of how each aspect of this technology works. For example, you can show how a Bitcoin transaction happens, with each slide illustrating one of its phases. Be sure to discuss all blockchain applications (not just cryptocurrency), and review its pros and cons. 

40. Can cryptocurrencies replace traditional finance?

Cryptocurrencies’ ability to replace traditional finance are up for debate, so use your speech to inform the audience of the arguments for and against such an event. To start, explain how crypto differs from conventional currencies, list its benefits and shortfalls, and describe government efforts to control its proliferation. Then, dive into credible evidence that backs crypto as the currency of the future, and proof of the contrary. At the end of the presentation, let your viewers opine on the subject matter. 

41. What is the future of transportation?

Explore transportation technologies that are currently being designed, developed, or have recently entered service. Electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft, new supersonic jets, the hyperloop, or even innovative micromobility vehicles are all intriguing examples. Apart from listing these transportation modes’ capabilities, explain the driving forces behind their invention. What problem are these new technologies striving to solve?  

42. What is causing climate change and how to combat it

Educate viewers on the scientifically accepted climate change triggers and walk through viable strategies for slowing the pace of global warming. As you analyze the causes, use statistics to show which human activities are most harmful. Likewise, include models to illustrate all the potential progression paths of global warming relative to the mitigation strategies we deploy. Touch on new climate strategies, such as geoengineering, and discuss their pros and cons.   

43. These cities will sink by 2050 if we don’t reduce carbon emissions

List cities that are expected to sink below the sea level by 2050 if the world does not reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. Tie these predictions to specific emission targets, temperature benchmarks, and sea level changes. Explain whether each of the doomed cities has a chance of either staying above water by natural or artificial means. Likewise, note any preparations to move government infrastructure and populations out of affected cities (as is the case with Jakarta). Finally, touch on the obstacles in the way of these cities’ survival. These may include positive feedback loops accelerating sea level rise, ineffective climate policies, and denialist propaganda.    

44. How to identify propaganda 

Propaganda techniques vary widely, so start by discussing the characteristics common to all propaganda forms: the agenda, the target audience, and the manipulated message. Show concrete samples of these “red flags” in the media (just be careful to stay clear of political battle lines!) Then, use the rest of your slides to analyze different propaganda techniques and their real-life manifestations.  

45. How populism has shaped politics over time 

Educate your viewers on the effect populism has had on politics and governments throughout history. Start by defining the concept, explain its methods and characteristics, and pinpoint its historical origins. Then, walk your audience through historical populist movements and their consequences. Unless you plan to stoke a heated debate with your speech, stay objective and use examples from both sides of the political divide.  

46. How the electoral college works in the United States

Discuss the processes behind the US electoral college within the broader framework of a presidential election. To properly illustrate the institution’s function, explain what happens from the moment the nation casts its ballots to the confirmation of the US president in the Senate. Finally, give examples of US presidents who won elections despite losing the plurality of the popular vote — and the role the electoral college played in these events. 

47. A look at modern monarchies

Inform the audience about the role monarchies continue to play in today’s world. List the reigning monarchs, discuss their powers within government, then touch on their networth and popularity among subjects. To promote critical thinking among your viewers, leave some time to debate monarchies’ relevance and utility in the modern world. 

48. Exploring systems of government 

Teach your viewers about various systems of government that operate in modern nations. Use countries as specific examples of the different government systems. Explain how these governments are formed or elected, how they pass and execute laws, and historical factors that led to their creation. Crucially, list each system’s pros and cons. 

49. The state of democracy around the world 

Use your speech to summarize the state of democratic power across different regions. Use maps and statistics to list nations where democratic norms are seeing improvement, and those slipping into totalitarianism. Address the contributing factors behind shifts in the quality of democracy. 

50. Bloodiest conflicts throughout history 

Present a compilation of the world’s bloodiest conflicts. Include both domestic and international confrontations, and rank them by the number of casualties. Discuss the root causes of each conflict you present, and aggravating factors (such as weapons of mass destruction use, famines, or oppressive political regimes). As you conclude, ask your audience to brainstorm ways to avoid such conflicts in the future. 

25 Ideas for complex informative speech topics 

different types of informative speech topics

The following 25 suggestions are for informative speech topics geared at a university-level audience. These topics delve into sophisticated theories and technologies at the forefront of scientific research. Your viewers may know the subject well, especially if they are your peers. However, do your best to break up the monotony of fact-rich, scholarly content with suitable graphics, videos, and discussion sessions. 

51. Gene therapy: definition, applications, and future development  

Explain how gene therapy works and give a brief overview of its history. Discuss the various delivery methods for gene therapy along with their suitability and pros and cons. Use available statistics to shine a light on the effectiveness of this treatment for different diseases, and touch on the therapy’s ongoing research and development.  

52. What is CRISPR gene editing? 

Define the CRISPR initialism (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), and describe the mechanism behind this gene editing technique. Use effective visuals to illustrate the processes and help your viewers grasp the subject matter. Crucially, list practical examples of CRISPR applications and address the controversy surrounding this method.  

53. How RNA vaccines work 

Show your viewers the workings of RNA vaccines with slides that graphically depict each step, from vaccine formulation to the host’s immune response. Examine RNA vaccines’ suitability for protecting against various diseases, touch on their development history, and compare their effectiveness against other common vaccine types.   

54. Current and future role of AI in healthcare 

Create an informative presentation showing AI’s current applications in healthcare, new AI-based technologies under development, and AI’s long-term future potential in the field. Your slides should describe how AI algorithms enhance various tasks (for example, diagnostic imaging), with statistics that show their efficacy. As you contemplate AI’s future potential in healthcare, ask your viewers to weigh in with their opinions. 

55. How nanotechnology continues to advance and change our world 

Describe the origins and history of nanotechnology, along with current uses, ongoing research, and possible implications. Your slide deck should have graphic representations of how nanotechnology powers various processes and consumer items, and the tools used in its production. Leave some time in your speech to debate the potential of nanotechnology and address concerns. 

56. How does the James Webb Telescope work? 

Your speech should illustrate how each of the James Webb Space Telescope components work in unison to capture images of faraway celestial bodies and transmit them to earth. Dedicate a slide to each of the elements, then show some of the telescope’s latest available images. Compare Webb’s mechanism and output to Hubble's. 

57. What is the future of space exploration?

The future of space exploration is a conjectural topic, so your speech should give your audience all the necessary information to make an educated guess. Start off by analyzing past space missions, the reasons behind them, the technology used, and the limitations they faced. Then, consider the same factors in the context of the future. What will motivate humans to continue space exploration? What technology will be available, and what constraints will we continue to face? Allow some time for debate before you conclude the speech. 

58. Can we make Mars inhabitable? 

Our ability to inhabit Mars is a speculative topic, so approach it with these facts: 

  • How suitable is Mars’s surface for habitation
  • Technology needed to make Mars inhabitable 
  • Current technical constraints and potential for their resolution
  • Implications for humans on Mars-bound missions 

After presenting the facts above, describe current plans for human Mars missions. Explain their current status, what they plan to accomplish, and what obstacles they currently face. Finally, get viewers to opine on the viability of Mars inhabitation. 

59. Future of supersonic commercial air travel 

Overview the current commercial supersonic projects (Boom and Quesst), and contrast them against the Concorde and Tu-144. List the challenges these original supersonic airliners faced, and explain why they ceased operating. Discuss whether Boom and Quesst will be able to overcome these same obstacles and make supersonic air travel possible again. 

60. How much of a threat is technological singularity? 

Discuss the concept of technological singularity and overview contending theories on its potential, mechanisms, and timelines. Crucially, explain why some scholars believe that singularity is inevitable. Finally, address the possible implications of singularity and the threats humanity might face as a result. 

61. Exploring the causes of political polarization

Guide your audience through the innate causes and triggers behind polarization in politics. Explain why some degree of polarization may be inherent in al democratic systems, especially where parties have widely differing ideologies. Then, talk about specific events that exacerbate polarization, such as gerrymandering or social media algorithms. Conclude with a debate on the subject matter, but steer the conversation clear of political flashpoints.  

62. How gerrymandering amplifies political polarization 

Gerrymandering is a redistricting technique that redraws borders in favor of a political party and ratchets up polarization among the voters. To illustrate the process, present instances where redistricting is believed to have fomented political divide. Stay objective and find examples from both sides of the political divide to avoid causing tension among your audience.  

63. What is dark matter? 

You may not be able to define dark matter, but you can overview the current, widely accepted hypotheses about its composition and place in the observable universe. Explain what we do know about dark matter (such as its interaction or lack thereof with light, the electromagnetic field, and gravity), present evidence of its existence, and list constraints that keep us from learning more about this mysterious phenomenon. 

64. How does the Placebo effect work?

Explain the neurophysiological process in the brain that helps the patient to feel better without actually treating the underlying cause of the symptoms. Discuss the various applications of placebos in medical practice and research. Supplement your speech with graphics that show the neural processes behind the effect and make it easier for your audience to grasp.

65. How intelligent are animals? 

Educate your viewers on the cognitive abilities of different animals. Consider ranking the animals in your presentation by intellect, with the most intelligent species appearing last (this will help your speech build momentum). For each animal, explain how its intelligence was assessed, whether it manifests in observable behavior, and how it helps the species excel in its environment. Videos of these behaviors could make your speech more intriguing. 

66. Plant and animal species on the brink of extinction 

Walk your viewers through a list of fauna and flora species that are either critically endangered or already extinct in the wild. For each species, detail the present populations, habitat, and crucially, the factors pushing it to extinction. Also, list conservation efforts underway to protect any of the threatened species and discuss their efficacy. 

67. Are there habitable earth-like exoplanets? 

Use your speech to present the exoplanets currently thought to have habitable, earth-like conditions. Explain how and when each planet was discovered, where it’s located in the Universe, how far it is from earth, and why scientists believe it may be inhabitable. List factors that determine whether a planet may be a host for lifeforms. 

68. The search for extraterrestrial life 

Outline the past and present efforts to find life beyond our planet. Talk about the different methods that have been used to look for extraterrestrial life and explain their outcomes. Likewise, list UFO sightings and purported alien encounters and discuss whether they are credible evidence of life on other planets. Finally, inform your audience about developing technologies that will enable us to find signs of life deep in the universe in the future.

69. How our microbiome connects the gut to the brain 

Explain the gut-to-brain connection that exists thanks to our microbiome. Use explanatory visuals to show the different types of beneficial and harmful bacteria that exist in the gut, and how these microbes influence our physical and mental well-being. Be sure to clearly illustrate the neurological processes through which the microbiome connects to and affects the human brain. 

70. Exploring the current climate change models and predictions 

Educate your viewers about the scientifically accepted climate change predictions and the models on which they’re based. Outline predictions for the next 50-100 years, with models showing how outcomes differ relative to the average temperature increase. Include consequences such as changing coastlines, population displacement, extinction and endangerment of plant and animal species, and effects on the economy.  

71. Superbugs: the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria 

Discuss the emergence of bacteria that can resist antibiotics and the root causes of their evolution. Cite specific medical cases where antibiotics were unable to treat previously treatable conditions. Explain what hazards such pathogens pose to humanity, and what (if any) measures are being taken to contain their spread and development. 

72. How to mitigate the effects of the next pandemic

Each pandemic humanity has lived through taught us invaluable lessons about disease prevention and control. Share these lessons in a speech that features key strategies for reducing the human and economic toll of inevitable future pandemics. Discuss how differences in virility and transmissibility affect the tactics used to contain their spread. Finally, tell your audience which pandemics are most and least likely to occur, and how prepared we are to handle them.  

73. What is quantum cryptography?

Explain the concept of quantum cryptography, its origins, and the reasons for its inception. Cover the processes through which cryptographic activities occur in the quantum state, how they differ from non-quantum ciphering, and what advantages they offer. Spell out distinct examples of quantum cryptographic applications, and potential for further development of these technologies. Since the topic requires at least intermediate knowledge of quantum mechanics, clearly cover the relevant fundamental concepts of this field and leave some time for a Q&A session in case your viewers have questions. 

74. What is the Modern Monetary Theory (MMT)?

Inform your viewers about the fundamentals of Modern Monetary Theory and how they play out in practice. Explain MMT’s five key tenets, and illustrate each of these with a real-life example. Compare MMT against Keynesian economic principles and list its benefits and shortfalls.   

75. Inflation, recession, and stagflation

Describe each of the three economic states, their causes, and their inter-relationship. Outline the factors that trigger each state and the policies designed to rectify them. Give real-life examples of inflation, recession, and stagflation, and the effects they’ve had on people’s everyday lives. 

25 Debate-worthy informative speech topic ideas 

different types of informative speech topics

The 25 topic ideas below have no place at the dinner table. However, their controversial subject matter demands debate and thoughtful action and they’re quite suitable for a mature, adult audience. 

Since these topics are meant to inspire discussion, your job is to supply relevant facts and stay objective while you present. Credible statistics presented with clear, impactful visuals are most effective. With hard facts laid out clearly in front of them, your audience has the best chance of thinking critically, being willing to see multiple perspectives, and engaging in constructive dialogue.

76. Is gentle parenting effective? 

Present evidence confirming and disputing the efficacy of gentle parenting (also known as “passive parenting.”) Find relevant statistics or expert opinions from child psychologists, educators, and parenting coaches to reinforce your speech. Finally, let your audience — the parents in particular — opine on the matter.  

77. Are video games an acceptable pastime for children? 

Showcase statistics on the effects of video games on children’s cognitive abilities, school performance, behavior, and personality. Rely solely on expert evidence — study results, clinical research, and opinions of child psychologists. Then, conclude your speech by inviting audience members to speak their minds. 

78. Individualism vs collectivism: which social system works best?

Describe the characteristics of individualism and collectivism, and offer examples of societies where one of the systems is considerably more prevalent. Compare these societies across metrics such as education levels, GDP, life satisfaction, human rights, and the state of democracy. Likewise, explore societies that balance individual and collective needs. After this analysis, allow your viewers to express their views on the topic.  

79. What are acceptable limits on free speech? 

Guide your audience through the various laws that protect and restrict free speech in the US and abroad. Find examples of positive and negative outcomes of such laws. Finally, ask your viewers what “freedom of speech” means to them, and how much of it they’re willing to sacrifice for the common good. 

80. What is net neutrality and how does it affect us? 

Explain what net neutrality means and cite specific laws that strive to make the internet “neutral.” Present examples of such laws in action, and ask the audience to consider their benefits and shortfalls.  

81. Is the world warming naturally or due to human activity? 

Start by describing the causes of ice ages and interglacial periods in the past and the feedback loops that exacerbated these climatic shifts. Next, present scientific evidence that pinpoints current shifts in the earth’s climate that wouldn’t have taken place without human activities. Examine how and why current climate change differs from glacial and interglacial cycles of the past. 

82. Pros and cons of AI use in an educational setting

List the various capabilities that AI products like ChatGPT afford students, and analyze their pros and cons from an educator’s perspective. For example, you may conclude that AI-generated essays impede academic progress, while AI-enhanced slide presentations let students focus their brainpower on the slide content by automating tedious tasks like slide design and formatting. 

83. Is AI disruptive or a force for the good?  

Outline the human activities AI has automated already, and those it will potentially take on in the future. Consider whether this automation will disrupt or enhance the quality of our lives. Examine factors that may contribute to either of the outcomes — for example, effective regulatory policies or powerful AI technology falling into the wrong hands. Give your viewers time to share their thoughts on the matter before you conclude. 

84. Does AI dehumanize us?

Share examples of AI art and compare it to pieces produced by humans. Let your audience compare samples of human-written text with AI-generated content that now permeates the web. Inform your viewers of any art activities AI can now perform. Then, ask them whether these creative tasks — formerly firmly in the human domain — can still elicit the same emotional response from us even if they’re automated. There are no right or wrong answers, and the debate you inspire with your speech will be as informative as the facts you’ve presented in your slides.  

85. What are deepfakes and how do we handle them?

Define deepfakes, explain how they’re made, and list their uses. Include videos with first-hand examples of people affected by deepfakes, and discuss what strategies should be in place to protect us from their harm. 

86. How to solve the addiction and mental health crises 

There are many proposals to address ongoing addiction and mental health crises, and you can summarize them in your speech. Describe each action plan in detail and include potential benefits and drawbacks. Show real-life examples of these strategies in action if you find them, along with reported outcomes. With the facts before them, your audience should be able to debate the efficacy of each proposed solution.   

87. Advantages and disadvantages of harm reduction 

Review the positive and negative effects of harm reduction policies on the addiction crisis, and try to establish whether the pros outweigh the cons. Ask your audience whether saving the life of a drug user is worth the possible proliferation of drugs within the community and the subsequent new addictions. These are tough moral questions, so moderate the debate to keep the discussion from getting heated. 

88. Arguments for and against the death penalty 

Educate your audience on the key arguments for and against the death penalty. For example, consider its efficacy as a deterrent and use crime statistics to back up your assertions. Likewise, discuss the punishment’s irreversibility and thus the chances of innocent people being executed. Get your viewers to opine on whether or not governments have the moral authority to kill their citizens. 

89. Thought experiments in ethics and morality

Engage your viewers with a series of ethical thought experiments. Consider using experiments such as the Heinz dilemma, survival lottery, the trolley problem, or any others that challenge participants to make tough moral decisions. 

90. Gun violence in the US: causes and potential solutions 

Present the latest gun violence statistics across the US and consider their causes and possible solutions. Discuss any preventative strategies that are currently in place and analyze their efficacy. Compare statistics across other developed nations, then ask your viewers to opine on what makes the US such a hotbed of gun crime. 

91. Is there a way to be an ethical billionaire? 

Using simple math, show your viewers how much one has to earn — and for how long — to make a billion dollars. Include real-life examples of billionaires and describe their journeys. Consider the special privileges they may have had that helped them attain their wealth and compare their efforts to those of the many employees that help them amass fortunes. At the same time, outline each of these folks’ charitable contributions, annual tax payments, and the number of jobs they create. At the end of your presentation, hold a debate to establish whether it’s possible to be an ethical billionaire.  

92. Pros and cons of genetic engineering 

Inform your viewers of the current genetic engineering practices, their applications, benefits, and shortfalls. Discuss any ethical implications of genetic engineering, and how these can be resolved. 

93. Risks and benefits of nuclear power 

Educate your viewers on the known risks and benefits of nuclear power. Explain nuclear plants’ capacity to produce clean energy with no greenhouse gas emissions, and compare their outputs against those of renewable generation methods, such as solar farms. At the same time, discuss the risk of accidents and their consequences for health and environment. Do some high-level calculations to establish how the world’s electricity needs can be met without nuclear power as the world shifts away from fossil fuels. 

94. Drawing the line between cultural appropriation and appreciation 

Define “cultural appropriation” and explain how it differs from appreciating other cultures. Give specific examples of both practices to illustrate the distinction for your viewers. Ask your audience if they’ve ever unwittingly participated in cultural appropriation, and if they see the practice as offensive or innocent.  

95. Does “cancel culture” work? 

Cancel culture is a form of boycott meant to promote social justice and give a voice to the vulnerable. Whether it always works as intended is up for debate. So, focus your presentation on real-life examples of cancel culture at work, and try to establish (together with your audience) whether justice was served in each case. 

96. Is armed intervention ever justified? 

Analyze the reasons behind the world's many conflicts and reconcile them with the outcomes. For example, how does US involvement in WWII compare to the war in Vietnam? In which of these cases was the use of force on foreign soil justified, and can the same ethical formula apply to future conflicts? 

97. How social media algorithms distort our perception of reality 

Use examples to demonstrate how social media algorithms create “filter bubbles” — feedback loops that expose us to more of the same content in which we’ve shown interest. Explain how these filter bubbles have the potential to misinform viewers, sway them emotionally, and even radicalize them. Together with your viewers, discuss possible strategies for containing this phenomenon and mitigating its effects.

98. Assisted suicide laws across the world 

Prepare an analysis of euthanasia laws worldwide. Explain how these laws differ in each nation, and what the outcomes have been so far. Be sure to delineate between active and passive euthanasia and current laws. Likewise, discuss the controversies surrounding assisted death. For example, Canada plans to expand eligibility to the mentally ill, while other nations let minors access the option even without a terminal disease. 

99. How do we measure happiness? 

The World Happiness Report measures happiness by polling populations using metrics such as GDP per capita, social support, life expectancy, and personal freedoms, among others. Meanwhile, the nation of Bhutan has a Gross National Happiness Index, which quantifies happiness on a broader spectrum that includes 33 indicators. Present these tools to your audience and discuss their efficacy. Finally, let your viewers pitch their own criteria for measuring happiness levels. 

100. Different visions for the future of humanity 

The future of humanity is a highly conjectural topic. The best you can do during your speech is inform the audience of the critical factors currently shaping our civilization’s path (think climate change, weapons of mass destruction, and the rise of AI), then ask for opinions. Let your viewers speak and share their vision for our future. 

10 Fun informative speech topic ideas

different types of informative speech topics

The next 10 topics are light and fun but educational nonetheless. If you do your research and deliver the findings in an engaging presentation, your viewers will walk away entertained and know more about the world. (Whether this new knowledge is useful is up for debate).

101. How cults indoctrinate and control their members 

Outline the methods cults typically use to recruit, indoctrinate, and control their members. Explain which people are most likely to respond to a cult’s messaging, and why. Give examples of notable cults and the techniques they used to recruit and brainwash adherents. 

102. Most bizarre and disturbing conspiracy theories 

Compile the world’s most prominent conspiracy theories for an intriguing and informative speech. From Paul Is Dead to Lizard People, conspiracy theories show how fringe ideas gain mainstream acceptance. They may be entertaining, but remind your audience not to dismiss these theories as trivial — these phenomena often have very real consequences, like legitimization of violence and endangerment of public safety. 

103. Why some people believe in conspiracy theories 

Explore why some people are more susceptible to beliefs in conspiracy theories. Walk your audience through contributing factors, such as mistrust of authority, social isolation, major life changes, and others. If possible, include video clips of interviews with former and current conspiracists in which they explain their path down the rabbit hole. 

104. Are UFOs real?  

Overview the world’s most notable UFO and alien encounter reports, with witness accounts and images (if possible). For each encounter, supply the official explanation and debate it with your viewers. Be sure to cover the most recent US government revelations on secret military tests that may have been mistaken for UFOs. 

105. Most mind-boggling mysteries that are still unsolved

Fascinate the audience with a list of the strangest and most unsettling mysteries that remain unsolved to this day. If you can, equip each of your slides with relevant images and clips of interviews of parties involved. Provide currently accepted interpretations of the events, and invite your viewers to opine.   

106. Secret government experiments revealed 

Compile a list of the most intriguing government experiments that have been revealed to the public. Describe the purpose of each experiment, the process, and the outcome. Any official interviews or declassified documents will help you bolster the credibility of your speech.

107. Strangest laws in each US state 

There’s no shortage of bizarre state laws, so pick the most outlandish one from each state. Explain what each piece of legislation tried to accomplish at the time of its passage, and tell your viewers whether it still gets enforced. 

108. Most ridiculous sports in the world 

Walk your audience through the world’s most absurd organized sports. From ferret legging to extreme ironing, there is no lack of ridiculous activities for humans with too much time on their hands. Overview each of your chosen sports’ origins, basic rules, and popularity across the world. 

109. How different cultures celebrate life’s milestones 

Explain how major life events like births, deaths and weddings are celebrated around the world. Discuss each tradition’s particulars, symbology, cultural roots, and significance to the people who observe it. Get your viewers to share their respective cultures’ customs as you conclude the speech.  

110. Breakfasts around the world: How different cultures start their day

Take your viewers on a culinary journey through different nations’ favorite breakfast meals. Present the origins, unique flavors, and key ingredients of each dish. Then, ask your audience to share their cultures’ quintessential breakfast items. 

How to choose a speech topic

Your speech topic should be relevant, educational, and thought-provoking, yet easily comprehensible by the viewers. To this end, use the five steps below to find the most suitable subject matter for your speech. 

  • Consider the purpose.  
  • Understand the audience.
  • Factor in your knowledge and interest.  
  • Adapt to the setting. 
  • Account for the availability of visuals.  

1. Consider the purpose  

Establish the objective of your presentation and choose the speech type accordingly. There are five common speech types, all of which convey different kinds of information: 

  • Definitional: Explains the meaning of the topic’s subject. Topic example: “What is net neutrality and how does it affect us?”
  • Descriptive: Depicts in detail the subject of the topic. Topic example: “Breakfasts around the world: How different cultures start their day.”
  • Explanatory: Overviews the functions behind a specific process. Topic example: “How our microbiome connects the gut to the brain.” 
  • Demonstrative: Lists steps to perform a task. Topic example: “How to mitigate the effects of the next pandemic.”
  • Comparative: Compares and contrasts two items, with a thorough analysis of the similarities and differences. Topic example: “Individualism vs collectivism: which social system works best?”

2. Understand the audience 

Once you’ve narrowed down your preferred speech type, consider how different topics within this category will resonate with your audience. Think about the viewers’ knowledge level, and choose subject matter that is challenging but graspable at the same time. Likewise, gauge their interest in your potential topics — the last thing you want is a crowd that’s dozing off as you speak. 

3. Factor in your knowledge and interest

Choose a topic that interests you — at least to some degree. Otherwise, your speech may turn out lifeless and you’ll struggle to deliver the information in a captivating way. You viewers will respond by tuning you out. 

4. Adapt to the setting 

Make sure you can present your chosen speech topic in your setting. For example, subject matter that’s best conveyed with lots of images or audio requires the facilities to run a slideshow. If the speech venue doesn’t have a screen, projector, and speakers, stick with topics where your words and your interactions with the audience can do all the work.  

5. Account for the availability of visuals.

Some subjects are best taught through visuals. If your preferred topic falls under this category, make sure that you can source relevant images and videos — don’t fill your slides with generic stock images. 

How to prepare your informative speech presentation

Now that you’ve chosen your speech topic, it’s time to prepare the presentation that will accompany you on the stage as you speak. By following the following five steps, you’ll make a presentation that effectively guides both you and your viewers through the key points of your speech. 

  • Research thoroughly 
  • Adhere to the 6 C’s of informative speaking 
  • Find a suitable platform for creating your presentation 
  • Ask for a peer review 

1. Research thoroughly 

Your task is to compose a speech that informs, so to start, research your topic until you know it like the back of your hand. Use credible sources, not just random blogs you find on Google (Google Scholar is an excellent choice). As you study the subject matter, note all the pertinent data, and create an outline that presents information in smooth, contextual flow. 

2. Adhere to the 6 C’s of informative speaking 

The 6 C’s of informative speaking help you deliver (and your audience absorb) the message effectively. A speech that adheres to the 6 C’s is:

  • Clear: Use clear phrasing that everyone understands. 
  • Colorful: Enliven your speech with color to keep the viewers’ attention. 
  • Concrete: Eliminate ambiguities and deliver concrete information that leaves no room for misinterpretation. 
  • Correct: If you present something as a fact, make sure you’ve triple-checked its accuracy. Leave no room for factually incorrect information in your presentation. 
  • Concise: Keep the written content in your slides and your speaking notes as short as possible. 
  • Courteous: Remain respectful and courteous throughout your speech, especially if the topic is controversial.  

3. Find a suitable platform for creating your presentation

Find a presentation maker to help you tackle your slides quickly and without excessive manual effort. For example, Plus AI does all the heavy lifting and lets you generate professional Google Slides presentations from a prompt , then helps you edit and format the slides quickly. With these tedious tasks out of the way, you can focus your efforts on the content of the speech. 

4. Ask for a peer review

Get your fellow student or coworker to review your presentation and give you their notes. You can even rehearse the speech with them to get some feedback on the delivery. Such a rehearsal should help you refine your speech (and slides) before the big day. 

Latest posts

Latest post.

different types of informative speech topics

AI glossary: 130+ AI terms that you should know

Here are 130+ understandable definitions of the most important AI terms

different types of informative speech topics

How to use ChatGPT to create PowerPoint presentations

Step-by-step guide to using AI tools to create presentations. Looking for ChatGPT for PowerPoint? Here's a guide to using AI in PowerPoint and Google Slides

different types of informative speech topics

How to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint

A video in your slideshow can invoke emotion, provide information, or demonstrate a product or task. Here’s how to embed a YouTube video in PowerPoint.

different types of informative speech topics

Plus AI vs. Copilot for PowerPoint: In-depth comparison, pricing, and recommendations

Plus AI and Copilot, which is the best AI for PowerPoint? Read our in-depth review and find the best tool for you!

More resources

6 best PowerPoint add-ins for making compelling and engaging presentations 

Reviews of the 6 best add-ins to elevate your PowerPoint presentations

different types of informative speech topics

How to convert text to PowerPoint

Want to use an existing doc to give you a jumpstart on creating your slideshow? We’ll show you a few ways to convert text to PowerPoint both online and on your desktop.

My Speech Class

Public Speaking Tips & Speech Topics

509 Informative Speech Ideas and Topics

Photo of author

Jim Peterson has over 20 years experience on speech writing. He wrote over 300 free speech topic ideas and how-to guides for any kind of public speaking and speech writing assignments at My Speech Class.

informative speech

How to Choose the Right Informative Topic

Half the battle of presenting a speech or writing an essay is choosing the right topic. Choosing a good informative speech topic or informative essay topic can keep your audience entertained, your reader interested, and your own work process more enjoyable. Here are a few tips to help you choose a topic:

Know your audience or reader: Your informative presentation – whether through speech or essay – should cover a subject not already well known to your audience, but still relevant to them. If you do choose a topic they’re familiar with, then present new and exciting information. Consider the age, knowledge level, and interests of your audience when preparing your informational speech or essay.

Consider your own interests: Think of your own passions and areas of expertise that you think people could benefit from learning more about. Choosing a topic you care about will help your speech or essay be better received. Your passion will keep them engaged and curious to learn more.

Consider length requirements : How much time are you allotted for your informative speech? What is the page requirement for your informative essay? You should be able to thoroughly cover the topic in the amount of time you are given. If you don’t think you have enough knowledge or personal interest to talk about illegal drug use among teens, saving money as a college student, or another informative topic for 20 minutes, you may need to consider a different subject.

The good news is that there are countless options available. Below are lists of informative topics for speeches and essays. Remember that, in order to choose the best informative topic for you, you need to consider your audience, your interests, and your time and length requirements. Then, customize the central idea to suit your situation.

Best 10 Informative Speech Topics

Don’t have time to read our full list of 500+ topic ideas? Here is our list of 10 best informative speech topics.

Can We Write Your Speech?

Get your audience blown away with help from a professional speechwriter. Free proofreading and copy-editing included.

  • How to adopt a dog
  • The history of motorcycles
  • The best sales tactics
  • The differences between male and female communication
  • America’s fastest growing cities
  • The importance of education for the economy
  • Different stages of poverty
  • How to cook vegetarian
  • How to keep your skin looking young and wrinkle free
  • The different types of poetry

List of Informative Speech Topics

  • Communication
  • Current Events
  • Environment
  • Food and Drink
  • International Relations
  • National Security

Relationships

  • Supernatural
  • Demonstration
  • Easy / Simple
  • Interesting
  • Legislation
  • Pop Culture

10 Animal Informative Speech Topics

Animal Informative Speech Topics

  • The role of cats throughout history.
  • Caring for hermit crabs.
  • What are the best pets?
  • The lives of ants.
  • The different types of tropical fish.
  • The different exotic breeds of cats.
  • How to raise rabbits.
  • The beauty of wolves.
  • How to adopt a dog.
  • Raising pet snakes.

See this page for a full list of Speech Topics About Animals .

10 Automotive Informative Speech Topics

automobiles in of series car cars

  • Is it better to buy or lease a car?
  • How to choose the right tires for your car.
  • How to make your car run better.
  • What to look for in a new car.
  • How to change your car’s oil.
  • Dirt bike riding safety tips.
  • How to drive a stick shift.
  • The history of motorcycles.
  • How to change a flat tire.
  • The best muscle cars.

14 Business Informative Speech Topics

Business Informative Speech Topics

  • Taking your brand to the next level with three easy steps: promoting, advertising and marketing.
  • How business owners’ personal characteristics impact their business.
  • What is the impact of training and development on employee job performance?
  • Leadership styles and their effects on employee productivity.
  • Engaged employees result in high retention.
  • Developing personal power in an organization.
  • Impacts of incentives on employee performance.
  • Psychological tactics in marketing.
  • How to create a successful brand.
  • The importance of accounting research.
  • The benefits of enterprise resource planning.
  • The benefits of multilevel marketing.
  • The best sales tactics.
  • How to nail the negotiation in your first meeting.

See this page for a full list of Informative Speech Topics for Business .

8 Communication Informative Speech Topics

Young brothers talking with tin can telephone on grunge backgrou

  • How deaf people talk with emotion.
  • The differences between male and female communication.
  • How to be a persuasive speaker.
  • How to improve your conversation skills.
  • Some simple conversation tips.
  • What is neural linguistic programming (NLP)?
  • Why smiles are contagious.
  • How to manage communicative disorders.

4 Current Events Informative Speech Topics

Current Events Informative Speech Topics

  • America’s fastest growing cities.
  • The Occupy Wall Street movement.
  • Poverty in New York City.
  • What is the national happiness rate?

6 Economy Informative Speech Topics

Economy Informative Speech Topics

  • The history of taxes on carbon dioxide emissions.
  • What would be the impact on economic growth if everyone produced their own food?
  • The impact of progressive taxation on the provision of social services.
  • Economic growth of the People’s Republic of China.
  • The effects of price and demand of agricultural products.
  • The importance of education for the economy.

10 Education Informative Speech Topics

Education Informative Speech Topics

  • How EFL teachers can use the internet as a classroom aid.
  • Should teachers and students be friends on social networks?
  • Why is our education system only based on theory and not practical knowledge?
  • Should students be permitted to eat during classes?
  • The importance of formal education for building a successful career.
  • The pros and cons of teaching students three languages in school.
  • What materials work best in a sandbag for blocking floodwaters?
  • Hypnosis: its misconceptions and common uses.
  • Learning disabilities and their effects on learning in college.
  • Are test scores a good indication of a school’s competency?

See this page for a full list of Informative Persuasive Speech Topics .

10 Environment Informative Speech Topics

Environment Informative Speech Topics

  • Should politicians bring more pollution to our country?
  • What would happen if finite resources were not used wisely?
  • Four main reasons for generating genetically modified crops.
  • The effect of organic and inorganic fertilizer on maize.
  • Are we going to lose the rainforest?
  • The best ways to protect the environment.
  • Commercial crops and their effect on the water table.
  • The environmental impact of a meat based diet.
  • Recycling helps mitigate the greenhouse effect.
  • Why we should stop global warming.

See this page for a full list of Environmental Informative Speech Topics .

3 Ethics Informative Speech Topics

Ethics Informative Speech Topics

  • Is it sometimes better to tell a lie than to tell the truth?
  • Is tolerance the same as love?
  • Is hunting morally acceptable?

10 Family Informative Speech Topics

Family Informative Speech Topics

  • Adopted children should always have the option to see their biological parents.
  • The impact of single parenting and its effects on children.
  • The appropriate penalties for parental negligence.
  • What it is like being the youngest of a family of 19 kids.
  • The importance of the parent-child relationship.
  • My father is my hero.
  • How to pick a name for your children.
  • Cases of domestic violence against men.
  • The importance of family.
  • The history of foster care.

See this page for a full list of Family Informative Speech Topics . We also have a page with Speech Topics for Kids .

18 Financial Informative Speech Topics

Financial Informative Speech Topics

  • How banks are getting paid twice for your mortgage.
  • How to save money in college.
  • How to build credit.
  • How to save money on your income taxes.
  • How to apply for a credit card.
  • The basics of financial aid.
  • The importance of saving money.
  • How to recognize stock market trends.
  • The process of buying a house.
  • The basics of internet banking safety.
  • The best investment strategies.
  • How to live on $5 a day/ Eating well on $5 a day.
  • Tips on how do deal with money problems.
  • The history of our currency.
  • How the US Dollar affects the Euro.
  • Debt relief programs.
  • Does China have a serious stock market?

9 Food and Drink Informative Speech Topics

Food Drink Informative Speech Topics

  • The difference between Gatorade and Powerade.
  • How to cook a delicious dinner.
  • How to grow your own food.
  • The different types of coffee.
  • How to cook vegetarian.
  • How to make a cocktail.
  • The best types of cheese.
  • The best exotic fruits.
  • How to make Chinese food.

See this page for a full list of Speech Topic Ideas On Food, Drink, and Cooking .

11 Fun Informative Speech Topics

Fun Informative Speech Topics

  • The history of Valentine’s Day, the celebrations in different cultures.
  • Some laugh, but there are many courageous people who overcome stuttering.
  • Funny Saint Patricks Day parades, pub decorating, Irish fun runs.
  • Differences between apes and monkeys, monkeys in space programs, how they live in groups in the zoo.
  • Your hand: what your signature, handwriting and your hand palm lines say about your character.
  • Amphibian vehicles – search for information about those rare car-boat vehicles, and you have lots of fun informative speech topics to talk about!
  • Cartoons in relation to our Freedom of Speech and Expression principles.
  • Show the listeners to your public speaking speech some flags of unknown countries, ask them what nation you mean and explain colors and symbols.
  • The extraterrestrial life stories and future theories from French author Jules Verne.
  • Etiquette and manners, how to cope with special situations, how to behave at official ceremonies you see enough public speaking speeches spicing humor.
  • Fashion styles and dress codes at parties and ceremonies.

See this page for a full list of Fun Informative Speech Topics .

5 Geography Informative Speech Topics

Geography Informative Speech Topics

  • The antipodes – Places on Earth which are diametrically opposite to each other.
  • Cartography – How terrestrial globe spheres are crafted.
  • Climatology – Patterns in climate change, like rising temperatures and flooding.
  • Coasts – Types of coasts, deltas, sea cliffs and beaches.
  • What does the continental drift theory mean in vulcanology?

See this page for a full list of Speech Topics On Geography .

9 Government Informative Speech Topics

Government Informative Speech Topics

  • The role of accounting in the control of public expenditures in Nigeria.
  • What factors affect community participation in public meetings?
  • How difficult is it to run a country of 1.2 billion people?
  • Speeding cameras are meant to provide government money.
  • Should the President be paid while being in office?
  • The Federal government’s separation of powers.
  • Journalism is our weapon against corruption.
  • How a bill passes in state government.
  • The best city planning practices.

10 Health Informative Speech Topics

Doctor in Medical Record's room.

  • Steroids, antibiotics, sprays: are these things hurting us?
  • The effects of dissociative identity disorder or multiple personality disorder.
  • Bigger isn’t always better: the effect fast food has on America.
  • The importance of proper stretching before a workout.
  • How to keep your skin looking young and wrinkle free.
  • The different types of insomnia.
  • The causes and effects of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • The psychosocial aspects of organ transplantation.
  • Controversial ideas about whooping cough vaccines.
  • The reasons why stress and depression should be taken seriously.

See this page for a full list of Informative Speech Topics on Health and Fitness . We also have a page with Medical Topics and Psychology topics.

10 History Informative Speech Topics

past, present, future, time concept on blackboard

  • The beauty of ancient Egyptian art.
  • The most beautiful paintings in history.
  • The history of fashion.
  • The history of high heels.
  • The history of cosmetic makeup.
  • The history of Tibetan burial practices.
  • What Olympic events did ancient Greece have?
  • The history of swear words and their impact on society.
  • Words and their meanings that have changed with time.
  • Why dragons perform in Chinese New Year celebrations.

See this page for a full list of History Speech Topics .

16 International Relations Informative Speech Topics

International Relations Informative Speech Topics

  • Economic development and the role of the private sector in reducing poverty in Lesotho.
  • Tourism and remittances are the solutions for Tonga’s economic growth.
  • The military of the Philippines.
  • Is South Africa ready for a female president?
  • Can democracy bring stability to Pakistan?
  • South Africa is an amazing country.
  • The impact of U.S drone strikes.
  • The discovery of oil in Equatorial Guinea.
  • How to help refugees.
  • Why everyone should live in China.
  • The status of trade relations in East Africa.
  • The effects of the Dowry system in India.
  • Sri Lanka after thirty years of war.
  • Why Africa is underdeveloped.
  • The political system of India.
  • The purpose of the United Nations.

2 Language Informative Speech Topics

language concept

  • English is a link language for many parts of the world.
  • The origins of cliches.

6 Literature Informative Speech Topics

Literature Informative Speech Topics

  • Inside the mind of Edgar Allen Poe.
  • How to write a book.
  • The three trials of Oscar Wilde.
  • The meaning of The House on Mango Street.
  • The history of vampires in literature.
  • The different types of poetry.

21 Media Informative Speech Topics

Social networks background

  • What steps are involved in creating a movie or television show?
  • How Spotify hurts new artists.
  • The benefits of watching less TV.
  • How the media has hurt our body image.
  • Books that were turned into terrible movies.
  • The benefits of reading a newspaper.
  • The basics of photography.
  • The history of the Titanic movie.
  • Some famous advertising campaigns.
  • The effects of misleading advertisements.
  • Some important women in the media.
  • The best foreign TV shows.
  • The benefits of satellite radio.
  • The best TV sitcoms.
  • Al Jazeera, the largest Arabic news channel is the Middle East.
  • How Disney produces and distributes short animated films.
  • The amazing stage performance of Christina Aguilera.
  • The love life of Jennifer Aniston,
  • The story of CNN International reporter, Christiane Amanpour.
  • The ten actors who played James Bond.
  • Top three worst Woody Allen movies.

9 Music Informative Speech Topics

Music Informative Speech Topics

  • The different types of marching bands.
  • The history of french horns.
  • The history of house music.
  • The evolution of rock and roll.
  • The beauty of reggae music.
  • Music as a “lifestyle”.
  • The best electronic dance music.
  • How to play the kazoo.
  • The beauty of Haitian music.

4 National Security Informative Speech Topics

  • How illegal things are smuggled into the country.
  • The United States military branches.
  • The importance of the Air Force.
  • The branches of the military.

10 Politics Informative Speech Topics

Politics Informative Speech Topics

  • Should the U.S. restrict immigration?
  • The benefits of communism.
  • The most important women in politics.
  • Define the term foreign policy and offer current examples.
  • The delicate position of women and children in war torn societies and countries on the globe.
  • How issues on oil in Nigeria lift the oil prices worldwide.
  • How a free trade agreement works.
  • The major environmental problems in Australia.
  • National gun control statistics compared to the statistics of other countries.
  • The function of the Federal Reserve Board in maintaining a stable financial system.

See this page for a full list of Speech Topics about Politics .

10 Psychology Informative Speech Topics

Psychology Therapy

  • The benefits of greeting people.
  • Positive thinking is the key to peaceful living.
  • The meaning of dreams.
  • How to explain child geniuses.
  • Difference between empathy and sympathy.
  • How to be more sensitive for an emotionally insensitive person.
  • How to know a person’s true personality when we are so good at disguise nowadays.
  • Secrets about quiet people.
  • How to respond or take a compliment.
  • Why do people lie and how to deal with that.

See this page for a full list of Psychology Speech Topics .

12 Relationships Informative Speech Topics

Relationships Informative Speech Topics

  • How marriages today differ from marriages from the 60’s.
  • The secrets of happy and successful relationships.
  • How to choose the right relationship.
  • How to get along with your roommate.
  • The guidelines for military marriages.
  • How to make long distance relationships work.
  • The average age to get married.
  • How to talk to people when you have nothing to say.
  • How to recognize toxic friends.
  • Your Brain Falls in Love Not Only Your Heart.
  • Who Was and Is Cupid and Co.
  • All You Wanted to Know About Engagement.

10 Religion Informative Speech Topics

Religion Informative Speech Topics

  • A comparison of Genesis and Revelation in the Bible.
  • Modern values are violating religious values.
  • How Christ is present in our world.
  • What percentage of the world’s population are Christians?
  • Why worshipping Satan isn’t a bad thing.
  • Why the bunny symbolizes Easter.
  • God helps those who help themselves.
  • A comparison of different religions.
  • The history of the Christian church.
  • The main principles of Christianity.

See this page for a full list of Speech Topics on Religion and Spirituality .

10 Science Informative Speech Topics

Two children making science experiments

  • The difference between an alligator and a crocodile.
  • Why whales should not be hunted for food.
  • Transhumanism and the evolution of the human race.
  • How we can create geniuses.
  • Falabella horses are the smallest in the world.
  • Why is the colonization of Mars important?
  • Albert Einstein’s contributions to science.
  • The isolation of nicotinic acid from tobacco.
  • The journey to becoming a nuclear physicist.
  • Some interesting facts about the human brain.

See this page for a full list of Informative Science Speech Topics .

31 Self-Help Informative Speech Topics

Self-Help Informative Speech Topics

  • The difference between boundaries and limits.
  • The benefits of affirmation.
  • Three goals to strive for in life.
  • How to present yourself with confidence.
  • Why it’s important to be yourself.
  • How to manage your anger.
  • How to make a good first impression.
  • How to prepare for a job interview.
  • Your actions determine your future.
  • How to set goals and achieve them.
  • How to enhance your public speaking skills.
  • How to increase your motivation.
  • What makes life meaningful?
  • How to take your next big step in life.
  • How to construct an argument.
  • How to boost your self-esteem.
  • How to be happy being single.
  • How to avoid procrastination.
  • How to improve your manners.
  • How to be a good leader.
  • The importance of a good attitude.
  • How to be more romantic.
  • How to break bad habits.
  • How to overcome conflict.
  • Happiness: The thing we all look for but never really understand.
  • What it’s like to be falling in love.
  • What is love and what’s not.
  • The secret to resolving conflicts.
  • Dancing is your secret weapon for happiness and health.
  • Things to remember if you don’t want to die with any regrets.

10 School Informative Speech Topics

sutent learning at school

  • Schools should not make money by selling unhealthy candy and soft drinks to students.
  • Music with foul language in it should not be allowed at school dances.
  • Students should be able to listen to their MP3 players during class.
  • Students who commit cyberbullying should be suspended or expelled from school.
  • Boys and girls should be taught in separate classrooms.
  • Homeschooling produces better results than public schools.
  • High School will be the best time of your life.
  • Boys are lazier than girls.
  • All students should wear school uniform.
  • It is possible to Ace your way through High School.

See this page for a full list of School Speech Topics for All Grades .

10 Society Informative Speech Topics

Society portraits

  • Why it is bad to judge people by their appearance.
  • The lives of isolated indigenous people.
  • How to tell someone they are annoying you without being rude.
  • How human behavior affects society.
  • Left handed people: the underrepresented minority group.
  • Is the military a fulfilling career choice for women?
  • The effects of discrimination.
  • The importance of newspapers in our daily life.
  • Do actors and athletes make too much money?
  • Why I’m optimistic about our nation’s future.

See this page for a full list of Informative Society Speech Topics .

10 Sport Informative Speech Topics

Sports equipment

  • Should female students be allowed to play on male sports teams?
  • How to do a walking handstand or a cartwheel into the splits.
  • Is netball or hockey more dangerous?
  • The benefits of sports for all ages.
  • Why the spelling bee shouldn’t be on ESPN.
  • The worst professional sports teams.
  • The importance of sports and games.
  • What you should have in your golf bag.
  • The history of professional fighting.
  • The worst trades in sports history.

See this page for a full list of Informative Sports Speech Topics .

3 Supernatural Informative Speech Topics

Young man in casual throwing fire ball

  • The mystery of the Bermuda triangle.
  • The evidence that bigfoot exists.
  • The existence of telepathy.

41 Technology Informative Speech Topics

Technology Informative Speech Topics

  • How roads are built.
  • Is wind energy cheap, effective, and practical?
  • Why college students should be careful about what they put on social media.
  • The uses for artificial intelligence computer networks.
  • The danger of putting too much personal information on social networks.
  • Modes of communication are constantly changing.
  • How has social media impacted our daily lives?
  • The line between the human brain and a computer.
  • Why technology is a bad thing for growing minds.
  • How technology has destroyed human interaction.
  • How is text messaging affecting teen literacy?
  • The advantages and disadvantages of social media.
  • The effects of violent video games on children.
  • The decline of interpersonal communication due to technology.
  • The difference between hardware and software.
  • Antivirus software: beware of malware functions.
  • The history of programming languages.
  • How voice over IP works.
  • What would we do without electricity?
  • The benefits of 3D printing.
  • The major technological changes since 1990.
  • The negative effects of cellphones.
  • How to avoid computer viruses.
  • The evolution of the internet.
  • Computers through the decades.
  • How airport biometrics systems work.
  • Robots now and in the future.
  • How satellites help communication.
  • How a water plant operates.
  • How watches work.
  • The evolution of video games.
  • How cellular phones work.
  • The evolution of the iPhone.
  • How to build a computer.
  • How nuclear power works.
  • How search engines work.
  • How air pressure works.
  • The best new technologies.
  • The future of electric cars.
  • How to practice cyber safety.
  • A guide to different social media sites.

15 Travel Informative Speech Topics

Travel Informative Speech Topics

  • How students can find great vacation bargains.
  • The best cruise vacations.
  • Famous parliament buildings
  • How to test the quality of water when traveling.
  • Interesting underground railroad systems in capital cities.
  • Investigation shipwrecks at the bottom of the sea.
  • The benefits of wind tunnels on transport.
  • The discovery of the famous temples in the Maya culture.
  • The influence of global warming on Alpine skiing.
  • The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
  • The Wright Brother’s first flight.
  • Totem poles and obelisks are symbols of unity, tradition, and pride.
  • What you need to know about the Principality of Andorra.
  • Why is there a Titanic replica?
  • Why the unsinkable and invincible Titanic sank.

9 Workplace Informative Speech Topics

I Love to Work Pin Button Enjoy Job Career

  • The benefits of break time for nursing mothers in the workplace.
  • The prevalence of dangerous chemicals in the workplace.
  • How to survive working in a restaurant.
  • Why underwater welding is dangerous.
  • How it is to work in the fast food industry.
  • How to get a great internship.
  • How to become a comedian.
  • The most dangerous jobs.
  • What are the fastest growing careers?

List of Informative Essay Topics

14 college informative essay topics.

young student girl with books in library

  • Benefits of a college degree
  • Crimes on college campuses
  • Healthiest foods in the campus cafeteria
  • How students can stay safe on a college campus
  • How students can use eLibrary Curriculum Edition for research
  • How to beat senioritis
  • How to find cheap textbooks
  • How to pick a major
  • How to study for and pass a test
  • Saving money as a college student
  • The story of how your school was founded
  • Ways of preventing college dropout
  • Whether binge drinking is a problem on your college campus
  • Your favorite club or organization on campus

5 Demonstration Informative Essay Topics

How to keep dialogue going

  • How to bake a cake
  • How to knit a scarf
  • How to organize a closet
  • How to swing a golf club
  • How to train your dog

7 Easy / Simple Informative Essay Topics

easy and simple

  • A genre of music
  • America’s fastest growing cities
  • Breeds of dogs
  • How a computer works
  • Interesting cultures
  • Lesser known presidents
  • Natural disasters

9 Education Informative Essay Topics

Education Informative Essay Topics

  • How to choose a persuasive speech topic
  • How to deliver a funny informative speech
  • How to deliver a persuasive speech
  • How to maintain audience attention during a speech
  • How to win your audience with descriptive speech
  • How to write a persuasive essay
  • How to write an argumentative essay
  • How to write an expository essay
  • The difference between a thesis statement and a topic sentence

10 Fun Informative Essay Topics

happy friends in summertime

  • An impressive world record
  • Fun games to play at the beach.
  • The history of ice cream
  • The revolution of the selfie
  • Ways different cultures celebrate Valentine’s Day
  • What do people do when they win the lottery?
  • What people don’t know about Disneyland
  • What you can learn from grade K students
  • What your horoscope means
  • Why people get tattoos

6 Funny Informative Essay Topics

funny kitten portrait with smile on card

  • Everything you need to know about skinny jeans
  • Funny St. Patrick’s Day parades
  • How to be nice to people you don’t like
  • How to cheat in poker
  • How to look attentive when you’re actually not
  • Things you can learn from your pet

See this page for a full list of Funny Informative Speech Topics .

10 Health Informative Essay Topics

Closeup of doctor writing on chart

  • All about gluten
  • Cause-and-effect relationship of air pollution
  • Causes of cancer
  • How caffeine works
  • How stress affects your body
  • How to make exercise a habit
  • How to quit smoking
  • Symptoms of Alzheimer Disease
  • Symptoms of depression
  • How to get rid of bad habits

6 Hobbies Informative Essay Topics

Hand made scrapbooking post card and tools lying on a table

  • Best places for scuba diving
  • Choosing your next book to read
  • Peace lily care tips
  • Professional baseball stadiums
  • The history of your favorite sport
  • Types of tropical fish

9 Interesting Informative Essay Topics

Two people peeking from hole in wall

  • Effects of global warming
  • Exotic pets
  • How to perform an attention-getting first dance at your wedding
  • Near-death experiences
  • Places to see in northern Nevada
  • The biography of Clyde Tombaugh
  • The history of a cliche marriage ritual
  • What is your dog actually thinking?
  • What your handwriting says about you

See this page for a full list of Informative Interesting Speech Topics .

7 Life Informative Essay Topics

Young Woman Enjoying a Hot Beverage

  • How to drive a stick-shift
  • How to pay off your student loans in under 10 years
  • How to succeed in multi-level marketing
  • The process of buying a car
  • Tips for being an effective networker
  • Traveling the world for cheap
  • Why people lie

7 Legislation Informative Essay Topics

Legislation Informative Speech Topics

  • Fees and taxes for an electric car
  • Minimum wage laws
  • The history of drinking age rules
  • What dogs are affected by breed specific legislation?
  • Anti-trust crimes.
  • Benefits of pleading guilty.
  • Felony penalties for aggravated stalking.

See this page for a full list of Legal Speech Topics .

10 Pop Culture Informative Essay Topics

Scene from a rock concert

  • A biography of your favorite celebrity
  • All about your favorite author
  • All about your favorite television show
  • Former childhood stars
  • History of your favorite product brand
  • Instances where the movie is better than the book
  • The Miss America pageant
  • The pop art movement during the 20th century and the changes it brought about
  • What makes a pop sensation
  • Your favorite form of public broadcasting

7 Relationships Informative Essay Topics

Couple of hands against the sea view

How to be a good friend

  • How to choose your friends
  • How to get along with your in-laws
  • How to make a marriage work
  • How to survive a blind date gone wrong
  • The different types of friendships
  • The history of online dating

Picking Your Topic

At first glance, an informative speech may seem like the simplest type of presentation . The basis of an informative speech is to introduce a topic to the audience and then describe or explain it . It sounds fairly straightforward, but special care must be given to selecting a topic or the entire speech may not be well received.

Informative speeches can easily become boring for an audience for several reasons. First, the speaker should be sure not to present a topic which is already well known, or the audience will quickly lose interest. The topic should be something the audience has never encountered, or at least include new and exciting information on a familiar topic. Speakers should remember, when preparing the speech, that their own level of interest will become apparent during delivery of the presentation. In other words, if the speaker is bored by the topic, the audience will feel bored as well.

Knowing the audience is a primary factor in choosing an informative speech topic. The speaker should consider the age, knowledge level, subculture, and other demographics of his listeners when preparing the speech. It is important to present information which is neither too elementary nor too difficult for the audience to comprehend. The chosen topic should reflect the interests of the audience, and should be intriguing to them without rehashing information they already know. For example, college students may be interested in a topic on alcohol use, but they are already very familiar with a topic like the dangers of drinking and driving. In this case the speaker might concentrate his topic on the health benefits of red wine. This way, he has chosen a topic which interests the audience, but is likely to present new information which will not bore his listeners.

Finally, speakers should consider time limits when choosing an informative speech topic. A topic should be covered thoroughly enough that the audience feels as if most of their questions on the topic have been answered. On the other hand, a tight time restriction may prevent the speaker from adequately covering a very intricate topic. When time is limited, a subject which requires lengthy explanation should be avoided. The audience should leave an informative speech feeling as if they’ve gained new insight on a topic. It is good if they are interested in doing their own research to learn more about the subject, but they should never leave the presentation feeling confused or unclear about what they have just heard.

Informative Speech Idea In 5 Steps

1. step one – make a list.

Make a short list of your personal interests and informative speech topic ideas. To help you determine your interests on an informative speech topic, think about your favorite objects, products, people, animals, events, places, processes, procedures, concepts, policies, theories, and so on. Answer these important questions:

  • Is there something you love to talk about, always have wanted to research?
  • What interests you very much, or do you like or love at first glance?
  • Do you have developed special skills in personal or professional life?
  • What interesting informative topics do you know a lot of or want to know more about?
  • What are some personal or professional experiences and skills in certain situations related to your favorite subjects?
  • Can you reveal hidden secrets, new perspectives or insights on some topics?

2. Step Two – Analyze Your Audience

Determine the interests and needs of your audience. What do they want to learn? Can you teach them on a subject you like?

3. Step Three – Check Your Interests

Review the short list of your interests and make a decision. Choose the informative speech topic that is also interesting to your audience. Take care of their interests, questions and needs.

4. Step Four – Research and Write

Research  just one new single aspect  of that informative speech idea. Look for valuable or amazing information that surprises your listeners. Fresh data, facts, intelligence, and advice will catch their attention immediately! To help you researching: look for new facts, figures, stories, statistics, surveys, personal experiences, professional experiences, quotations, comparisons and contrasts.

5. Step Five – Add Help Props

Demonstrate steps, stages, pros and cons, and remarkable effects by the use of public speaking software or other visual aids , that display the material you want them to be understood or remembered.

Informative Speeches FAQ

1. Speeches About Objects 2. Speeches About Processes 3. Speeches About Events 4. Speeches About Concepts

An informative speech is one that provides information and educates the audience on a specific topic. An informative speech should help your audience learn, understand, and remember information you are presenting.

1. Know your audience or reader 2. Consider your interests 3. Consider length requirements

You can see this page with speech examples .

Vote of Thanks Examples

613 Original Argumentative Speech Topics Ideas

15 thoughts on “509 Informative Speech Ideas and Topics”

Demonic Possession

Creativity is the Mother of Invention.

1-How to be a good friend: you have to do everything to make them happy, don’t snatch on them

2-How to choose your friends: Choose friends with similar values Choose friends with common goals

3-How to get along with your in-laws:1-Get to know them. … 2-Know your limits. … 3-Keep things cordial. … 4-Put your relationship first

4-How to make a marriage work

5-How to survive a blind date gone wrong 1-Ask open-ended questions. … 2-Tell a funny anecdote. … 3-Let your date talk. … 4-Answer questions fully. … 5-Listen to them carefully.

6-The different types of friendships

7-The history of online dating

the evolution of humans

school doesn’t need to exist

Nice compilations this is helpful

Hamburgers vs hotdogs

Chocolate Caffeine Grass is Greener on the other side April Fools Why teens should have a part time job or not

History of Tobacco

Effects of anxiety on teenage students.

how depression affects people and others around them

peer pressure and its effects on students

Different ways kids handle peer pressure.

depression and how it can effect a students mindset

Leave a Comment

I accept the Privacy Policy

Reach out to us for sponsorship opportunities

Vivamus integer non suscipit taciti mus etiam at primis tempor sagittis euismod libero facilisi.

© 2024 My Speech Class

50 Interesting Informative Speech Topics for College

26 September, 2020

15 minutes read

Author:  Mathieu Johnson

Informative speeches grant speakers a responsible mission of educating people about significant ideas and themes. They’re also about sharing thoughts and opinions on this or that topic, aimed at expanding understanding and providing listeners with relevant insights for further deliberation. Therefore, it’s a particular type of speeches given to put things into sharp focus and offer food for thought. Read up to know which informative speech topics have the most impact.

Informative Speech Topics

What is an informative speech?

As mentioned above, it’s a kind of speech that, well, informs the audience about your topic. Sounds simple enough, but simplicity is deceptive, and there are enough secrets behind this science. Specifically, not all people are fully aware of the fact that the “what” question is a key element that needs to be answered, for with informative speeches, you want to choose a topic most likely to be well received.

Of course, you can speak about something you already know, but you can also talk about the topic which is absolutely new to you. In this case, however, you must make sure that the theme will be relatively easy to research and studied before speech delivery. Another important point worth noticing is that organizational requirements and type of information for informative speech usually intertwines with those for an informative essay, for the latter is often an extension of the first.

How to write an informative speech?

How to write an informative speech

So, now it’s time to move from theory to practice and write an informative speech. But where do you start from?

Although there are many different processes involved in the process, we’ll narrow them to essentials to help you better grasp the idea of how a perfect speech should be tailored.

Stage 1. Research and Brainstorming

Think about the topic.

The first and most crucial step is about choosing the right topic. We’ve mentioned before that it’s vital to select the issue you feel free to talk about. However, there are also cases when professors assign a specific task for you. Either way, the point here is to conduct thorough research based on the given or chosen topic.

If you want to explain the history of some company, band or event, for example, make sure to deliver the message clearly, without going here and there. For this, consider talking about particular points which will cover the whole speech and help the audience quickly digest it. Otherwise, your speech will depart from the topic, and listeners will find it challenging to follow your thoughts.

Gather Evidence

Every scholarly work proves its credibility by the inclusion of relevant sources to show both the audience and the instructor that you’ve put enough effort into the work to sound authoritative. This is a great chance to get a good mark, but more importantly, earn trust from listeners. To cite the evidence correctly, you can search for some facts, stats, or numbers in a variety of sources. These include textbooks, books, and encyclopedias (online ones work as well), scholarly articles, reputable news bureaus, and government documents. If these are hard to find for you, think of alternatives, like online journals and magazines. But be careful and don’t use sources from there if they are not credible and reputable. As an example, use The New York Times, The Guardian, Harvard Business Review, SAJE journals, Forbes, etc.

Also, keep in mind that the evidence you’ll use should depend on the subject of your talk. If it’s about science, check scientific publications. If it’s about medicine – embark upon texts on this specific sphere. Finally, don’t forget to create a works cited page at the end of your speech and put all your sources there. Even if your instructor does not specify such a requirement, create a list anyways. This will help you keep references organized, and you will be able to pick a suitable one from the list.

Generate a Nice Thesis

A thesis is the core of impactful speech that tells listeners about its focal points. It also reveals the purpose of your speech and provides the audience with an insight into what the speech is all about. Notably, your thesis should not exceed the length of one-two sentences and be as precise as possible. More so, thesis, like the speech itself, is not about convincing people to take your topic stance immediately. Rather, it’s about informing listeners about significant events or cases which they could analyze and make relevant conclusions themselves. No need to push them or force to change the perspective, just try to be genuine and honest with people you’re talking to. Considering that it’s a scholarly piece of work, there’s no room for appealing to emotions or subjective claims. So in informative speeches, objectivity is the key player.

How to Start Informative Speech Writing?

Informative speech outline

The outline is a skeleton of your speech that briefly explains each of your points. This is basically a list of short sentences which reveal the meaning of your main speech ideas. Remember that this list is not for the audience; it’s for your own use. So the task here is to write about every point in a way you’ll understand. You can also use notecards instead of paper so that it’ll be much easier for you not to get lost in a sea of ideas and organize the speech properly. Tip: include numbers and capital letters for headings, and bullet points or other figures to mark subheadings.

If you are still unsure on whether you can cope with your task – you are in the right place to get help. Our essay writers will easily answer the to the question “Who can write my speech?”

Stage 2. Writing

Once the sketches are ready and you have a clear understanding of what to speak about, move on straight to writing.

Craft an Engaging Intro

What does engaging stand for in this case? It denotes some speech elements which will be enticing for listeners from the first sentence. It’s a common practice to start speeches with different hooks to call for more people’s attention. There are a plethora of techniques you can use to make an unforgettable first impression: jokes, anecdotes, examples from personal life, interesting statistics, rhetorical questions, quotes of famous people. You can even invent your own attention-grabber which will help you knock down listeners.

Give More Detail in the Main Body

Once you managed to create impact by the introduction and made sure everyone will be eager to listen to you further, you need to expand the explanation of key speech ideas in a well-structured, organized manner. Like in regular life, you start a story from the beginning to the end, while gradually moving from one idea to another. The same goes for informative speech – you need to ensure that the flow of your narration is logical and concise, fully elaborated, and precise. Also, don’t forget about making transitions between sentences. They will make your speech flow naturally, helping the audience to process the information much easier and effortlessly.

Wrap Everything Up in Conclusion

The ending of your informative speech should restate the main idea and the thesis you’ve mentioned in the introduction. There’s no need to say new things that will only confuse your audience. Instead, all the conclusion needs is a nice wrapping of the already stated claims.

So basically you want to review your main points and thereby deliver listeners a message which they will perceive as a major takeaway from what you’ve just told them. However, the introductory part should by no means repeat previous information word by word. It’s just a short restatement that covers up the main points.

Proofread and Edit the Final Version

Once the text is written entirely, it’s a must for you to double check it to avoid possible mistakes. If your informative speech turns out not as informative as expected due to grammatical or lexical errors, you’ll not be taken seriously, which we bet is not the purpose of delivering your talk. So, to prevent casualties from happening, you’ll need to use reliable editing and proofreading tools. Grammarly is an excellent source for this. Its accurate algorithm detects all kinds of mistakes and fixes them on the fly in a matter of seconds. And you can also check the text for plagiarism to make sure that it has no analogs anywhere on the web.

The Writing Process of Informative Speech

Stage 3. Perfecting Speech Delivery

Memorize your speech.

Half work is done – you have a writing piece. Now it’s time to learn it. Of course, it’ll take you time to do this, but with a little patience and enough time, you can memorize it even faster than expected. Besides, it’s not recommended to learn the speech from A to Z, inside out and upside down by heart. If your instructor is indulgent enough, feel free to memorize your talk in a way that allows you to explain your ideas clearly and consistently. To facilitate the process of learning, you can memorize sentence by sentence until you’re confident. And even if you forget something during delivery, you can always count on the outline that’ll give you a hint on what to talk about next.

Practice Reading Speech Aloud

When the final product is finally ready and polished, you need to concentrate on reading it.

Practice the speech in a mirror, to a friend/relative/pet, or record yourself to trace the tone and intonation. This way, you’ll make sure that your informative speech is brilliant and you deliver it just the way you wanted. Besides, this practice can help you critically evaluate the flaws and correct them before the actual delivery. Have enough time for this, because even experienced speakers always rehearse their speeches. Finally, focus on the way you use gestures, the way you stand and look at the audience, and facial expressions.

How to Deliver Informative Speech?

List of informative speech topics

There are lots of easy informative speech topics to choose from, but we offer you to review our topics list with some of the most alluring ones to get you started. Let’s examine pro informative topics that’ll help you write a memorable speech.

Topics for informative speech about music

  • Frank Sinatra – a beloved father of music
  • The drastic evolution of french music
  • Deep house – the most popular music style among youngsters
  • Why did rock and roll became an epitome of popular dance music
  • Why does reggae music most known under the name of Bob Marley
  • The psychological and physical benefits of listening to music
  • Chill, lounge and electronica has market the era of progressive sound
  • The impact of rap music on society at large
  • The art of playing the violin
  • The evolution of jazz music and its connection to historical movements

Informative speech topics about animals

  • Why are so many animals under extinction today and how do we fix it?
  • Why dogs are considered as humans best friend?
  • The history and evolution of polar bears
  • Why does rhinos horn trimming in South Africa still allowed
  • How to properly raise chinchillas
  • The most dangerous types of dogs on the planet
  • Staggering intellectual abilities of elephants baffle even scientists
  • How to keep snakes away and save your life
  • Different types of butterflies
  • The history of bees and their role in the world

Topics for informative speech about global warming

  • Patterns in climate change: rising temperatures and flooding
  • What Effects does Climate Change have on the Earth and its Inhabitants?
  • What are the practical solutions to global warming
  • What is global warming and what causes it?
  • The future of global warming: dismal predictions and statistics
  • Controversial opinions about global warming
  • The greenhouse effect as the top one reason of climate change
  • The global issue of global warming: what’s next?
  • Humans are responsible for the emergence and progress of global warming
  • Sanctions against generation of greenhouses: will they ever take place?

Informative speech ideas about sports

  • How sports improve human physical and psychological health
  • Is golf the game of the past?
  • The real life of sport teams: from trainings to furious games
  • Can roller skating be considered a kind of sport?
  • What’s more dangerous: white water rafting or ice diving?
  • The history of sports: whom do we owe respect?
  • Hockey 101: gear, playing techniques, team spirit
  • Why is boxing the most dangerous type of sports
  • The most unusual kinds of sports humans have invented
  • The importance and potential threat of football for the world 

Interesting speech topics about food and drinks

  • How to bake a cake and not put on weight
  • Why does alcohol bring so much trouble to contemporary youth?
  • There are no superfoods, the study shows
  • Does fast food really cause addiction?
  • The secret ingredient of Coca Cola and why you’ll never want to drink it again
  • If the fruit diet useful for health?
  • Why bananas can save the world
  • Eating vegetables and olive oil is a golden ticket to rejuvenation
  • What’s the difference between natural and processed foods?
  • Why eating pizza is the worst way to get away with cooking

As you can see from the list of topics for speeches, informative speech is a perfect occasion to explore interesting themes in depth and share your knowledge with people who are most likely to learn new things with you. Discovering a variety of topics and writing them on paper is perhaps the most engaging task your instructor has ever assigned you. And if you find it challenging to come with the right idea for a good topic, just send a “ write my speech ” request, and we’ll complete your order in no time.

A life lesson in Romeo and Juliet taught by death

A life lesson in Romeo and Juliet taught by death

Due to human nature, we draw conclusions only when life gives us a lesson since the experience of others is not so effective and powerful. Therefore, when analyzing and sorting out common problems we face, we may trace a parallel with well-known book characters or real historical figures. Moreover, we often compare our situations with […]

Ethical Research Paper Topics

Ethical Research Paper Topics

Writing a research paper on ethics is not an easy task, especially if you do not possess excellent writing skills and do not like to contemplate controversial questions. But an ethics course is obligatory in all higher education institutions, and students have to look for a way out and be creative. When you find an […]

Art Research Paper Topics

Art Research Paper Topics

Students obtaining degrees in fine art and art & design programs most commonly need to write a paper on art topics. However, this subject is becoming more popular in educational institutions for expanding students’ horizons. Thus, both groups of receivers of education: those who are into arts and those who only get acquainted with art […]

different types of informative speech topics

15 Informative Speech Examples to Inspire Your Next Talk

  • The Speaker Lab
  • May 13, 2024

Table of Contents

A good informative speech is one of the most effective tools in a speaker’s arsenal. But with so many potential topics out there, it can be tough to know where to start. That’s why we’ve compiled 15 informative speech examples to help you find your perfect subject. Whether you’re unearthing secrets from history for your listeners or delving into future technologies, informative speeches can prove to be the recipe for the perfect talk.

But crafting an effective informative speech is about more than just picking a topic. You have to research topics, put your thoughts in order, and speak up clearly and confidently. In this post, we’ll explore strategies for each step of the process, so you can create a speech that informs, engages, and makes a lasting impact on your listeners. Let’s get started.

15 Informative Speech Examples

If you’re looking for some inspiration for your next informative speech, look no further. Below are 15 examples of informative speech topics that are sure to engage and educate your audience.

  • The history and evolution of social media platforms
  • The benefits and drawbacks of renewable energy sources
  • The impact of sleep deprivation on mental and physical health
  • The role of emotional intelligence in personal and professional success
  • The science behind climate change and its potential consequences
  • The importance of financial literacy for young adults
  • The influence of artificial intelligence on various industries
  • The benefits of regular exercise and a balanced diet
  • The history and cultural significance of a specific art form or genre
  • The impact of technology on interpersonal communication
  • The psychology behind procrastination and effective strategies to overcome it
  • The role of diversity and inclusion in fostering innovation and creativity
  • The importance of mental health awareness and resources for students
  • The future of space exploration and its potential benefits for humanity
  • The impact of globalization on local economies and cultures

These topics cover a wide range of subjects, from technology and science to psychology and culture. By choosing one of these informative speech examples, you’ll have plenty of material to work with to create an engaging and educational presentation.

Remember, the key to a successful informative speech is to choose a topic that you’re passionate about and that will resonate with your audience. Do your research, organize your thoughts, and practice your delivery to ensure that your message comes across loud and clear.

What Is an Informative Speech?

If you’ve ever been to a conference or seminar, chances are you’ve heard an informative speech. But what exactly is an informative speech? Simply put, it’s a type of speech designed to educate the audience on a particular topic. The goal is to provide interesting and useful information, ensuring the audience walks away with new knowledge or insights. Unlike persuasive speeches that aim to convince the audience of a viewpoint, informative speeches focus on explaining a subject clearly and objectively.

Types of Informative Speeches

Informative speeches come in various forms, each with its own purpose. The most common types are definition, explanation, description, and demonstration speeches. Depending on the objective, an informative speech can take on different structures and styles.

For example, a definition speech aims to explain a concept or term, while a demonstration speech shows the audience how to perform a task or process. An explanatory speech, on the other hand, provides a detailed account of a complex subject, breaking it down into digestible parts.

Purpose of Informative Speeches

At its core, the purpose of an informative speech is to share knowledge with the audience. These speeches are characterized by their fact-based, non-persuasive nature. The focus is on delivering information in an engaging and accessible way.

A well-crafted informative speech not only educates but also sparks curiosity and encourages further learning. By dedicating yourself to providing valuable information and appealing to your audience’s interests, you can succeed as an informative speaker.

Strategies for Selecting an Informative Speech Topic

Choosing the right topic is crucial for an effective informative speech. You want a subject that is not only interesting to you but also relevant and engaging for your audience. Consider their knowledge level, background, and expectations when selecting your topic.

One strategy is to focus on a subject you’re passionate about or have expertise in. This allows you to speak with authority and enthusiasm, making your speech more compelling. Another approach is to address current events or trending topics that are on people’s minds.

When brainstorming potential topics, consider your speech’s purpose and the type of informative speech you want to deliver. Is your goal to define a concept, explain a process, describe an event, or demonstrate a skill? Answering these questions will help guide your topic selection.

Find Out Exactly How Much You Could Make As a Paid Speaker

Use The Official Speaker Fee Calculator to tell you what you should charge for your first (or next) speaking gig — virtual or in-person! 

How to Write an Informative Speech

Now that you’ve selected your topic, it’s time to start writing your informative speech. The key to a successful speech is thorough preparation and a clear, organized structure. Let’s break down the steps involved in crafting an engaging and informative presentation.

Researching Your Topic

Before you start writing, it’s essential to conduct thorough research on your topic. Gather facts, statistics, examples, and other supporting information for your informative speech. These things will help you explain and clarify the subject matter to your audience.

As you research, use reliable sources such as academic journals, reputable websites, and expert opinions to ensure the accuracy and credibility of your information. Take notes and organize your findings in a way that makes sense for your speech’s structure.

Structuring Your Speech

A typical informative speech structure includes three main parts, namely, an introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction should grab the audience’s attention, establish your credibility , and preview the main points you’ll cover.

The body of your speech is where you’ll present your main points and supporting evidence. Use clear transitions between each point to maintain a logical flow. The conclusion should summarize your key takeaways and leave a lasting impression on your audience.

Outlining Your Speech

Creating an outline is a crucial step in organizing your thoughts and ensuring a coherent flow of information. Start by listing your main points and then add subpoints and supporting details for each section.

A well-structured outline will serve as a roadmap for your speech, keeping you on track and helping you stay focused on your key messages. It also makes the writing process more efficient and less overwhelming.

Writing Your Draft

With your outline in hand, it’s time to start writing your draft. Focus on presenting information clearly and concisely, using simple language and avoiding jargon. Provide examples and analogies throughout your informative speech in order to illustrate complex ideas and make them more relatable to your audience.

As you write, keep your audience in mind and tailor your language and examples to their level of understanding. Use transitions to link your ideas and maintain a smooth flow throughout the speech.

Editing and Revising

Once you’ve completed your draft, take the time to edit and revise your speech. First, check for clarity, accuracy, and logical organization. Then, eliminate unnecessary details, repetition, and filler words.

Read your speech aloud to identify any awkward phrasing or unclear passages. Lastly, seek feedback from others and be open to making changes based on their suggestions. Remember, the goal is to create a polished and effective informative speech.

Delivering an Informative Speech

You’ve written a fantastic informative speech, but now comes the real challenge: delivering it effectively. The way you present your speech can make all the difference in engaging your audience and ensuring they retain the information you’re sharing.

Practicing Your Speech

Practice makes perfect, and this couldn’t be more true when it comes to public speaking. Rehearse your speech multiple times to build confidence and familiarity with the content. Practice in front of a mirror, family members, or friends to get comfortable with your delivery.

As you practice, focus on your pacing, intonation, and body language. Aim for a conversational tone and maintain eye contact with your audience. The more you practice, the more natural and engaging your delivery will become.

Using Visual Aids

Visual aids such as slides, charts, or props can enhance your informative speech by making complex information more accessible and engaging. When utilized in your informative speech, they can help illustrate key points, provide visual examples, and break up the monotony of a purely verbal presentation.

Of course, it’s important to ensure your visuals are clear, relevant, and easy to understand. Otherwise, they may end up obscuring your points instead of clarifying them. In light of this, avoid cluttering your slides with too much text or overwhelming your audience with too many visuals. Use them strategically to support your message, not distract from it.

Engaging Your Audience

Engaging your audience is crucial for a successful informative speech. Use rhetorical questions, anecdotes, or interactive elements to keep them involved and attentive. Encourage participation, if appropriate, and maintain a conversational tone to create a connection with your listeners.

Pay attention to your audience’s reactions and adapt your delivery accordingly. If you sense confusion or disinterest, try rephrasing your points or providing additional examples to clarify your message. Remember, your goal is to educate and inspire your audience, so keep them at the forefront of your mind throughout your speech.

Handling Nerves

It’s normal to feel nervous before and during a speech, but there are strategies to help you manage those nerves . Take deep breaths, visualize success, and focus on your message rather than your anxiety. Remember, your audience wants you to succeed, and a little nervousness can actually enhance your performance by showing enthusiasm and authenticity.

If you find yourself getting overwhelmed, take a moment to pause, collect your thoughts, and regain your composure. Smile, make eye contact, and remind yourself that you’ve prepared thoroughly and have valuable information to share.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

To deliver an effective informative speech, it’s important to be aware of common pitfalls and mistakes. One of the biggest errors is overloading your audience with too much information. Remember, less is often more when it comes to public speaking.

Another mistake is failing to organize your content logically or using complex jargon without explanation. Make sure your speech has a clear structure and that you’re explaining any technical terms or concepts in a way that your audience can understand.

Finally, don’t neglect the importance of practice and preparation. Winging it or relying too heavily on notes can lead to a disjointed and unengaging speech. Take the time to rehearse, refine your delivery, and internalize your key points.

By avoiding these common mistakes and focusing on the strategies we’ve discussed, you’ll be well on your way to delivering an informative speech that educates, engages, and inspires your audience.

Tips for Delivering a Compelling Informative Speech

Once you’ve chosen your topic and done your research, it’s time to focus on delivering a compelling speech. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Start with a strong attention-grabbing opening that draws your audience in and sets the tone for your speech.
  • Use clear, concise language and avoid jargon or technical terms that your audience may not understand.
  • Incorporate storytelling, examples, and anecdotes to make your points more relatable and memorable.
  • Use visual aids , such as slides or props, to enhance your message and keep your audience engaged.
  • Practice your delivery and timing to ensure that you stay within your allotted time and maintain a natural, conversational tone.

By following these tips and choosing a topic that you’re passionate about, you’ll be well on your way to delivering an informative speech that educates and inspires your audience.

Free Download: 6 Proven Steps to Book More Paid Speaking Gigs in 2024​

Download our 18-page guide and start booking more paid speaking gigs today!

20 Bonus Topics for Informative Speeches

In case the informative speech examples above didn’t pique your interest, we have several more for you to consider. Ranging from topics like science and technology to history and education, these 20 topics are perfect for your next presentation.

  • The history and development of virtual reality technology
  • The benefits and challenges of remote work
  • The science behind the formation of hurricanes and tornadoes
  • The impact of social media on political campaigns and elections
  • The importance of sustainable fashion and its environmental benefits
  • The role of emotional support animals in mental health treatment
  • The history and cultural significance of a specific cuisine or dish
  • The impact of plastic pollution on marine ecosystems
  • The benefits and risks of gene editing technology
  • The psychology behind conspiracy theories and their spread online
  • The importance of digital privacy and data security in the modern age
  • The role of music therapy in healthcare and wellness
  • The impact of deforestation on biodiversity and climate change
  • The history and evolution of a specific sport or athletic event
  • The benefits and challenges of alternative education models
  • The science behind the human immune system and how vaccines work
  • The impact of mass incarceration on communities and families
  • The role of storytelling in preserving cultural heritage and traditions
  • The importance of financial planning for retirement and old age
  • The impact of urban agriculture on food security and community development

Choosing a Topic That Resonates With Your Audience

When selecting a topic for your informative speech, it’s important to consider your audience and what will resonate with them. Think about their interests, backgrounds, and knowledge levels, and choose a topic that will be both informative and engaging.

For example, if you’re speaking to a group of high school students, you may want to choose a topic that relates to their experiences or concerns, such as the impact of social media on mental health or the importance of financial literacy for young adults. If you’re speaking to a group of business professionals, you may want to focus on topics related to industry trends, leadership strategies, or emerging technologies.

By choosing a topic that resonates with your audience, you’ll be more likely to capture their attention and keep them engaged throughout your speech. And remember, even if you’re not an expert on the topic, you can still deliver an informative and engaging speech by doing your research and presenting the information in a clear and accessible way.

FAQs on Informative Speech Examples

What is an example of informative speech.

An example includes breaking down the impacts of climate change, detailing causes, effects, and potential solutions.

What are the 3 types of informative speeches?

The three main types are explanatory (breaks down complex topics), descriptive (paints a picture with words), and demonstrative (shows how to do something).

What are the 5 useful topics of an informative speech?

Top picks include technology advances, mental health awareness, environmental conservation efforts, cultural diversity appreciation, and breakthroughs in medical research.

What is an effective informative speech?

An effective one delivers clear info on a specific topic that educates listeners without overwhelming them. It’s well-researched and engaging.

Informative speech examples are everywhere, if you know where to look. From TED Talks to classroom lectures, there’s no shortage of inspiration for your next presentation. All you have to do is find a topic that lights your fire while engaging your audience.

Remember, a great informative speech is all about clarity, organization, and engagement. By following the tips and examples we’ve covered, you’ll be well on your way to delivering an informative speech that educates, enlightens, and leaves a lasting impression. So go ahead, pick your topic, and start crafting your own informative speech today!

  • Last Updated: May 9, 2024

Picture of The Speaker Lab

Explore Related Resources

Learn How You Could Get Your First (Or Next) Paid Speaking Gig In 90 Days or Less

We receive thousands of applications every day, but we only work with the top 5% of speakers .

Book a call with our team to get started — you’ll learn why the vast majority of our students get a paid speaking gig within 90 days of finishing our program .

If you’re ready to control your schedule, grow your income, and make an impact in the world – it’s time to take the first step. Book a FREE consulting call and let’s get you Booked and Paid to Speak ® .

About The Speaker Lab

We teach speakers how to consistently get booked and paid to speak.  Since 2015, we’ve helped thousands of speakers find clarity, confidence, and a clear path to make an impact.

Get Started

Let's connect.

[email protected]

Copyright ©2023 The Speaker Lab. All rights reserved.

100+ Informative Speech Topics & Ideas for All Students 

  • Post category: Uncategorized
  • Reading time: 30 mins read

As a student tasked with delivering an informative speech, finding the right topic can be a difficult first step. The challenge doesn’t just end with selecting a topic; it extends to researching, preparing, and effectively presenting it. We’ve got you covered.

Our selection of informative speech topics is filled with captivating and relevant ideas to keep your audience engaged while educating them. You can choose any of these topics as a starting point for an informative and memorable speech.

List of Informative Speech Topics for Students

When selecting informative speech topics for students, the aim is to find subjects that are educational, engaging, and relevant to their interests and experiences. Here are some diverse and thought-provoking informative topic ideas that college students can explore for their informative speeches:

Good Informative Speech Topics for Students

  • First Aid Basics and Their Importance
  • Cold and Flu: Symptoms and Prevention
  • Pediatric Nursing: Caring for Children
  • Mental Health Awareness in Adolescence
  • Essentials of Nutritional Health
  • The Science and Importance of Vaccines
  • Hygiene Practices to Prevent Illness
  • The Role of Sleep in Maintaining Health
  • Understanding and Managing Allergies
  • An Introduction to Human Anatomy
  • Special Considerations in Geriatric Nursing
  • Effective Stress Management Techniques
  • The Health Benefits of Regular Exercise
  • Ethical Considerations in Nursing
  • Managing and Understanding Diabetes
  • Fundamentals of Wound Care
  • Common Skin Conditions and Treatments
  • The Diverse Role of Nurses in Healthcare
  • Basics of Pain Management
  • Promoting Cardiovascular Health

Best Informative Speech Topics for College

  • Advanced First Aid and Crisis Management
  • In-depth Analysis of Mental Health Disorders
  • Pediatric Oncology: Challenges and Care
  • Lifestyle’s Impact on Chronic Diseases
  • Nutritional Therapy in Healthcare Settings
  • Vaccine Development and Effectiveness
  • Infection Control Techniques in Hospitals
  • Sleep Psychology and Related Disorders
  • Comprehensive Allergy Management
  • Detailed Study of Human Physiology
  • Geriatric Nursing and Age-Related Diseases
  • Advanced Stress and Anxiety Management
  • Exercise Physiology in Disease Prevention
  • Navigating Ethical Dilemmas in Nursing
  • In-depth Look at Diabetes and Endocrine Health
  • Advanced Techniques in Wound Healing
  • Dermatology from a Nursing Perspective
  • Leadership and Management in Nursing
  • Comprehensive Approaches to Pain Management
  • Cardiac Care and Rehabilitation Techniques

Easy Informative Speech Topics

  • Basic First Aid Techniques Everyone Should Know
  • The Importance of Hand Hygiene in Preventing Infections
  • Understanding Common Cold: Symptoms and Treatment
  • Introduction to Healthy Eating and Nutrition
  • Basic Steps for Blood Pressure Monitoring
  • Sleep Hygiene: Tips for a Good Night’s Sleep
  • Stress Management: Simple Relaxation Techniques
  • Basics of Diabetes: Types and Management
  • Understanding and Preventing Seasonal Allergies
  • Basic Wound Care: Do’s and Don’ts
  • The Role of Vaccinations in Public Health
  • The Impact of Smoking on Health
  • Introduction to Mental Health and Well-being
  • Basic Skin Care and Sun Protection
  • The Importance of Regular Exercise
  • Understanding Asthma: Basics and Management
  • Principles of Healthy Weight Management
  • Dehydration: Causes, Symptoms, and Prevention
  • Introduction to Geriatric Health Issues
  • Pediatric Health: Common Childhood Illnesses

Short Informative Speech Topics

  • Handwashing: The Best Way to Prevent Germs
  • Quick Tips for a Healthy Heart
  • Introduction to CPR: Basic Steps
  • The Dangers of Antibiotic Resistance
  • Understanding Migraines and Headache Management
  • Basic Nutrition: Vitamins and Minerals Essentials
  • The Significance of Breast Cancer Awareness
  • Recognizing and Responding to a Stroke
  • Basic Eye Care and Common Eye Problems
  • Importance of Vaccines in Disease Prevention
  • Ear Health and Preventing Hearing Loss
  • Simple Techniques for Anxiety Relief
  • Oral Hygiene and Dental Health Basics
  • Foot Care for Diabetics
  • Dealing with Common Digestive Disorders
  • Bone Health: Preventing Osteoporosis
  • Overview of Common Respiratory Diseases
  • Basic Understanding of Arthritis
  • Skin Cancer Awareness and Prevention
  • Basics of Maternal and Child Health

Interesting/ Fun Informative Speech Topics

  • The Evolution of Nursing Throughout History
  • Fascinating Medical Discoveries and Innovations
  • The Role of Pets and Animals in Healing
  • Bizarre but True: Unusual Medical Conditions
  • Medical Miracles: Remarkable Recovery Stories
  • How Laughter Benefits Physical Health
  • Exploring the Power of the Placebo Effect
  • Myths and Facts About the Human Brain
  • Pioneering Women in the Field of Nursing
  • The Science Behind Love and Its Health Benefits
  • Unique Traditional Healing Practices Around the World
  • The Future of Telemedicine and Virtual Healthcare
  • The Psychology of Pain: Perception vs. Reality
  • The Weird World of Rare Genetic Conditions
  • How Music Therapy Enhances Health and Well-being
  • The History and Significance of World Health Day
  • Famous Medical Experiments in History
  • The Impact of Space Travel on Human Health
  • The Influence of Social Media on Health Trends
  • Nursing in War: Stories from the Frontline

Unique Informative Speech Topics

  • The Link Between Climate Change and Public Health
  • The Future of Genetic Engineering in Medicine
  • Exploring the World of Rare Diseases
  • Nursing Practices in Different Cultures
  • Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare
  • The Psychology of Color in Healing Environments
  • The Impact of Globalization on Healthcare
  • Revolutionary Medical Treatments Under Development
  • The Ethical Dilemmas of Modern Medicine
  • The Role of Nutrition in Chronic Disease Management
  • Virtual Reality and its Application in Healthcare
  • The Evolution of Surgical Techniques
  • The Role of Nurses in Disaster Response
  • Breakthroughs in Brain-Computer Interfaces
  • The Connection Between Art and Healing
  • The Growing Field of Gerontechnology
  • The Science of Sleep Disorders
  • The Challenges of Healthcare in Remote Areas
  • The Effects of Social Isolation on Mental Health
  • The Role of Robotics in Modern Surgery

Popular Informative Speech Topics

  • The COVID-19 Pandemic: Lessons Learned
  • The Opioid Crisis: Understanding and Prevention
  • Mental Health: Breaking the Stigma
  • The Importance of Healthcare Accessibility
  • The Role of Technology in Modern Nursing
  • The Impact of Diet on Mental Health
  • The Challenges of Nursing in a Pandemic
  • Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Breastfeeding: Benefits and Challenges
  • The Rise of Telehealth Services
  • The Importance of Patient Advocacy in Nursing
  • The Effects of Social Media on Teen Mental Health
  • The Growing Problem of Antibiotic Resistance
  • The Benefits of Yoga and Meditation in Healthcare
  • Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia
  • The Impact of Stress on Physical Health
  • The Role of Community Health Nursing
  • Advances in Cancer Treatment and Research
  • The Importance of Health Education in Schools
  • The Growing Trend of Wellness and Preventative Care

Informative Speech Topics – 2024 Ideas

  • The Role of Nursing in Global Health Initiatives
  • Advances in Stem Cell Research and Therapy
  • The Future of Personalized Medicine
  • The Ethics of Assisted Reproductive Technologies
  • The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Patient Care
  • The Growing Trend of Plant-Based Diets and Health
  • The Use of Big Data in Healthcare
  • The Challenges of Providing Healthcare in Conflict Zones
  • The Role of Mental Health First Aid
  • The Impact of Climate Change on Infectious Diseases
  • Innovations in Wound Care and Healing
  • The Future of Nursing Education
  • The Role of Nurses in Palliative and End-of-Life Care
  • The Effects of Pollution on Respiratory Health
  • The Importance of Global Vaccine Equity
  • The Challenges of Rural Healthcare Delivery
  • Emerging Trends in Healthcare Technology
  • The Psychology Behind Chronic Pain Management
  • The Importance of Cultural Competence in Nursing
  • The Growing Field of Nursing Informatics

Creative Informative Speech Topics

  • The Art and Science of Nursing
  • The Role of Storytelling in Patient Care
  • Innovative Approaches to Patient Education
  • The Impact of Urban Design on Public Health
  • The Intersection of Fashion and Medical Wearables
  • Creative Therapies in Mental Health Care
  • The Use of Gamification in Health Education
  • The Role of Nurses in Health Policy Development
  • Exploring the World of Holistic Nursing
  • The Future of 3D Printing in Medicine
  • The Importance of Empathy in Healthcare
  • The Use of Augmented Reality in Surgical Training
  • The Role of Nutrition in Cancer Prevention
  • Innovations in Home Health Care Technology
  • The History and Future of Epidemics and Pandemics
  • The Role of Nurses in Climate Change Advocacy
  • The Use of Social Media in Health Awareness Campaigns
  • The Evolution of Maternal and Neonatal Care
  • Exploring the Benefits of Alternative Medicine
  • The Role of Nurses in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

What Is An Informative Speech?

An informative speech is a type of speech that aims to educate the audience on a specific topic, providing them with facts, insights, and information in a clear and understandable manner. Its main objective is to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the listeners about the subject being discussed.

What are the 4 Types of Informative Speeches?

Informative speeches are a cornerstone of effective communication, especially in educational and professional settings. They serve the crucial purpose of educating and enlightening audiences on various topics. Broadly categorized, there are four distinct types of informative speeches, each serving a unique role in conveying information.

The four types of informative speeches are:

Descriptive Speeches:  These speeches aim to provide a detailed, vivid, and clear picture of a person, place, object, or event. The goal is to make the audience feel as if they are familiar with the subject through the use of descriptive language.

Explanatory Speeches: These focus on explaining a concept, idea, or phenomenon. The objective is to clarify the subject matter and help the audience understand it better, often involving the breaking down of complex ideas into simpler parts.

Demonstrative Speeches: These speeches are about showing or demonstrating how to do something. They are often accompanied by visual aids and step-by-step instructions, making them particularly useful for teaching processes or procedures.

Definition Speeches: This type involves explaining the meaning, context, or background of a specific term, concept, or issue. It’s about providing a clear and precise definition that enhances the audience’s understanding of a subject that might be abstract or complex.

Choosing Informative Speech Ideas

When writing an informative speech, one of the most critical steps is selecting a compelling and appropriate topic. Choose an informative speech topic that is interesting and can captivate your audience and ensure your message is conveyed and understood. Here’s how to choose a topic using the Five W’s – Who, What, When, Where, and Why –  approach:

Who: Consider your audience. Who are they? What are their interests, age group, and educational background? Selecting an interesting topic that resonates with the specific demographics of your audience will make your speech more impactful.

What: Determine the subject of your information speech. What topic do you want to address? Ensure it’s informative, interesting, and something you’re passionate about. The ‘what’ should also align with the purpose of your speech – are you aiming to educate, explain, demonstrate, or define?

When: Timing can be crucial. When is the best time to talk about these essay topics? Choose a subject that is timely and relevant. For instance, discussing technological advancements would be more engaging if aligned with recent breakthroughs.

Where: The setting or context where your professional speech will be delivered can influence your choice. Where will you be speaking? In a classroom, a business meeting, or a community event? The environment and occasion can dictate the appropriateness and tone of your topic.

Why: Finally, consider why this topic is essential. Why should your audience care about it? The ‘why’ is crucial for creating a compelling speech that informs and connects with the audience on a deeper level.

How to Write a Killer Informative Speech

Writing a good informative speech involves several key steps, each designed to ensure that your speech is engaging, informative, and memorable. Here’s a guide to help you craft an effective informative speech:

Choose a Topic

When selecting a topic for an informative speech essay, choose one that aligns with your interests and expertise, ensuring a passionate and knowledgeable presentation that resonates with your audience. The topic should be engaging, offering new insights or a deeper understanding of a subject, and appropriately scoped to be thoroughly covered within the time allotted for your speech. This balance ensures that your speech is informative, interesting, relevant, and impactful to those listening.

Understand Your Audience

Understanding your audience is a crucial aspect of preparing an informative speech. This involves analyzing their interests, background knowledge, and expectations to tailor your presentation for maximum engagement and relevance. For instance, a speech aimed at industry professionals should differ in complexity and terminology compared to one intended for high school students. 

Knowing the audience’s baseline understanding of the topic helps avoid oversimplification or excessive complexity. Additionally, understanding their interests can guide you in choosing which aspects of the topic to emphasize, making the speech more appealing and relatable. A well-tailored speech, cognizant of its audience, delivers information effectively and ensures that the audience remains engaged and interested throughout the presentation.

Gather Evidence and Facts From Credible Scholarly Sources

Gathering evidence and facts from credible scholarly sources is fundamental in preparing an informative speech. This process involves extensive research to ensure the information you present is accurate, current, and authoritative. Utilizing sources such as academic journals, books, and reputable online databases adds depth and credibility to your speech. It’s important to critically evaluate these sources for their reliability and relevance to your topic. 

Incorporating well-researched facts and evidence strengthens your arguments and enhances your speech’s overall quality. It demonstrates to your audience that you thoroughly understand the subject and are committed to providing them with trustworthy and informative information. This careful attention to source selection and fact verification is key to delivering a speech that is engaging and intellectually robust.

Deconstruct the Topic to Select the Best Ideas

Deconstructing the topic involves brainstorming and breaking down the overarching subject into its constituent components or key ideas. By identifying these core elements, you can structure your speech in a logical and organized manner. 

This ensures you cover all relevant aspects of the topic and enables you to prioritize and emphasize the most significant and compelling ideas. Through this deconstruction and selection process, you can create a clear, focused, and engaging speech, providing your audience with a well-structured and informative presentation.

Write a Thesis Statement for Your Informative Speech

A thesis statement serves as the compass that guides the entire public speaking presentation. It encapsulates the main message you aim to convey and provides a roadmap for both you as the speaker and your audience. 

A well-constructed thesis statement should state the topic and indicate the specific angle, perspective, or key points you plan to cover. It’s the nucleus around your informative essay speech, ensuring your content remains focused and relevant. Moreover, a strong thesis statement provides your audience with a clear understanding of what to expect, enhancing their comprehension and engagement throughout your speech.

Inform Rather Than Persuade the Audience

Here, the primary objective is to inform and educate the audience rather than to persuade or convince them. This key distinction underlines the importance of objectively presenting facts, data, and information without bias or attempting to sway opinions. The aim is to give the audience a well-rounded understanding of the topic, enabling them to form opinions and make informed decisions. 

While persuasive speeches focus on advocating for a particular viewpoint, informative speeches prioritize clarity, objectivity, and the dissemination of knowledge. By adhering to this principle of informing rather than persuading, speakers can build trust with their audience and ensure that their message is received as credible and unbiased.

Write the First Draft of Your Speech

Here, you transform your research, unique ideas, and thesis statement into a cohesive and structured narrative. Focusing on getting your ideas down on paper without being overly concerned about perfection is important. Start with a strong introduction that grabs the audience’s attention and presents your thesis statement. In the body of the speech, present your key points or ideas logically, providing supporting evidence and examples. 

Finally, craft a conclusion summarizing the main points and leaving a lasting impression. While the first draft may be rough around the edges, it serves as the foundation for refining and improving your speech in subsequent revisions. It’s a critical step in turning your knowledge and insights into an informative and engaging presentation.

Start Writing Your Essay with Power Words 

Power words can include compelling statistics, vivid anecdotes, thought-provoking questions, or impactful quotations. The goal is to grab your audience’s attention immediately, piquing their curiosity and drawing them into your speech. They set the tone for your presentation and create an initial impression that can linger throughout the speech. 

They also serve as hooks, enticing the audience to listen attentively and setting the stage for the valuable information you are about to impart. Starting your speech with such impactful words creates an engaging opening that sets the tone for the rest of your presentation.

Develop the Body of the Speech

The body of your informative speech is where you delve into the core content, presenting your key points, supporting evidence, and explanations. Each key point should be organized logically, and transitions between them should be smooth to maintain the flow of your speech. To ensure clarity, providing examples, statistics, and relevant facts that bolster your main ideas is essential. Visual aids, if applicable, can enhance comprehension and engagement. 

Remember to maintain an objective and informative tone, steering clear of persuasion or bias. By developing the body of your speech with a clear structure and comprehensive content, you enable your audience to follow along easily and gain a deep understanding of the topic. This is where the substance of your speech lies, and a well-structured body ensures that your informative message is effectively conveyed to your audience.

End Your Informative Speech with a Bang

Concluding your informative speech with impact is essential to leave a lasting impression on your audience. This closing section is where you summarize your main points, reinforcing the key takeaways for your listeners. It’s also an opportunity to make a final statement or leave the audience with something to ponder. 

An effective conclusion can involve a powerful quote, a thought-provoking question, or a call to action, depending on the nature of your speech. By ending your speech with a “bang,” you ensure that your audience departs with a clear understanding of the topic and a sense of closure, making your presentation memorable and impactful.

Proofread and Edit, Then Present

Proofreading and editing your informative speech is the final critical step before the presentation. Carefully review your speech for clarity, coherence, and grammatical accuracy. Check for any factual inaccuracies or inconsistencies in your content. Ensure that your speech flows smoothly, with logical transitions between ideas. Pay attention to your pacing and tone to ensure a natural and engaging delivery. 

If using visual aids, ensure they are well-prepared and integrated seamlessly into your presentation. You must practice your speech multiple times to refine your delivery and become comfortable with the content. Effective proofreading and editing, followed by diligent rehearsal, contribute to a polished and confident presentation that will effectively inform and engage your audience.

Bottom Line

Selecting topics for an informative speech requires thoughtful consideration to ensure the audience is engaged, informed, and enlightened. The key is to choose subjects that are not only interesting and relevant but also rich in content, allowing for a deep dive into facts, data, and insights. A compelling informative speech topic should entertain and cater to the audience’s interests and knowledge level while offering new perspectives or information. 

Balancing complexity with clarity is crucial, ensuring the topic is neither too esoteric nor overly simplistic. Whether the speech aims to educate, raise awareness, or provide a fresh outlook on a familiar subject, the topic should spark curiosity and invite further exploration. Ultimately, the success of an informative speech lies in its ability to convey knowledge in a compelling and accessible manner.

You Might Also Like

Corporate compliance, implementing and using business information systems.

different types of informative speech topics

Planning and Presenting an Informative Speech

In this guide, you can learn about the purposes and types of informative speeches, about writing and delivering informative speeches, and about the parts of informative speeches.

Purposes of Informative Speaking

Informative speaking offers you an opportunity to practice your researching, writing, organizing, and speaking skills. You will learn how to discover and present information clearly. If you take the time to thoroughly research and understand your topic, to create a clearly organized speech, and to practice an enthusiastic, dynamic style of delivery, you can be an effective "teacher" during your informative speech. Finally, you will get a chance to practice a type of speaking you will undoubtedly use later in your professional career.

The purpose of the informative speech is to provide interesting, useful, and unique information to your audience. By dedicating yourself to the goals of providing information and appealing to your audience, you can take a positive step toward succeeding in your efforts as an informative speaker.

Major Types of Informative Speeches

In this guide, we focus on informative speeches about:

These categories provide an effective method of organizing and evaluating informative speeches. Although they are not absolute, these categories provide a useful starting point for work on your speech.

In general, you will use four major types of informative speeches. While you can classify informative speeches many ways, the speech you deliver will fit into one of four major categories.

Speeches about Objects

Speeches about objects focus on things existing in the world. Objects include, among other things, people, places, animals, or products.

Because you are speaking under time constraints, you cannot discuss any topic in its entirety. Instead, limit your speech to a focused discussion of some aspect of your topic.

Some example topics for speeches about objects include: the Central Intelligence Agency, tombstones, surgical lasers, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the pituitary gland, and lemmings.

To focus these topics, you could give a speech about Franklin Delano Roosevelt and efforts to conceal how he suffered from polio while he was in office. Or, a speech about tombstones could focus on the creation and original designs of grave markers.

Speeches about Processes

Speeches about processes focus on patterns of action. One type of speech about processes, the demonstration speech, teaches people "how-to" perform a process. More frequently, however, you will use process speeches to explain a process in broader terms. This way, the audience is more likely to understand the importance or the context of the process.

A speech about how milk is pasteurized would not teach the audience how to milk cows. Rather, this speech could help audience members understand the process by making explicit connections between patterns of action (the pasteurization process) and outcomes (a safe milk supply).

Other examples of speeches about processes include: how the Internet works (not "how to work the Internet"), how to construct a good informative speech, and how to research the job market. As with any speech, be sure to limit your discussion to information you can explain clearly and completely within time constraints.

Speeches about Events

Speeches about events focus on things that happened, are happening, or will happen. When speaking about an event, remember to relate the topic to your audience. A speech chronicling history is informative, but you should adapt the information to your audience and provide them with some way to use the information. As always, limit your focus to those aspects of an event that can be adequately discussed within the time limitations of your assignment.

Examples of speeches about events include: the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, Groundhog's Day, the Battle of the Bulge, the World Series, and the 2000 Presidential Elections.

Speeches about Concepts

Speeches about concepts focus on beliefs, ideas, and theories. While speeches about objects, processes, and events are fairly concrete, speeches about concepts are more abstract. Take care to be clear and understandable when creating and presenting a speech about a concept. When selecting a concept, remember you are crafting an informative speech. Often, speeches about concepts take on a persuasive tone. Focus your efforts toward providing unbiased information and refrain from making arguments. Because concepts can be vague and involved, limit your speech to aspects that can be readily explained and understood within the time limits.

Some examples of topics for concept speeches include: democracy, Taoism, principles of feminism, the philosophy of non-violent protest, and the Big Bang theory.

Strategies for Selecting a Topic

In many cases, circumstances will dictate the topic of your speech. However, if the topic has not been assigned or if you are having difficulty figuring out how to frame your topic as an informative speech,the following may be useful.

Begin by thinking of your interests. If you have always loved art, contemplate possible topics dealing with famous artists, art works, or different types of art. If you are employed, think of aspects of your job or aspects of your employer's business that would be interesting to talk about. While you cannot substitute personal experience for detailed research, your own experience can supplement your research and add vitality to your presentation. Choose one of the items below to learn more about selecting a topic.

Learn More about an Unfamiliar Topic

You may benefit more by selecting an unfamiliar topic that interests you. You can challenge yourself by choosing a topic you'd like to learn about and to help others understand it. If the Buddhist religion has always been an interesting and mysterious topic to you, research the topic and create a speech that offers an understandable introduction to the religion. Remember to adapt Buddhism to your audience and tell them why you think this information is useful to them. By taking this approach, you can learn something new and learn how to synthesize new information for your audience.

Think about Previous Classes

You might find a topic by thinking of classes you have taken. Think back to concepts covered in those classes and consider whether they would serve as unique, interesting, and enlightening topics for the informative speech. In astronomy, you learned about red giants. In history, you learned about Napoleon. In political science, you learned about The Federalist Papers. Past classes serve as rich resources for informative speech topics. If you make this choice, use your class notes and textbook as a starting point. To fully develop the content, you will need to do extensive research and perhaps even a few interviews.

Talk to Others

Topic selection does not have to be an individual effort. Spend time talking about potential topics with classmates or friends. This method can be extremely effective because other people can stimulate further ideas when you get stuck. When you use this method, always keep the basic requirements and the audience in mind. Just because you and your friend think home-brew is a great topic does not mean it will enthrall your audience or impress your instructor. While you talk with your classmates or friends, jot notes about potential topics and create a master list when you exhaust the possibilities. From this list, choose a topic with intellectual merit, originality, and potential to entertain while informing.

Framing a Thesis Statement

Once you settle on a topic, you need to frame a thesis statement. Framing a thesis statement allows you to narrow your topic, and in turns allows you to focus your research in this specific area, saving you time and trouble in the process.

Selecting a topic and focusing it into a thesis statement can be a difficult process. Fortunately, a number of useful strategies are available to you.

Thesis Statement Purpose

The thesis statement is crucial for clearly communicating your topic and purpose to the audience. Be sure to make the statement clear, concise, and easy to remember. Deliver it to the audience and use verbal and nonverbal illustrations to make it stand out.

Strategies For Framing a Thesis Statement

Focus on a specific aspect of your topic and phrase the thesis statement in one clear, concise, complete sentence, focusing on the audience. This sentence sets a goal for the speech. For example, in a speech about art, the thesis statement might be: "The purpose of this speech is to inform my audience about the early works of Vincent van Gogh." This statement establishes that the speech will inform the audience about the early works of one great artist. The thesis statement is worded conversationally and included in the delivery of the speech.

Thesis Statement and Audience

The thesis appears in the introduction of the speech so that the audience immediately realizes the speaker's topic and goal. Whatever the topic may be, you should attempt to create a clear, focused thesis statement that stands out and could be repeated by every member of your audience. It is important to refer to the audience in the thesis statement; when you look back at the thesis for direction, or when the audience hears the thesis, it should be clear that the most important goal of your speech is to inform the audience about your topic. While the focus and pressure will be on you as a speaker, you should always remember that the audience is the reason for presenting a public speech.

Avoid being too trivial or basic for the average audience member. At the same time, avoid being too technical for the average audience member. Be sure to use specific, concrete terms that clearly establish the focus of your speech.

Thesis Statement and Delivery

When creating the thesis statement, be sure to use a full sentence and frame that sentence as a statement, not as a question. The full sentence, "The purpose of this speech is to inform my audience about the early works of Vincent van Gogh," provides clear direction for the speech, whereas the fragment "van Gogh" says very little about the purpose of the speech. Similarly, the question "Who was Vincent van Gogh?" does not adequately indicate the direction the speech will take or what the speaker hopes to accomplish.

If you limit your thesis statement to one distinct aspect of the larger topic, you are more likely to be understood and to meet the time constraints.

Researching Your Topic

As you begin to work on your informative speech, you will find that you need to gather additional information. Your instructor will most likely require that you locate relevant materials in the library and cite those materials in your speech. In this section, we discuss the process of researching your topic and thesis.

Conducting research for a major informative speech can be a daunting task. In this section, we discuss a number of strategies and techniques that you can use to gather and organize source materials for your speech.

Gathering Materials

Gathering materials can be a daunting task. You may want to do some research before you choose a topic. Once you have a topic, you have many options for finding information. You can conduct interviews, write or call for information from a clearinghouse or public relations office, and consult books, magazines, journals, newspapers, television and radio programs, and government documents. The library will probably be your primary source of information. You can use many of the libraries databases or talk to a reference librarian to learn how to conduct efficient research.

Taking Notes

While doing your research, you may want to carry notecards. When you come across a useful passage, copy the source and the information onto the notecard or copy and paste the information. You should maintain a working bibliography as you research so you always know which sources you have consulted and so the process of writing citations into the speech and creating the bibliography will be easier. You'll need to determine what information-recording strategies work best for you. Talk to other students, instructors, and librarians to get tips on conducting efficient research. Spend time refining your system and you will soon be able to focus on the information instead of the record-keeping tasks.

Citing Sources Within Your Speech

Consult with your instructor to determine how much research/source information should be included in your speech. Realize that a source citation within your speech is defined as a reference to or quotation from material you have gathered during your research and an acknowledgement of the source. For example, within your speech you might say: "As John W. Bobbitt said in the December 22, 1993, edition of the Denver Post , 'Ouch!'" In this case, you have included a direct quotation and provided the source of the quotation. If you do not quote someone, you might say: "After the first week of the 1995 baseball season, attendance was down 13.5% from 1994. This statistic appeared in the May 7, 1995, edition of the Denver Post ." Whatever the case, whenever you use someone else's ideas, thoughts, or words, you must provide a source citation to give proper credit to the creator of the information. Failure to cite sources can be interpreted as plagiarism which is a serious offense. Upon review of the specific case, plagiarism can result in failure of the assignment, the course, or even dismissal from the University. Take care to cite your sources and give credit where it is due.

Creating Your Bibliography

As with all aspects of your speech, be sure to check with your instructor to get specific details about the assignment.

Generally, the bibliography includes only those sources you cited during the speech. Don't pad the bibliography with every source you read, saw on the shelf, or heard of from friends. When you create the bibliography, you should simply go through your complete sentence outline and list each source you cite. This is also a good way to check if you have included enough reference material within the speech. You will need to alphabetize the bibiography by authors last name and include the following information: author's name, article title, publication title, volume, date, page number(s). You may need to include additional information; you need to talk with your instructor to confirm the required bibliographical format.

Some Cautions

When doing research, use caution in choosing your sources. You need to determine which sources are more credible than others and attempt to use a wide variety of materials. The broader the scope of your research, the more impressive and believable your information. You should draw from different sources (e.g., a variety of magazines-- Time, Newsweek, US News & World Report, National Review, Mother Jones ) as well as different types of sources (i.e., use interviews, newspapers, periodicals, and books instead of just newspapers). The greater your variety, the more apparent your hard work and effort will be. Solid research skills result in increased credibility and effectiveness for the speaker.

Structuring an Informative Speech

Typically, informative speeches have three parts:

Introduction

In this section, we discuss the three parts of an informative speech, calling attention to specific elements that can enhance the effectiveness of your speech. As a speaker, you will want to create a clear structure for your speech. In this section, you will find discussions of the major parts of the informative speech.

The introduction sets the tone of the entire speech. The introduction should be brief and to-the-point as it accomplishes these several important tasks. Typically, there are six main components of an effective introduction:

Attention Getters

Thesis statement, audience adaptation, credibility statement, transition to the body.

As in any social situation, your audience makes strong assumptions about you during the first eight or ten seconds of your speech. For this reason, you need to start solidly and launch the topic clearly. Focus your efforts on completing these tasks and moving on to the real information (the body) of the speech. Typically, there are six main components of an effective introduction. These tasks do not have to be handled in this order, but this layout often yields the best results.

The attention-getter is designed to intrigue the audience members and to motivate them to listen attentively for the next several minutes. There are infinite possibilities for attention-getting devices. Some of the more common devices include using a story, a rhetorical question, or a quotation. While any of these devices can be effective, it is important for you to spend time strategizing, creating, and practicing the attention-getter.

Most importantly, an attention-getter should create curiosity in the minds of your listeners and convince them that the speech will be interesting and useful. The wording of your attention-getter should be refined and practiced. Be sure to consider the mood/tone of your speech; determine the appropriateness of humor, emotion, aggressiveness, etc. Not only should the words get the audiences attention, but your delivery should be smooth and confident to let the audience know that you are a skilled speaker who is prepared for this speech.

The crowd was wild. The music was booming. The sun was shining. The cash registers were ringing.

This story-like re-creation of the scene at a Farm Aid concert serves to engage the audience and causes them to think about the situation you are describing. Touching stories or stories that make audience members feel involved with the topic serve as good attention-getters. You should tell a story with feeling and deliver it directly to the audience instead of reading it off your notecards.

Example Text : One dark summer night in 1849, a young woman in her 20's left Bucktown, Maryland, and followed the North Star. What was her name? Harriet Tubman. She went back some 19 times to rescue her fellow slaves. And as James Blockson relates in a 1984 issue of National Geographic , by the end of her career, she had a $40,000.00 price on her head. This was quite a compliment from her enemies (Blockson 22).

Rhetorical Question

Rhetorical questions are questions designed to arouse curiosity without requiring an answer. Either the answer will be obvious, or if it isn't apparent, the question will arouse curiosity until the presentation provides the answer.

An example of a rhetorical question to gain the audiences attention for a speech about fly-fishing is, "Have you ever stood in a freezing river at 5 o'clock in the morning by choice?"

Example Text: Have you ever heard of a railroad with no tracks, with secret stations, and whose conductors were considered criminals?

A quotation from a famous person or from an expert on your topic can gain the attention of the audience. The use of a quotation immediately launches you into the speech and focuses the audience on your topic area. If it is from a well-known source, cite the author first. If the source is obscure, begin with the quote itself.

Example Text : "No day dawns for the slave, nor is it looked for. It is all night--night forever . . . ." (Pause) This quote was taken from Jermain Loguen, a fugitive who was the son of his Tennessee master and a slave woman.

Unusual Statement

Making a statement that is unusual to the ears of your listeners is another possibility for gaining their attention.

Example Text : "Follow the drinking gourd. That's what I said, friend, follow the drinking gourd." This phrase was used by slaves as a coded message to mean the Big Dipper, which revealed the North Star, and pointed toward freedom.

You might chose to use tasteful humor which relates to the topic as an effective way to attract the audience both to you and the subject at hand.

Example Text : "I'm feeling boxed in." [PAUSE] I'm not sure, but these may have been Henry "Box" Brown's very words after being placed on his head inside a box which measured 3 feet by 2 feet by 2 1\2 feet for what seemed to him like "an hour and a half." He was shipped by Adams Express to freedom in Philadelphia (Brown 60,92; Still 10).

Shocking Statistic

Another possibility to consider is the use of a factual statistic intended to grab your listener's attention. As you research the topic you've picked, keep your eyes open for statistics that will have impact.

Example Text : Today, John Elway's talents are worth millions, but in 1840 the price of a human life, a slave, was worth $1,000.00.

Example Text : Today I'd like to tell you about the Underground Railroad.

In your introduction, you need to adapt your speech to your audience. To keep audience members interested, tell them why your topic is important to them. To accomplish this task, you need to undertake audience analysis prior to creating the speech. Figure out who your audience members are, what things are important to them, what their biases may be, and what types of subjects/issues appeal to them. In the context of this class, some of your audience analysis is provided for you--most of your listeners are college students, so it is likely that they place some value on education, most of them are probably not bathing in money, and they live in Colorado. Consider these traits when you determine how to adapt to your audience.

As you research and write your speech, take note of references to issues that should be important to your audience. Include statements about aspects of your speech that you think will be of special interest to the audience in the introduction. By accomplishing this task, you give your listeners specific things with which they can identify. Audience adaptation will be included throughout the speech, but an effective introduction requires meaningful adaptation of the topic to the audience.

You need to find ways to get the members of your audience involved early in the speech. The following are some possible options to connect your speech to your audience:

Reference to the Occasion

Consider how the occasion itself might present an opportunity to heighten audience receptivity. Remind your listeners of an important date just passed or coming soon.

Example Text : This January will mark the 130th anniversary of a "giant interracial rally" organized by William Still which helped to end streetcar segregation in the city of Philadelphia (Katz i).

Reference to the Previous Speaker

Another possibility is to refer to a previous speaker to capitalize on the good will which already has been established or to build on the information presented.

Example Text : As Alice pointed out last week in her speech on the Olympic games of the ancient world, history can provide us with fascinating lessons.

The credibility statement establishes your qualifications as a speaker. You should come up with reasons why you are someone to listen to on this topic. Why do you have special knowledge or understanding of this topic? What can the audience learn from you that they couldn't learn from someone else? Credibility statements can refer to your extensive research on a topic, your life-long interest in an issue, your personal experience with a thing, or your desire to better the lives of your listeners by sifting through the topic and providing the crucial information.

Remember that Aristotle said that credibility, or ethos, consists of good sense, goodwill, and good moral character. Create the feeling that you possess these qualities by creatively stating that you are well-educated about the topic (good sense), that you want to help each member of the audience (goodwill), and that you are a decent person who can be trusted (good moral character). Once you establish your credibility, the audience is more likely to listen to you as something of an expert and to consider what you say to be the truth. It is often effective to include further references to your credibility throughout the speech by subtly referring to the traits mentioned above.

Show your listeners that you are qualified to speak by making a specific reference to a helpful resource. This is one way to demonstrate competence.

Example Text : In doing research for this topic, I came across an account written by one of these heroes that has deepened my understanding of the institution of slavery. Frederick Douglass', My Bondage and My Freedom, is the account of a man whose master's kindness made his slavery only more unbearable.

Your listeners want to believe that you have their best interests in mind. In the case of an informative speech, it is enough to assure them that this will be an interesting speech and that you, yourself, are enthusiastic about the topic.

Example Text : I hope you'll enjoy hearing about the heroism of the Underground Railroad as much as I have enjoyed preparing for this speech.

Preview the Main Points

The preview informs the audience about the speech's main points. You should preview every main body point and identify each as a separate piece of the body. The purpose of this preview is to let the audience members prepare themselves for the flow of the speech; therefore, you should word the preview clearly and concisely. Attempt to use parallel structure for each part of the preview and avoid delving into the main point; simply tell the audience what the main point will be about in general.

Use the preview to briefly establish your structure and then move on. Let the audience get a taste of how you will divide the topic and fulfill the thesis and then move on. This important tool will reinforce the information in the minds of your listeners. Here are two examples of a preview:

Simply identify the main points of the speech. Cover them in the same order that they will appear in the body of the presentation.

For example, the preview for a speech about kites organized topically might take this form: "First, I will inform you about the invention of the kite. Then, I will explain the evolution of the kite. Third, I will introduce you to the different types of kites. Finally, I will inform you about various uses for kites." Notice that this preview avoids digressions (e.g., listing the various uses for kites); you will take care of the deeper information within the body of the speech.

Example Text : I'll tell you about motivations and means of escape employed by fugitive slaves.

Chronological

For example, the preview for a speech about the Pony Express organized chronologically might take this form: "I'll talk about the Pony Express in three parts. First, its origins, second, its heyday, and third, how it came to an end." Notice that this preview avoids digressions (e.g., listing the reasons why the Pony Express came to an end); you will cover the deeper information within the body of the speech.

Example Text : I'll talk about it in three parts. First, its origins, second, its heyday, and third, how it came to an end.

After you accomplish the first five components of the introduction, you should make a clean transition to the body of the speech. Use this transition to signal a change and prepare the audience to begin processing specific topical information. You should round out the introduction, reinforce the excitement and interest that you created in the audience during the introduction, and slide into the first main body point.

Strategic organization helps increase the clarity and effectiveness of your speech. Four key issues are discussed in this section:

Organizational Patterns

Connective devices, references to outside research.

The body contains the bulk of information in your speech and needs to be clearly organized. Without clear organization, the audience will probably forget your information, main points, perhaps even your thesis. Some simple strategies will help you create a clear, memorable speech. Below are the four key issues used in organizing a speech.

Once you settle on a topic, you should decide which aspects of that topic are of greatest importance for your speech. These aspects become your main points. While there is no rule about how many main points should appear in the body of the speech, most students go with three main points. You must have at least two main points; aside from that rule, you should select your main points based on the importance of the information and the time limitations. Be sure to include whatever information is necessary for the audience to understand your topic. Also, be sure to synthesize the information so it fits into the assigned time frame. As you choose your main points, try to give each point equal attention within the speech. If you pick three main points, each point should take up roughly one-third of the body section of your speech.

There are four basic patterns of organization for an informative speech.

  • Chronological order
  • Spatial order
  • Causal order
  • Topical order

There are four basic patterns of organization for an informative speech. You can choose any of these patterns based on which pattern serves the needs of your speech.

Chronological Order

A speech organized chronologically has main points oriented toward time. For example, a speech about the Farm Aid benefit concert could have main points organized chronologically. The first main point focuses on the creation of the event; the second main point focuses on the planning stages; the third point focuses on the actual performance/concert; and the fourth point focuses on donations and assistance that resulted from the entire process. In this format, you discuss main points in an order that could be followed on a calendar or a clock.

Spatial Order

A speech organized spatially has main points oriented toward space or a directional pattern. The Farm Aid speech's body could be organized in spatial order. The first main point discusses the New York branch of the organization; the second main point discusses the Midwest branch; the third main point discusses the California branch of Farm Aid. In this format, you discuss main points in an order that could be traced on a map.

Causal Order

A speech organized causally has main points oriented toward cause and effect. The main points of a Farm Aid speech organized causally could look like this: the first main point informs about problems on farms and the need for monetary assistance; the second main point discusses the creation and implementation of the Farm Aid program. In this format, you discuss main points in an order that alerts the audience to a problem or circumstance and then tells the audience what action resulted from the original circumstance.

Topical Order

A speech organized topically has main points organized more randomly by sub-topics. The Farm Aid speech could be organized topically: the first main point discusses Farm Aid administrators; the second main point discusses performers; the third main point discusses sponsors; the fourth main point discusses audiences. In this format, you discuss main points in a more random order that labels specific aspects of the topic and addresses them in separate categories. Most speeches that are not organized chronologically, spatially, or causally are organized topically.

Within the body of your speech, you need clear internal structure. Connectives are devices used to create a clear flow between ideas and points within the body of your speech--they serve to tie the speech together. There are four main types of connective devices:

Transitions

Internal previews, internal summaries.

Within the body of your speech, you need clear internal structure. Think of connectives as hooks and ladders for the audience to use when moving from point-to-point within the body of your speech. These devices help re-focus the minds of audience members and remind them of which main point your information is supporting. The four main types of connective devices are:

Transitions are brief statements that tell the audience to shift gears between ideas. Transitions serve as the glue that holds the speech together and allow the audience to predict where the next portion of the speech will go. For example, once you have previewed your main points and you want to move from the introduction to the body of the Farm Aid speech, you might say: "To gain an adequate understanding of the intricacies of this philanthropic group, we need to look at some specific information about Farm Aid. We'll begin by looking at the administrative branch of this massive fund-raising organization."

Internal previews are used to preview the parts of a main point. Internal previews are more focused than, but serve the same purpose as, the preview you will use in the introduction of the speech. For example, you might create an internal preview for the complex main point dealing with Farm Aid performers: "In examining the Farm Aid performers, we must acknowledge the presence of entertainers from different genres of music--country and western, rhythm and blues, rock, and pop." The internal preview provides specific information for the audience if a main point is complex or potentially confusing.

Internal summaries are the reverse of internal previews. Internal summaries restate specific parts of a main point. To internally summarize the main point dealing with Farm Aid performers, you might say: "You now know what types of people perform at the Farm Aid benefit concerts. The entertainers come from a wide range of musical genres--country and western, rhythm and blues, rock, and pop." When using both internal previews and internal summaries, be sure to stylize the language in each so you do not become redundant.

Signposts are brief statements that remind the audience where you are within the speech. If you have a long point, you may want to remind the audience of what main point you are on: "Continuing my discussion of Farm Aid performers . . . "

When organizing the body of your speech, you will integrate several references to your research. The purpose of the informative speech is to allow you and the audience to learn something new about a topic. Additionally, source citations add credibility to your ideas. If you know a lot about rock climbing and you cite several sources who confirm your knowledge, the audience is likely to see you as a credible speaker who provides ample support for ideas.

Without these references, your speech is more like a story or a chance for you to say a few things you know. To complete this assignment satisfactorily, you must use source citations. Consult your textbook and instructor for specific information on how much supporting material you should use and about the appropriate style for source citations.

While the conclusion should be brief and tight, it has a few specific tasks to accomplish:

Re-assert/Reinforce the Thesis

Review the main points, close effectively.

Take a deep breath! If you made it to the conclusion, you are on the brink of finishing. Below are the tasks you should complete in your conclusion:

When making the transition to the conclusion, attempt to make clear distinctions (verbally and nonverbally) that you are now wrapping up the information and providing final comments about the topic. Refer back to the thesis from the introduction with wording that calls the original thesis into memory. Assert that you have accomplished the goals of your thesis statement and create the feeling that audience members who actively considered your information are now equipped with an understanding of your topic. Reinforce whatever mood/tone you chose for the speech and attempt to create a big picture of the speech.

Within the conclusion, re-state the main points of the speech. Since you have used parallel wording for your main points in the introduction and body, don't break that consistency in the conclusion. Frame the review so the audience will be reminded of the preview and the developed discussion of each main point. After the review, you may want to create a statement about why those main points fulfilled the goals of the speech.

Finish strongly. When you close your speech, craft statements that reinforce the message and leave the audience with a clear feeling about what was accomplished with your speech. You might finalize the adaptation by discussing the benefits of listening to the speech and explaining what you think audience members can do with the information.

Remember to maintain an informative tone for this speech. You should not persuade about beliefs or positions; rather, you should persuade the audience that the speech was worthwhile and useful. For greatest effect, create a closing line or paragraph that is artistic and effective. Much like the attention-getter, the closing line needs to be refined and practiced. Your close should stick with the audience and leave them interested in your topic. Take time to work on writing the close well and attempt to memorize it so you can directly address the audience and leave them thinking of you as a well-prepared, confident speaker.

Outlining an Informative Speech

Two types of outlines can help you prepare to deliver your speech. The complete sentence outline provides a useful means of checking the organization and content of your speech. The speaking outline is an essential aid for delivering your speech. In this section, we discuss both types of outlines.

Two types of outlines can help you prepare to deliver your speech. The complete sentence outline provides a useful means of checking the organization and content of your speech. The speaking outline is an essential aid for delivering your speech.

The Complete Sentence Outline

A complete sentence outline may not be required for your presentation. The following information is useful, however, in helping you prepare your speech.

The complete sentence outline helps you organize your material and thoughts and it serves as an excellent copy for editing the speech. The complete sentence outline is just what it sounds like: an outline format including every complete sentence (not fragments or keywords) that will be delivered during your speech.

Writing the Outline

You should create headings for the introduction, body, and conclusion and clearly signal shifts between these main speech parts on the outline. Use standard outline format. For instance, you can use Roman numerals, letters, and numbers to label the parts of the outline. Organize the information so the major headings contain general information and the sub-headings become more specific as they descend. Think of the outline as a funnel: you should make broad, general claims at the top of each part of the outline and then tighten the information until you have exhausted the point. Do this with each section of the outline. Be sure to consult with your instructor about specific aspects of the outline and refer to your course book for further information and examples.

Using the Outline

If you use this outline as it is designed to be used, you will benefit from it. You should start the outline well before your speech day and give yourself plenty of time to revise it. Attempt to have the final, clean copies ready two or three days ahead of time, so you can spend a day or two before your speech working on delivery. Prepare the outline as if it were a final term paper.

The Speaking Outline

Depending upon the assignment and the instructor, you may use a speaking outline during your presentation. The following information will be helpful in preparing your speech through the use of a speaking outline.

This outline should be on notecards and should be a bare bones outline taken from the complete sentence outline. Think of the speaking outline as train tracks to guide you through the speech.

Many speakers find it helpful to highlight certain words/passages or to use different colors for different parts of the speech. You will probably want to write out long or cumbersome quotations along with your source citation. Many times, the hardest passages to learn are those you did not write but were spoken by someone else. Avoid the temptation to over-do the speaking outline; many speakers write too much on the cards and their grades suffer because they read from the cards.

The best strategy for becoming comfortable with a speaking outline is preparation. You should prepare well ahead of time and spend time working with the notecards and memorizing key sections of your speech (the introduction and conclusion, in particular). Try to become comfortable with the extemporaneous style of speaking. You should be able to look at a few keywords on your outline and deliver eloquent sentences because you are so familiar with your material. You should spend approximately 80% of your speech making eye-contact with your audience.

Delivering an Informative Speech

For many speakers, delivery is the most intimidating aspect of public speaking. Although there is no known cure for nervousness, you can make yourself much more comfortable by following a few basic delivery guidelines. In this section, we discuss those guidelines.

The Five-Step Method for Improving Delivery

  • Read aloud your full-sentence outline. Listen to what you are saying and adjust your language to achieve a good, clear, simple sentence structure.
  • Practice the speech repeatedly from the speaking outline. Become comfortable with your keywords to the point that what you say takes the form of an easy, natural conversation.
  • Practice the speech aloud...rehearse it until you are confident you have mastered the ideas you want to present. Do not be concerned about "getting it just right." Once you know the content, you will find the way that is most comfortable for you.
  • Practice in front of a mirror, tape record your practice, and/or present your speech to a friend. You are looking for feedback on rate of delivery, volume, pitch, non-verbal cues (gestures, card-usage, etc.), and eye-contact.
  • Do a dress rehearsal of the speech under conditions as close as possible to those of the actual speech. Practice the speech a day or two before in a classroom. Be sure to incorporate as many elements as possible in the dress rehearsal...especially visual aids.

It should be clear that coping with anxiety over delivering a speech requires significant advanced preparation. The speech needs to be completed several days beforehand so that you can effectively employ this five-step plan.

Anderson, Thad, & Ron Tajchman. (1994). Informative Speaking. Writing@CSU . Colorado State University. https://writing.colostate.edu/guides/guide.cfm?guideid=52

Study.com

In order to continue enjoying our site, we ask that you confirm your identity as a human. Thank you very much for your cooperation.

Module 9: Informative Speaking

Selecting a topic for an informative speech, learning objectives.

Select an appropriate topic for an informative speech.

Now that we have discussed the five different types of informative speeches, let’s focus on how to select a specific and appropriate topic for your speech. Your speech should fit within one of the five speech types we have discussed in the prior section.

Person choosing a bar of chocolate from a wall of options

Choice is hard.

Choosing a topic can sometimes be the most difficult step. You want to choose a topic that is of interest to the audience and yourself. You also want to make sure that you have met the assignment expectations. If you think finding a topic is a challenge, you are not alone. There are many (even professional speakers) who think this can be one of the hardest parts of a speech!

As you think about topic choices, recall that the purpose in an informative speech is to share information with an audience, not to persuade them to believe something or take some kind of action.

As an example, you may want to give a speech about affordable housing options. You will want to keep your focus on explaining the options available to your audience rather than offering your opinion on the best options. You do not want to ask your audience to try and persuade their local legislators. You only want to stick to the research you have done about what constitutes affordable housing and nothing more. It is important to select a topic you understand well, is of interest to you, and can be explained to your audience easily. You do not have to be an expert on your topic, but you should be familiar enough with it that you can talk about it with confidence. You also want to keep your audience in mind and select a topic they are unlikely to know a lot about and that they would be interested in learning more about.

When determining a topic, keep the following in mind:

  • Know your speech purpose. In this case, it would be to inform or explain. Focus on topics that lend themselves to that purpose.
  • Who is your specific audience? Would they be interested in your topic? What knowledge might they already have about your topic? What might they want to know about your topic?
  • What constraints have you been given? For example, what kind of room are you speaking in? How much time will you have to speak? How many sources do you need to cite? Are you required to use visual aids?

Find the right scope

One common error students in public speaking classes have is selecting a topic that is too large or broad in scope for the time they have been given to deliver their speech. To illustrate, you might be interested in developing a speech that informs your audience about the Black Lives Matter movement. Even though Black Lives Matter is a specific social justice movement, it is still a broad subject with many different facets, many of which might be a good subject for an informative speech. For example, you could devote the speech to the particular events in 2013 that were the genesis of the movement. Or you might focus your speech on explaining how the #BlackLivesMatter social media hashtag helped spread awareness of the movement. Or, you could talk about how Black Lives Matter started.

As you think about selecting a topic, ask yourself whether you can reasonably hope to inform or educate your audience in the time frame you have for the speech. If you think it might be too broad in scope, try and brainstorm aspects of the topic that would be focused and narrow enough to fit the time parameters you have been given.

Once you have selected your topic and narrowed it to fit the assignment parameters, you can start organizing the speech.

  • Wall of Chocolate. Authored by : Bryan Allison. Located at : https://flic.kr/p/2sksk . License : CC BY-SA: Attribution-ShareAlike
  • Selecting a Topic for an Informative Speech. Authored by : Mike Randolph with Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Selecting a Topic for an Informative Speech. Authored by : Sandra K. Winn with Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution

Footer Logo Lumen Waymaker

  • How to Order

User Icon

Informative Speech

Types Of Informative Speeches

Cathy A.

Understanding Different Types of Informative Speeches with Examples

types of informative speeches

People also read

Informative Speech Writing - A Complete Guide

Good Informative Speech Topics & Ideas

250+ Demonstrative Speech Ideas and ‘How To’ Topics - 2024

10+ Informative Speech Examples - Get Inspiration For Any Type

Informative Speech Outline - Format, Writing Steps, and Examples

Are you struggling to choose the right type of informative speech for your next presentation?

Selecting the appropriate style can be a daunting task, especially when you're aiming to engage, educate, and enlighten your audience effectively.

In this blog, we'll help you understand informative speeches better. We'll look at different types and share expert insights to guide your choices.

So, let’s get started.

Arrow Down

  • 1. Informative Speech Definition
  • 2. Types of Informative Speeches
  • 3. Types of Informative Speeches Examples
  • 4. Informative Speech Topics
  • 5. Mistakes to Watch Out for When Crafting Your Informative Speech

Informative Speech Definition

An informative speech is a type of presentation that aims to educate, enlighten, or inform the audience about a particular topic, idea, concept, or issue. 

Unlike persuasive speeches , informative speeches are designed to provide the audience with factual information, clear explanations, and a better understanding of the subject matter. 

These speeches can cover a wide range of topics, from scientific concepts and historical events to personal experiences and current trends.

Informative speeches serve to increase awareness, provide insights, and equip the audience with valuable knowledge they can apply or share.

Types of Informative Speeches

Informative speeches are versatile and can be categorized into various types, each serving a unique purpose. Here are some of the most common types:

Definition Speech 

A definition speech is a type of speech that defines the nature of something. It explains the actual meaning of a particular thing or subject matter. It defines a specific subject’s theory, philosophy, or meaning that the audience likely does not know much about.

The definition speech topic might be general, i.e., a game, or highly specific, i.e., a particular place. The central idea of a definition speech is to define something so that it becomes easy to understand.

Here is how you can write a definition speech:

  • Explain the term or subject with the help of a synonym or a common word that has a similar meaning.
  • Provide some examples that make the definition clear for the audience.
  • Compare different dictionary definitions and explain how these definitions are similar and related to each other.

To learn more, check out this example of a definition speech.

Definition Speech Example

Explanatory Speech

An explanatory speech is when a speaker talks about a specific topic to inform the audience. It often uses visuals to simplify complex information, making it easy for the audience to understand.

Follow these tips for writing an explanatory speech:

  • Begin by defining the subject. You can use a dictionary definition to give the precise meaning of the speech topic.
  • Provide meaningful and specific information that explains the topic on a deeper level.
  • Explain the topic with the help of examples and facts to make the audience understand the process.

Take a look at this example of an explanatory speech for a better understanding.

Explanatory Speech Example

Order Essay

Paper Due? Why Suffer? That's our Job!

Descriptive Speech 

A descriptive speech is a type of informative presentation that immerses the audience in a detailed and vivid portrayal of a specific person, place, object, or concept. 

The main objective of a descriptive speech is to use words to create a clear mental picture for the audience. 

This type of speech often relies on the use of sensory language to evoke the five senses, making the subject come alive in the minds of the listeners.

The following tips will help you write a good descriptive speech:

  • Provide a vivid description of your topic.
  • Describe all the characteristics in a logical order.
  • Decide what impression you want to make with your speech.

Here is an example of a descriptive speech to help you grasp the concept better.

Descriptive Speech Example

Demonstrative Speech

A demonstrative speech is a type of informative speech that describes how to do something. Demonstrative speech is intended to make the audience understand the process of doing something. For example, you are explaining how to create a bibliography. 

Demonstrative speech usually takes help from visual examples that show the audience how to move from one step to another. Visual examples increase the likelihood that the audience will retain the information of the speech.

Below are some tips to help you write a good demonstrative speech:

  • You need to know the process well before you explain it to your audience.
  • Suppose that your audience knows nothing about the process, so you need to explain everything in detail.
  • Make sure that the steps are in proper order.
  • Show steps visually; it will help your audience remember the steps easily.
  • In the end, warn your audience of any common mistakes or any possible difficulties if they don’t follow the procedure.

Explore this example of a demonstrative speech to gain a deeper understanding.

Demonstrative Speech Example

Types of Informative Speeches Examples

Take a look at the following informative speech examples to gain a better understanding of how informative speeches are structured and delivered.

Sample Informative Speech

Short Informative Speech Example

Making an outline for your speech is an essential step. If you're finding it challenging to create an informative speech outline , take a look at this example provided below for guidance.

Informative Speech Outline Example

If you need more examples, take a look at this blog about informative speech examples for your inspiration.

Informative Speech Topics

Selecting the right topic for your informative speech is a critical step in ensuring a successful presentation. Your choice should be based on your interests, your audience's interests, and the occasion. 

Here's a list of diverse informative speech topics to inspire your next presentation:

  • The Impact of Social Media on Mental Health
  • Sustainable Living Practices for a Greener Future
  • Understanding Blockchain Technology
  • The Wonders of the Human Brain
  • The Influence of Music on Emotions and Memory
  • Exploring the World of Cryptocurrency
  • The Importance of Financial Literacy
  • The History and Significance of the Mona Lisa
  • Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare
  • The Power of Storytelling in Marketing

Are you still having trouble coming up with a good speech topic? Check out this blog for some great informative speech topics .

Tough Essay Due? Hire Tough Writers!

Mistakes to Watch Out for When Crafting Your Informative Speech

Crafting an informative speech can be a rewarding experience when done correctly, but it's essential to be aware of potential pitfalls that can undermine your efforts. 

Here are some common mistakes to avoid when writing and delivering your informative speech:

  • Lack of Clarity in Purpose: Failing to clearly define the specific purpose of your speech can confuse your audience. Make sure your goal, whether it's to educate, explain, or describe, is evident from the beginning.
  • Insufficient Research : Inadequate research can lead to inaccuracies and undermine your credibility. Thoroughly research your topic to ensure you provide accurate and up-to-date information.
  • Overwhelming with Information : Avoid overwhelming your audience with excessive details. Focus on the most important and relevant information to keep your speech concise and engaging.
  • Poor Organization : A disorganized speech can be hard to follow. Use a clear structure, such as an introduction, body, and conclusion, and consider using visual aids or transitions to help guide your audience.
  • Neglecting the Audience's Needs : Failing to consider your audience's prior knowledge and interests can lead to a speech that's either too basic or too advanced for them. Tailor your content to your specific audience.
  • Ignoring the Time Limit : Going over the allotted time for your speech can test your audience's patience. Practice to ensure your speech fits within the time constraints.
  • Monotone Delivery : A lack of enthusiasm or a monotonous tone can make your speech less engaging. Use vocal variety and expressive gestures to maintain your audience's interest.
  • Ignoring Visual Aids : Visual aids, when used effectively, can enhance the clarity of your message. Neglecting to incorporate them or using them haphazardly can hinder your presentation.

In conclusion, informative speeches are powerful tools for sharing knowledge, and fostering a deeper understanding of a wide array of subjects. 

By avoiding common mistakes such as lack of clarity, or disorganization, you can ensure that your audience leaves informed and engaged.

Writing informative speeches is very easy and simple. However, if you need some help, you can ask our experts to ' write my essay for me '. We at MyPerfectWords.com provide high-quality speechwriting services at affordable prices that are sure to win any debate!

So, what are you waiting for? Buy speech today and experience exceptional support for your speech writing needs.

AI Essay Bot

Write Essay Within 60 Seconds!

Cathy A.

Cathy has been been working as an author on our platform for over five years now. She has a Masters degree in mass communication and is well-versed in the art of writing. Cathy is a professional who takes her work seriously and is widely appreciated by clients for her excellent writing skills.

Get Help

Paper Due? Why Suffer? That’s our Job!

Keep reading

informative speech

Protect your data

This site uses cookies and related technologies for site operation, and analytics as described in our Privacy Policy . You may choose to consent to our use of these technologies, reject non-essential technologies, or further manage your preferences.

  • Career Advice
  • The Purpose of Informative...

The Purpose of Informative Speech - Rules, Types, and Topic Ideas

10 min read · Updated on February 20, 2023

Marsha Hebert

Does the thought of public speaking leave you quaking in your boots?

When you were in school, you were probably required, at some point, to get up in front of the class and give a speech about something. Perhaps your teacher wanted you to give a 15-minute presentation about making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, or you had to talk about what happens when a star explodes. Both of these are examples of informative speeches.

Now you have a career and your boss has asked you to give an informative speech about a new project that's on the horizon. If you've been lucky enough to live without having to give a presentation in the past, you may be wondering about the purpose of an informative speech. What are the rules? Are there different types of informative speech? How do you pick topics and generate ideas? Well, put on your learning hat and let's dive into these questions. 

What is an informative speech?

Basically, an informative speech is when you verbalize a message to give someone else information. In that context, giving someone directions to your house is a miniature informative speech. Informative speeches are used by companies to present details about a new policy, describe procedures, and set expectations. 

The content of an informative speech is educational and objective. It's based on facts and, often, visuals are used as supporting evidence to help cement the information into the audience's mind. No matter which type of informative speech you deliver, the overall objective should be education. 

There are four goals of an informative speech. They are to be accurate, give meaningful information, articulate the message clearly, and be engaging. In other words, make it memorable and truthful in a way that people can easily understand. 

4 types of informative speech

There are countless types of informative speech; however, there are four types that are commonly used .

Definition 

A definition speech aims to explain what something means. The topic is likely something the audience knows little about. The easiest way to define concepts is by using synonyms or antonyms. You could also talk about how something is used or what it does as a way to define it. Another very effective way to deliver a definition-style informative speech is to use examples. Examples help your audience to assimilate the information in their brain for easier retention. 

Demonstration

If you're going to deliver a demonstration speech, it's imperative that you're intimately familiar with the topic. You also must be able to think quickly to overcome any challenge that may occur during your demonstration. Above all else, be sure to practice, practice, practice! Talking and doing something at the same time involves psycho-motor skills that can be hard to accomplish with people looking. 

Think of every television chef - Gordon Ramsay, Rachel Ray, or Julia Child. Their broadcasts are the epitome of a demonstration type of informative speech. Gordon Ramsay goes through the process of scrambling eggs and at the same time, he's telling you what to do, when to do it, and how to do it. Just because they make it look easy, doesn't mean you'll be able to wing it. 

The really great thing about demonstration speeches is that you can do things like ask for volunteers from the audience, fill in any empty space in your speech with the definition of what you're working with, and have a clear sequence of steps to complete to ensure that the information is fully delivered. 

Description

A description type of informative speech relies on the five human senses to deliver information. You could be talking about a new restaurant and the hunger associated with the smells that come from the kitchen, or your speech could be something that advises your employees about a rebranding initiative and the vibrant colors in the new logo. 

Either way, you're giving the audience a mental picture of what you're talking about. This is called spatial pattern organization and allows the people listening to you to arrange concepts in their minds to evoke a sensory reaction. 

Explanation

You have to be careful with explanation speeches as they can quickly become boring for your audience, especially if you're presenting complicated information. Of course, you can break up the information into units. Avoid word vomiting on your audience and use examples to explain the content in a way that your audience can relate to. 

What are the rules for informative speech?

First and foremost, an informative speech isn't meant to persuade anyone of anything. Your informative speech may inspire people to change their minds about a topic; however, that isn't the goal. The goal of informative speaking is to give information. Persuasive speaking, often used in sales roles, is meant to get someone to do something or act in a particular way, based on information that is shared with them. 

You may deliver an informative speech on solar panels and how their use on a residential dwelling lowers utility bills. The goal of your speech is simply to explain the correlation between the use of solar and the effect on the electricity bill that the resident receives each month. However, there may be some audience members who run home and get solar panels. Even though your informative speech ended up persuading that audience member to do something, that doesn't change the fact that your speech was informative. It's all about intent. 

How do you start an informative speech?

Before you get up in front of your audience, there are several things to consider when you start building your informative speech. 

Who is your audience? Of course, knowing the specific people you'll be presenting to is imperative. You need to also consider what they may or may not already know. This could greatly impact how much or how little information you need to share.

What will you be talking about? The answer to this question defines the basis of your speech. Take into account where your passions lie and, conversely, what you don't like about the topic. If you want to keep your audience engaged, you have to keep any biases you may have about the subject in check so that they don't influence your message.

How long does the speech need to be? If you only have 5 minutes, a high-level overview may be all you have time to discuss. However, if you'll be in the spotlight for 30 minutes or more, you can spend a bit more time on the things you feel your audience may not be as familiar with. This will aid comprehension and knowledge retention. 

Where will you physically give the speech? This is especially important if you'll have visuals. If you're in a large auditorium, the visuals you present need to be seen by the people in the back. If you're in a small conference room, it won't present much of an issue.

Why are you giving the speech? If you know the different types of speeches, answering the “why” will be easy. Your goal will be to inform someone about something in a demonstrative or descriptive way.

After you answer those questions, you can craft your presentation. When you get in front of your audience, remember to be engaging. 

You only have a few seconds to grab their attention. The standard advice is to open with a joke, but that may not always be appropriate. Think about every speech or presentation you've had to attend. What were the things that made it memorable for you? Use those elements in your own speech.

Don't forget about your body language

Your audience isn't only listening to the words you say. They're also watching your posture, hand gestures, and facial expressions. When you need to give an informative speech, it's quite possible that the content is simply boring but, if you're an engaging orator, the audience will be more apt to follow along because they enjoy watching you. 

It can be argued that body language says as much as our words. If you're smiling, the audience will assume you like the topic. If you slump over a podium, the audience may guess that you're not confident in what you're talking about. 

The wrong body language can turn off your entire audience. Not only will they miss what you're saying, but they will also question your authority to tell them anything. They certainly won't walk away with the knowledge that you want them to possess. On the other hand, the right body language will improve audience engagement and assist in getting your message across. 

Informative speech topics vary by career

You may have had to give informative speeches at school, but don't think graduation saves you from ever having to give one again. Almost every career path you can take could present an opportunity for you to give an informative speech. 

Good news! If you find a career you love, giving informative speeches will be a breeze, and narrowing down your list of ideas will also lead you to easy informative speech topics. 

Here are some examples of careers that require frequent informative speeches.

Teachers : Since informative speeches are, by nature, educational, it makes sense that teachers and professors use them to develop learning environments for their students. Teachers are also good at turning boring material into fun, informative speeches to engage students and promote knowledge retention. 

Journalist : You must have a passion for relaying information if you decide to go into journalism. This career is filled with informative speeches on a daily basis. Journalists are the ones the public relies on to get pertinent information about critical events that are happening in the world. 

Docent/Curator : If you've ever been to a museum and had someone guide you through the exhibits explaining the nature of the pieces being presented, you watched someone give an informative speech. 

Doctor : Wait a second, doctors don't give speeches. Yes, they do! A lot! When a doctor describes your ailment or injury and what you have to do to take care of it, that's an informative speech. Additionally, many doctors present on topics at association events. Those are informative speeches, too. 

Mechanic : This one may stump you, too. At what point does a mechanic give an informative speech? The moment he or she starts explaining what's wrong with your car and what needs to be done to fix it. 

It doesn't matter what career you fall into, you will likely have to give an informative speech at some point - although some careers will require it more often than others. 

Key takeaways

Anything you need to tell someone can technically be considered an informative speech, as long as your goal is to give information and not try to change their mind about the topic. It doesn't matter if you're giving a 2-minute set of directions to someone or providing an hour-long oration over a complex concept; your informative speech needs to be:

Well thought out

Truthful 

Audience-centered

One immutable truth is that you will see some sort of requirement for communication skills in every single job description you read. That's because communication is a highly sought-after soft skill that will first be judged during your interview - another form of informative speech. 

TopResume would love to be a part of your career journey. We can help you with career advice and interview preparation, so that your speech-giving skills are up to par. Submit your resume for a free resume review and step into that interview room with confidence. 

Recommended reading:

15 Free Resources to Improve Presentation and Public Speaking Skills

Ask Amanda: How Can I Become Better at Public Speaking?

10 Easy Ways to Improve Nonverbal Communication Skills

Related Articles:

Don't “Snowplow” Your Kids' Job Search — Set Them Up for Success Instead

What Kind of Job Candidate Are You?

Why December is the Best Time of Year to Look for a Job

See how your resume stacks up.

Career Advice Newsletter

Our experts gather the best career & resume tips weekly. Delivered weekly, always free.

Thanks! Career advice is on its way.

Share this article:

Let's stay in touch.

Subscribe today to get job tips and career advice that will come in handy.

Your information is secure. Please read our privacy policy for more information.

IMAGES

  1. PPT

    different types of informative speech topics

  2. The 4 types of speeches: overviews, writing guidelines, examples

    different types of informative speech topics

  3. PPT

    different types of informative speech topics

  4. 190+ Interesting Informative Speech Topics & Ideas

    different types of informative speech topics

  5. Informative Speech Topics with Example 2023

    different types of informative speech topics

  6. 294 Informative Speech Topics and Ideas: The Ultimate Guide

    different types of informative speech topics

VIDEO

  1. What is Informative Speech?

  2. Informative Speech Topics

  3. Informative Speech Topics || Speech Ideas || Presentation Topics || Nasir Ullah Khan

  4. KAUN HAI SHIV |INSPIRATIONAL| INFORMATIVE|FACTS|Hinduism|hindi #ytshorts #shorts #freaky_naturalist

  5. Informative Speech Conclusion

  6. Public Speaking

COMMENTS

  1. 333 Informative Speech Topics To Rock Your Presentation

    The six key types of informative speeches are: Definition speeches: This speech aims to explain a concept or theory. For example, a speech topic starting with "What is…?" is usually a definition-type informative speech. ... A college speech class is a far different audience than a room of conference attendees. Consider what your audience ...

  2. 126 Good Informative Speech Topics

    Audience. Knowing your target audience is key to creating reciprocity, or the necessary give and take between speaker and listener that creates communication and understanding. Speakers who know their audiences are better able to shape their speeches to be well-received. [i] Imagine, for example, you're giving an informative speech on "Jane ...

  3. 50+ Informative Speech Topics to Engage Your Audience

    2. Make an introduction - Introduce yourself and the topic of your speech, as well as any relevant background information that the audience needs to understand the topic better. 3. Present facts and evidence - Use facts and evidence to support the points you make in your speech.

  4. Types of Informative Speeches

    O'Hair, Stewart, and Rubenstein identified six general types of informative speech topics: objects, people, events, concepts, processes, and issues (O'Hair, et al., 2007). Objects: Your speech may include how objects are designed, how they function, and what they mean. For example, a student of one of our coauthors gave a speech on the ...

  5. Informative Speech Topics and Ideas: The Ultimate Guide

    2) Research on the topic. a) Carry out the initial research. b) Think about how your research might change your topic. 3) About writing the speech. a) Think about your audiences earlier than writing the speech. b) Summarize your speech. c) Elaborate the key points to make it interesting. d) Write an introduction.

  6. Informative Speeches

    The most common types of informative speeches are definition, explanation, description, and demonstration. A definition speech explains a concept, theory, or philosophy about which the audience knows little. The purpose of the speech is to inform the audience so they understand the main aspects of the subject matter.

  7. 16.2 Types of Informative Speeches

    A variety of different topic categories are available for informative speaking. One way to develop your topic is to focus on areas that might be confusing to the audience. If the audience is likely to be confused about language or a concept, an elucidating explanation might be helpful. If a process is complex, a quasi-scientific explanation may ...

  8. Informative speech examples: key features, topics & outlines

    Types of informative speeches. There are four types of informative speeches: definition, description, explanation and demonstration. A speech may use one, or a mix of them. 1. Informing through definition An informative speech based on definition clearly, and concisely, explains a concept*, theory, or philosophy. The principal purpose is to ...

  9. Types of Informative Speeches

    Types of Informative Speeches. In the last section we examined how informative speakers need to be objective, credible, knowledgeable, and how they need to make the topic relevant to their audience. This section discusses the four primary types of informative speeches. These include definitional speeches, descriptive speeches, explanatory ...

  10. 12.2: Types of Informative Speeches

    Type 5: Categories or divisions. Sometimes an informative speech topic doesn't lend itself to a specific type of approach, and in those cases the topics tend to fall into a "general" category of informative speeches. For example, if a student wanted to give an informative speech on the four "C's" of diamonds (cut, carat, color, and ...

  11. 9 Types of Informative Speeches To Educate an Audience

    9 types of informative speeches. While all informative speeches educate your audience, there are some different types you may consider to most effectively display your knowledge and help your audience understand a topic. Examine nine types of informative speeches below: 1. Descriptive speeches. The purpose of a descriptive speech is often to ...

  12. 220+ Informative Speech Topics: Fresh Ideas for a Winning Speech

    Educating your audience with informative speech topics you feel passionate about is the primary goal. Browse this list and let your enthusiasm shine through. ... fascinated and interested in learning more. For another take on a different type of speech, get tips for writing an effective welcome speech. Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement ...

  13. 100+ Ideas for informative speech topics

    An informative speech topic should captivate and educate your viewers. Likewise, you should take pleasure in delivering and discussing the subject matter. ... Use explanatory visuals to show the different types of beneficial and harmful bacteria that exist in the gut, and how these microbes influence our physical and mental well-being. ...

  14. 509 Informative Speech Ideas [Updated July 2024 ]

    Informative Speech Idea In 5 Steps. 1. Step One - Make a List. Make a short list of your personal interests and informative speech topic ideas. To help you determine your interests on an informative speech topic, think about your favorite objects, products, people, animals, events, places, processes, procedures, concepts, policies, theories ...

  15. 50 Good Informative Speech Topics for College

    With our informative speech topics, you will stand out with your engaging speech. And our experts can assist you with generating impactful work. US. 19292010148 . ... Different types of butterflies; The history of bees and their role in the world; Topics for informative speech about global warming.

  16. 15 Informative Speech Examples to Inspire Your Next Talk

    Below are 15 examples of informative speech topics that are sure to engage and educate your audience. The history and evolution of social media platforms. The benefits and drawbacks of renewable energy sources. The impact of sleep deprivation on mental and physical health. The role of emotional intelligence in personal and professional success.

  17. 100+ Informative Speech Topics & Ideas for All Students

    Good Informative Speech Topics for Students. First Aid Basics and Their Importance. Cold and Flu: Symptoms and Prevention. Pediatric Nursing: Caring for Children. Mental Health Awareness in Adolescence. Essentials of Nutritional Health. The Science and Importance of Vaccines. Hygiene Practices to Prevent Illness.

  18. 12.4: Types of Informative Speeches

    Events. Speech of Definition. Concepts. Contributors and Attributions. There are three different types of informative speeches. They are the speech of demonstration, speech of description and the speech of definition. Each one maintains a different specific purpose, but all three types have the general purpose of to inform.

  19. Guide: Planning and Presenting an Informative Speech

    In general, you will use four major types of informative speeches. While you can classify informative speeches many ways, the speech you deliver will fit into one of four major categories. Speeches about Objects. Speeches about objects focus on things existing in the world. Objects include, among other things, people, places, animals, or products.

  20. Informative Speech

    Many different versions of informative speeches exist, but most fall into one of the following informative speech types: Speeches about Objects Speeches about objects generally focus on a specific ...

  21. Selecting a Topic for an Informative Speech

    Select an appropriate topic for an informative speech. Now that we have discussed the five different types of informative speeches, let's focus on how to select a specific and appropriate topic for your speech. Your speech should fit within one of the five speech types we have discussed in the prior section.

  22. An Overview of the 4 Different Types of Informative Speeches

    Informative Speech Definition. An informative speech is a type of presentation that aims to educate, enlighten, or inform the audience about a particular topic, idea, concept, or issue.. Unlike persuasive speeches, informative speeches are designed to provide the audience with factual information, clear explanations, and a better understanding of the subject matter.

  23. The Purpose of Informative Speech

    4 types of informative speech. There are countless types of informative speech; however, there are four types that are commonly used. Definition . A definition speech aims to explain what something means. The topic is likely something the audience knows little about. The easiest way to define concepts is by using synonyms or antonyms.

  24. Effective Delivery of Informative Speeches

    The body of an informative speech should be well-organized and logically structured to enhance clarity and retention. Common organizational patterns include: ... This method is useful for topics that involve different locations or parts of an object . Topical Order: Dividing the subject into subtopics, each addressing a different aspect of the ...