Importance of citizenship education

Why is citizenship education important.

Citizenship education gives people the knowledge and skills to  understand ,  challenge  and  engage with democratic society including politics, the media, civil society, the economy and the law.

Democracies need active, informed and responsible citizens – citizens who are willing and able to take responsibility for themselves and their communities and contribute to the political process.

How does it benefit young people?

It helps them to develop  self-confidence and a sense of agency,  and successfully deal with life changes and challenges such as bullying and discrimination.

It gives them a  voice : in the life of their schools, their communities and society at large.

It enables them to  make a positive contribution  by developing the knowledge and experience needed to claim their rights and understand their responsibilities. It prepares them for the challenges and opportunities of adult and working life.

Who else does it benefit?

Citizenship also brings benefits for schools, other educational organisations and for society at large.

For schools and other educational organisations, it helps to produce motivated and responsible learners, who relate positively to each other, to staff and to the surrounding community. For society it helps to create an active and responsible citizenry, willing to participate in the life of the nation and the wider world and play its part in the democratic process.

One of the first steps on the civic journey is the education system. Education should help young people become active citizens once they understand their role within society and how they can go about improving it. The Ties that Bind – House of Lords Report on Citizenship, 2018

Society belongs to all of us. What we put into it creates what we get out of it.

At Young Citizens, we believe society is best when we  all  join in. That is, when we all bring our energy and judgment to it. This helps make it fairer and more inclusive. It supports a democracy in which people participate and belong. We have countless examples of how  even the youngest  can  make a difference .

But it means we all need enough  knowledge ,  skills  and  confidence  to take part effectively.

We want everyone to feel they belong. And we want everyone to feel they can drive change.

The European Commission supports the following definition of active citizenship:

Participation in civil society, community and/or political life, characterised by mutual respect and non-violence and in accordance with human rights and democracy Hoskins, 2006

So let’s make this a reality. Let’s help people become effective citizens. The cost is much greater if we don’t.

Suggested Next Steps:

  • Read about what citizenship education entails.
  • Here are opportunities to volunteer with Young Citizens  to be a part of the difference we are making.
  • Find out more about our programmes to become active and engaged citizens.

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Citizenship education is key to creating a lifelong learning culture that supports learning to live together

Think-tank meeting on citizenship education

The UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL), together with the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding (UNESCO APCEIU), hosted a think-tank meeting on 31 August 2023 at its headquarters in Hamburg, Germany. 

Titled ‘Placing citizenship education within a lifelong learning perspective: From research to action’, the meeting welcomed 28 participants, both on-site and online, comprising representatives of international organizations and academia, individual experts and practitioners to engage in a thought-provoking debate on the merits of promoting citizenship education for advancing a new social contract for education. 

In her opening remarks, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Education Ms Stefania Giannini reflected on the instrumental role citizenship education plays in ‘creating a lifelong learning culture that supports learning to live together.’ She emphasized the need to inspire citizens of all ages, and in all spaces, to not only become well-informed, critical thinkers but to actively engage in shaping a society that is democratic, peaceful, sustainable and just. She also referred to the current revision of the UNESCO’s 1974 Recommendation concerning education  for international understanding, co-operation and peace and education relating to human rights and fundamental freedoms.  

Further remarks were provided by the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to education, Ms Farida Shaheed, who described citizenship education as a human right to be exercised throughout one’s life, and Special Adviser to the UN Secretary-General for the Transforming Education Summit Mr Leonardo Garnier Rímolo, who defined citizenship education as ‘not about providing the right answer but about learning how to search for the answer.’ 

Discussions covered a range of themes, including the conceptualization of citizenship education, its role within lifelong learning, the need to include it in adult learning and education curriculum, building the capacities of educators to facilitate citizenship education, and how digitalization impacts citizenship education and vice versa. Best practice examples of non-formal citizenship education initiatives were also shared to further highlight the interconnectedness of multiple forms of learning throughout life.

Participants agreed on the centrality of citizenship education for reshaping the educational landscape and on the importance of promoting it more widely within adult learning and education. To this end, they called for concrete strategies to advance the development of citizenship education within families, classrooms, communities and among all relevant actors.

An advocacy brief based on these discussions is in development and will be published by UIL in the coming weeks.

Looking ahead, UIL plans to host additional think-tank meetings on citizenship education to explore strategies for its monitoring and evaluation, as well as its relationship to well-being. More information on these meetings will be shared in the coming months.

Download the report of the meeting.

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Evidence on Curriculum—Citizenship Education and Classroom Teaching Methods

  • First Online: 03 May 2019

Cite this chapter

citizenship training essay

  • Clive Harber 2  

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This chapter argues that citizenship education is often seen as playing a potentially key role in peacebuilding in post-conflict societies. The chapter begins by discussing overview studies of citizenship education in post-conflict, developing countries before going on to examine evidence from a range of African, Asian, Middle Eastern and Central and South American countries. There follows a section of the chapter specifically on teaching methods used in classrooms in a range of post-conflict, developing countries. The chapter concludes that the evidence on system-wide transformation of citizenship education and classroom teaching methods in order to help to facilitate peacebuilding in post-conflict, developing societies is as weak as evidence on school structures and other potentially positive areas of curriculum intervention. As in the previous evidence-based chapters, this chapter suggests there may well be some individual schools or teachers who have made successful attempts to change their practice, but the evidence suggests that even these are not entirely straightforward and unproblematic.

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Harber, C. (2019). Evidence on Curriculum—Citizenship Education and Classroom Teaching Methods. In: Schooling for Peaceful Development in Post-Conflict Societies. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17689-1_9

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Citizenship: Rights, Responsibilities, and Identity

This essay about citizenship examines its multifaceted nature, encompassing legal status, social responsibilities, and personal identity within a nation. It discusses how citizenship provides essential rights like voting and legal protection, while also imposing duties such as obeying laws and paying taxes. The essay explores the social implications of citizenship, emphasizing its role in fostering community belonging and participation in civic life. Additionally, it addresses the complexities introduced by dual citizenship and globalization, which expand the concept to include global issues and responsibilities. Overall, the essay presents citizenship as a dynamic and active relationship that shapes individuals’ roles in society and their sense of belonging.

How it works

The notion of citizenship embodies a manifold concept that transcends the mere possession of a passport, encapsulating a complex interplay between an individual and their homeland. This interplay is characterized by a fusion of legal entitlements, societal obligations, and a shared ethos of identity and affiliation.

Fundamentally, citizenship confers a legal status upon individuals within the political and juridical frameworks of a nation. Legally, it endows individuals with the prerogative to engage in labor, reside, and partake in electoral processes within a sovereign state, while concurrently affording them protection under the jurisdiction of the state’s legal apparatus.

These entitlements are foundational, enabling citizens to actively participate in the civic fabric of their nation. Nevertheless, these entitlements are counterbalanced by a gamut of duties—ranging from compliance with statutory regulations to fiscal contributions and participation in adjudicatory processes—which are imperative for the efficacy and stability of a functional legal and political infrastructure.

Beyond the legal purview, citizenship assumes substantial sociological ramifications. It fosters a sense of communal solidarity and inclusion among individuals, molding their sense of self vis-à-vis the wider societal milieu. This sociocultural dimension is pivotal, shaping individuals’ self-perception and their roles within the societal tapestry. It promotes involvement in communal initiatives and grassroots governance, fortifying democratic precepts and practices.

Moreover, the construct of citizenship exerts a profound influence on personal identity. For many, citizenship constitutes a quintessential facet of their selfhood, serving as a wellspring of profound pride. This sentiment is particularly conspicuous during national commemorations or global athletic spectacles, wherein citizens experience a sense of fraternity and exultation in their national heritage. Conversely, the tribulations endured by stateless persons underscore the pivotal role that citizenship plays in the sustenance of one’s sense of security and self-esteem.

In the contemporary era of globalization, the delineation of citizenship has assumed an increasingly intricate complexion. The proliferation of dual citizenship and the escalating fluidity of global population dynamics engender queries regarding allegiance and self-identification. Pertinently, how does one navigate the obligations and privileges incumbent upon them from disparate national affiliations? Furthermore, the phenomenon of globalization has engendered notions such as “cosmopolitan citizenship,” wherein individuals align themselves with transnational predicaments, such as environmental conservation and human rights, transcending parochial confines.

However, citizenship transcends mere entitlements; it equally underscores participation. Actuated citizenship entails active engagement in the communal fabric, spanning from electoral suffrage to voluntary civic endeavors. Such proactive involvement serves to fortify democratic ethos and nurtures a more interconnected society.

In summation, citizenship constitutes far more than a statutory descriptor; it constitutes an active, experiential reality underpinned by a harmonization of entitlements and obligations. It configures individuals’ identity, securing their societal niche, and engendering a sense of affiliation and involvement. As the global landscape evolves, the construct of citizenship will persist as a focal point in discourses concerning democracy, entitlements, and global stewardship, adapting to emergent challenges and prospects in an interlinked world.

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NSTP Common Module Topic 7: Environmental Protection | Mylene Cayetano

NSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training | Dennis Quilala

NSTP Common Module Topic 7: Environmental Protection | Mylene Cayetano

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NSTP Common Module Topic 7: Environmental Protection | Mylene Cayetano

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NSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training Asst. Prof. Dennis Quilala

NSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training discusses the basic concepts of nation, nationalism, nation building and citizenship as well as the rights, privileges, and duties of a citizen. The module further looks into the concept of cultural sensitivity and competence.

NSTP Diliman Office (Producer). (2020, October). Citizenship Training by Asst. Prof. Dennis Quilala [Video File]. Retrieved from https://tinyurl.com/NSTPUPDInstructionalMaterials

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citizenship training essay

Citizenship Advancement Training and its Effect on the Behavior of Grade 10 Students on Emiliano Tria Tirona Memorial National High School S.Y. 2018-2019

  • Clarice C. Malagueño
  • John Williams B. Servana

INTRODUCTION

Citizenship Advancement Training (CAT) is a training program for both public and private secondary schools in the Philippines. It aims to enhance the student's social responsibility and commitment to the development of their communities and develop their ability to uphold law and order as they assume active participation in community activities and assist the members of the community especially in times of emergency (Arroyo, 2010).CAT has been a mandatory subject among secondary schools and has been identified to have effects on the behavior of the students. This study discusses the effect of CAT on the behavior of Grade 10 students in ETTMNHS.

Simple Random sampling was utilized in the study. Using the Gay's Guidelines, 30 Grade 10 students enrolled under the CAT course were considered as the respondents. A 4-point Likert scale was used as the instrument in gathering data. The data were subjected to quantitative analysis.

The result of the survey reported that there were 11 female respondents and 19 male respondents. It was found that most of the grade 10 students had agreed because they have an idea on the CAT subject in Emiliano Tria Tirona Memorial National High School. Moreover, most of the students agreed that they became responsible and they developed discipline as a result of CAT. This study concluded that the CAT has a positive impact on the behavior of the students.

DISCUSSIONS

Based on the study, they have implemented the CAT on their behavior during their CAT class. Most of the grade 10 students implemented their CAT subject on themselves. They know what will they do to resolve their problems during their situation. They know that if they cheat, it is not good for their studies. They know how to discipline themselves. Having a CAT class has an impact on the students, especially on their behavior.

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Higher Education Needs More Socrates and Plato

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By Ezekiel J. Emanuel and Harun Küçük

Dr. Emanuel and Dr. Küçük are on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, where Dr. Emanuel is a professor and the vice provost for global initiatives and Dr. Küçük is an associate professor of the history and sociology of science.

The right attacks colleges and universities as leftist and woke. Progressives castigate them as perpetuating patriarchy and white privilege. The burdens of these culture war assaults are compounded by parents worried that the exorbitant costs of higher education aren’t worth it.

No wonder Americans’ faith in universities is at a low. Only 36 percent of Americans have confidence in higher education, according to a survey by Gallup last year, a significant drop from eight years ago. And this was before colleges and universities across the country were swept up in a wave of protests and counter-protests over the war in Gaza.

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By liberal arts, we mean a broad-based education that aspires to send out into society an educated citizenry prepared to make its way responsibly in an ever-more complex and divided world. We worry that at many schools, students can fulfill all or most of their general education requirements and take any number of electives without having had a single meaningful discussion that is relevant to one’s political life as a citizen.

Over the past century, what made American higher education the best in the world is not its superiority in career training, but educating students for democratic citizenship, cultivating critical thinking and contributing to the personal growth of its students through self-creation. To revive American higher education, we need to reinvigorate these roots.

In Europe and many countries elsewhere, colleges and universities have undergraduates specialize from Day 1, focusing on developing area-specific skills and knowledge. College students are trained to become doctors, lawyers or experts in international relations, English literature or computer science.

In the United States, European-style specialization for medical, legal, business or public policy careers is the purpose of post-collegiate professional schools. Traditionally, the American college has been about imparting a liberal arts education, emphasizing reasoning and problem solving. Those enduring skills are the critical ingredients for flourishing companies and countries.

Historically, students arriving on American college campuses spent a majority of their first two years taking classes outside their projected majors. This exposed them to a common curriculum that had them engage with thoughtful writings of the past to develop the skills and capacity to form sound, independent judgments.

Over the past half century, American colleges and universities have moved away from this ideal , becoming less confident in their ability to educate students for democratic citizenship. This has led to a decline in their commitment to the liberal arts, a trend underscored in the results last year of a survey of chief academic officers at American colleges and universities by Inside Higher Ed. Nearly two-thirds agreed that liberal arts education was in decline, and well over half felt that politicians, college presidents and university boards were increasingly unsympathetic to the liberal arts.

Today, there is almost no emphasis on shared courses among majors that explore and debate big questions about the meaning of equality, justice, patriotism, personal obligations, civic responsibility and the purpose of a human life. Majors that once required only eight or 10 courses now require 14 or more, and students are increasingly double majoring — all of which crowds out a liberal arts education. Ambitious students eager to land a prestigious consulting, finance or tech job will find it too easy to brush aside courses in the arts, humanities and social and natural sciences — the core of a liberal education.

The devaluing of the first two years of a shared liberal arts education has shortchanged our students and our nation. Educating young adults to be citizens is why the first two years of college still matter.

To that end, the so-called Great Books have long been the preferred way to foster citizenship. This approach is not, contrary to critics on the left and right, about sanctifying specific texts for veneration or a mechanism for heritage transmission.

Books by Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Kant, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman as well as Wollstonecraft, Austen, Woolf, Baldwin, Hurston and Orwell are worthy of introductory collegiate courses for students of all majors. These writers address the fundamental questions of human life. They explore the ideas of self-determination, friendship, virtue, equality, democracy and religious toleration and race that we have all been shaped by.

As students address those big questions, the Great Books authors provide a road map as they challenge and criticize one another and the conventional wisdom of the past. The Socrates of Plato’s dialogues is the exemplar — asking about beliefs and then subjecting them to respectful but critical analysis and skepticism.

These books are best studied in small seminar discussions, which model and inculcate in students democratic behavior. This discourse is an antidote to the grandstanding in today’s media and social media.

The teacher is less an expert in specific writers and more a role model for intellectual curiosity, asking probing questions, offering critical analyses and seeking deeper understanding. In an idealized Socratic fashion, these discussions require listening at length and speaking briefly and, most important, being willing to go where the argument leads.

Parents who are paying for college might question the value of spending $80,000 a year so that their son or daughter can read Plato, Hobbes and Thoreau instead of studying molecular biology or machine learning. But discussing life’s big value questions in seminars gives students personal engagement with professors that can never be reproduced in large lecture halls. Discussions among students on their deepest thoughts cultivates curiosity and empathy, and forges bonds of friendship important for citizenship and fulfilling lives.

Although we like to set ourselves apart from the past by appeals to modernity, the fundamental questions that we find ourselves asking are not always modern, and the latest answer is not always right. But how would you know how to think beyond the readily presented check boxes if you haven’t done the work of laying things out and putting them back together for yourself?

War was no less a concern for Thucydides, Tacitus and Thoreau than it is today. Discussing Great Books allows students to gain distance from the daily noise and allows their reason to roam free among principles and foundations rather than becoming absorbed in contemporary events. Our biggest problems are often best addressed not by leaning in but by stepping away to reflect on enduring perspectives.

Liberal arts education is not value neutral. That is why it is indispensable today. Freedom of thought, critical reasoning, empathy for others and respectful disagreement are paramount for a flourishing democratic society. Without them, we get the unreasoned condemnations so pervasive in today’s malignant public discourse. With them, we have a hope of furthering the shared governance that is vital to America’s pluralistic society.

Ezekiel Emanuel and Harun Küçük are on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, where Dr. Emanuel is a professor and the vice provost for global initiatives and Dr. Küçük is an associate professor of the history and sociology of science.

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citizenship training essay

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Key stage 2 tests: 2024 English reading test materials

English reading test materials administered to eligible pupils at the end of key stage 2 in May 2024.

2024 key stage 2 English reading booklet

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2024 copyright ownership: key stage 2 national curriculum tests

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Cybersecurity and Digital Literacy Training for Teachers (Barcelona, Spain)

In today's technology-driven world, integrating digital tools into education has become essential for preparing students for future challenges. However, with this digital transformation comes the responsibility to ensure the safety and security of students and staff within the digital realm.

Description

  • This interactive 5-day course is designed to equip teachers with the knowledge, skills, and practical strategies necessary to promote online safety, digital literacy, and cybersecurity in schools effectively. Throughout the course, participants will explore the foundations of cybersecurity, digital literacy, and responsible digital citizenship, enabling them to create a secure and inclusive digital learning environment.
  • By engaging in hands-on activities, collaborative discussions, and real-life scenarios, teachers will learn how to integrate digital literacy across various subjects, foster critical thinking in students, and address cyber threats and risks within the school community. Furthermore, this course will guide participants in the development of a school-wide cybersecurity action plan, ensuring the implementation of cybersecurity practices throughout the educational institution.
  • Course Program
  • Pre-registration
  • Course Category:   ICT - Technology in the Classroom
  • Related Courses:  Digital Education Tools for Teachers: Web 2.0 ,  The Digital Classroom: Innovative Teaching Methods - Istanbul ,  Digital Game Based Learning and Gamification
  • You can also directly contact us by email: [email protected] 

Learning objectives

  • Understand the fundamental principles of cybersecurity and digital literacy within the school context , recognising their importance in primary, lower secondary, and upper secondary schools.
  • Identify potential digital threats and vulnerabilities faced by schools, classrooms, and educators , enabling them to take proactive measures to protect sensitive information and personal data.
  • Foster critical thinking and responsible online behaviour among students , promoting digital citizenship and ethical digital interactions.
  • Integrate digital literacy components across various subjects and grade levels, enhancing students' ability to evaluate digital information and navigate the digital landscape effectively.
  • Utilise a variety of digital tools and resources to enhance teaching methods and student engagement, tailoring them to suit different educational contexts and learning preferences.
  • Design cybersecurity-aware lesson plans and activities tailored to various age groups and subjects , ensuring the seamless integration of cybersecurity concepts into the curriculum.
  • Recognise and address cyberbullying and other online risks within the school community, implementing strategies to create a safer digital environment for all stakeholders.
  • Create a comprehensive school-wide cybersecurity action plan, encompassing strategies for integrating digital literacy and cybersecurity into the school curriculum, policies, and student activities.

Methodology & assessment

Certification details.

  • Certificate of Attendance: includes the name of the participant and the trainer, the location, the dates, learning hours and competences acquired. 
  • Learning Agreement(s)
  • Europass Mobility Document(s) 

Pricing, packages and other information

  • Price: 400 Euro
  • Package contents: Course

Additional information

  • Language: English
  • Target audience ISCED: Primary education (ISCED 1) Lower secondary education (ISCED 2) Upper secondary education (ISCED 3)
  • Target audience type: Teacher Head Teacher / Principal Teacher Educator
  • Learning time: 25 hours or more

Upcoming sessions

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Drama-Based English Language Course for Teachers and School Staff (Barcelona, Spain)

Next upcoming session  27.05.2024 - 31.05.2024

citizenship training essay

English Language Course for Teachers: Building Foundations - Beginner Level (Barcelona, Spain)

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Digital Education Tools for Teachers: Web 2.0 (Barcelona, Spain)

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USCIS Announces New FY 2024 Funding Opportunity Under the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program

WASHINGTON — U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services today announced the opening of the application period for the Citizenship and Integration Training Academy (CITA), a new funding opportunity under the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program. CITA, a technical assistance grant, will provide up to $2.6 million in competitive funding to public or nonprofit organizations that have not received previous grant funding from USCIS. Through this grant opportunity, USCIS will provide funding and rigorous training to enable organizations to establish new high-quality citizenship programs.  

“The CITA grant provides increased capacity-building and additional citizenship instruction resources for organizations that otherwise may not qualify for a grant,” said USCIS Director Ur M. Jaddou. “Through this program, we can help build organizations’ capacity to help immigrants improve their English language skills, increase their knowledge of U.S. history and government, and gain the tools to become successful and responsible U. S. citizens.”

Through the CITA grant, USCIS continues to fulfill President Biden’s charge in Executive Order 14012 (Restoring Faith in Our Legal Immigration Systems and Strengthening Integration and Inclusion Efforts for New Americans) to “eliminate barriers in the naturalization process” and “make it more accessible to all eligible individuals.” USCIS also continues to pursue its goals under the Interagency Strategy for Promoting Naturalization to address the needs of remote, isolated, and/or vulnerable populations by equipping more organizations to serve these communities. 

USCIS expects to award up to seven organizations with a grant up to $400,000 for a period of three years. The recipients will be announced in September 2024, and the three-year performance period for this funding opportunity will begin Oct. 1, 2024, and end Sept. 30, 2027.  

Since 2009, the USCIS Citizenship and Integration Grant Program has awarded $155 million through 644 grants to immigrant-serving organizations. These grant recipients have provided citizenship preparation services to more than 350,000 immigrants in 41 states and the District of Columbia. USCIS will use remaining fiscal year 2023 funding that it received from Congress through appropriations to make this funding opportunity available to communities. 

 To apply for this funding opportunity, USCIS encourages applicants to obtain registration information needed to complete the application process at grants.gov/register .

 For additional information on the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program, visit uscis.gov/grants or email the USCIS Office of Citizenship at [email protected] .

For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit  uscis.gov  or follow us on X (formerly Twitter), Instagram , YouTube , Facebook , and LinkedIn .  

Sydney judge says US ex-fighter pilot accused of training Chinese aviators can be extradited to US

Saffrine Duggan speaks outside Downing Central Court in Sydney, Friday, May 24, 2024, where her husband Daniel will appear. A Sydney judge ruled that former U.S. Marine Corps pilot Daniel Duggan can be extradited to the United States on allegations he illegally trained Chinese aviators, leaving the Australian attorney-general Duggan's last hope of remaining in Australia. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

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A Sydney judge on Friday ruled that former U.S. Marine Corps pilot Daniel Duggan can be extradited to the United States on allegations that he illegally trained Chinese aviators, leaving the attorney-general as Duggan’s last hope of remaining in Australia.

Magistrate Daniel Reiss ordered the Boston-born 55-year-old to remain in custody awaiting extradition.

While his lawyers said they had no legal grounds to challenge the magistrate’s ruling that Duggan was eligible for extradition, they will make submissions to Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus on why the pilot should not be surrendered.

“The attorney will give us sufficient time, I’m quite sure, to ventilate all of the issues that under the Extradition Act are not capable of being run in an Australian court,” Duggan’s lawyer, Bernard Collaery, told reporters outside court.

Dreyfus’ office said in a statement the government does not comment on extradition matters.

Duggan’s wife and mother of his six children, Saffrine Duggan, said the extradition court hearing was “simply about ticking boxes.”

“Now, we respectfully ask the attorney-general to take another look at this case and to bring my husband home,” she told a gathering of reporters and supporters outside court.

The pilot has spent 19 months in maximum-security prison since he was arrested in 2022 at his family home in the state of New South Wales.

In a 2016 indictment from the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., unsealed late 2022, prosecutors say Duggan conspired with others to provide training to Chinese military pilots in 2010 and 2012, and possibly at other times, without applying for an appropriate license.

Prosecutors say Duggan received about nine payments totaling around 88,000 Australian dollars ($61,000) and international travel from another conspirator for what was sometimes described as “personal development training.”

Duggan served in the U.S. Marines for 12 years before immigrating to Australia in 2002. In January 2012, he gained Australian citizenship, choosing to give up his U.S. citizenship in the process.

The indictment says Duggan traveled to the United States, China and South Africa, and provided training to Chinese pilots in South Africa.

Duggan has denied the allegations, saying they were political posturing by the U.S., which unfairly singled him out.

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Macron begins the first state visit to Germany by a French president in 24 years

President Emmanuel Macron has arrived in Germany for the first state visit by a French head of state in 24 years

This combination photo shows, top row from left, Michael Cohen on May 14, 2024, in New York, Stormy Daniels on May 23, 2018, in West Hollywood, Calif., Hope Hick on Feb. 27, 2018, in Washington, and bottom row from left, Jeffrey McConney on Nov. 15, 2022, in New York, David Pecker on Jan. 31, 2014, in New York and Madeleine Westerhout on April 2, 2018, in Washington. After 22 witnesses, testimony is over at former President Donald Trump's criminal trial in New York. Prosecutors and Trump's lawyers are scheduled to make their closing arguments Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo)

Here’s what every key witness said at Donald Trump’s hush money trial. Closing arguments are coming

Testimony is over at Donald Trump’s criminal trial in New York after a parade of 22 witnesses, including a porn actor, tabloid publisher and White House insiders

Prime Minister of the Palestinian Authority Mohammed Mustafa, left, speaks after receiving a document handed over by Norway's Foreign Minister Espen Barth Eide, right, prior to a meeting for talks on the Middle East in Brussels, Sunday, May 26, 2024. Norway on Sunday handed over papers to the Palestinian prime minister to officially give it diplomatic recognition as a state in a largely symbolic move that has infuriated Israel. The formal recognition by Norway, Spain and Ireland, which all have a record of friendly ties with both the Israelis and the Palestinians, while long advocating for a Palestinian state, is planned for Tuesday. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Norway hands over papers for diplomatic recognition to the Palestinian prime minister

Norway has handed over papers to the Palestinian prime minister in the latest step toward recognizing a Palestinian state

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Rocket sirens sound in Tel Aviv for the first time in months. Hamas says it fired a barrage from Gaza

Firefighters put out a fire after Russian attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Saturday, May, 25, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

The death toll in Kharkiv attack rises to 14 as Zelenskyy warns of Russian troop movements

President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has warned that Russia is preparing to intensify its offensive along Ukraine’s northern border as the death toll rose to 14 in an aerial bomb attack on a large construction supplies store in the city of Kharkiv

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  1. Mastering the US Citizenship Test 2023: Actual N400 Interview Practice

  2. Citizenship Education and Community Engagement: Introduction (Part A). English and Urdu ارد و

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  4. How To Be A Good Citizen In Your Community(2024) @RockstarAcademy

  5. Conduct of Citizenship Training Program every Friday plus construction of Bahay Kubo sa Gilid

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COMMENTS

  1. Importance of citizenship education

    Why is citizenship education important? Citizenship education gives people the knowledge and skills to understand, challenge and engage with democratic society including politics, the media, civil society, the economy and the law. Democracies need active, informed and responsible citizens - citizens who are willing and able to take responsibility for themselves and their communities and ...

  2. Essay #3

    Essay #3 - Citizenship Training - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. This document is a student's essay on citizenship training. It discusses that citizens are the foundation of a democratic country as they elect leaders. For a country to progress, citizens must be responsible and actively participate through activities like ...

  3. Study for the Test

    The USCIS officer will ask you up to 10 questions from the list of 100 civics test questions. You must answer 6 questions correctly to pass the civics test. For more information, refer to the USCIS Policy Manual Volume 12, Part E, English and Civics Testing and Exceptions, Chapter 2, English and Civics Testing. 65/20 Special Consideration.

  4. Teachers' classroom practices for citizenship education: Experiences of

    In recent decades, citizenship education has acquired great importance in democratic countries. Before the appearance of new global social and educational challenges, such as the information society, immigration and political apathy, it had become necessary to rethink the role of the school in the education of citizens around the world (Eurydice, 2017), particularly in the Latin American ...

  5. Citizenship Education: Theory, Research and Practice

    Citizenship education is a vast field that includes a wide range of philosophical, political and ideological perspectives, and of pedagogical approaches, goals and practices. At the most abstract ...

  6. What you need to know about global citizenship education

    What UNESCO does in global citizenship education. UNESCO works with countries to improve and rewire their education systems so that they support creativity, innovation and commitment to peace, human rights and sustainable development. Provides a big-picture vision for an education that learners of all ages need to survive and thrive in the 21 ...

  7. Full article: Can schools teach citizenship?

    In this essay I question the liberal faith in the efficacy and morality of citizenship education (CE) as it has been traditionally (and is still) practiced in most public state schools. In challenging institutionalized faith in CE, I also challenge liberal understandings of what it means to be a citizen, and how the social and political world ...

  8. PDF Youth and Digital Citizenship+ (Plus): Understanding Skills for a

    Digital citizenship has become a topic of growing importance among academics and policymakers alike, at the center of debate and theorization around the skills youth need to navigate and actively participate in our digital world. On a global level, a variety of stakeholders — including government, international organizations, non- ...

  9. PDF Perceptions and experiences of global citizenship education

    global citizenship education strives to deepen cross-cultural understanding through the study of current transnational issues. This qualitative, interpretivist case study sought to examine and ... service and in-service training for teachers of global studies related courses, including teacher education and professional development programs ...

  10. Citizenship education is key to creating a lifelong learning ...

    Titled 'Placing citizenship education within a lifelong learning perspective: From research to action', the meeting welcomed 28 participants, both on-site and online, comprising representatives of international organizations and academia, individual experts and practitioners to engage in a thought-provoking debate on the merits of promoting ...

  11. Citizenship Education

    Citizenship Education Types. In citizenship classes, students often study politics, human rights, justice, democracy, voting, the law, and even the economy. The aim of citizenship classes is for ...

  12. Evidence on Curriculum—Citizenship Education and Classroom ...

    This chapter argues that citizenship education is often seen as playing a potentially key role in peacebuilding in post-conflict societies. The chapter begins by discussing overview studies of citizenship education in post-conflict, developing countries before going on to examine evidence from a range of African, Asian, Middle Eastern and Central and South American countries.

  13. Become a U.S. citizen through naturalization

    This video shows you what takes place during a naturalization interview and helps you prepare for it. For most people, one of the requirements during the interview is taking the 2008 U.S. naturalization test. The test has two parts: a civics test (U.S. history and government) and an English test. Find study resources for the test:

  14. Citizenship: Rights, Responsibilities, and Identity

    This essay about citizenship examines its multifaceted nature, encompassing legal status, social responsibilities, and personal identity within a nation. It discusses how citizenship provides essential rights like voting and legal protection, while also imposing duties such as obeying laws and paying taxes. The essay explores the social ...

  15. NSTP Citizenship Training by R J on Prezi

    At the first note, all persons shall execute a salute by placing their right palms over their left chests. Those in military, scouting, citizen's military training and security guard uniforms shall give the salute prescribed by their regulations. The salute shall be completed upon the last note of the anthem.

  16. NSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training

    NSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training discusses the basic concepts of nation, nationalism, nation building and citizenship as well as the rights, privileges, and duties of a citizen. The. module further looks into the concept of cultural sensitivity and competence. NSTP Diliman Office (Producer). (2020, October).

  17. NSTP-CWTS 1: Values Development for Citizenship Training

    NSTP 1 : Values Development for Citizenship Training. This lesson deals with the values development for good citizenship, including the preamble to the 1987 Constitution, the roots and philosophy behind the Filipino Values, nationalism and patriotism, and personal development plan. For this module, we will talk about the different values that ...

  18. Citizenship Resource Center

    The Citizenship Resource Center has a collection of helpful resources and free study materials for a variety of users including: Immigrants who are interested in becoming U.S. citizens. Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) will find information about the naturalization process, eligibility requirements, and study materials to prepare for the ...

  19. NSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training

    NSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training Asst. Prof. Dennis QuilalaNSTP Common Module Topic 5: Citizenship Training discusses the basic concepts of n...

  20. NSTP100 Citizenship Training ESSAY QUINDOZA.pdf

    View NSTP100 Citizenship Training ESSAY QUINDOZA.pdf from NSTP 100 at Mapúa Institute of Technology. QUINDOZA, DENNICE ARES OL91 NSTP100 As a student, how do you show your duties and ... This part of citizenship training is crucial for it serves as the guidelines in becoming a better citizen.

  21. Digital citizenship education

    1.1. The concept. Digital Citizenship Education (DCE) has emerged as a supranational priority, seeking to empower younger citizens to participate actively and responsibly in a digital society and to foster their skills to use digital technologies effectively and critically (Richardson & Milovidov, Citation 2019).In order to facilitate the implementation of DCE in schools and in curricula ...

  22. Citizenship Advancement Training and its Effect on the Behavior of

    INTRODUCTION Citizenship Advancement Training (CAT) is a training program for both public and private secondary schools in the Philippines. It aims to enhance the student's social responsibility and commitment to the development of their communities and develop their ability to uphold law and order as they assume active participation in community activities and assist the members of the ...

  23. Citizenship Essay

    3. Based on your personal understanding, explain the four (4) components of citizenship training and development. 1. Provision of National and Universal Rights for the Citizens. Its objective is to provide and to inform Filipinos their various rights, either their national or universal, as a citizen.

  24. Opinion

    Over the past century, what made American higher education the best in the world is not its superiority in career training, but educating students for democratic citizenship, cultivating critical ...

  25. Prepare Students for the Interview and Test

    Use these resources to prepare citizenship students for the naturalization interview (review of Form N-400), which also serves as the speaking test. These resources can be used to help students understand key concepts and vocabulary found on Form N-400, as well as understand and respond to commands used during the interview process.

  26. Collectivism and Organizational Citizenship Behavior : Mediation of

    DOI: 10.37674/ceoms.25.2.6 Corpus ID: 252237930; Collectivism and Organizational Citizenship Behavior : Mediation of Affective Commitment @article{Seon2022CollectivismAO, title={Collectivism and Organizational Citizenship Behavior : Mediation of Affective Commitment}, author={Ju-won Seon and Yong Sun Chang}, journal={Journal of CEO and Management Studies}, year={2022}, url={https://api ...

  27. Key stage 2 tests: 2024 English reading test materials

    Government activity Departments. Departments, agencies and public bodies. News. News stories, speeches, letters and notices. Guidance and regulation

  28. Cybersecurity and Digital Literacy Training for Teachers (Barcelona

    This interactive 5-day course is designed to equip teachers with the knowledge, skills, and practical strategies necessary to promote online safety, digital literacy, and cybersecurity in schools effectively. Throughout the course, participants will explore the foundations of cybersecurity, digital literacy, and responsible digital citizenship, enabling them to create a secure and inclusive ...

  29. USCIS Announces New FY 2024 Funding Opportunity Under the Citizenship

    WASHINGTON — U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services today announced the opening of the application period for the Citizenship and Integration Training Academy (CITA), a new funding opportunity under the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program. CITA, a technical assistance grant, will provide up to $2.6 million in competitive funding to public or nonprofit organizations that have not ...

  30. Sydney judge says US ex-fighter pilot accused of training Chinese

    In a 2016 indictment from the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., unsealed late 2022, prosecutors say Duggan conspired with others to provide training to Chinese military pilots in 2010 and ...