Library Resources and E‑Journals

Library resources.

All BYU Library resources for economics faculty and students can be found in one convenient and easy to navigate location. The Economics Subject Guide provides valuable resources for learning, research, and publication. There users can search for and access journals, working papers, legal research, books, and other databases. The Data tab is specifically designed to help students locate datasets to download and analyze for research projects.

Please reach out to the Economics Librarian, Maggie Marchant ( [email protected] ), with any questions.

Frequently Used Resources

Articles & Journals:

  • EconLit The main database for research in economics. Contains articles from premier economics journals. Produced by the American Economic Association.
  • ProQuest Business Collection Broad coverage of peer-reviewed articles and industry publications on economics, business, and related disciplines.
  • NBER Working Papers Early access to research and findings from leading economists. Produced by the National Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Journal Citation Reports Presents statistical citation data that provides a systematic way to evaluate leading journals and their impact on the global research community.
  • Wall Street Journal (Online)
  • The Economist
  • New York Times (Online)
  • Salt Lake Tribune

Data & Statistics:

  • FRED (Federal Reserve Economic Data) Time series data on a variety of topics related to economics.
  • Data Planet Find, visualize, and download data on a variety of topics including economics, business, and demographics. Also includes resources for teaching with and understanding data (see Data Basics ).
  • Statista An aggregator of statistics on almost any topic.
  • SAGE Research Methods – Datasets A great source for ready-to-use datasets and guides to teach students and research assistants how to clean and analyze data with Stata and Python.

Background Research:

  • New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics The place to go for an introduction to any topic in economics. Includes biographies and bibliographies.
  • Opposing Viewpoints in Context Collects articles, statistics, and editorials on present both sides of controversial or hot topics.

Helpful Library Services

  • Course Reserve Provide books, articles, and media for students to access in your courses.
  • Interlibrary Loan Request and receive access to books, articles, and other items not available at the BYU library.
  • Faculty Delivery Service Faculty and administrators can sign up to have library materials and interlibrary loans delivered and picked up from their department office.
  • BYU ScholarsArchive Make your research, publications, and data more globally accessible and impactful. Contact Ellen Amatangelo or Maggie Marchant for questions about submitting work to ScholarsArchive.

Where and How to Get Info

Keywords and boolean operators.

Watch the following two videos (blue one first, then the purple one):

1. Understand how keywords and boolean operators help me with searching.

2. Become familiar with different databases.

Instructions  at the bottom of the page will guide you through a few steps to help you find sources. Perform the searches and copy your  search  terms into the text  boxes  at the  bottom  of the page. 

Database Guide

There are a lot of places out there to find information. Search engines do a good job at grappling with everything out in the world wide web, but that’s a lot of stuff to filter through.

Databases can help you search in a more pointed environment. It’s like walking into a shoe store instead of walking into an entire mall. You’ll find some new kicks quicker. 👟 In this section, you can learn about specific resources you have access to and why you would want to use each one.

*Use the database guide below to help you complete the assignment mentioned at the bottom of the page. 

Why Use It?

Academic Search Ultimate is great place to find articles related to any academic discipline, and you have access to it because of the BYU Library (thanks, Library!). This database has many different filters that will allow you to narrow your search to get specific results. You can use it to search through specific databases related to your topic or you can use it to search across many different databases.

There are a lot of different search options and filters, but don’t get overwhelmed. These are designed to help you find exactly what you are looking for.  The database also has a built in Boolean operators function.

byu library research articles

Make sure you access Academic Search Ultimate through the library website so you get access to all of the resources they offer. You can do this by going to lib.byu.edu and typing “Academic Search Ultimate” in the search bar and selecting the first option.

The library website ( lib.byu.edu ) is great for accessing topic-centered research guides. It is also a great resource for finding physical items to use in your researching.

Subject librarians have created wonderful research guides to aid students in their research. You can navigate to research guides from the library homepage and browse through the various categories. Each research guide contains valuable recommendations from the librarians on resources that can help you gather resources while you research.

Remember to login with your BYU credentials to gain access to online resources and place materials on hold. 

You’ll now see that some articles say “GET IT! @ BYU.” Just click that link to access the resource!

byu library research articles

Pew Research Center is a great non-partisan resource for finding data among public opinion and demographic trends. Its findings are available free for the public.

Like many of the other databases, Pew Research has filters that allow you to narrow your search results. You can narrow by date, type of source, region, and more. 

byu library research articles

Statista is great for finding understandable statistics in over 80,000 topic areas. You can download graphs and charts directly from Statista to include in your research papers.  Some statistics are included in reports and you can download those as PDFs in order to gather the information you need.

byu library research articles

Source Mining

One of the best ways to learn while researching is to source mine . Information is always in conversation with other information. Because articles cite their sources and references, it’s easier for us to follow the conversation and find more sources. If you’re reading an article, try scrolling to the bottom and looking at the references. There, you can find relevant articles related to your area of interest! Looking at the connections between sources can help you see what different people think of others’ thoughts.

Google Scholar even has a handy “Cited by” function that lets you see how many times an article has been cited by other people. A bigger number can–but does not always–mean that the article has been pretty influential. Clicking on the “Cited by” number will also pull up the articles that use the source you’re looking at! This is a great way to learn more about what people are saying about a certain topic. 

byu library research articles

Use keywords and boolean operators to find 2+ helpful resources in the Academic Search Ultimate database.  Follow these steps:

1. Perform your first search using just one keyword related to your topic. Look at the number of results and read some of the article titles. Do they seem like they will be helpful?

2. For your second search, add a boolean operator and another keyword. Notice how the results change. (Copy what you typed in the search bar into the text box down below.)

3. Next, change either a keyword, a boolean operator, or both. (Also copy this search and put it into the text box below.)  Keep adjusting things until you find 2 sources you can use to learn more about your research topic. 

byu library research articles

Japanese Studies: Home

  • Encyclopedias
  • Electronic Resources
  • Japanese History
  • Politics & International Relations
  • Pre-Modern Literature
  • Modern Literature
  • Japanese Film
  • Language Skills
  • Linguistics & Language Pedagogy

Databases for Finding Scholarship on Japan

Each of the databases listed below provides access to different resources. For best search results you should try several of them. If you are new to database searching, click for some very helpful tips on how to conduct a successful database search .

  • National Diet Library Index to Japanese Periodicals 国立国会図書館オンライン The most comprehensive index of articles in Japanese periodicals, going back to 1948. After locating desired article information, request it through Interlibrary Loan.

Annual Bibliography of Oriental Studies Arranged by Category 東洋學文獻類目  (1934–present)

Version 6.1 (1981–present)

Version 7.4 (1934-1980) & (2001-present)

  • CiNii Articles From the website: CiNii(Scholarly and Academic Information Navigator, pronounced like "sigh-knee") is a database service which can be searched with academic information of articles, Books & Journals. It is available free of charge for anyone. "CiNii Articles" enables you to search information on academic articles published in academic society journals, university research bulletins or articles included in the National Diet Library's Japanese Periodicals Index Database. Mostly in Japanese

Additional Research Help

For additional help, try these excellent resources from the BYU Library:

Trained consultants help you in any part of the research and writing process - for free!

Detailed information on each part of the research process.

Descriptions and links to resources to help you do your research.

Excellent, quick modules that make sense of what you need to do to be successful in your research.

Subject Resources

Rare japanese books in the byu library's special collections.

Digital Resources from the Harry F. Bruning Collection

byu library research articles

For comparison see this later example of a Yokai scroll  (the Bruning scroll is of higher quality).

Nagasaki Harbor

(Original materials housed in the Japanese Rare Book Collection of the L. Tom Perry Special Collections at BYU.)

byu library research articles

Yomidas Rekishikan is a full text database of the Yomiuri shinbun 読売新聞 , the largest newspaper in Japan, from the first issue in 1874 to present. All full text articles of Yomiuri shinbun  from 1874 to 1989 are available from image database of shukusatsuban (reduced-size edition) and most of the articles are retrievable in full text except some articles with copyright issue from 1986 to present. The database also includes the English edition: the Daily Yomiuri (Sept. 1989- to the present), both searchable by article, keyword, subject category, and issue.

  • National Diet Library Digital Collections
  • Shosoin 正倉院 Treasure House View material objects, works of art, and manuscripts from this famous collection of Japanese treasures. Descriptions in English.
  • Statistics Bureau of Japan
  • Koto bank (Word Bank) Provides free access to 50 Japanese dictionaries and encyclopedias.
  • Aozora bunko Online collection of out-of-copyright Japanese fiction and non-fiction
  • National Institute of Japanese Literature
  • Japanese Buddhist Temple (Salt Lake City) Jōdo Shishū (Pureland Buddhism)
  • The Gertrude Bass Warner Collection of Japanese Votive Slips Digitized images of the only known collection of Japanese shrine and temple votive slips (nōsatsu) in North America
  • Mangapedia Managed by リンクトデータ (Linked Data), a subgroup of Shogakkan, and VOYAGE. Contents are provided by publishers, and you can view many images. The articles are written by researchers and journalists specialized in manga. The site calls for a login, but that is for contributors. You can view without logging in.

Research Materials

Japan Times

朝日新聞デジタル(Asahi Shinbun digital)

毎日新聞 (Mainichi Shinbun)

読売新聞(Yomiuri Online)

Wall Street Journal (1984–Present)

Wall Street Journal (Historical)

Financial Times (Historical)

The Economist (1992–present)

The Economist (Historical)

New York Times Archive (1851-2006)

Chicago Tribune (1849 - 1986)

Christian Science Monitor (1908 - 1996)

The Making of the Modern World (Gale)

Asian Studies Librarian

Profile Photo

Asian Collection 4th Floor Map (Click to Enlarge)

byu library research articles

Humanities Reference Level 5 Hours: M-Th: 8am-9pm;  F: 8am-6pm; Sat:10am-6pm

801.422.4006 [email protected]

Call Number Guide

Think of a call number as the address of a book. The two letters can be considered the street. Each pari of letters are associated with a specific subject. For example. all Asian History can be found in the DS section of the library (on Level 1). The numbers are the house number on that street. Books that cover the same topic will be on the shelf next to each other.

The Only a fraction of the library's books are available in digital format. Those who  Browse the Stacks  always discover additional research materials! Books on the same topics are shelved next to each other, so if you find one relevant book, you will likely find others next to it on the shelf. Don't limit yourself to digital copies only.

All books published in Asian languages are located on the 4th Floor in the Asian Collection. Do not confuse the small reference collection near the bronze statue as the whole collection, that is only the reference collection. There is a much larger collection of Japanese books and academic journals on the main Asian Collection (look for the overhead sign). See the map above for details.

English materials on Asian topics are located in different parts of the library as noted below.

PL 501–899 Japanese Language and Literature   (5th Floor, North Stacks)

DS 800-899 Japanese History   (1st Floor, Social Science Library)    

JZ 1745-47 Japanese Politics and Government   (1st Floor, Central Stacks)

BQ Buddhism   (2nd Floor, Religion & Family History Library)

ND Japanese Painting  (5th Floor, North Stacks)

AC-AE Collections, Encyclopedias   (1st Floor, Social Science Reference)

If you have trouble finding a book ask the Asian Studies Librarian or inquire at any library help desk.

How to Search for a Japanese Book

To Find Books in Japanese:

If you know the author or title you want:

Look up the book in the library catalog using Kanji  漢字, or K ana かな, or Hepburn Romanization.

Click for detailed rules on Romanization  

To browse the Asian Collection for Japanese books:

Check the Asian Collection Call Number Guide and visit the relevant section of the stacks.

20,000 Books in Japanese are located on Level 4.  See the map and call number guide at the bottom-right of this page for details.

Books in English about Japan are located in various parts of the library (History Level 1; Language and Literature Level 5) .

  • Next: Encyclopedias >>
  • Last Updated: Apr 9, 2024 4:50 PM
  • URL: https://guides.lib.byu.edu/japan

BYU Harold B. Lee Library

Byu library | family history, research outlines.

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byu library research articles

The digital copies are in PDF form and have been annotated to help users make better use of the content. Resources that were available at the BYU Family History Library at the time that these were digitized are highlighted and additional notes about availability, such as film number or call number information, can be seen by hovering with the cursor over the highlighted text. Hyperlinks have been added that link to web sites or to other topics within the current document. (The availability of these resources at the BYU Family History Library may have changed since the time these were digitized.)

NOTE: Much of the content from these research outlines and other guides is now available in the FamilySearch Research Wiki , which may include more comprehensive and current information.

Geographic Regions

Africa Research Outlines

  • South Africa

Asia Research Outlines

  • Philippines

British Isles Research Outlines

  • British Isles

Canada Research Outlines

  • British Columbia
  • New Brunswick
  • Newfoundland
  • Nova Scotia
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Saskatchewan

Europe Research Outlines

  • Azores Islands
  • Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuanian)
  • Czechoslovakia
  • Eastern Europe
  • Germans from Russia
  • Germans to America
  • Germany Civil & Parish Jurisdictions & Maps
  • Netherlands
  • Switzerland

Latin America Research Outlines

  • Dominican Republic
  • El Salvador
  • Latin America
  • Puerto Rico

Other Research Outlines

  • Jewish Genealogy
  • Native American
  • Quaker Genealogy
  • Tracing Immigrant Origins
  • Tracing LDS Families
  • U.S. Military Records

Pacific Research Outlines

  • New Zealand
  • Samoa, Tahiti, Tonga, and Fiji

Scandinavia Research Outlines

  • Scandinavia

United States Research Outlines

  • African American
  • Connecticut
  • Massachusetts
  • Mississippi
  • New Hampshire
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • United States
  • Washington DC
  • West Virginia

byu library research articles

Important Links

BYU Library Catalog

BYU Library Catalog

Familysearch microfilms & fiche at byu.

Scanner Reservations

Scanning Equipment

FamilySearch

FamilySearch*

Ancestry.com (byu campus).

MyHeritage Libarary Edition

MyHeritage Library Edition (BYU campus)

Find My Past

Find My Past (BYU Library)

Saints by Sea

Saints by Sea

The Family History Guide

The Family History Guide

County Histories

County Histories (BYU access)

Fold3.com

Fold3 (BYU access)

WorldVitalRecords.com

Sanborn Maps (BYU access)

HistoryGeo

HistoryGeo (BYU access)

Gateway to North America

Gateway to North America (BYU access)

"BYU access" means that the item is accessible on BYU campus or remotely for logged-in BYU students and faculty. If labeled “BYU campus” then it is available anywhere on BYU campus, but not remotely. "BYU Library" indicates that you may only access the resource while physically at the BYU Library. (If you have a personal account with any of these sites, you can access them anywhere. If so, it is best to access them directly rather than using these links.)

* FamilySearch is accessible anywhere on the Internet, but many of the images (ca. 25-30%) require viewing at a FamilySearch family history center or affiliate library. The BYU Library has access to these images.

Info for BYU Library Family History Missionaries

Searching as Strategic Exploration

🎯 objectives.

  • Explore strategies and resources that will help you conduct both background and scholarly research.
  • Create a RefWorks account to organize your sources.
  • Assignment: Find two resources relevant to your research topic.

Keywords and Boolean Operators

❗ If the videos don't load correctly, reload the webpage to fix the problem.

Background Research

Background research is simply using reliable sources to learn about your topic. Don’t be afraid to take the time to learn more about your topic and start thinking about what aspects of the topic you want to focus your research and writing on.

It is important to note that just because you have selected a research topic doesn’t mean that your topic is set in stone. Anytime during the research process, you can make changes to the topic of your paper.

Have fun learning more about your topic of interest. Below are some helpful resources to use when conducting background research. Choose at least two of the below options to read through.

Click through the following four slides to learn how to best use Wikipedia.

The Opposing Viewpoints database by Gale might be one of the most helpful resources for you as you research. Watch this video to get acquainted. (You’ll be glad you know how to use it.)

The Opposing Viewpoints database can help you understand many of the perspectives of current issues being discussed by people today.

Pew Research Center is a great non-partisan resource for finding data on public opinion and demographic trends. Its findings are available free to the public.

Like many of the other databases, Pew Research has filters that allow you to narrow your search results. You can narrow it by date, type of source, region, and more.

Screenshot of the results page when searching 'nuclear energy' on the Pew Research Example.  On the top of the page, it says "Search Results For: nuclear energy."  There are several sources listed such as "Tech is (just) a tool" or "Concern over climate and the environment predominates among these publics."

Google can be a great resource when conducting background research about a topic.

Evaluate Sources

Not all information that you find on Google will be true. Make sure to focus on the most reliable sources.  Some of the best sources may be found on the first page of search results, but don't forget that there are often other great results past the first page.

Use Relevant Keywords

Don't ask Google questions. Instead, focus on using keywords that reflect the aspects of the topic you want to learn more about. Doing this will help you find more helpful sources.

Make sure to avoid using keyphrases that are biased. For example, if you type “minimum wage problems,” Google tries to give you sources that say minimum wage is a problem. A strong bias is likely already built into the sources you see. Similarly, even though the terms “illegal aliens” and “immigrants” are getting at a similar concept, searching one term over the other will lead you to very different results.

So when using Google:

  • Be mindful of the keywords you use to search
  • Be critical of the sources Google provides you with
  • Look past the first page 😀

Scholarly Research

Once you have conducted background research and have an idea of what your research topic is, you can start focusing on scholarly research. Scholarly research is your opportunity to dive into the nitty-gritty details of your topic. Remember this part of research is still considered learning. Enjoy the learning process. In doing this type of research, you will be searching for scholarly sources such as books, peer-reviewed journal articles, and valid data sets.

One of the best ways to find scholarly sources that relate to your topic is by using scholarly databases. Databases can help you search in a more focused environment. It’s like walking into a shoe store instead of walking into a mall. You’ll find some new kicks quicker. 👟

Below, you can learn about specific databases and other resources that you can use to find scholarly sources. Read through at least two of the options. Make sure that one of the options is Academic Search Ultimate because you will be using that database to complete the final activity.

Click through the following three slides to learn how to use Academic Search Ultimate.

Click through the following three slides to learn how to use Google Scholar.

Statista is great for finding understandable statistics in over 80,000 topic areas. You can download graphs and charts directly from Statista to include in your research papers. Some statistics are included in reports that you can download as PDFs in order to gather the information you need.

A young woman working on her computer while sitting at a table.

Click through the following three slides to learn how to access Subject Research Guides on the BYU Library Website.

❗Note: There is not a hard-fast rule that each of these resources can only be used for either background or scholarly research. You may find that some of the resources listed can be used for both.

Set up a RefWorks account

As you're looking through all the many resources available to you, it can be hard to keep track of everything that you find, but don't worry! There are a lot of great tools out there to organize your articles and sources, and you get access to one through the BYU Library.

As part of your homework, create and learn how to use a RefWorks account. Click on the buttons below to learn how to sign up for and use RefWorks.

This document will walk you through the process of creating a free RefWorks account. Take a few minutes to set up an account.

Watch the following YouTube video for a brief explanation of how to use RefWorks.

🎓 It is important that you create a RefWorks account at this time. You will need to be able to access your account when you visit the BYU library as part of your WRTG 150 course. Please write down your login information and make a note of the RefWorks website so you are ready to use it in the future. You may even consider bookmarking the RefWorks website in your browser.

Your turn to search!

Use keywords and Boolean operators to find 2+ helpful resources related to your topic in the Academic Search Ultimate database.

Follow these steps to access the Academic Search Ultimate Database:

1. Click on this link to access the database via The BYU Library's website. 2. Click on "Academic Search Ultimate" in the tan box. 3. If prompted, log in using your BYU NetID and password. 4. Once in the database, find and click on "Advanced Search."

Now, follow these steps to complete the activity:

1. Perform your first search using just one keyword related to your topic. Look at the number of results and read some of the article titles. Do they seem like they will be helpful?

2. For your second search, add a Boolean operator and another keyword.  Notice how the results change.

3. Next, change either a keyword, a Boolean operator, or both. Keep adjusting things until you find 2 sources you can use to learn more about your research topic.

What Have We Learned

  • Use keywords and Boolean operators when searching for sources.
  • You can use resources such as Wikipedia to conduct background research.
  • You can use resources such as academic books, peer-reviewed journal articles, and valid data sets to conduct scholarly research.
  • A citation managing tool, such as RefWorks, can be used to store and organize the many sources that you find.
  • UP Textbook Guide
  • The Writing Process
  • Addressing the Prompt
  • Originality
  • Timed Writing (Expectations)
  • Integrated Writing (Writing Process)
  • Shape and Organization
  • A Shifting Structure
  • Introductions
  • Body Paragraphs
  • Conclusions
  • Reference Page
  • Example Writing
  • Timed Writing (Revising)
  • Integrated Writing (TOEFL Task 1)
  • Descriptive Writing
  • Alternative Project: Creative Writing
  • Example Descriptive Writing
  • Skill: Word Choice
  • Sources: Quoting
  • Revise Descriptive Writing
  • Timed Writing (Word Choice)
  • Integrated Writing (TOEFL Task 2)
  • Personal Statements
  • Alternative Project: Formal Emails
  • Example Personal Statement
  • Types of Personal Statements
  • Organization for Comprehensive Personal Statement
  • Organization for Prompted Personal Statement
  • Skill: Development
  • Revise a Personal Statement
  • Timed Writing (Audience & Register)
  • Integrated Writing (Audience & Register)
  • Comparison Writing
  • Alternative Project: Reviews
  • Example Comparison Writing
  • Skill: Unity
  • Sources: Summarizing
  • Revise Comparison Writing
  • Timed Writing (The Prompt)
  • Integrated Writing (Paraphrasing)
  • Persuasive Writing
  • Alternative Project: Reflections
  • Example Persuasive Writing
  • Skill: Cohesion
  • Sources: Paraphrasing
  • Revise Persuasive Writing
  • Timed Writing (Scope & Scale)
  • Integrated Writing (Content)
  • Appendix A: Sentence Variety
  • Simple Sentences
  • Compound Sentences
  • Complex Sentences Part 1
  • Complex Sentences Part 2
  • Compound-Complex Sentences
  • Appendix B: Using Sources

Finding Sources

  • In-text Citations
  • More about Reference Pages
  • Translations

Choose a Sign-in Option

Tools and Settings

Questions and Tasks

Citation and Embed Code

byu library research articles

You can look in many different places to find credible sources. Print books, newspapers, journal articles, and websites are some of the more frequently used, but you can also use video, radio broadcasts, interviews, and many other types of sources as well. Websites and journal articles will likely be some of your most frequently used sources, so most of this unit will focus on them. 

Finding Other Sources

Sources are often gathered at university libraries and are usually free to use. University librarians are happy to help students become familiar with the sources stored at their libraries and in their library databases. 

If you have questions about using other sources,

  • ask your teacher.
  • ask a librarian (university or public).
  • See this webpage: https://guides.lib.byu.edu/c.php?g=216340&p=1428398 .
  • See this webpage: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/index.html   .

Using Website Sources

There are some websites that are useful to cite in academic papers, but there are many websites that you shouldn't use as a source for an academic paper. Websites you may cite in a researched essay include sites like The United States Department of Commerce or NASA. Sites that are not good to use are sites like personal blogs, social media, open-source websites, or forums.

A website URL can tell you a lot about the credibility of a source. If you are on a government website (.gov), people usually feel that the information is more credible than what is written on a commercial website (.com). Educational websites (.edu) and organization websites (.org) are sometimes credible, but you should be careful. You can narrow a Google search by domain extension if you simply type the extension after your search term (e.g., Poverty .gov) in the Google search bar.

The website domain extension alone isn't enough to know if the site is a good source. For example, many newspapers and encyclopedias use the .com extension and can still be good sources.

Other things you can look at are references, authors, and dates. If you read an educational website that lists references, that is an extra level of confidence that you can trust what they say is true. If you see an author, that is also usually a good sign. Finally, look for a date of publication. If the website was last updated in 1990, using that website probably isn't a good idea. Look for things that are more current, or are at least updated regularly.

What about Wikipedia?

Wikipedia is an excellent place to begin your preliminary research for a topic (but not a source you should cite). Wikipedia can offer background knowledge that will help you decide quickly if you are interested in a topic. You can also use wikipedia to mine for other, better sources. If there are references listed at the end of the article, those references would be an excellent place to start looking for sources you can cite.

Ways to Mine for Better Sources:

  • Click the hyperlinked [#] in the text or full links at the bottom of the page. 
  • Read the titles of any articles/books included on the page. Would they be useful? If so, copy and paste them into an internet or library search bar to find the original source. 
  • Are there any names that are frequently repeated? These names might be prominent experts on this topic. Copy and paste those names into a search bar to see if you can find out who they are and if they made any sources you could use. 

Mountain with pickaxe and gems

Image: Barraza 2022

Use these methods to avoid having to cite Wikipedia. Avoid citing Wikipedia mountain by mining for the gems of trustworthy sources. 

Most teachers will ask you not to cite Wikipedia for several reasons. First, it can change (and does change) frequently. When you write an essay and list references, people should be able to look up your references for more information. If someone looks up a Wikipedia article, it may be different from when you wrote your essay. Second, it can be edited by anyone, so you don't know if the information there is completely accurate. It is a good place to start, but you will need more credible sources for your essay. 

Academic Searches

Journal articles (especially those from a respected journal) and books are often considered much more credible than general websites, so it will strengthen your writing to use them.

You may find that journal articles and books are very difficult to understand. It is helpful to start by reading the abstract of an article before you read the entire article. The abstract will give a brief summary of the article. Some students skip the abstract and start reading with the beginning of the introduction, but this will slow you down in your research.

In order to find academic research articles, you should use a library database or Google Scholar.

Databases are collections of academic sources. Some databases you could use include:

  • https://lib.byu.edu/    
  • https://lib.byu.edu/journals/
  • https://scholar.google.com/  
  • https://www.jstor.org/
  • https://link-gale-com.byu.idm.oclc.org/apps/menu  
  • https://byu.on.worldcat.org/discovery  

For a full list of databases available to BYU students see: https://lib.byu.edu/databases/  

The trick to finding research when you use an academic database is limiting your search to find useful results. You can use quotation marks, asterisks, or boolean search terms (e.g., AND) to refine your search. For example, if you want to write an essay and describe various types of earthquakes, you will get different results if you use these different search terms:

For more information and practice finding and understanding academic sources, check out the research tutorials at https://ysearch.lib.byu.edu .

Tip: Keeping Track of Sources

There are many different ways to keep track of your sources. For this exercise, you will practice using a table or spreadsheet.

  • Create a table in your word document or create a separate spreadsheet that looks like the one below.
  • In the first column, make a list of possible search terms you might use to find sources.
  • As you use the search terms, click on articles with titles that sound relevant.
  • Read  only the abstract. If you need more information, the introduction and conclusion may be helpful at this stage.
  • If the article abstract sounds connected to your thesis, copy and paste the names of the article in the second column.
  • Add the name of the journal or website in the third column.
  • In the fourth column, you can make a note of what part of your outline the source would best support (ex. the first topic sentence, the opposite point of view, introducing a definition of the topic, etc).
  • Later, when you have time, you will read the article and add notes and any quotes you may want to use in the final column.

This is a helpful way to keep all of your outside information organized. It will be easier to create your reference page later and to add support from sources as you write your body paragraphs.

Exercise 1: Find Sources

Using a table like the one below, find  THREE  sources to support the following thesis statement:

  • There have been many different ways for which pollution has impacted society,  some of those include health and the environment.

BYU Library. (2022, July 6). Finding books and print resources - step-by-step guide & research ... guides.lib.byu.edu. Retrieved December 16, 2022, from https://guides.lib.byu.edu/c.php?g=216340&p=1428398

Purdue OWL. (2022). Apa formatting and style guide (7th edition) . APA Formatting and Style Guide (7th Edition) - Purdue OWL® - Purdue University. Retrieved December 16, 2022, from https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/index.html

This content is provided to you freely by BYU Open Learning Network.

Access it online or download it at https://open.byu.edu/up_writing_summer/finding_sources .

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  6. Reading Academic Articles

COMMENTS

  1. Articles

    There is no single website or search box in the world that can search every article ever published on the web, even the search on this page or Google Scholar (although both are great places to start). Sometimes, to find enough articles for your paper, you'll have to search multiple databases and/or journals. Additionally, databases and ...

  2. Journals

    How to search multiple journals at once. Using subject specific databases allows you to search multiple journals at once. To find the best database for your subject go to Subject Guides. If you would like to do a general search for peer reviewed articles, you can use the Advanced Search of the main search box and check the "Peer reviewed" box.

  3. Databases

    The ASCE Research Library is a comprehensive online tool for locating articles of interest across all disciplines of civil engineering. The Research Library provides you with unprecedented access to more than 73,000 full-text papers from ASCE Journals and Proceedings. ... ©2024 Brigham Young University.

  4. Research Guides

    Dance 396: Methods of teaching ballet. Dance 460: Dance History and Theory. ELing 324 - History of the English Language. ELing 325 - Grammar of English. ELing 525 - Old English. ELing 526 - Middle English (Don Chapman) German 330. Healthcare Industry Research Collaborative.

  5. A-Z Databases

    Find the best library databases for your research. ... Full-text journal articles published by major South Korean research institutions. There are over 1900 journal titles and more than 1.9 million Korean articles included. Some resources are available in English.

  6. Finding Sources

    Keys to Success. Identify the core concepts that will answer your research question. There is value in using both academic and public sources when researching. Use advanced search techniques when searching databases. Make sure to use: Keywords that reflect your selected core concepts (Learn more here ). Boolean operat ors (Learn more here ).

  7. Home

    This guide will help you understand research metrics about authors, articles/books, and journals. Skip to Main Content. Harold B. Lee Library; Subject Guides; Research Metrics; ... Library Availability ; Consumer Ratings ; Reading Lists & Collection Recommendations ... Last Updated: Feb 1, 2024 2:18 PM; URL: https://guides.lib.byu.edu/metrics ...

  8. Library Resources and E‑Journals

    Library Resources. All BYU Library resources for economics faculty and students can be found in one convenient and easy to navigate location. The Economics Subject Guide provides valuable resources for learning, research, and publication. There users can search for and access journals, working papers, legal research, books, and other databases.

  9. » Where and How to Get Info

    2. For your second search, add a boolean operator and another keyword. Notice how the results change. (Copy what you typed in the search bar into the text box down below.) 3. Next, change either a keyword, a boolean operator, or both. (Also copy this search and put it into the text box below.)

  10. The Library and the Availability of Knowledge

    Library usage at Brigham Young University in the past ten years has shown a phenomenal increase. A recent library statistical report disclosed that while the student body increased 261 percent in the last decade, the use of library books and materials increased approximately 1000 percent during the same period.

  11. BYU Business Library: Library News

    A comprehensive research report database that puts valuable business information right into students' hands. You'll get market intelligence on consumer demographics, market size and growth trends, industry forces and structure, product trends, competitive environment analysis, and company profiles. Covers consumer, manufacturing, medical ...

  12. Japanese Studies: Home

    Mostly in Japanese. Additional Research Help. For additional help, try these excellent resources from the BYU Library: Research & Writing Center. Trained consultants help you in any part of the research and writing process - for free! Step-by-Step Research Guide. Detailed information on each part of the research process.

  13. Research Outlines

    We have digitized the FamilySearch Research Outlines and other related reference materials from the BYU Family History Library "Blue Binders." These reference guides are organized geographically. Although they are now out of print, they still contain relevant information about record types, reference resources, and methodology for genealogy in various geographic areas. The digital copies ...

  14. Searching as Strategic Exploration

    Follow these steps to access the Academic Search Ultimate Database: 1. Click on this link to access the database via The BYU Library's website. 2. Click on "Academic Search Ultimate" in the tan box. 3. If prompted, log in using your BYU NetID and password. 4. Once in the database, find and click on "Advanced Search."

  15. Finding Sources

    In order to find academic research articles, you should use a library database or Google Scholar. Databases. Databases are collections of academic sources. Some databases you could use include: https://lib.byu.edu/ ... BYU Library. (2022, July 6). Finding books and print resources ...

  16. Rapid Discovery of House-keeping Genes in The Bacterium Kushneria

    including looking into the properties of salt-tolerant plants. Recent research into salt-tolerant plants in southern Utah has found a host of microorganisms isolated from the soil, plant surfaces, or plant tissues that stimulate salt tolerance in alfalfa. Leveraging a Mobile-CRISPRi system to repress a library of genes created through the recently

  17. Video of the Day: Provo School District features local libraries for

    To celebrate National Library Week, which ran from April 7-13, Provo City School District posted videos giving an inside look at Provo's public school libraries.