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Home » Best Motivation Letter Erasmus: 7+ Editable Samples

Best Motivation Letter Erasmus: 7+ Editable Samples

Motivation Letter Erasmus

Embarking on an Erasmus journey is not just about crossing borders—it’s about transcending limits, embracing growth, and crafting the perfect passport to your aspirations. The Motivation Letter for Erasmus is your golden ticket, your narrative that resonates beyond words. Imagine unlocking doors to cultures, friendships, and a transformative experience; this is the power of a well-crafted motivation letter.

In this blog post, we unravel the secrets of composing a magnetic Motivation Letter for Erasmus, tailored to amplify your unique story. From the first sentence to the closing remarks, we navigate the nuances of language, injecting passion into your words.

Let’s turn aspirations into eloquence—because your journey begins with a letter, and every word counts. Ready to carve your mark? Dive in, discover, and let your motivation letter set the stage for an unforgettable chapter. Crafted for you, by you. Let’s embark on this journey together.

Table of Contents

Key Components of Strong Motivation Letters Erasmus

  • Introduction: Forge a compelling opening that introduces yourself and your enthusiasm for the Erasmus experience.
  • Personalized Story: Weave a narrative, connecting your past experiences to your aspirations, showcasing authenticity.
  • Clear Objectives: Define your goals explicitly—what you seek to achieve and contribute during your Erasmus journey.
  • Cultural Awareness: Demonstrate an understanding of diverse cultures, emphasizing your adaptability and global perspective.
  • Unique Contributions: Highlight what sets you apart—your skills, experiences, and passions that align with the Erasmus ethos.

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Motivation Letter Erasmus Example:

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Best motivation letter erasmus internship:.

Best Motivation Letter Erasmus Internship

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Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Impactful Motivation Letters Erasmus

Do’s:

  • Tailor Your Story: Craft a personalized narrative connecting your academic journey, passions, and aspirations to the unique opportunities Erasmus offers.
  • Highlight Cultural Adaptability: Showcase your ability to thrive in diverse settings, emphasizing how Erasmus will enrich your perspective and contribute to a global community.
  • Demonstrate Research: Illustrate a deep understanding of the host institution’s values and programs, proving your genuine interest in becoming a valuable part of their academic environment.

Don’ts:

  • Avoid Generic Statements: Steer clear of clichés and generic language; instead, focus on specific experiences and qualities that set you apart.
  • Don’t Overstate or Exaggerate: Be truthful about your achievements and aspirations; avoid hyperbole that may come off as insincere.
  • Skip the One-Size-Fits-All Approach: Tailor each motivation letter to the specific Erasmus opportunity, avoiding a generic template that lacks authenticity.

Final Thoughts:

In the realm of career aspirations, your motivation letter serves as the beacon that illuminates your unique journey, aspirations, and the compelling narrative of who you are. Through this exploration of crafting a Motivation Letter Erasmus, we’ve delved into the intricacies of weaving a story that not only captivates but resonates. It’s more than just words on paper; it’s a testament to your authentic self. A key that unlocks doors to transformative experiences and global opportunities.

Remember, a well-crafted motivation letter is your passport to making a lasting impression on potential employers or decision-makers. The art lies in tailoring it to the specific job, showcasing the relevance of your skills. And breathing life into your experiences.

It’s not just a letter; it’s your narrative, your unique imprint on the professional landscape. As you embark on this journey of self-expression and career advancement, let your motivation letter be the catalyst that propels you toward your dream job. Take a moment, revisit your letter, and infuse it with the insights shared here. And watch as it becomes a compelling testament to your potential.

In the competitive arena of job applications, your motivation letter stands as a powerful tool—one that can elevate you beyond the conventional. So, seize this opportunity to revise, refine, and truly make it yours. Your dream job awaits, and your motivation letter is the key to unlocking that door. Craft it with purpose. Infuse it with authenticity, and let your professional journey unfold. Best of luck!

Motivation Letter Erasmus Template

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Tips to write your Erasmus motivation letter in 2024

Published by Manuel Herrero on September 28, 2021 September 28, 2021

Writing a motivation letter can be boring and many times you don't know where to start. Here is a common template for all Erasmus students which you can either use directly or as a guide to inspire your own Erasmus motivation letter.

Some main characteristics that a good Erasmus motivation letter has to have are:

Show your personal data

Be polite, concise and brief

Properly structure the charter

Convey the reasons why you want to leave Erasmus

Write a conclusion

Here is an example of an Erasmus motivation letter made by the Erasmus Play team that will surely be of help. You only have to copy and paste, changing the data that appears in 'bold', by the name of your University, your studies, the country you are going to and the language you want to learn.

Example of an Erasmus motivation letter in English

Peter Johnson Brown

C/Laurel 5, 128000

Madrid, Spain

Tlf: XXX XXX XXX

E-mail: [email protected]

International Relations Office

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am aware that the <Universidad Complutense of Madrid> offers its students the possibility of taking the Erasmus+ programme. Aware of the importance of this opportunity, I would like to apply for a scholarship.

I am currently in my < second year of the degree in Business Administration and Management >. Given this situation I believe that this is a good opportunity for me, to grow both personally and professionally.

From a personal point of view, it will allow me to grow and develop, obtaining greater sense of responsibility, thus achieving a higher degree of confidence and maturity than at present.

From the professional point of view, it will allow me to understand different ways of working, to improve and perfect my level of < English >, therefore, improving my Curriculum Vitae, which will allow me to apply for more qualified and high responsible jobs.

Regarding my chosen host country, < England > has prestigious universities, which will help me develop abilities in a pleasant work environment with good educational system. In addition, I will have the opportunity to interact with native students and students from other cultures, which will help me to improve my English.

Finally, I think that doing the Erasmus plus programme will give me a broader sense of what Europe stands for and what it means to be a European citizen.

Yours sincerely,

< Peter Brown >

cover letter for erasmus internship

Manuel Herrero

Former Erasmus+ student, now ErasmusPlay CTO and Co-founder.

cover letter for erasmus internship

Anne · December 1, 2020 at 7:32 am

This article is very interesting. 😉 It has helped me to write my Erasmus motivation letter.

cover letter for erasmus internship

Concha · March 1, 2023 at 8:57 am

A European , not an European.

Learning Agreement - Erasmus+ Programme ErasmusPlay · May 19, 2020 at 3:19 pm

[…] addition to the Learning Agreement, an Erasmus Motivation Letter must be written too, this is compulsory in most cases. Erasmus Play team has prepared a model […]

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Traineeships abroad for students

Erasmus+ supports traineeships (work placements, internships) abroad at any workplace for students currently enrolled in higher education institutions in Programme Countries at short-cycle Bachelor and Master level as well as for doctoral candidates. These opportunities are also open to recent graduates.

By doing a traineeship abroad, you can greatly improve your knowledge, skills and competences that employers are looking for. Also, one in ten of Erasmus+ trainees have created their own company!

Where to look

The Erasmus Intern Traineeship Portal , developed by the Erasmus Student Network, can help you find Erasmus+ traineeships opportunities from companies.

How to apply

You can also apply through the international or Erasmus+ office of your higher education institution.

Good to know

Access to Erasmus+ Online Language Support will help you learn the language used at your workplace.

Benefits for students and recent graduates

  • develop entrepreneurial and creative skills highly valued by future employers
  • improve foreign language skills, interpersonal and inter-cultural teamwork skills
  • gain a deeper understanding of another country and culture

Benefits for companies

  • a trainee can provide a new international perspective, innovative ideas and active support
  • a trainee brings fresh enthusiasm and increased competitiveness and innovation
  • getting trainees' insights into their home culture can open doors to new markets and expand the business
  • enhance competences at the company: the trainee learns from employees, but employees can also learn from an international trainee through interaction with different languages and up-to-date IT skills

Companies can post their traineeships offers on the Erasmus Intern Traineeship Portal .

Traineeships abroad can receive Erasmus+ support from 2 to 12 months.

Students and recent graduates can also do a blended mobility, which means combining a short physical stay abroad (between 5 and 30 days) with a virtual period.

Trainees can also combine an Erasmus+ traineeship with a study period abroad .

Erasmus+ traineeships are open to any student enrolled in a higher education institution holding an Erasmus+ Charter for Higher Education .

The traineeship must be relevant for the degree-related learning and personal development needs and, wherever possible, be integrated in the study programme.

A traineeship can take place at any organisation located anywhere in the world (with the exception of EU institutions, bodies and agencies).

Financial support

Erasmus+ grant levels are published in the Erasmus+ Programme Guide .

Find out more

Make sure you know your rights and obligations when you study or do a traineeship abroad.

Students with further questions about taking part in Erasmus+ should check the frequently asked questions before contacting their institution or their National Agencies for Erasmus+ Programme countries .

You can also download a guide on blended mobility , detailing how higher education institutions can organise blended mobility opportunities for students and staff.

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Erasmus cover letter: advice, model & example

Here are our tips for writing a suitable and successful cover letter to try the erasmus programme as part of your studies., our advice for writing your erasmus cover letter.

Erasmus cover letter: advice, model & example

Taking part in the Erasmus programme is a very rewarding experience as a student. Going to study in another country gives you a sense of freedom and adventure, far from your comfort zone!

But if life as a student abroad is like a daydream, it is essential to get your entry into the Erasmus programme. When you apply for an Erasmus file, if there is a selection of students, for example, it is compulsory to provide a letter of motivation.

To help you write your Erasmus cover letter, we provide you with a sample letter :

Location, the ... . ADDRESS: Phone number / e-mail

SUBSCRIPTION

Subject: ERASMUS APPLICATION

Ma'am, sir,

After inquiring about the opportunities offered to students for further study abroad, I decided to compile an international mobility file. I am very interested and I suggest you examine my application.

Being currently a student in (speciality), I would like to specialise in fields related to the (field). However, it so happens that the University of (place) offers a training course entitled (name) of (level) corresponding to my professional aspirations.

Indeed, this program offers (details of the training). It is therefore a multidisciplinary program that corresponds exactly to my academic profile since I am already a (diploma) holder. This training would thus allow me to reinforce my skills in (specialty), accentuating my success in professional opportunities.

Moreover, the fact that this training is given at the University of (place) is a real chance for me. Indeed, since the beginning of my higher education I have been looking for the opportunity to study a year abroad. I know that this is a considerable advantage on a CV, which will also allow me to integrate more easily into the world of work. Moreover, living in (a) country(ies) for a year will allow me to open up to a different culture, which will also enrich me personally.

Thank you for the attention you will give to my application. Yours sincerely

P.J.: Curriculum Vitae

As you will have understood, a cover letter is also personal and must be adapted to your situation. You must therefore add your own motivations and personal reasons. The Erasmus cover letter should be based on your course of study and the experiences you think you will have on the spot.

Explain how going abroad can be beneficial for you, both personally and academically. Why can an Erasmus year or semester help you in your current course of study?

Don't hesitate to build on the strengths of the country in which you plan to study.

The motivation letter is not always requested in Erasmus for the sole and good reason that many Erasmus student places are not filled and that there are enough places every academic year. However, you will need this letter of motivation if you wish to go to a coveted Erasmus destination (notably the United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark...).

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Sample cover letter for Internship position at erasmus

Got the job yes.

Dear Sir or Madam,

Let me introduce my self, my name is Lena Mauer, age 21, studying (course of study) with a focus on (major). Currently I am in my 4 th semester of the Bachelor of Arts program at the  (name of school/university) in (city).

The obligatory internship abroad enables me to link my theoretical knowledge with some practical experiences and provides me with important soft skills. That is the reason why I apply for the ERASMUS program.

This summer I will complete the internship at the marketing department of (company)in (city). (company) is a worldwide operating, stock listed company, which develops, produces and markets diagnostic and life-supporting devices for hospitals and rescue services.

During an internship in the summer 2010 at the project management office of the (name) I got in contact with the products of XX and gained an insight in their working enviroment.

Thereupon I decided to apply for an internship at Ambu, due to their internationality, a unique business culture and their status as a market leader for anesthetics equipment.

My participation in the (project) of the (name) as the head of marketing and the interesting lectures and business insights I gained during my studies, have aroused my interest in marketing.

From the work in the marketing department I expect a deeper understanding of the different marketing tools, market analysis and the implementation of variable marketing processes as well as getting to know a foreign working culture.

Living and working in a spanish speaking country seems to be a challenging opportunity for me, in order to develop not only my language skills but also my personality and working horizon. The working culture in Germany and Spain varies in many aspects and the work abroad will help me to learn more about coping with different cultures and emphazise the international direction of my study.

In order to make the best experience out of my stay abroad, I am applying for the xx. Its financial support as well as the honor to be a selected student, will help me to achieve my goals abroad in the best possible way and it also enables me to experience all of the spanish culture. I am personally convinced that I will complete a successful internship not only due to my open-minded attitude towards new environments but also because of my focused way of working.

I will be very thankful, if I receive an xx grant for the internship abroad.

Thank you for considering my application.

© J. Kelly Brito, 2017

Tips to write a motivation letter for traineeships at the EU institutions

Last updated on Monday, 15/11/2021

Applying for traineeships may become a tedious and stressing task, yet we will help you to get closer to that letter that will make you land your first experience in the EU institutions.

There are different programmes to obtain a traineeship in EU institutions: Blue Book Traineeship in the Commission , Schuman Traineeships in the European Parliament , funded traineeships in EU External Delegations, traineeships at the Council , the European Ombudsman, or experiences at any of the Agencies. To demonstrate your interest and display your qualifications you will have to carefully write the application form in each case. The format to submit your candidature may differ between a dedicated tool - such is the case of the Blue Book - or emails with the required documents.  A work-experience in the EU institutions is the best way to understand how the EU works from the inside and get you started in a fruitful career in EU-related affairs. That is why there are thousands of applicants across the continent for each call, nonetheless, we will give you some tips to make your application stand out and increase your chances to be selected.

1. Take into account the space and character limit

It may sound obvious, but this is one of the first things you should consider when you are going to draft your motivation letter. Usually, the range is between 1,000 and 2,000 characters, depending on the application, and this will affect what information you put in and how detailed it can be. 

2. Be selective

Having in mind the space you allocated, you should select very wisely what you are going to write. It’s likely that you have had various work-experiences (like summer jobs or part-time jobs in combination with your studies) or volunteering activities before, but you should only consider them if they relate to the position you are applying for.

3. Link your achievements to how they can contribute to the position

You certainly have achieved many things throughout your academic and personal life which could be an advantage to the position, but so have the rest of applicants. Hence, you shouldn’t aim to send a list with all your certificates since primary school to prove that your candidature excels among the rest. Instead, your experiences can serve the application if you elaborate on what you learnt in a way that explains how they can contribute to the position you are applying for. Put in a different way, the best way to highlight your background is to show how this will help you to carry out the duties related to the position.

4. Get familiar with EU jargon

Thanks to its diversity, during a traineeship in the institutions you will be able to come across many EU languages on a daily basis. However, you will be most likely using English and you should know that some words appear more often than others. This could help you to insert some of them in your motivation letter because it is a subtle way to demonstrate your interest and knowledge of the area where you will be involved. For example, some of these are worth having in mind: cooperation, fairness, development, integration, solidarity, diversity, sustainability, growth, or potential. Make sure you also understand the basic functioning/structures of the EU in order to use the correct vocabulary. Indeed, in the motivation letter, you will have to explain why you want to apply to a specific DG, unit or Agency.

5. Your personal touch

Last but not least, don’t forget that you should feel comfortable with the letter you send and that it should reflect what you want to highlight for the position. Make sure to follow a specific structure that serves to organise what you want to express about yourself, but don’t make it too difficult for a reader to get to know you. You may be sending that letter to your future colleagues! Read more about traineeships in EU institutions in the section Traineeships .

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How to Write a Cover Letter for Internship (Examples & Template)

Background Image

You’ve found the perfect internship and it’s now time to apply and land the position!

But, in addition to your resume, you also have to write an internship cover letter.

You might end up staring at the blank Word document for hours and nothing comes out.

We don’t blame you; cover letters are hard to write even if you have a decade’s worth of work experience, let alone if you’re a recent graduate or a student.

Worry not, though; in this article, we’re going to teach you all you need to know to write a compelling cover letter for your internship.

  • Do you need a cover letter for an internship?
  • How to write a compelling cover letter for an internship
  • Plug and play internship cover letter template

Do I Need a Cover Letter for an Internship?

First things first—if you’re wondering whether you actually need a cover letter for your internship application, the answer is yes . 

An internship application is just like any other hiring process, meaning that a recruiter will go over your resume , cover letter (and maybe even references), and decide whether you’re qualified for the position. 

And yes, recruiters contrary to what you might think, recruiters do read your cover letter. 56% of recruiters prefer a cover letter with an applicant’s application.

This is reasonable - a cover letter allows you to add essential information you didn’t have space for in a resume, as well as explain (in words) how your experiences are tied to the role you’re applying for.

As such, a cover letter for an internship is essential and complementary to your application package.

Now that we got that out of the way, let’s go over all the best ways to write a cover letter for an internship. 

How to Write a Cover Letter for Internship

#1. respect the format.

Before you can focus on your cover letter’s contents, you should first make sure you’re sticking to the right format. 

Otherwise, your cover letter will be disorganized and the recruiter will have a hard time following your train of thought.

So, here’s the format that your cover letter for an internship should follow: 

  • Header with contact information. This includes your full name, professional email, phone number, and LinkedIn profile (if you have one). Underneath your contact info, you should add the date and the receiver’s information (the recruiter’s name and title, the company/organization name, and their physical address). 
  • Addressing the recruiter. Greeting the recruiter with “Dear Sir/Madam” or “To Whom It May Concern” is common, but not the best approach. Want to show the hiring manager that you did your research? We recommend you address the hiring manager by name directly. Our guide on how to address a cover letter covers everything you need to know on this topic!      
  • Opening statement. Your opening statement should be brief, but at the same time professional and attention-grabbing. Here, you introduce yourself, mention the position you’re applying for, and potentially a key achievement or two.   
  • Body. The body of your cover letter consists of 2-3 paragraphs where you highlight your education, provide background for your skills, and explain how you (and the company) would benefit from each other professionally. 
  • Closing paragraph. Your closing paragraph is your chance to include a call to action, to thank the recruiters for their time, or mention anything important you left out. 
  • Formal salutation. End your cover letter with a formal salutation such as “kind regards,” “sincerely,” or “best regards.” Our guide on how to end a cover letter can teach you all you need to know on the topic. 

Having trouble getting started with your cover letter? Read our guide on how to start a cover letter and get inspired!

job search masterclass

#2. State the Position You’re Applying For in the Opening

Recruiters hate one-size-fits-all cover letters and resumes.

Around 48% of recruiters and hiring managers aren’t even going to read your cover letter if it’s not customized to the role you’re applying for.

And one of the easiest ways to do this is by mentioning the role you’re applying for right in the cover letter opening.

This allows you to:

  • Show that you will be tailoring the rest of your cover letter for that position alone.
  • Prove that your cover letter is customized for this specific internship, and you’re not just randomly applying for the job,

Here’s a practical example of how you can mention the role you’re applying for in the cover letter opening:

Dear Mr. Jacobs, 

It is my pleasure to apply for the Communications Assistant internship position at the United Nations Development Programme. I can confidently say based on my 2-year experience working as a journalist and my excellent academic results in the Mass Communications Major that I’d be a good fit for the position. 

#3. Mention the Right Keywords

When reviewing your application, hiring managers tend to scan your cover letter or resume and look for the right keywords that would make you qualified for the internship you’re applying for.

E.g. If you're applying for a job in graphic design, the recruiter is probably looking for keywords like “Photoshop,” “Illustrator,” or “InDesign.”

As such, it’s very important to include the right keywords in your cover letter.

How can you find these keywords, you might ask?

It’s actually pretty simple - just look at the internship job description and go through the required skills & responsibilities and identify the keywords that you’d think the recruiter would be looking for.

Then, do the following:

  • Sprinkle some of those keywords throughout your cover letter. When relevant, back them up with an experience. E.g. don’t just say “I’m good at Photoshop,” say how you’ve taken 3 different Photoshop classes and used Photoshop for 2 different projects.
  • Don’t include keywords that don’t apply to you, they’ll just make it seem like you’re copy-pasting from the job description.
  • Research and add other popular soft skills that recruiters look for in applicants for the role you’re applying for. E.g. If you’re applying for an internship as a communications assistant, chances are, you’ll need strong communication skills (even if this is not something listed in the job description.

Now, let’s look at a practical example. Let’s say that the internship you’re applying for requires the following skills:

  • Communication
  • Ability to meet strict deadlines

Here’s how you’d mention this in your cover letter:

During my time as Editor in Chief at my University’s newspaper, I got to develop my communication and leadership skills significantly. For over two years, I was in charge of a 7 people team, which also helped my teamwork skills and my ability to meet deadlines. 

Keep in mind, though, that it IS possible to overdo it with the keywords.

44% of hiring managers say they will dismiss a resume or cover letter that looks as if it has copied the job posting. 

Using each and every keyword mentioned in the job description (without backing the skills up with experiences) might cause the hiring manager to think that you’re just copying the job ad & don’t actually have these skills.

So, don’t just copy-paste all the keywords from the job description, and if you DO mention a lot of those keywords, make sure to back them up with practical experiences.

#4. Highlight Your Education

If you don’t have a lot of work experience, your education and relevant coursework is your best chance to show that you’re a good fit for the internship. 

Letting the recruiter know what kind of courses you’ve completed that are relevant to the internship you’re applying for will be a big plus for your application. 

Say, for example, that you’re applying for an internship as a graphic designer. To make your internship cover letter impactful, make sure to mention all the relevant courses and related accomplishments. 

Here’s an example of how you could do that:

As a Visual Design major, I have completed several courses that have helped me build my professional portfolio. A few of the most beneficial ones have been Design & Layout and Visual Communication: Theory and Practice. I have also gained valuable experience doing the layout of the university’s newspaper for 4 years and of several books as independent projects. 

#5. Provide Background For Your Skills

It’s one thing to just claim that you have a set of skills and another to prove it. 

Anyone can say that they’re great at doing something, but what makes all the difference is when you can actually put your money where your mouth is. 

For example, in your internship cover letter, instead of just mentioning that you have “good time-management skills,” actually back it up with a past experience that proves it.

During the summers I assisted my family’s wedding planning business, I learned a lot about time management. In that kind of business, it’s important that things run like clockwork so in addition to time management skills, it also significantly improved my attention to detail. 

#6. Explain Why You’re a Good Fit For The Position

In addition to just listing out the skills that are relevant and beneficial for the internship, you should also explain why you are a good fit for the position. 

This means that you should connect the dots between what the company/organization is looking to gain from its interns and what you can do to provide those services. 

So, after you research and create an understanding of what is required of you, you should use your cover letter to explain why you’re a good fit for that position. 

For the sake of the example, let’s assume you’re applying for an internship at a Human Rights organization. A big chunk of what the role requires is categorizing virtual files of the cases the organization has worked on in the past.

What you want to do, in this case, is show how you can help with that particular job as an intern. Here’s how:  

I have spent 3 summers working at the National Library, where I was tasked to sort and categorize books based on their topic, author, and year of publication, and also memorize where each section fits in the library. I believe this skill, which I have perfected over the years, can really be of use for the internship position at Organization X.

#7. Describe What You Would Gain Professionally

In addition to showing (and proving) your skills and how you can benefit the company, you should also explain how getting the position will benefit YOU . 

When it comes to internships, oftentimes they serve the purpose of helping students and young professionals acquire in-depth knowledge about the industry, create a network, and develop skills that will benefit them throughout their careers. 

So, it will surely help you make an even better impression if you show that you are self-aware about what you’ll get out of the internship and how it will help you grow professionally. 

Here’s how you can do that: 

I am excited for this internship to provide me with the necessary customer service skills and network that will help me grow professionally in my future career as a customer service manager. 

#8. Proofread Your Cover Letter

After all, is written and done, there’s one final thing to do and that is make sure your cover letter doesn’t have mistakes. 

A spelling or grammar mistake probably won’t disqualify you, but at the same time, it will probably be a red flag for recruiters that you’re not too attentive.

For this reason, ask a friend to proofread your cover letter or use spell-checking software such as Grammarly and Hemingway . 

Want to know what other cover letter mistakes you should avoid? Our guide on cover letter mistakes has all you need to know on the topic! 

#9. Match Your Cover Letter & Resume Designs

Want your internship application to truly shine?

Match your cover letter design with your resume!

Sure, you could go with a generic Word cover letter template, but why fit in when you can stand out?

At Novorésumé, all our resume templates come with a matching cover letter template , guaranteed to make your application truly special.

Cover Letter for Internship Template

Struggling to create a cover letter for your internship?

Simply follow our tried-and-tested internship cover letter template!

cover letter example for internship application

Key Takeaways 

And that’s a wrap! You should now have all the necessary information about how to create a cover letter for an internship.

Now, let’s do a small recap of the key learning points we just covered:

  • Cover letters are a must when you’re applying for an internship.
  • When you start writing your cover letter, make sure you respect the format: the header with contact information, the greeting to the recruiter, an opening paragraph, the body with 2-3 paragraphs, and a closing paragraph followed by an official salutation and your name.
  • Some of our main tips on how to write a cover letter for an internship include: state the position you’re applying for, make use of the right keywords, and back up your skills with experiences.
  • Use a cover letter builder and match it with your resume to make sure your cover letter truly stands out from the rest.

Related Readings: 

  • Entry-level Cover Letter
  • Do I Need a Cover Letter in 2024?
  • Top 21 Cover Letter Tips

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How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internship? (+5 Real Internship Cover Letter Examples)

  • Julia Mlcuchova , 
  • Updated March 20, 2024 8 min read

Trying to figure out how to write a cover letter for an internship ? Look no further!

POV: After weeks and weeks of searching for the right internship opportunity, you've finally found it. But, at the end of the posting, there's a single short sentence that takes you aback:  “Please, attach a cover letter to your application .”

Although some consider cover letter writing to be a relic of the past, it still holds its rightful place in the professional world. 

Because a well-written and persuasive cover letter can sometimes make up for the lack of work experience on your resume . And if you're trying to apply for an internship , this is probably your case, too. 

So, continue reading this article and learn: 

  • What is a cover letter for an internship;
  • Whether you need to attach a cover letter to your internship application;
  • How to write one in 7 steps;
  • 5 real-life internship cover letter examples .

Table of Contents

Click on a section to skip

What is a cover letter for an internship?

Do you need a cover letter for an internship, how to write a cover letter for an internship in 7 steps, 5 real-life internship cover letter examples, key takeaways: how to write a cover letter for an internship.

Generally speaking, an internship cover letter is a formal document that accompanies your resume when applying for an internship. 

When it comes to its content, a cover letter for an internship falls somewhere between a traditional cover letter and a motivational letter . 

  • A traditional cover letter , used by job applicants with years of experience, is supposed to underline some of the candidate's most relevant and impressive skills, qualifications, and work achievements . 
  • A motivational letter , used mostly in academia, aims to communicate one's passion for the subject, their motivation, and personal goals . 

Hence, a cover letter for an internship combines the purpose of the traditional cover letter (convincing the recruiters that you're the right person for the job) with the tone and strategy of the motivational letter (writing about personal motivations and goals).

A truly successful internship cover letter should answer the following questions:

  • Who are you? 
  • Why are you interested in this particular internship?
  • Why are you the best fit for this internship?
  • What do you want to gain from this internship?

Absolutely! 

In fact, you should always attach a cover letter to your internship application , even if it isn't explicitly required from you.  

Why, you ask? 

Well, consider this: Internships are crucial stepping stones towards your dream career. And they're also incredibly competitive. A single internship opening can be answered by tens of applicants at a time. 

But how can you stand out from a crowd of equally inexperienced candidates? Certainly not by your non-existent professional accomplishments, right? 

When companies look for interns, they don't expect you to have a ton of real-life experience. They aren't looking for a “finished product,” but for someone with a genuine desire to learn and enthusiasm for the job. 

And these two are your weapons of choice!

How can a cover letter for an internship help you?

Apart from the reasons mentioned above, your internship cover letter is also responsible for: 

  • Conveying first impression. Usually, recruiters will read your cover letter before looking at your resume. So, it's the perfect opportunity to introduce yourself to them in a memorable way. 
  • Showing your efforts. Next, taking the time to craft a thoughtful cover letter shows that you're willing to put in that extra effort to stand out from the rest of the candidates. 
  • Highlighting your communication skills. Also, a well-written cover letter demonstrates your ability to articulate your thoughts clearly and professionally. 
  • Showing your professionalism. When you walk into a room, it's polite to introduce yourself and shake everybody's hand. This is exactly what a cover letter does! To attach one to your application is a common courtesy.

Now that you're familiar with the whats and whys , let's have a look at how to write a good cover letter for an internship step-by-step. 

For example : Application for [name of the internship] internship – Surname.

Then, place your contact information (your name; professional email address; phone number; link to your website / portfolio / social media accounts if relevant) directly into the header .

If you know the recipient's name, address them by “ Dear [full name] ,” or “ Dear Mrs/Mr [last name] ,”. If you don't know who to address the cover letter to , address it more generally to “Dear Hiring Manager,” .

In the first paragraph of your cover letter , start by stating your name and where you studied (including your current degree and year of study). Proceed by explaining how you came to know about the internship and what are your motivations for applying to it.

Since you don't have much work experience, you can talk about your academic achievements; relevant coursework; dissertation project; extracurricular activities; volunteering; membership in relevant societies, etc.

The closing paragraph of your cover letter should reiterate your desire to get the specific internship, express gratitude to the recipient for their time and consideration, and include a final call for action (i.e. "I look forward to discussing the next steps during an interview." )

Finally, based on how you greeted the recipient of your cover letter, you can sign off with either “ Yours sincerely ,” or “ Yours faithfully ,” . If you addressed the recruiter by their name, sign off with the former; if not, use the latter.

Don't feel like writing your internship cover letter by hand?

Let our AI cover letter writer create the first draft of your internship cover letter!

Undoubtedly, the best way to learn something is to look at specific examples . And that's exactly what we're going to do right now! 

Below, we've prepared 5 internship cover letters written by real people with the help of our cover letter templates .

And, each of them is accompanied by our internship cover letter writing tips that you can implement into your own cover letter! 

FYI, you can use each of these examples as the first draft for your very own internship cover letter – simply click on the red button and start personalising the text (or let AI handle it).

#1 Philips Marketing Intern Cover Letter Sample

Internship cover letter example:.

This cover letter sample was provided by a real person who got hired with Kickresume’s help.

What can you take away?

  • Eye-catching header.  Firstly, the header is visually clearly separated from the rest of the text. This makes the recruiters notice it immediately. Plus, the contact information of the company is also featured in the left-hand corner - just like it would be on an actual letter.
  • Research the company before applying. Notice sentences like: “ I really like and relate to what Philips stands for … ” and “ Furthermore, it is very appealing that Philips operates on an international level… ”.This shows that the candidate’s done a thorough research of the company's philosophy and structure.

#2 Warner Bros. Public Relations Intern Cover Letter Example

  • Share a personal story. This can help you establish a sentimental connection between you and the company. Show them that for you, working for their company means more than any old internship.
  • Name-drop a referral. Now, this is a little bit of a cheat code. But, if you happen to know about anyone who has worked/currently works for the company, slip their name into your cover letter.

#3 University of Massachusetts Boston Intern Cover Letter Example

What can you take away  .

  • Write about what you want to gain from the internship. It shows that you're not there just to have something to put on your resume; but that you’re motivated by the idea of gaining actual industry knowledge and skills.

#4 Audit/Tax Summer Internship at CohnReznick Cover Letter Sample

  • Mention any relevant academic activities. If you're wondering how to write a cover letter for an internship with no experience whatsoever, this is your way to go! For example, notice how this candidate noted all of his relevant courses, skills, association membership, and competition participation.
  • Focus on transferrable skills. Especially when your study programme doesn't necessarily fit the internship opening to a T. Instead, focus on any transferable skills you've picked up. 

#5 Intern at NBC Cover Letter Sample

  • Keep your opening and closing paragraphs short and sweet. As you can see in this example, it helps keep a certain visual harmony of the overall document. And, despite the length, both paragraphs do exactly what they're supposed to. Besides, recruiters might be discouraged to read the rest of your cover letter if your introductory paragraph is too long.

To sum it all up, an internship cover letter is a formal document that you submit together with your resume when applying for an internship. Its content should be something between a traditional cover letter and a motivational letter.

Its purpose is to introduce yourself to the recruiters in a more personal way than the resume allows. 

The main things you want your internship cover letter to communicate are:

  • who you are,
  • why you're interested in this opportunity,
  • what make you the best fit for the internship, 
  • your motivation (your long-term professional goals),
  • your desire to learn (what you want to gain from the experience).

To write a truly impactful and persuasive cover letter, we recommend following these 7 key steps: 

  • Specify which internship you're applying for in the subject line.
  • Include your contact information in a header.
  • Address the recipient appropriately.
  • Introduce yourself & your motivations in the opening paragraph.
  • Elaborate on why you're a good fit and what motivated you in body.
  • End your cover letter with a confident closing paragraph.
  • Finish off with a polite sign off. 

Finally, if you feel that the examples provided in this article aren't enough, you can always find more in our cover letter database . 

Julia has recently joined Kickresume as a career writer. From helping people with their English to get admitted to the uni of their dreams to advising them on how to succeed in the job market. It would seem that her career is on a steadfast trajectory. Julia holds a degree in Anglophone studies from Metropolitan University in Prague, where she also resides. Apart from creative writing and languages, she takes a keen interest in literature and theatre.

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How to Write an Erasmus Motivation Letter with Examples

May 1, 2023 by Bassey James Leave a Comment

Are you looking for a concise piece of information on how to write an Erasmus Motivation Letter? if your answer to this question is a yes, then read this article to the end.

We have written extensively some of the things needed to write an effective motivation letter for the Erasmus program including written and pictorial samples to serve as a guide for you.

All you need to do is grab a bottle of Coke and read this article to the end and you will be happy you did.

Erasmus’s motivation letter is a decisive part of the Erasmus Exchange, and one must learn how to write it the best way. In this article, we have put together the steps, with an example of how to write the Erasmus Motivation or cover letter as some people call it.

Erasmus motivation letter sample

What is a Motivation Letter? 

The letter of motivation is a document with a maximum length of one page to which the curriculum vitae is attached. The purpose of this letter is to introduce you, and briefly describe your academic background and the reasons why you want and deserve the opportunity you are applying.

To make it easier for you to get started, you should be clear about the structure of your letter. This is the information that should be included in an Erasmus motivation or cover letter: 

  • Contact information
  • Name and surname
  • Date of birth
  • Contact information such as email and phone.
  • City and date you wrote the letter.
  • Courtesy of greetings

Why Write a Motivation Letter for Erasmus?

A letter of motivation provides you with the rare chance to make sure that anyone reviewing your application is able to understand why you are applying to the program in the first place.

A strong and well-written letter will show why you should be selected over other applicants. It explains your enthusiasm for the program and what you hope to gain by participating in the Erasmus program. You need to tell a story to inspire readers to find you worthy of receiving the award.

Preparing to write a motivation letter for the Erasmus program

Before you think of applying for the Erasmus program and writing the motivation letter, you should know why you want to be a part of the program as this will help you write an effective motivation letter.

Knowing why you wish to be a part of the program is the bedrock for excelling in the program. The following questions are some of the questions that will help you write an effective Erasmus motivation letter for a scholarship application.

  • What is your background makes you competitive? – What courses, jobs or real-life experiences do you have that can help you enrol in the Erasmus program?
  • What are your long-term career or educational goals – this has to do with where you see yourself in the next few years academically and career-wise
  • How will the Erasmus experience help you achieve your goals? – After completing your Erasmus experience, how will it prepare you for the future you want? Consider things like cultural awareness, education, living in a brand new country or other things concerning the Erasmus program that make it unique.

The above questions will be the guide that will come in handy when writing your motivation letter and we have also stated below some of the recommended structures that your Erasmus motivation letter should take.

Recommended Structure for Erasmus Motivation Letter

We recommend a three-part structure for all motivation letters. Here is the basic structure:

  • Introduction – This paragraph should have a few sentences – and this is the part where you introduce yourself, and what you are interested in and also make it clear why you are participating in the Erasmus program.
  • Body – This is the body of your letter. Usually, 1-3 paragraphs are sufficient.
  • Conclusion – The last paragraph is to thank them for their time. Propose to meet or have a call with them for any further questions and include your contact information so they can reach you easily.

In the first paragraph:

Explain why and where you would like to participate in the Erasmus program. Don’t forget to mention that you want to benefit from the scholarship as financial support will help you fund this experience.

In the second paragraph:

You should talk about your academic achievements. The best way to present yourself is to talk about your successes and titles won and your training goals. Try to highlight how your stay in Spain has had a positive impact on your career and why.

Remember that an Erasmus abroad not only gives you an academic level but also enriches you on a personal level.

Best Format for an Erasmus Program Motivation Letter

There is nothing like the best format for a motivation letter for an Erasmus application. A lot depends on the application that the letter only –  you can include it in your email, or you can send the actual physical letter. Irrespective of how you send it, make sure formatted well and looks professional.

Because of this, we have decided to include a sample motivation letter to serve as a guide for you. Many of us don’t write letters anymore, and there’s a sample to help you format your letter properly.

Here is a short list of things to check before you send your letter.

  • Check your spelling . At least use a spell checker. This won’t check everything but will remove the biggest errors.
  • Check your grammar – Check your letters for correct grammar, language usage and punctuation. Grammarly is a great tool for checking your spelling. The free version will point out most of the biggest grammar mistakes. It also has the added benefit of pointing out most problems when you use the wrong words (“to” vs “too”).
  • Be polite and respectful – you want to make sure your letter uses the correct tone. You want to be polite and respectful, but not too stale. You want to be a real person and tell a real story. After all, your goal is to inspire readers to choose you. However, you want to understand their roles.

The Erasmus programme has “a strong focus on social inclusion, green and digital transformation, and promoting young people’s participation in democratic life.” You will need to consider these goals when completing your application. Saying you want to learn a language is fine, but it may be more important to consider talking about the societal benefits of the program and what it means to you as an individual.

Just do these few simple things to make your letter even better. This is an academic program for studying abroad. You want to be seen as an educated kind of person. It can be helpful to have others read and comment on your letter.

How do I write an Erasmus letter of motivation?

I will give you some advice as many of you have already sent emails asking for help or a sample letter. I think that’s because everyone is fixing everything for next year. When writing a motivation letter, I recommend the following:

Be concise and Brief

Remember that the person reading your cover letter must read yours and hundreds of others. If you have to read more than you need it will drive you crazy. It’s not a good thing, the truth is that you might not even read it, but just in case you need to make sure it’s well-written.

Be polite, but not too polite.

Use formal terms in your Erasmus motivation or cover letter, but don’t write them as if you were writing Jane Eyre. Try to make reading fun.

Make sure your Motivation Letter for Erasmus is well structured.

It is vital to separate each paragraph with a space and not to write “Mazacote paragraphs”, large paragraphs that are very difficult to read. If you’re somewhat brave, you can also write more original, such as “10 reasons I think the  Erasmus exchange  would be a great opportunity for me,” and present it as another list. Lists that are used frequently in blogs etc. are much easier to read than the normal long text.

Do not use language as the sole reason you want to do the Erasmus exchange.

Above all, try to fix your attention on how it will help you with employment in the future. For example, I am sure that the university you are going to visit has something unique to offer that you can use in the future.

Don’t try to make it too emotional.

You are not writing the Erasmus motivation or cover letter to your mother or a friend. Someone you’ve never met will read it along with hundreds of others, which makes you another piece of paper. You could be the best person in the world. Or you could be the embodiment of Cruella de Vil. So don’t try to make it too personal. Avoid writing about wanting to go to Paris to see your French friend you met there last summer.

The main thing is that you make it clear Erasmus is going to help you in the future. 

Similar to the previous point, clearly you should speak about how you are going to experience a new culture and how this will be an enriching process, etc., but save this for the end. You can talk about and should emphasize, how the Erasmus exchange will open doors in the working world and give you a unique learning experience. Speak about the opportunity to know more about a completely new education system or if you are working, how you will acquire new skills and even perhaps specialize in these areas.

Write a concluding statement

Write something short and sweet that summarizes everything you have said. This will help make your message clear and make sure it sticks in the reader’s head.

An Example of a Good Erasmus Motivation Letter

You can find many examples of cover letters on the Internet, such as the following:

Elsa Román Garcia C / Buenos aires 28 67584 Lugo Tlf: 83736190

E-mail:  [email protected] IES DE FOZ Rúa Castelao s / n  27780 Foz. Lugo Dear Sirs,

I have learned that Foz IES offers its students the opportunity to participate in the Erasmus program. I am aware of the importance of being part of this project and am writing to you with the firm intention of applying for one of the available scholarships.

I am currently in my last year at middle school ……………….. In such a situation I understand that this is an ideal opportunity for me. Firstly, I was able to benefit from the high level of cooperation between the Italian region in which I want to do internships and very important companies in the industry.

Second, because it would allow me to perfect a language as well as Italian, it would also allow me to get closer and get to know cultures from all over the world, which undoubtedly completes my academic journey in an extraordinary way. If I want to take part in the Erasmus program, I am aware of the opportunity I have in front of me and therefore I am convinced that I can make the best of it.

Nonetheless, I consider it a unique opportunity to make a qualitative leap if I finish my higher-level studies with an excellent curriculum that will undoubtedly translate into better prospects for me in my future work.

Erasmus Traineeship

Whether you’re applying for a semester, a full year, or a traineeship, you can use these tips. traineeships are a great opportunity to acquire skills that will get you prepared and ready for your future career. These traineeship programs can last from 2 to 12 months. You are even allowed to do more than a single traineeship.

If you haven’t decided where to go for your traineeship, you might want to look out for some of the best cities in Europe to do your Erasmus program. If you do good research you will see some of the best online platforms that will direct you to the best places and positions for Erasmus traineeship.

Sample Motivation Letter for Erasmus Program

The sample motivation letter for the Erasmus program below is just a guide, not the one you should submit. You can look at it and prepare yours effectively.

Most times, the hardest part of any writing is the starting part, but with the sample below you can start by transforming the story to your with respect to your story.

Erasmus motivation letter

How is a motivation letter for an Erasmus scholarship written?

Think deeply and organised yourself, then start by introducing yourself. Make sure your letter contains an introduction, the body of the letter, and a conclusion. Review your letter again to check for spelling and grammatical errors.

What should be the length of a motivation letter for Erasmus?

Depending on the information you decide to include in your letter and the kind of application you are making, your letter should be between 1000 to 2000 characters.

How is Erasmus Mundus’s motivation letter addressed?

You can start your letter with Dear Madam/Sir. And then the specific program you are applying for, who introduced you and the kind of studies you want to take in Europe.

Is GPA considered when applying for Erasmus?

Yes. Students will be selected first on the basis of academic Excellence, taking their GPA (grade point average) as a major criterion.

Yes, the selection committee will first consider students with good academic backgrounds and GPA will be the basis for this consideration.

Recommendations:

  • Motivation Letter for Scholarship Application: PDFs Samples/Guidelines
  • Motivation Letter For Job Application Example
  • Definition Of Motivation In Psychology
  • How to write a cover letter for scholarship – Samples and PDFs
  • Motivation For The Week: Achieve Anything

About Bassey James

Bassey Chimezirim James is an ardent writer who has written for top education and tech websites, which includes the likes of World Scholarship Forum, After School Africa, Gadget Wrights, etc. James is a public speaker; a graduate of Physics and the Team for the http://stayinformedgroup.com/ Project.

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Book cover

English for Academic Correspondence pp 87–108 Cite as

Cover Letters for Summer Schools, Internships, Placements, Erasmus, PhD / MA / Postdoc Programs

  • Adrian Wallwork 3  
  • First Online: 27 February 2016

3695 Accesses

Part of the book series: English for Academic Research ((EAR))

This chapter covers a wide area of academic correspondence including:

cover letters for job applications

motivational letters for internships, summer schools, workshops, Erasmus exchanges etc

applications for PhD and Postdoc programs

Bad examples are provided followed by good templates.

Download chapter PDF

A student from Yale once submitted a video version of his CV to the financial services firm UBS. The seven-minute film was forwarded to every investment in Wall Street with subject lines such as "What NOT to do when looking for a banking job".

A survey conducted by Experian revealed that 37% of job seekers had lied about their previous experience, 21% lied about their qualifications, and 19% had not been honest about their current salaries.

A 12-year study of the career paths of over 650 business professionals revealed that one of the most common mistakes in choosing a career was basing choices on aptitudes rather than interests.

In 1998 the buzzword 'elevator statement' was coined, i.e. a summary, in the time it takes to ride an elevator, made by an entrepreneur to a venture capitalist. The reasoning was that someone who cannot explain their company in thirty seconds does not know his/her stuff. Elevator statements are now often used in job interviews to ask neo-graduates what they could offer their potential employer.

In a survey by Powerchex, a UK pre-employment screening company, discrepancies were found in 43% of the job application forms of students from low ranking UK universities (14% in top universities).

According to researchers at the University of Hertfordshire (UK), a successful personal statement when applying for university directly depends on the specific words and phrases used. Top 10 words to include: achievement, active, developed, evidence, experience, impact, individual, involved, planning, transferable skills . Top 10 words to avoid: always, awful, bad, fault, hate, mistake, never, nothing, panic, problems .

7.1 What's the buzz?

The following exercises are designed to get you to think about the content and look&feel of various types of cover letters.

Below is the cover letter for an application for a job in a multinational company

What visual impact might this letter have on the recipient?

How effective is the Dear Sir/Madam salutation?

Where would you begin new paragraphs?

How could the information be given in a better order?

What evidence has the writer given that she has tailored (personalized) this letter to a specific company rather than just sending the same letter to hundreds of companies?

What could be added / removed to give the letter more impact?

Is the indentation aesthetically pleasing and effective?

Dear Sir/ Madam,

I am have a BSc in Agricultural Engineering from the American University of Beirut (AUB). Regarding my experience, I had two student jobs at two different labs in AUB and followed attended several workshops. I recently completed a "Master of Sciences in Food Quality and chemistry of natural products" at the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute. The Master's program is spread out over two years: the first includes intensive courses in quality control and second is devoted to the development and the drafting of an applied thesis. I have just completed my thesis concerning the quality of wine grapes following a treatment from maturation dehydration in a tunnel. I am currently employed as a medical representative for the promotion of a micro-nutritional supplement for the Swedish laboratories of PLK. I am presently seeking a more challenging career with a well-established local or multinational company such as yours. I wish to devote myself to food quality improvement more than to the marketing of health supplements, which is my current job. I will be very motivated to work and give my best. I’m attaching my latest resume with the letter. I am available for any further information or interview at the contact addresses stated in my resume.

Below is a letter enquiring about a possible internship in a professor's lab. Will the recipient get a positive impression from this letter and consequently think seriously about offering the student a position? Why? Why not?

Dear Professor,

I am Carmine Pine, a PhD student at the University of Atlantis. I am working on spam-recognition software and I have seen on your lab web page that your group is also working on spam recognition. I have seen from your publications record that your lab is very much advanced in this field of science. As I am also working in this field and I am a beginner in this field I would like to come in your lab for a short term training programme to learn new things in this field of science. Details of my education and research experience are mentioned in my CV which is attached with email. Please find attached file.

Below is a request for postdoctoral grant.

Why is this an effective letter?

Underline any useful phrases you find.

Is there any other information that you would add?

Postdoctoral grant, EXEGO project

Dear Dr. Jill Cohen

I am very interested in the postdoctoral grant related to the EXEGO project “ Design of a decision matrix to assess the link between selfies and selfish behavior ”, with vacancy number: DPW 08–40.

My background is closely related to the field of cognitive selfish behavior. During my Bachelor’s studies in Psychology I participated in projects regarding smoking in the presence of young children, unauthorized parking in disabled parking spaces, financial trading, and other non-altruistic behaviors. In addition, my M.Sc. degree focused on Acts of Neuro-narcissism in Top League Football Players . During this period I developed a method to assess the level of narcissistic and selfish behaviors among young extremely wealthy people who had suddenly been catapulted into the public eye.

I am currently finishing my Ph.D. in Postmodern Relational Psychology at the School of Advanced Neurological Studies in Manchester (UK). The work I performed during my Ph.D. studies investigated the ego pathway in the Manchester United first team using a transgenic approach. Part of this research was recently published ( Ego pathways as an indicator of selfish behavior in public . Functional Psychology. 35(7): 606-618). Additionally, I published the results of this work as an oral presentation at the XVI Congress of the Federation of European Psychologists (FEP) held in Tampere, Finland, in August last year.

The topic of the research position you are offering is fully related to the experience I acquired during my M.Sc. and Ph.D. studies. I am confident that my acquaintance with Neurology and Psychology, including the construction of decision matrices, binary vectors, behavior transformations and analysis of the selfish gene, will allow me to successfully perform this project.

I enclose my CV where you can find more details on my research experience.

Best regards,

************

The key idea when writing such letters and applications is to think from the professor's point of view:

why would they want you in their team

what differentiates you from others

what special knowledge you have that could benefit them (you need to find a 'gap' in their research or in the expertise of their team)

what the cost will be to them, how this cost could possibly be reduced or avoided

To learn more about writing cover letters, reference letters, CVs etc see Skills in CVs, Resumes and LinkedIn: A Guide to Professional English.

PART 1: HOW TO STRUCTURE A LETTER

7.2 Begin your letter with a heading to indicate what job you are applying for

A heading immediately tells the reader what your letter is about, for example a job application or a request to participate in a workshop or summer school. The heading should be in bold and centered.

The heading should be an abbreviated version of the position, workshop etc (see examples below).

If the job is advertised on the institute or company’s website, make it clear which particular job you are applying for (see below: Examples for advertised positions ).

If you don’t know if the institute or company has any positions available, indicate what kind of job you are looking for (see below: Examples for non-advertised positions ).

Examples for advertised positions:

Workshop on Bio-economics - Brighton 13/14 July.

I would like to apply for a place at the workshop on the Bio-economics of Environmental Sustainment in Urban Areas. I believe that …

DPhil project on GPS navigation (position ref. 3453/GPS/navi)

Dear Dr. Moon,

I am very interested in the DPhil project that you are proposing on GPS lunar navigation, advertised on your website. My current research focuses on …

PhD project: “Physiological tolerance of tropical forest invertebrates”.

I would like to apply for the PhD project “Physiological tolerance of tropical forest invertebrates to microclimate change”. I am currently …

Full-time Winter International Program Intern (June newsletter)

I learnt from your newsletter that you are looking for a full-time Winter International Program Intern in your laboratory for January-May of next year. As you will see from the attached CV, I am …

Examples for unadvertised positions:

PhD at the Manchester School of Business

Dear Dr Burgess

I would like to apply for the research position at your university …

Placement at the Institute of Animal Ecology

Dear Professor Smith

I am writing about the possibility of a placement, which is a requirement for my Masters in Ecology at Bordeaux.

7.3 Initial salutation

Your initial salutation should be:

Dear + the first name and last name of the person who is most relevant for the position you are looking for (e.g. a human resources manager, a professor's assistant), provided that this person does not have an academic title. If you can't find the name of this person on the institute / company's website, then make a phone call and find out.

Dear + academic title (e.g . Professor, Dr ) + surname, if you are applying directly to an individual academic.

Always ensure you have the correct spelling of the person's name.

If you are applying for a summer school or workshop, then finding out the name of the relevant person is not necessary. In such cases, the best solution is to have no initial salutation.

7.4 First paragraph (introduction)

As highlighted by the examples in 7.2 , begin by saying what position you are interested in. This will entail repeating some of the information given in the heading, but in a more extended form, i.e. the heading should be an abbreviated form of the job / placement you are interested in.

If the person who you are writing to was referred to you by a third person, then indicate who this third person is. For example:

Your name was given to me by Professor Kahn, who recommended I should write to you with regard to a position as an intern in ....

7.5 Second / third paragraphs

Examples of how to write these paragraphs are given in Part 2 of this chapter. This subsection just summarizes what you should include.

job applications, internships, PhD programs, post doc positions

This is the main part of the letter where you explain how your skills and experience directly relate to your application. It must be absolutely clear to the reader that the letter was written specifically for him / her, or his / her institute. So you should highlight how your skills, strengths, objectives, and interests match their institute and the position you are looking for.

Do not talk about the benefits for you of working for them. Instead think about three key skills that you have, and detail how these would be useful for them, i.e. the added value that you would be bringing to their research team. You can present these three skills as bullets.

Apart from specific technical skills, you could mention some of the following:

ability to work in a team

professional, pro-active, flexible, punctual with deadlines

qualifications (put these on CV, but mention the main qualification in the cover letter)

problem solving skills

presentation skills

ability to write manuscripts technical documents

high level of English

However, you cannot just list the above, you also need to provide examples to substantiate them (see Chapter 9 in CVs, Resumes and LinkedIn: A Guide to Professional English ).

summer schools, workshops

Explain why you are interested in the school or workshop. How does it match what you are studying? Try to think of three areas in your academic studies and career which are relevant to the course.

Make it clear that you have chosen the school or workshop for some particular reason, and that this is not just a spam letter that you have written to hundreds of other schools and workshop organizers.

7.6 Closing paragraph

In your closing paragraph you could include one or more of the following:

say when you are available to start work, when you are free for an interview

your contact details

say you are attaching your CV

7.7 Final salutation

Just have one salutation (see 2.7 ).

The simplest and most international and most neutral final salutation is Best regards . Alternatively you can use the more formal Yours sincerely . Another way to end is to write: I look forward to hearing from you.

7.8 Recognize the importance of such letters and triple check everything

The kinds of letters covered in this chapter could theoretically change your career, particularly those where you apply for an internship or a PhD / Postdoc. You should give them the same importance as you might to conducting a particularly important part of your research.

When you have finished your letter:

cut any information that will not add explicit value for the recipient

check that you have not written any English phrases that you are not 100% certain about - if you are not sure they are correct, paraphrase them in a way that you know is correct

check you have not translated any standard phrases literally into English

look at the layout - is it clear and simple (all aligned to the left, with no indentations)?

have you chosen a standard font?

could some info be better expressed / highlighted as bullets?

have you double checked the name of the person you are writing to, plus any names of projects and institutes, towns etc?

have you done a spelling check?

Bear in mind that your recipient (e.g. professor, human resources manager, workshop organizer) will not appreciate any of the following:

strange (non-standard) email addresses: [email protected], [email protected]

unclear subject lines

unclear requests

multiple emails – i.e. where it is obvious that you have sent the same email to a lot of other people

advertisements after your signature

strange fonts and colors

cut and pastes

txt mssg style

too much text

missing contact details

spelling mistakes

Finally, when you are satisfied that you have produced the best letter possible, send it to a native speaker (preferably a fellow academic) and ask them to check it.

PART 2: BAD AND GOOD EXAMPLES (TEMPLATES)

The following letters are designed to highlight the dangers of writing poor emails ( bad examples ), and the benefits of writing letters with a precise objective ( templates ).

7.9 Erasmus programme

bad example

Dear Mr. Pohjola,

My name is Diego and I´m a Brazilian Master student of Constitutional Law/Political Science in University of Porto (Portugal).

I was approved for the Erasmus Program in University of Helsinki and they required that I wrote to you, introducing myself and in order to make all the right academic choices.

I´m not sure whether it´s you I ask about documents I need to send via University of Porto.

Anyways, about the core of my studies, since I will be on my thesis year, I got advised to enroll in one class and ask for a co-guide on the thesis, along with the portuguese one (which is yet to be appointed by the University of Porto). Is that possible? How will I be evaluated on the class and by my co-guide? Do you have a list of classes I could choose? Are all of them taught in finnish?

Thank you very much in advance and I´m sorry if I seem a bit lost, I´m at the very beginning of the procedure.

Diego has written a very friendly letter, and Prof Pohjola (from the University of Helsinki) will probably have a positive impression of Diego's personality. However, the letter is rather too informal - generally speaking, and especially with people whose culture you are not familiar with (e.g. Finland), you should opt to be more formal than you might normally be.

Specific points:

Use the recipient's academic position (e.g. Professor, Dr .) and not Mr, Mrs etc.

Master student is not correct: You can say Master's student or I am currently doing a Master's in + name of subject, or I have a Master's in + name of subject

Many of the prepositions are wrong (see the template version below)

Avoid mentioning your name at the beginning, simply state i) what kind of student you are (PhD, Master's etc), ii) what and where you are studying.

Check your spelling and punctuation ( Portuguese and Finnish should have an initial capital letter)

Delete any phrases that add no value for the reader

The parts to change are in italics. Parts in square brackets are optional.

Dear Professor Name

I´m a Master's / undergraduate student in subject at the University of Town ( Country ).

I have been approved for the Erasmus Program at recipient's university .

I was wondering whether you could tell me what documents I need to send via my university.

I will be in my thesis year, so I have been advised to enroll in one class and ask for a co-tutor for my thesis (I also have a tutor at applicant's university ). Would that be possible?

[I also have a few other questions:

How will I be assessed throughout the course?

Do you have a list of classes I could choose?

Are all of them taught in language of host university ?]

[If you are not the right person to ask, please could you kindly forward this email to the relevant person.]

Thank you very much in advance.

First name + last name

7.10 Workshop

Dear Madam/Sir,

my name is Anong Challcharoenwattana, and I am a PhD student in Agroecology at Aarhus University.

With this letter I hereby would like to state my motivation to attend the workshop on agroecology and ecological intensification for a sustainable food future, which will be held at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Avignon on 13/14 July.

I am writing a thesis about the management of functional biodiversity in low input agriculture. I am investigating how to enhance cover crops potential to suppress weeds and improve soil fertility. My research interests are strictly connected to agroecosystem services, and the ways in which they are provided to society by agriculture. The topic of the workshop is key to my research activity and professional objectives. Therefore, I would highly appreciate to be given the opportunity to attend this event gathering towering scientists and representatives from the EU institutions.

I also perceive this as a possibility to familiarize with good practices, which are essential to my career and personal growth. I firmly believe in the necessity to connect academia with the stakeholders involved in agriculture. Research should strive to provide policy-makers with concrete solutions to environmental issues. I am sincerely convinced that scientific research should meet the fundamental interests of society.

I am confident you will find my application to be a worthwhile investment. I am sure that the attendance at this workshop will be an outstanding opportunity to me, and will pay off for years to come.

Anong has written a competent letter, but the final two paragraphs sound like they were pasted from a website called "How to write an application to go to a workshop" - they don't sound real and could have been written by anyone. When you write any kind of letter ask yourself "what value will the reader gain by reading this sentence / paragraph?"

ensure you have a heading. This means that the second paragraph in Anong's letter could be reduced considerably (see template version below)

if you are not addressing your letter to anyone in particular, you can avoid using a salutation

always begin each paragraph with a capital letter, even the first paragraph after the salutation

consider using bullets to list your skills, reasons etc

delete anything that is not specifically aimed at getting your request accepted

do not write any strange sentences particularly those whose meaning you are not sure of (e.g. gathering towering scientists, I hereby state my motivation, pay off for years to come )

Workshop on psycholinguistics and statistical tools - Atlantis 13/14 July.

I am a PhD student in psycholinguistics at Melbourne University and I would very much like to attend your workshop.

I am writing a thesis about how a researcher's name can influence the research field that they choose . This project has involved compiling lists of surnames such as Wood, Bugg, Gold and Wordsworth in order to understand the incidence of such names in the fields of forestry, entomology, economics and linguistics, respectively . To carry out this research I am using an innovative statistical tool, developed by me and some fellow PhD students, called SirName .

I believe my research area matches the topic of the workshop because:

[In addition, I think I could share my knowledge in:

These three points are at the cutting edge of research in this area, and fortunately I am working in a top laboratory [name of lab] where I have acquired skills in .... In fact, I believe participants may be interested in learning new techniques about …

I look forward to hearing from you.

7.11 Summer school

I’m very interesting in your school because I think it would be a very useful for my PhD activity as well very formative for my personality.

I’m apassionate in neuroscience and I’d like to learn much more about the techniques sued in this field.

The main topic of my research are neuroengineering techniques, in particular imaging analysis both in-vitro and in-vivo and neuronal models. My research activity is focused on understanding the neural basis of some brain disord er such as autism so I’m specially interesting in your activity concerning neuropsychological diseases.

I’m at the beginning of my PhD so I have a lot to learn and I think your school would be a wonderful occasion both to have a deeper theoretical background and to get involved in your laboratories activity . I’d like to participate at two different projects one concerning an fMRI experiments and one a microscopic technique so that I can make practice in both areas of my research.

Finally I think that attending your school will be a good occasion to know the wroks of other students and researchers, to exchange opinions and so to increase my knowledge and my experience in the neuroscience field.

The content and structure of the above letter are fine. The problem is the English (see words in italics). The letter contains at least 10 basic mistakes in the use of English, including typos. The issue here is that the candidate clearly didn't take the time to check the letter, and if she didn't check the letter, then by implication she may not be a conscientious person, and thus may not be suitable for the workshop.

I would like to apply for a place at your summer school.

I am particularly interested in attending because

I’m passionate about neurosciences and I’d like to learn much more about the techniques used in this field.

The main topic of my research is neuroengineering techniques, in particular imaging analysis both in-vitro and in-vivo and neuronal models. My research focuses on understanding the neural basis of some brain disorders [link to personal webpage where the candidate's research is outline in detail], such as autism, so I’m especially interested in your courses on neuropsychological diseases.

I’m at the beginning of my PhD so I have a lot to learn. I think your school would be a wonderful opportunity both to have a deeper theoretical background and to get involved in the activities at your laboratories. If possible, I would like to participate in two different projects: fMRI experiments and microscopic techniques. This would thus enable me to gain experience in both areas of my research.

Finally, I think that attending your school would be perfect for learning about the work of other students and researchers, to exchange opinions, and thus to increase my knowledge and my experience in neurosciences.

7.12 PhD application

Dear Prof.,

My name is Miluše Adamik, final year student of Master's in Innovation Management, at the České vysoké učení technické in Prague (Czech Republic).

Currently I am writing my thesis about "network diffusion model of Innovation". My background is industrial engineering. I was visiting the webpage of Innovation Management at UCCIL, and I found a very interesting field of research in Innovation management. I would like to ask for further information about doing a PhD in your institute.

I really appreciate your reply in advance,

Miluše Adamik

Miluše's email looks as if it took 30 seconds to write. Little or no thought has gone into what information the professor might need.

She was lucky to receive the following reply from the professor.

Dear Mr. Miluse, Thank you very much for your interest in our research. Could you please send me your CV? I also some need information about your current Master's studies. Is it a university? What is your current status in the program (grade average)? How long will it take you to finish your studies?

The professor's reply highlights the following:

don't write the name of your university or institute in your own language - how can your reader be expected to know what it means (in this case the Czech Technical University)

provide clear information about what you are studying now, what types of courses you are following, and when you will finish

attach your CV, or provide a link to your CV

specify which PhD you are interested in

make it clear what sex you are (male or female) - this avoids the recipient replying with the wrong title ( Miluše = female first name, the professor probably read Adamik and thought it was a male first name). The simplest solution is to have a photo in your CV. Alternatively sign yourself, for example, Miluše Adamik (Ms) or Andrea Paci (Mr)

Miluše's email has other problems, highlighting that you should:

never address the recipient simply as Prof , use the full form ( Professor ) and add their last name (e.g. Dear Professor Wallwork )

avoid repetition

structure your mail clearly

think from the reader's point of view and include all the information they may need

Dear Dr. Wood,

I would like to apply for the PhD project “ Physiological tolerance of tropical forest invertebrates to microclimate change”.

I am currently doing a Master's in ecology at the University of Zurich , and I would like to find a PhD program for the next academic year. Last semester I studied the physiological tolerance of different species of trees to changes in temperature and precipitation . I would be very interested in seeing whether as with trees, different species of ants and beetles have different ranges of tolerance to microclimate change .

I would appreciate if you could take a look at my CV to see if my profile corresponds to the type of candidate you are looking for. If it does, could you please let me know how to apply for the PhD.

Best regards

7.13 Placement

A placement and an internship in the field of academia are essentially the same thing - a period away from your own institute spent in the team of another research group (generally in another country). However the two terms do have slightly different meanings if the period is spent in industry rather than an academic institution. To learn more: https://www.wikijob.co.uk/wiki/internships-placement-or-internship

Below is an example of a letter where the candidate has been recommended by his/her professor to write to another professor to ask about the possibility of a placement.

good example

Dear Professor Weber

Urma Schmidt was in touch with me recently concerning the possibility of a placement which is a requirement for my Master's in Sociology at Malmö University.

I am required, as part of my course, to find a placement with a research group in Sociology for a minimum period of 39 days from February next year. This can be unpaid work.

I have an interest in social morphology as I worked with Dr Schmidt when she ran the Geographical Data and Settings Laboratory at the RQW. I also have considerable experience in statistics and experimental design.

Dr Schmidt is no longer active in this area but recommended that I apply to you for a potential placement. She informs me that your group is working in many of the areas where I think my experiences might be useful for your team.

I would be very grateful if you would consider me for a placement position within the research group for the period identified, or longer if required by the research project.

I aim to finish my Master's in Sociology and gain skills that will allow me to progress to a Doctoral level. I would like to develop a career in social morphology, and any assistance in gaining the required skills in this area would be greatly appreciated.

Yours sincerely

7.14 Research position / Internship

I am S.A. RAMASAMY, I finished my Post-Graduation degree in Computer Science [MCA] from the Indian Institute of Technology. I am keen on doing the research work in Mobile/Wireless, Computer Networks, Software Engineering, Graphics, Computer Architecture, Operating Systems, Databases & Data Streaming, Internet and Web Technologies. I am a dedicated, innovative team player with a strong academic background in C, C++, Java, Oracle, SQL, Informatica tools, Assembling, Installation, Trouble shooting and Maintenance. I had a work experience in networking field from June 20__ to Sep 20__ and three months of training as a Data warehouse Trainee in Business Intelligence & Solutions, Delhi from Nov 20__ to Jan 20__, and i completed in OCA certificate in Oracle.

So I am applying to the research position to your University. For your kind review, I have attached my curriculum vitae. I assure you that the information said in my vitae is true. So have an eye on my vitae and am expecting a positive reply from you at the earliest. Thanking You

There is nothing in the above email to suggest that it has not been spammed to hundreds of professors. Not a single mention is made of anything specific about the professor's university, department or field of interest. Additional problems:

your country may have very specific ways of writing your name (e.g. S.A. RAMASAMY) - such ways are fine when you use them within your own country, but not on an international level where the standard is given name + family name

your cover letter should not contain long lists of technical skills and work experiences, these should be reserved for your CV. Instead you should choose one or two skills or experiences and clearly highlight how these would benefit the institute where you hope to conduct your research

you should not make subjective statements such as I am a dedicated, innovative team player without giving a clear examples that illustrate that you have such skills (see Chapter 9 in CVs, Resumes and LinkedIn: A Guide to Professional English ).

avoid any strange statements ( I assure you that the information said in my vitae is true )

avoid literal translations from your own language ( So have an eye on my vitae / Am expecting a positive reply from you at the earliest. / Thanking You ) instead use standard English phrases. Note that particularly with regard to written correspondence, Indian English differs from standard British or US English.

you does not require an initial capital letter

The example on the next page comes directly from Section 12.35 of Chapter 12 in Cover Letters in CVs, Resumes and LinkedIn: A Guide to Professional English . The CV book covers everything you need to know about how to write a CV / resume and write your profile on LinkedIn.

Center for Economic and Policy Research

1611 Connecticut Avenue

NW, Suite 400

Washington, DC 20009

25 November 2028

Full-time Winter International Program Intern January-May 2029

Dear CEPR Staff,

paragraph 1 I learnt from your newsletter about this interesting opportunity for an intern. In fact, I have read your web pages on a daily basis since I got to know the CEPR from attending Sally Watson's lecture at the XVIII Encuentro de economistas internacionales sobre problemas de desarrollo y globalización last March in La Habana, and it has now become an indispensable resource for my understanding of current social and economic problems.

paragraph 2 I have spent the last academic year at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM ) on an Overseas Exchange Student scholarship from the University of Bologna. In the first semester I attended courses of the Maestría en Economía Política and the Maestría en Estudios Latinoamericanos, whereas I spent my second semester doing research for my postgraduate thesis on the perspectives of the regional integration programme Alternativa Bolivariana para las Américas (ALBA).

paragraph 3 Because of my past experience as head of a cultural association in Bologna I am used to working in a self-directed group and I perform well on both a personal and institutional level. I also have experience in the organization of international events, due to a long collaboration with the University of Groningen in establishing, running and consolidating the European Comenius Course in Bologna.

paragraph 4 I believe that the combination of my commitment to learning and researching, my long standing interest in Latin American issues, the skills gained from past work experience and the knowledge of CEPR commitments acquired in these months of passionate reading, will enable me to contribute immediately and directly to the CEPR as an International Program Intern.

Thank you for your time and consideration,

Here is an analysis of the cover / motivation letter on the previous page.

Layout: Everything is aligned to the left, apart from the subject of the letter which is centered and in bold.

Structure: 1) address 2) date 3) subject line 4) opening salutation 5) four paragraphs 6) closing salutation 7) signature 8) reference to the enclosure

Paragraph 1: a) the candidate says where she learned about the position b) she mentions Sally Watson who presumably will be known to the reader c) she shows appreciation for the work that CEPR is doing.

Paragraph 2: Here she shows how what she has studied fits in perfectly with the CEPR's requirements.

Paragraph 3: The candidate states what she can do and then provides strong evidence of it.

Paragraph 4: Again a little pretentious but in reality it makes the candidate sound very sincere, passionate and committed, and in my opinion is a strong ending to her letter.

Below is an example of a longer cover letter / motivational letter.

I would like to apply for a volunteer position for your “New Volunteering @ ToyHouse Project”. Please find attached the application form and my CV.

I am 22 years-old, from Pisa (Italy) where I am studying Political Sciences at the University of Pisa. I came to London two years ago, and plan to go back to Italy to finish my degree in June next year.

Currently I’m looking for an opportunity to develop my skills and knowledge in charities and social organizations. The ToyHouse Project appeals to my long-standing interest in childcare and education. In fact, from the age of 15 to 20 I worked as a dance instructor with children from 3 to 12 years of age. It was an amazing working experience that has changed my approach to life and also influenced the choice of my degree. Working with children at such an early age made me really conscious about child labour and how this above all affects developing countries. In addition, during my teenage years I spent I worked at summer camps. My ultimate dream would be to work either in my local community or abroad with NGOs and charities, to help deal with these issues and especially to try to help give these children their childhood back.

I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to be part of your team, and feel sure that your organisation would benefit from my versatile skills. I love spending time with kids and feel that I would be a particularly appropriate person for your Early Years Softplay and Sensory Softplay programs. In addition my fitness training and teaching practice would be appropriate skills for your outdoor Olympic theme program, Hop, Skip & Jump. Furthermore thanks to my experience in the retail sector, I can offer great customer service and help in selecting and stocking toys. Regarding my recent work experience, you will notice from my CV that I have changed jobs quite frequently - each new job has resulted in a higher salary and greater responsibility, and of course, new and useful experiences. I hope you will consider my application because I believe that with my work experience and skills, I would be a positive addition to your team.

Note how the candidate has:

tried to find the typical things that would be involved in the job and how she would match these needs.

shown that she is really interested and passionate, and that she has a clear idea of what the job entails. She thus highlights why she is the right person. By doing so she should be able to differentiate herself from all the other applicants.

mentioned elements from her CV. She has not assumed that the HR person will read her CV in detail

avoided writing anything that makes it seem that she is exploiting this job opportunity entirely for her own benefit. She makes it look that there will be a clear benefit for her potential employer

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Adrian Wallwork

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Wallwork, A. (2016). Cover Letters for Summer Schools, Internships, Placements, Erasmus, PhD / MA / Postdoc Programs. In: English for Academic Correspondence . English for Academic Research. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-26435-6_7

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DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-26435-6_7

Published : 27 February 2016

Publisher Name : Springer, Cham

Print ISBN : 978-3-319-26433-2

Online ISBN : 978-3-319-26435-6

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Read the vacancy notice carefully and highlight the skills that relate to the requirements of the position in your cover letter.

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Use the keywords when you list your soft skills as mentioned on the vacancy notice (punctual, organised, team-player and so on).

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Take time to research the employer to gain valuable insights into the culture of their organisation and make references in your cover letter to one or two key points.

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ERASMUSINTERN

The perfect resume

Business studies and/or management science, education and/or teacher training.

  • Internship details

General information

The perfect resume.

There is more to writing a resume than simply listing all professional experiences. In our article on " write my resume " you will learn everything about the following points:

  • What belongs in the perfect resume?
  • How is it structured?
  • What contact details do I have to provide?
  • How do I enter data on school, training and studies?
  • How do I deal with gaps in my CV?

We have also drawn up a small checklist for you. As inspiration, we have put together three CV templates for you to download free of charge.

Tips & Tricks.

The perfect resume looks different for each position: Avoid using the same resume for all applications, because your career can also be tailored to the desired position by emphasizing your previous practical experience and specialist knowledge differently. Focus on industry-specific practice. Adapt your resume (use  professional resume writers ) to the individual cover letter.

Use active instead of passive formulations: Active and direct sentence structures appear more self-confident and signal that you know your strengths.

Months and years: Often, attempts are made to cover up gaps by not mentioning the month data - HR managers have known this trick for a long time. So always state the respective month and explain gaps and fill them differently.

Formatting: Big, bold, and underlined headings are all well and good; they help with structure and readability. However, sometimes less is more. Therefore limit yourself to only one of these formats and use a uniform font for your resume, cover letter (use  cover letter writing services ) and cover sheet.

Design: a touch of color can change everything. A subtle colored frame for the application photo, a different color for the headings or a "nice" header make a big difference. Sometimes even the smallest changes are enough to stand out from the crowd. But you shouldn't overdo it.

Student Leadership

Government in Education

High School Resume

Baggy Bulldogs

Guidelines for Writing an Employment Resume

cover letter for erasmus internship

IMAGES

  1. Internship Program Cover Letter

    cover letter for erasmus internship

  2. Contoh Cover Letter Internship

    cover letter for erasmus internship

  3. Erasmus Internship Motivation Letter Example

    cover letter for erasmus internship

  4. Cover Letter Erasmus

    cover letter for erasmus internship

  5. Erasmus Cover Letter Example

    cover letter for erasmus internship

  6. Internship Program Cover Letter

    cover letter for erasmus internship

VIDEO

  1. Erasmus Aftermath

  2. Video for Erasmus Internship Program

  3. How to write Recommendation letter (LOR) ?

  4. Erasmus Mundus Scholarship Motivation Letter winning tips

  5. Βιογραφικό Σημείωμα (CV) και Cover Letter για Erasmus +

COMMENTS

  1. Best Motivation Letter Erasmus: 7+ Editable Samples

    Motivation Letter Erasmus Example: Dear [Admissions Office], Embarking on an Erasmus adventure represents a pivotal chapter in my academic journey. As a dedicated student majoring in [Your Field], I recognize the profound impact of cultural diversity on intellectual growth.

  2. Erasmus internship Cover Letter

    Sample cover letter for Internship position at Erasmus internship. POSITION: Intern. GOT THE JOB? Yes. Dear Sir/Madam, I am writing this letter to introduce myself and to express my motivation for working as an intern at your company. My name is *** and I am ** years old. I have been studying Business Administraiton and Management for 4 years ...

  3. Erasmus Cover Letter

    Sample cover letter for Internship position at Erasmus. POSITION: Studying abroad. GOT THE JOB? Yes. Dear Erasmus committee, My name is >>Name<< and I am currently in my second semester at >>Name of University<< majoring in English and minoring in French as part of >>Name of programme<<. As a language student a semester/year abroad is of great ...

  4. Tips to write your Erasmus motivation letter in 2024

    Show your personal data. Be polite, concise and brief. Properly structure the charter. Convey the reasons why you want to leave Erasmus. Write a conclusion. Here is an example of an Erasmus motivation letter made by the Erasmus Play team that will surely be of help. You only have to copy and paste, changing the data that appears in 'bold', by ...

  5. Traineeships abroad for students

    Companies can post their traineeships offers on the Erasmus Intern Traineeship Portal. Duration. Traineeships abroad can receive Erasmus+ support from 2 to 12 months. Students and recent graduates can also do a blended mobility, which means combining a short physical stay abroad (between 5 and 30 days) with a virtual period.

  6. Erasmus cover letter: advice, model & example

    But if life as a student abroad is like a daydream, it is essential to get your entry into the Erasmus programme. When you apply for an Erasmus file, if there is a selection of students, for example, it is compulsory to provide a letter of motivation. To help you write your Erasmus cover letter, we provide you with a sample letter : Sender

  7. 7 tips for writing an Erasmus cover letter

    Be brief and concise. Remember that the person reading your cover letter will have to read yours as well as hundreds of others. If they have to read more than they need to it will drive them mad. This isn't good. The truth is, they might not even read it, but just in case, you need to make sure it is written well.

  8. PDF Dear Sir/Madam,

    I am writing this letter to introduce myself and to express my motivation for working as an intern at your company. My name is *** and I am ** years old. I have been studying *** for *** years at Samsun University. I am interested in having summer internship under the Erasmus Student Exchange Programme by the Erasmus Placement grant and

  9. How to Write an Internship Cover Letter: 9 Tips (+ Examples)

    2. Have a professional email address. The header of your cover letter is where you include your contact information, including your full name, phone number, and email address. While it may seem insignificant, one of the most important things you can do in your header is to include a professional-sounding email address.

  10. erasmus Cover Letter

    Dear Sir or Madam, Let me introduce my self, my name is Lena Mauer, age 21, studying (course of study) with a focus on (major). Currently I am in my 4 th semester of the Bachelor of Arts program at the (name of school/university) in (city).. The obligatory internship abroad enables me to link my theoretical knowledge with some practical experiences and provides me with important soft skills.

  11. How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internship (Plus…

    1. Make It All About the Company. Step one is to introduce yourself and why you're interested in this particular internship. As a student, you'll probably instinctively want to write about all the things you're excited to learn on the job.

  12. Tips to write a motivation letter for traineeships at the EU

    1. Take into account the space and character limit. It may sound obvious, but this is one of the first things you should consider when you are going to draft your motivation letter. Usually, the range is between 1,000 and 2,000 characters, depending on the application, and this will affect what information you put in and how detailed it can be. 2.

  13. How to Write a Cover Letter for Internship (Examples & Template)

    Respect the Format #2. State the Position You're Applying For in the Opening #3. Mention the Right Keywords #4. Highlight Your Education #5. Provide Background For Your Skills #6. Explain Why You're a Good Fit For The Position #7. Describe What You Would Gain Professionally #8. Proofread Your Cover Letter #9.

  14. How to Write a Cover Letter For an Internship (+5 Real Examples)

    To write a truly impactful and persuasive cover letter, we recommend following these 7 key steps: Specify which internship you're applying for in the subject line. Include your contact information in a header. Address the recipient appropriately. Introduce yourself & your motivations in the opening paragraph.

  15. How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internship

    Your internship cover letter should be: Half a page to one page long. Single spaced with 1-inch margins. Written in 10-12 point font (Times New Roman, Arial, or Calibri) Submitted as a PDF for electronic or email submissions unless otherwise instructed. Printed on US letter size paper (8.5 by 11 inches) if mailing.

  16. Writing an Internship Cover Letter With Examples and Tips

    Here are a few steps you can follow when writing an internship cover letter: 1. State the exact role you want. Starting your cover letter with the position you're applying for shows you thoughtfully considered what makes you the best candidate for this specific position while reminding the reader what role you're hoping to earn.

  17. How to Write an Erasmus Motivation Letter with Examples

    Write something short and sweet that summarizes everything you have said. This will help make your message clear and make sure it sticks in the reader's head. An Example of a Good Erasmus Motivation Letter. You can find many examples of cover letters on the Internet, such as the following: Elsa Román Garcia.

  18. Examples and Guide for an Internship Cover Letter

    3. Address the hiring manager by name. One of the best ways to impress the hiring manager is simply by using their name when you start your cover letter. Instead of writing "Dear Sir/Madam," or " To Whom It May Concern ," do some research first to figure out the name of the hiring manager or department head.

  19. Cover Letters for Summer Schools, Internships, Placements, Erasmus, PhD

    Here is an analysis of the cover / motivation letter on the previous page. Layout: Everything is aligned to the left, apart from the subject of the letter which is centered and in bold. Structure: 1) address 2) date 3) subject line 4) opening salutation 5) four paragraphs 6) closing salutation 7) signature 8) reference to the enclosure

  20. Create your Europass Cover Letter

    Keep it short. You cover letter should not be longer than one page. First paragraph - why you are motivated to apply for the position, Second paragraph - how you are the most suitable candidate for the position, and. Third Paragraph - why the company is a good match for you.

  21. The perfect resume

    The perfect resume looks different for each position: Avoid using the same resume for all applications, because your career can also be tailored to the desired position by emphasizing your previous practical experience and specialist knowledge differently. Focus on industry-specific practice. Adapt your resume (use professional resume writers ...

  22. Should I put this in my Erasmus Internship cover letter?

    Including info about the Erasmus programms financial support in your cover letter is a good idea. It shows you know your stuff and are ready to take advantage of the resources available. Plus, it can ease any worries the company has about you being able to support yourself during the internship.

  23. Erasmus Placement Programme Cover Letter

    FEUP's graduation courses have a very high employment rate: In the academic year 2005/2006, 41,5% of the graduates had a Professional offer before they graduate, 56,4% started working within a month after concluding the course and 89,8% were fully integrated in the work market within 6 months. The ERASMUS Program exists since 1987, and was ...